Logic in Computer Science (cs.LO)

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    We study the problem of learning description logic (DL) ontologies in Angluin et al.'s framework of exact learning via queries. We admit membership queries ("is a given subsumption entailed by the target ontology?") and equivalence queries ("is a given ontology equivalent to the target ontology?"). We present three main results: (1) ontologies formulated in (two relevant versions of) the description logic DL-Lite can be learned with polynomially many queries of polynomial size; (2) this is not the case for ontologies formulated in the description logic EL, even when only acyclic ontologies are admitted; and (3) ontologies formulated in a fragment of EL related to the web ontology language OWL 2 RL can be learned in polynomial time. We also show that neither membership nor equivalence queries alone are sufficient in cases (1) and (3).
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    We revisit the classic problem of proving safety over parameterised concurrent systems, i.e., an infinite family of finite-state concurrent systems that are represented by some finite (symbolic) means. An example of such an infinite family is a dining philosopher protocol with any number n of processes (n being the parameter that defines the infinite family). Regular model checking is a well-known generic framework for modelling parameterised concurrent systems, where an infinite set of configurations (resp. transitions) is represented by a regular set (resp. regular transducer). Although verifying safety properties in the regular model checking framework is undecidable in general, many sophisticated semi-algorithms have been developed in the past fifteen years that can successfully prove safety in many practical instances. In this paper, we propose a simple solution to synthesise regular inductive invariants that makes use of Angluin's classic L* algorithm (and its variants). We provide a termination guarantee when the set of configurations reachable from a given set of initial configurations is regular. We have tested L* algorithm on standard (as well as new) examples in regular model checking including the dining philosopher protocol, the dining cryptographer protocol, and several mutual exclusion protocols (e.g. Bakery, Burns, Szymanski, and German). Our experiments show that, despite the simplicity of our solution, it can perform at least as well as existing semi-algorithms.
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    Temporal logic based synthesis approaches are often used to find trajectories that are correct-by-construction for tasks in systems with complex behavior. Some examples of such tasks include synchronization for multi-agent hybrid systems, reactive motion planning for robots. However, the scalability of such approaches is of concern and at times a bottleneck when transitioning from theory to practice. In this paper, we identify a class of problems in the GR(1) fragment of linear-time temporal logic (LTL) where the synthesis problem allows for a decomposition that enables easy parallelization. This decomposition also reduces the alternation depth, resulting in more efficient synthesis. A multi-agent robot gridworld example with coordination tasks is presented to demonstrate the application of the developed ideas and also to perform empirical analysis for benchmarking the decomposition-based synthesis approach.
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    We overview the logic of Bunched Implications (BI) and Separation Logic (SL) from a perspective inspired by Hiroakira Ono's algebraic approach to substructural logics. We propose generalized BI algebras (GBI-algebras) as a common framework for algebras arising via "declarative resource reading", intuitionistic generalizations of relation algebras and arrow logics and the distributive Lambek calculus with intuitionistic implication. Apart from existing models of BI (in particular, heap models and effect algebras), we also cover models arising from weakening relations, formal languages or more fine-grained treatment of labelled trees and semistructured data. After briefly discussing the lattice of subvarieties of GBI, we present a suitable duality for GBI along the lines of Esakia and Priestley and an algebraic proof of cut elimination in the setting of residuated frames of Galatos and Jipsen. We also show how the algebraic approach allows generic results on decidability, both positive and negative ones. In the final part of the paper, we gently introduce the substructural audience to some theory behind state-of-art tools, culminating with an algebraic and proof-theoretic presentation of (bi-)abduction.

Recent comments

Zoltán Zimborás May 28 2014 04:42 UTC

It's a bit funny to look at a formally verified proof of the CLT :), here it is online:
https://github.com/avigad/isabelle.