Logic in Computer Science (cs.LO)

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    While quantum computers are expected to yield considerable advantages over classical devices, the precise features of quantum theory enabling these advantages remain unclear. Contextuality---the denial of a notion of classical physical reality---has emerged as a promising hypothesis. Magic states are quantum resources critical for practically achieving universal quantum computation. They exhibit the standard form of contextuality that is known to enable probabilistic advantages in a variety of computational and communicational tasks. Strong contextuality is an extremal form of contextuality describing systems that exhibit logically paradoxical behaviour. Here, we consider special magic states that deterministically enable quantum computation. After introducing number-theoretic techniques for constructing exotic quantum paradoxes, we present large classes of strongly contextual magic states that enable deterministic implementation of gates from the Clifford hierarchy. These surprising discoveries bolster a refinement of the resource theory of contextuality that emphasises the computational power of logical paradoxes.
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    Quantum computing is moving rapidly to the point of deployment of technology. Functional quantum devices will require the ability to correct error in order to be scalable and effective. A leading choice of error correction, in particular for modular or distributed architectures, is the surface code with logical two-qubit operations realised via "lattice surgery". These operations consist of "merges" and "splits" acting non-unitarily on the logical states and are not easily captured by standard circuit notation. This raises the question of how best to reason about lattice surgery in order efficiently to use quantum states and operations in architectures with complex resource management issues. In this paper we demonstrate that the operations of the ZX calculus, a form of quantum diagrammatic reasoning designed using category theory, match exactly the operations of lattice surgery. Red and green "spider" nodes match rough and smooth merges and splits, and follow the axioms of a dagger special associative Frobenius algebra. Some lattice surgery operations can require non-trivial correction operations, which are captured natively in the use of the ZX calculus in the form of ensembles of diagrams. We give a first taste of the power of the calculus as a language for surgery by considering two operations (magic state use and producing a CNOT) and show how ZX diagram re-write rules give lattice surgery procedures for these operations that are novel, efficient, and highly configurable.
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    An important class of contextuality arguments in quantum foundations are the All-versus-Nothing (AvN) proofs, generalising a construction originally due to Mermin. We present a general formulation of All-versus-Nothing arguments, and a complete characterisation of all such arguments which arise from stabiliser states. We show that every AvN argument for an n-qubit stabiliser state can be reduced to an AvN proof for a three-qubit state which is local Clifford-equivalent to the tripartite GHZ state. This is achieved through a combinatorial characterisation of AvN arguments, the AvN triple Theorem, whose proof makes use of the theory of graph states. This result enables the development of a computational method to generate all the AvN arguments in $\mathbb{Z}_2$ on n-qubit stabiliser states. We also present new insights into the stabiliser formalism and its connections with logic.
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    The stabilizer ZX-calculus is a rigorous graphical language for reasoning about quantum mechanics. The language is sound and complete: one can transform a stabilizer ZX-diagram into another one if and only if these two diagrams represent the same quantum evolution or quantum state. We show that the stabilizer ZX-calculus can be simplified, removing unnecessary equations while keeping only the essential axioms which potentially capture fundamental structures of quantum mechanics. We thus give a significantly smaller set of axioms and prove that meta-rules like `only the topology matters', `colour symmetry' and `upside-down symmetry', which were considered as axioms in previous versions of the language, can in fact be derived. In particular, we show that most of the remaining rules of the language are necessary, however leaving as an open question the necessity of two rules. These include, surprisingly, the bialgebra rule, which is an axiomatisation of complementarity, the cornerstone of the ZX-calculus. Furthermore, we show that a weaker ambient category -- a braided autonomous category instead of the usual compact closed category -- is sufficient to recover the topology meta rule.
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    We exhibit a complete set of identities for CNOT, the symmetric monoidal category generated by the controlled-not gate, the swap gate, and the computational ancillae. We prove that CNOT is a discrete inverse category. Moreover, we prove that CNOT is equivalent to the category of partial isomorphisms of finitely-generated non-empty commutative torsors of characteristic 2. This is equivalently the category of partial isomorphisms of affine maps between finite-dimensional $\mathbb{Z}_2$ vector spaces.
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    Schaefer introduced a framework for generalized satisfiability problems on the Boolean domain and characterized the computational complexity of such problems. We investigate an algebraization of Schaefer's framework in which the Fourier transform is used to represent constraints by multilinear polynomials in a unique way. The polynomial representation of constraints gives rise to a relaxation of the notion of satisfiability in which the values to variables are linear operators on some Hilbert space. For the case of constraints given by a system of linear equations over the two-element field, this relaxation has received considerable attention in the foundations of quantum mechanics, where such constructions as the Mermin-Peres magic square show that there are systems that have no solutions in the Boolean domain, but have solutions via operator assignments on some finite-dimensional Hilbert space. We obtain a complete characterization of the classes of Boolean relations for which there is a gap between satisfiability in the Boolean domain and the relaxation of satisfiability via operator assignments. To establish our main result, we adapt the notion of primitive-positive definability (pp-definability) to our setting, a notion that has been used extensively in the study of constraint satisfaction problems. Here, we show that pp-definability gives rise to gadget reductions that preserve satisfiability gaps. We also present several additional applications of this method. In particular and perhaps surprisingly, we show that the relaxed notion of pp-definability in which the quantified variables are allowed to range over operator assignments gives no additional expressive power in defining Boolean relations.
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    In this paper we present a Quantomatic case study, verifying the basic properties of the Smallest Interesting Colour Code error correcting code.
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    We present a logic for reasoning about pairs of interactive quantum programs -- quantum relational Hoare logic (qRHL). This logic follows the spirit of probabilistic relational Hoare logic (Barthe et al. 2009) and allows us to formulate how the outputs of two quantum programs relate given the relationship of their inputs. Probabilistic RHL was used extensively for computer-verified security proofs of classical cryptographic protocols. We argue why pRHL is not suitable for analyzing quantum cryptography and present qRHL as a replacement, suitable for the security analysis of post-quantum cryptography and quantum protocols. The design of qRHL poses some challenges unique to the quantum setting, e.g., the definition of equality on quantum registers. Finally, we implemented a tool for verifying proofs in qRHL and developed several example security proofs in it.
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    We describe categorical models of a circuit-based (quantum) functional pro- gramming language. We show that enriched categories play a crucial role. Following earlier work on QWire by Paykin et al., we consider both a simple first-order linear language for circuits, and a more powerful host language, such that the circuit language is embedded inside the host language. Our categorical semantics for the host language is standard, and involves cartesian closed categories and monads. We interpret the circuit language not in an ordinary category, but in a category that is enriched in the host category. We show that this structure is also related to linear/non-linear models. As an extended example, we recall an earlier result that the category of W*-algebras is dcpo-enriched, and we use this model to extend the circuit language with some recursive types.
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    Theoretical computer science discusses foundational issues about computations. It asks and answers questions such as "What is a computation?", "What is computable?", "What is efficiently computable?","What is information?", "What is random?", "What is an algorithm?", etc. We will present many of the major themes and theorems with the basic language of category theory. Surprisingly, many interesting theorems and concepts of theoretical computer science are easy consequences of functoriality and composition when you look at the right categories and functors connecting them.
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    The development and deployment of Autonomous Vehicles (AVs) on our roads is not only realistic in the near future but can also bring significant benefits. In particular, it can potentially solve several problems relating to vehicles and traffic, for instance: (i) possible reduction of traffic congestion, with the consequence of improved fuel economy and reduced driver inactivity; (ii) possible reduction in the number of accidents, assuming that an AV can minimise the human errors that often cause traffic accidents; and (iii) increased ease of parking, especially when one considers the potential for shared AVs. In order to deploy an AV there are significant steps that must be completed in terms of hardware and software. As expected, software components play a key role in the complex AV system and so, at least for safety, we should assess the correctness of these components. In this paper, we are concerned with the high-level software component(s) responsible for the decisions in an AV. We intend to model an AV capable of navigation; obstacle avoidance; obstacle selection (when a crash is unavoidable) and vehicle recovery, etc, using a rational agent. To achieve this, we have established the following stages. First, the agent plans and actions have been implemented within the Gwendolen agent programming language. Second, we have built a simulated automotive environment in the Java language. Third, we have formally specified some of the required agent properties through LTL formulae, which are then formally verified with the AJPF verification tool. Finally, within the MCAPL framework (which comprises all the tools used in previous stages) we have obtained formal verification of our AV agent in terms of its specific behaviours. For example, the agent plans responsible for selecting an obstacle with low potential damage, instead of a higher damage obstacle (when possible) can be formally verified within MCAPL. We must emphasise that the major goal (of our present approach) lies in the formal verification of agent plans, rather than evaluating real-world applications. For this reason we utilised a simple matrix representation concerning the environment used by our agent.
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    We introduce the fermionic ZW calculus, a string-diagrammatic language for fermionic quantum computing (FQC). After defining a fermionic circuit model, we present the basic components of the calculus, together with their interpretation, and show how the main physical gates of interest in FQC can be represented in the language. We then list our axioms, and derive some additional equations. We prove that the axioms provide a complete equational axiomatisation of the monoidal category whose objects are quantum systems of finitely many local fermionic modes, with operations that preserve or reverse the parity (number of particles mod 2) of states, and the tensor product, corresponding to the composition of two systems, as monoidal product. We achieve this through a procedure that rewrites any diagram in a normal form. We conclude by showing, as an example, how the statistics of a fermionic Mach-Zehnder interferometer can be calculated in the diagrammatic language.
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    We analyse how the standard reductions between constraint satisfaction problems affect their proof complexity. We show that, for the most studied propositional, algebraic, and semi-algebraic proof systems, the classical constructions of pp-interpretability, homomorphic equivalence and addition of constants to a core preserve the proof complexity of the CSP. As a result, for those proof systems, the classes of constraint languages for which small unsatisfiability certificates exist can be characterised algebraically. We illustrate our results by a gap theorem saying that a constraint language either has resolution refutations of constant width, or does not have bounded-depth Frege refutations of subexponential size. The former holds exactly for the widely studied class of constraint languages of bounded width. This class is also known to coincide with the class of languages with refutations of sublinear degree in Sums-of-Squares and Polynomial Calculus over the real-field, for which we provide alternative proofs. We then ask for the existence of a natural proof system with good behaviour with respect to reductions and simultaneously small size refutations beyond bounded width. We give an example of such a proof system by showing that bounded-degree Lovász-Schrijver satisfies both requirements. Finally, building on the known lower bounds, we demonstrate the applicability of the method of reducibilities and construct new explicit hard instances of the graph 3-coloring problem for all studied proof systems.
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    In this paper, we develop a game-theoretic account of concurrent separation logic. To every execution trace of the Code confronted to the Environment, we associate a specification game where Eve plays for the Code, and Adam for the Environment. The purpose of Eve and Adam is to decompose every intermediate machine state of the execution trace into three pieces: one piece for the Code, one piece for the Environment, and one piece for the available shared resources. We establish the soundness of concurrent separation logic by interpreting every derivation tree of the logic as a winning strategy of this specification game.
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    We used computer proof-checking methods to verify the correctness of our proofs of the propositions in Euclid Book I. We used axioms as close as possible to those of Euclid, in a language closely related to that used in Tarski's formal geometry. We used proofs as close as possible to those given by Euclid, but filling Euclid's gaps and correcting errors. Euclid Book I has 48 propositions, we proved 213 theorems. The extras were partly "Book Zero", preliminaries of a very fundamental nature, partly propositions that Euclid omitted but were used implicitly, partly advanced theorems that we found necessary to fill Euclid's gaps, and partly just variants of Euclid's propositions. We wrote these proofs in a simple fragment of first-order logic corresponding to Euclid's logic, debugged them using a custom software tool, and then checked them in the well-known and trusted proof checkers HOL Light and Coq.
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    In this paper, we study the problem of deciding the winner of reachability switching games. These games provide deterministic analogues of Markovian systems. We study zero-, one-, and two-player variants of these games. We show that the zero-player case is NL-hard, the one-player case is NP-complete, and that the two-player case is PSPACE-hard and in EXPTIME. In the one- and two-player cases, the problem of determining the winner of a switching game turns out to be much harder than the problem of determining the winner of a Markovian game. We also study the structure of winning strategies in these games, and in particular we show that both players in a two-player reachability switching game require exponential memory.
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    A social network service is a platform to build social relations among people sharing similar interests and activities. The underlying structure of a social networks service is the social graph, where nodes represent users and the arcs represent the users' social links and other kind of connections. One important concern in social networks is privacy: what others are (not) allowed to know about us. The "logic of knowledge" (epistemic logic) is thus a good formalism to define, and reason about, privacy policies. In this paper we consider the problem of verifying knowledge properties over social network models (SNMs), that is social graphs enriched with knowledge bases containing the information that the users know. More concretely, our contributions are: i) We prove that the model checking problem for epistemic properties over SNMs is decidable; ii) We prove that a number of properties of knowledge that are sound w.r.t. Kripke models are also sound w.r.t. SNMs; iii) We give a satisfaction-preserving encoding of SNMs into canonical Kripke models, and we also characterise which Kripke models may be translated into SNMs; iv) We show that, for SNMs, the model checking problem is cheaper than the one based on standard Kripke models. Finally, we have developed a proof-of-concept implementation of the model-checking algorithm for SNMs.
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    In this paper we introduce \em global and local announcement logic (GLAL), a dynamic epistemic logic with two distinct announcement operators -- $[\phi]^+_A$ and $[\phi]^-_A$ indexed to a subset $A$ of the set $Ag$ of all agents -- for global and local announcements respectively. The boundary case $[\phi]^+_{Ag}$ corresponds to the public announcement of $\phi$, as known from the literature. Unlike standard public announcements, which are \em model transformers, the global and local announcements are \em pointed model transformers. In particular, the update induced by the announcement may be different in different states of the model. Therefore, the resulting computations are trees of models, rather than the typical sequences. A consequence of our semantics is that modally bisimilar states may be distinguished in our logic. Then, we provide a stronger notion of bisimilarity and we show that it preserves modal equivalence in GLAL. Additionally, we show that GLAL is strictly more expressive than public announcement logic with common knowledge. We prove a wide range of validities for GLAL involving the interaction between dynamics and knowledge, and show that the satisfiability problem for GLAL is decidable. We illustrate the formal machinery by means of detailed epistemic scenarios.
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    The recent increase of interest in the graph invariant called tree-depth and in its applications in algorithms and logic on graphs led to a natural question: is there an analogously useful "depth" notion also for dense graphs (say; one which is stable under graph complementation)? To this end, in a 2012 conference paper, a new notion of shrub-depth has been introduced, such that it is related to the established notion of clique-width in a similar way as tree-depth is related to tree-width. Since then shrub-depth has been successfully used in several research papers. Here we provide an in-depth review of the definition and basic properties of shrub-depth, and we focus on its logical aspects which turned out to be most useful. In particular, we use shrub-depth to give a characterization of the lower ${\omega}$ levels of the MSO1 transduction hierarchy of simple graphs.
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    String diagrams provide a convenient graphical framework which may be used for equational reasoning about morphisms of monoidal categories. However, unlike term rewriting, rewriting string diagrams results in shorter equational proofs, because the string diagrammatic representation allows us to formally establish equalities modulo any rewrite steps which follow from the monoidal structure. Manipulating string diagrams by hand is a time-consuming and error-prone process, especially for large string diagrams. This can be ameliorated by using software proof assistants, such as Quantomatic. However, reasoning about concrete string diagrams may be limiting and in some scenarios it is necessary to reason about entire (infinite) families of string diagrams. When doing so, we face the same problems as for manipulating concrete string diagrams, but in addition, we risk making further mistakes if we are not precise enough about the way we represent (infinite) families of string diagrams. The primary goal of this thesis is to design a mathematical framework for equational reasoning about infinite families of string diagrams which is amenable to computer automation. We will be working with context-free families of string diagrams and we will represent them using context-free graph grammars. We will model equations between infinite families of diagrams using rewrite rules between context-free grammars. Our framework represents equational reasoning about concrete string diagrams and context-free families of string diagrams using double-pushout rewriting on graphs and context-free graph grammars respectively. We will prove that our representation is sound by showing that it respects the concrete semantics of string diagrammatic reasoning and we will show that our framework is appropriate for software implementation by proving important decidability properties.
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    Automata learning has been successfully applied in the verification of hardware and software. The size of the automaton model learned is a bottleneck for scalability and hence optimizations that enable learning of compact representations are important. In this paper we develop a class of optimizations and an accompanying correctness proof for learning algorithms, building upon a general framework for automata learning based on category theory. The new algorithm is parametric on a monad, which provides a rich algebraic structure to capture non-determinism and other side-effects. Our approach allows us to capture known algorithms, develop new ones, and add optimizations. We provide a prototype implementation and experimental results.
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    This paper presents a symmetric monoidal and compact closed bicategory that categorifies the zx-calculus developed by Coecke and Duncan. The $1$-cells in this bicategory are certain graph morphisms that correspond to the string diagrams of the zx-calculus, while the $2$-cells are rewrite rules.
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    The logic MMSNP is a restricted fragment of existential second-order logic which allows to express many interesting queries in graph theory and finite model theory. The logic was introduced by Feder and Vardi who showed that every MMSNP sentence is computationally equivalent to a finite-domain constraint satisfaction problem (CSP); the involved probabilistic reductions were derandomized by Kun using explicit constructions of expander structures. We present a new proof of the reduction to finite-domain CSPs which does not rely on the results of Kun. This new proof allows us to obtain a stronger statement and to verify the more general Bodirsky-Pinsker dichotomy conjecture for CSPs in MMSNP. Our approach uses the fact that every MMSNP sentence describes a finite union of CSPs for countably infinite $\omega$-categorical structures; moreover, by a recent result of Hubička and Nešetřil, these structures can be expanded to homogeneous structures with finite relational signature and the Ramsey property. This allows us to use the universal-algebraic approach to study the computational complexity of MMSNP.
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    We investigate the relative computability of exchangeable binary relational data when presented in terms of the distribution of an invariant measure on graphs, or as a graphon in either $L^1$ or the cut distance. We establish basic computable equivalences, and show that $L^1$ representations contain fundamentally more computable information than the other representations, but that $0'$ suffices to move between computable such representations. We show that $0'$ is necessary in general, but that in the case of random-free graphons, no oracle is necessary. We also provide an example of an $L^1$-computable random-free graphon that is not weakly isomorphic to any graphon with an a.e. continuous version.
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    We show that universes of fibrations in various models of homotopy type theory have an essentially global character: they cannot be described in the internal language of the presheaf topos from which the model is constructed. We get around this problem by extending the internal language with a modal operator for expressing properties of global elements. In this setting we show how to construct a universe that classifies the Cohen-Coquand-Huber-Mörtberg (CCHM) notion of fibration from their cubical sets model, starting from the assumption that the interval is tiny - a property that the interval in cubical sets does indeed have. This leads to a completely internal development of models of homotopy type theory within what we call crisp type theory.
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    The increasing use of deep neural networks for safety-critical applications, such as autonomous driving and flight control, raises concerns about their safety and reliability. Formal verification can address these concerns by guaranteeing that a deep learning system operates as intended, but the state of the art is limited to small systems. In this work-in-progress report we give an overview of our work on mitigating this difficulty, by pursuing two complementary directions: devising scalable verification techniques, and identifying design choices that result in deep learning systems that are more amenable to verification.
  • Jan 16 2018 cs.LO arXiv:1801.04337v1
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    We extend Tilson's theory of the algebra of finite categories, in particular, the Derived Category Theorem, to the setting of forest algebras. As an illustration of the usefulness of this method, we provide a new proof of a result of Place and Segoufin characterizing locally testable tree languages.
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    A marked Petri net is lucent if there are no two different reachable markings enabling the same set of transitions, i.e., states are fully characterized by the transitions they enable. This paper explores the class of marked Petri nets that are lucent and proves that perpetual marked free-choice nets are lucent. Perpetual free-choice nets are free-choice Petri nets that are live and bounded and have a home cluster, i.e., there is a cluster such that from any reachable state there is a reachable state marking the places of this cluster. A home cluster in a perpetual net serves as a "regeneration point" of the process, e.g., to start a new process instance (case, job, cycle, etc.). Many "well-behaved" process models fall into this class. For example, the class of short-circuited sound workflow nets is perpetual. Also, the class of processes satisfying the conditions of the \alpha algorithm for process discovery falls into this category. This paper shows that the states in a perpetual marked free-choice net are fully characterized by the transitions they enable, i.e., these process models are lucent. Having a one-to-one correspondence between the actions that can happen and the state of the process, is valuable in a variety of application domains. The full characterization of markings in terms of enabled transitions makes perpetual free-choice nets interesting for workflow analysis and process mining. In fact, we anticipate new verification, process discovery, and conformance checking techniques for the subclasses identified.
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    Cyber-physical systems, like Smart Buildings and power plants, have to meet high standards, both in terms of reliability and availability. Such metrics are typically evaluated using Fault trees (FTs) and do not consider maintenance strategies which can significantly improve lifespan and reliability. Fault Maintenance trees (FMTs) -- an extension of FTs that also incorporate maintenance and degradation models, are a novel technique that serve as a good planning platform for balancing total costs and dependability of a system. In this work, we apply the FMT formalism to a Smart Building application. We propose a framework for modelling FMTs using probabilistic model checking and present an algorithm for performing abstraction of the FMT in order to reduce the size of its equivalent Continuous Time Markov Chain. This allows us to apply the probabilistic model checking more efficiently. We demonstrate the applicability of our proposed approach by evaluating various dependability metrics and maintenance strategies of a Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning system's FMT.
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    It is well known that the length of a beta-reduction sequence of a simply typed lambda-term of order k can be huge; it is as large as k-fold exponential in the size of the lambda-term in the worst case. We consider the following relevant question about quantitative properties, instead of the worst case: how many simply typed lambda-terms have very long reduction sequences? We provide a partial answer to this question, by showing that asymptotically almost every simply typed lambda-term of order k has a reduction sequence as long as (k-1)-fold exponential in the term size, under the assumption that the arity of functions and the number of variables that may occur in every subterm are bounded above by a constant. To prove it, we have extended the infinite monkey theorem for strings to a parametrized one for regular tree languages, which may be of independent interest. The work has been motivated by quantitative analysis of the complexity of higher-order model checking.
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    Parity games have important practical applications in formal verification and synthesis, especially to solve the model-checking problem of the modal mu-calculus. They are also interesting from the theory perspective, as they are widely believed to admit a polynomial solution, but so far no such algorithm is known. In recent years, a number of new algorithms and improvements to existing algorithms have been proposed. We implement a new and easy to extend tool Oink, which is a high-performance implementation of modern parity game algorithms. We further present a comprehensive empirical evaluation of modern parity game algorithms and solvers, both on real world benchmarks and randomly generated games. Our experiments show that our new tool Oink outperforms the current state-of-the art.
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    Recursive algebraic data types (term algebras, ADTs) are one of the most well-studied theories in logic, and find application in contexts including functional programming, modelling languages, proof assistants, and verification. At this point, several state-of-the-art theorem provers and SMT solvers include tailor-made decision procedures for ADTs, and version 2.6 of the SMT-LIB standard includes support for ADTs. We study an extremely simple approach to decide satisfiability of ADT constraints, the reduction of ADT constraints to equisatisfiable constraints over uninterpreted functions (EUF) and linear integer arithmetic (LIA). We show that the reduction approach gives rise to both decision and Craig interpolation procedures in (extensions of) ADTs.
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    In this paper we consider the problem of configuring partial predicate abstraction that combines two techniques that have been effective in analyzing infinite-state systems: predicate abstraction and fixpoint approximations. A fundamental problem in partial predicate abstraction is deciding the variables to be abstracted and the predicates to be used. In this paper, we consider systems modeled using linear integer arithmetic and investigate an alternative approach to counter-example guided abstraction refinement. We devise two heuristics that search for predicates that are likely to be precise. The first heuristic performs the search on the problem instance to be verified. The other heuristic leverages verification results on the smaller instances of the problem. We report experimental results for CTL model checking and discuss advantages and disadvantages of each approach.
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    This is the fourth in a series of papers extending Martin-Löf's meaning explanation of dependent type theory to higher-dimensional types. In this installment, we show how to define cubical type systems supporting a general schema of cubical inductive types, inductive types whose constructors may take dimension parameters and may have specified boundaries. Using this schema, we are able to specify and implement many of the higher inductive types which have been postulated in homotopy type theory, including homotopy pushouts, the torus, $W$-quotients, truncations, and arbitrary localizations. We also construct one indexed inductive type, the fiber family of a term. Using the fiber family, it is possible to define an identity type whose eliminator satisfies an exact computation rule on the reflexivity constructor. We believe that the techniques used to construct the fiber family could be straightforwardly combined with our schema for inductive types in order to give a schema for indexed cubical inductive types. The addition of higher inductive types and identity types makes computational higher type theory a model of homotopy type theory, capable of interpreting almost all of the constructions in the HoTT Book (with the exception of general indexed inductive types and inductive-inductive types). This is the first such model with an explicit canonicity theorem stating that all closed terms of boolean type evaluate either to true or to false.
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    Type-preserving (or typed) compilation uses typing derivations to certify correctness properties of compilation. We have designed and implemented a type-preserving compiler for a simply-typed dialect of Prolog we call T-Prolog. The crux of our approach is a new certifying abstract machine which we call the Typed Warren Abstract Machine (TWAM). The TWAM has a dependent type system strong enough to specify the semantics of a logic program in the logical framework LF. We present a soundness metatheorem which constitutes a partial correctness guarantee: well-typed programs implement the logic program specified by their type. This metatheorem justifies our design and implementation of a certifying compiler from T-Prolog to TWAM.
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    The current state-of-the-art in many natural language processing and automated knowledge base completion tasks is held by representation learning methods which learn distributed vector representations of symbols via gradient-based optimization. They require little or no hand-crafted features, thus avoiding the need for most preprocessing steps and task-specific assumptions. However, in many cases representation learning requires a large amount of annotated training data to generalize well to unseen data. Such labeled training data is provided by human annotators who often use formal logic as the language for specifying annotations. This thesis investigates different combinations of representation learning methods with logic for reducing the need for annotated training data, and for improving generalization.
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    We argue that computation is an abstract algebraic concept, and a computer is a result of a morphism (a structure preserving map) from a finite universal semigroup.
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    In domains with high knowledge distribution a natural objective is to create principle foundations for collaborative interactive learning environments. We present a first mathematical characterization of a collaborative learning group, a consortium, based on closure systems of attribute sets and the well-known attribute exploration algorithm from formal concept analysis. To this end, we introduce (weak) local experts for subdomains of a given knowledge domain. These entities are able to refute and potentially accept a given (implicational) query for some closure system that is a restriction of the whole domain. On this we build up a consortial expert and show first insights about the ability of such an expert to answer queries. Furthermore, we depict techniques on how to cope with falsely accepted implications and on combining counterexamples. Using notions from combinatorial design theory we further expand those insights as far as providing first results on the decidability problem if a given consortium is able to explore some target domain. Applications in conceptual knowledge acquisition as well as in collaborative interactive ontology learning are at hand.
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    We implement a user-extensible ad hoc connection between the Lean proof assistant and the computer algebra system Mathematica. By reflecting the syntax of each system in the other and providing a flexible interface for extending translation, our connection allows for the exchange of arbitrary information between the two systems. We show how to make use of the Lean metaprogramming framework to verify certain Mathematica computations, so that the rigor of the proof assistant is not compromised.
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    In the context of abstract coinduction in complete lattices, the notion of compatible function makes it possible to introduce enhancements of the coinduction proof principle. The largest compatible function, called the companion, subsumes most enhancements and has been proved to enjoy many good properties. Here we move to universal coalgebra, where the corresponding notion is that of a final distributive law. We show that when it exists the final distributive law is a monad, and that it coincides with the codensity monad of the final sequence of the given functor. On sets, we moreover characterise this codensity monad using a new abstract notion of causality. In particular, we recover the fact that on streams, the functions definable by a distributive law or GSOS specification are precisely the causal functions. Going back to enhancements of the coinductive proof principle, we finally obtain that any causal function gives rise to a valid up-to-context technique.
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    Graphs are used as models in many areas of computer science and computer engineering. For example graphs are used to represent syntax, control and data flow, dependency, state spaces, models such as UML and other types of domain-specific models, and social network graphs. In all of these examples, the graph serves as an intuitive yet mathematically precise foundation for many purposes, both in theory building as well as in practical applications. Graph-based models serve as an abstract communication medium and are used to describe various concepts and phenomena. Moreover, once such graph-based models are constructed, they can be analyzed and transformed to verify the correctness of static and dynamic properties, to discover new properties, to deeply study a particular domain of interest or to produce new equivalent and/or optimized versions of graph-based models. The Graphs as Models (GaM) workshop series combines the strengths of two pre-existing workshop series: GT-VMT (Graph Transformation and Visual Modelling Techniques) and GRAPHITE (Graph Inspection and Traversal Engineering), but also solicits research from other related areas, such as social network analysis. GaM offers a platform for exchanging new ideas and results for active researchers in these areas, with a particular aim of boosting inter- and transdisciplinary research exploiting new applications of graphs as models in any area of computational science. This year (2017), the third edition of the GaM workshop was co-located with the European Joint Conferences on Theory and Practice of Software 2017 (ETAPS'17), held in Uppsala, Sweden.
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Recent comments

Zoltán Zimborás May 28 2014 04:42 UTC

It's a bit funny to look at a formally verified proof of the CLT :), here it is online:
https://github.com/avigad/isabelle.