Logic in Computer Science (cs.LO)

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    Various moral conundrums plague population ethics: The Non-Identity Problem, The Procreation Asymmetry, The Repugnant Conclusion, and more. I argue that the aforementioned moral conundrums have a structure neatly accounted for, and solved by, some ideas in computability theory. I introduce a mathematical model based on computability theory and show how previous arguments pertaining to these conundrums fit into the model. This paper proceeds as follows. First, I do a very brief survey of the history of computability theory in moral philosophy. Second, I follow various papers, and show how their arguments fit into, or don't fit into, our model. Third, I discuss the implications of our model to the question why the human race should or should not continue to exist. Finally, I show that our model ineluctably leads us to a Confucian moral principle.
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    This report is an extension of 'A Model of Parametric Dependent Type Theory in Bridge/Path Cubical Sets' (Nuyts, arXiv:1706.04383). The purpose of this text is to prove all technical aspects of our model for dependent type theory with parametric quantifiers (Nuyts, Vezzosi and Devriese, 2017) and with degrees of relatedness (Nuyts and Devriese, 2018).
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    Reversible computing models settings in which all processes can be reversed. Applications include low-power computing, quantum computing, and robotics. It is unclear how to represent side-effects in this setting, because conventional methods need not respect reversibility. We model reversible effects by adapting Hughes' arrows to dagger arrows and inverse arrows. This captures several fundamental reversible effects, including serialization and mutable store computations. Whereas arrows are monoids in the category of profunctors, dagger arrows are involutive monoids in the category of profunctors, and inverse arrows satisfy certain additional properties. These semantics inform the design of functional reversible programs supporting side-effects.
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    There are two natural and well-studied approaches to temporal ontology and reasoning: point-based and interval-based. Usually, interval-based temporal reasoning deals with points as a particular case of duration-less intervals. A recent result by Balbiani, Goranko, and Sciavicco presented an explicit two-sorted point-interval temporal framework in which time instants (points) and time periods (intervals) are considered on a par, allowing the perspective to shift between these within the formal discourse. We consider here two-sorted first-order languages based on the same principle, and therefore including relations, as first studied by Reich, among others, between points, between intervals, and inter-sort. We give complete classifications of its sub-languages in terms of relative expressive power, thus determining how many, and which, are the intrinsically different extensions of two-sorted first-order logic with one or more such relations. This approach roots out the classical problem of whether or not points should be included in a interval-based semantics.
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    This paper describes a formalism that subsumes Peterson's intermediate quantifier syllogistic system, and extends the ideas by van Eijck on Aristotle's logic. Syllogisms are expressed in a concise form making use of and extending the Monotonicity Calculus. Contradictory and contrary relationships are added so that deduction can derive propositions expressing a form of negation.
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    We present a \ke-based implementation of a reasoner for a decidable fragment of (stratified) set theory expressing the description logic $\dlssx$ ($\shdlssx$, for short). Our application solves the main TBox and ABox reasoning problems for $\shdlssx$. In particular, it solves the consistency problem for $\shdlssx$-knowledge bases represented in set-theoretic terms, and a generalization of the \emphConjunctive Query Answering problem in which conjunctive queries with variables of three sorts are admitted. The reasoner, which extends and optimizes a previous prototype for the consistency checking of $\shdlssx$-knowledge bases (see \citecilc17), is implemented in \textsfC++. It supports $\shdlssx$-knowledge bases serialized in the OWL/XML format, and it admits also rules expressed in SWRL (Semantic Web Rule Language).

Recent comments

Zoltán Zimborás May 28 2014 04:42 UTC

It's a bit funny to look at a formally verified proof of the CLT :), here it is online:
https://github.com/avigad/isabelle.