Logic in Computer Science (cs.LO)

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    The existence of a coalition strategy to achieve a goal does not necessarily mean that the coalition has enough information to know how to follow the strategy. Neither does it mean that the coalition knows that such a strategy exists. The article studies an interplay between the distributed knowledge, coalition strategies, and coalition "know-how" strategies. The main technical result is a sound and complete trimodal logical system that describes the properties of this interplay.
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    This paper focuses on detecting anomalies in a digital video broadcasting (DVB) system from providers' perspective. We learn a probabilistic deterministic real timed automaton profiling benign behavior of encryption control in the DVB control access system. This profile is used as a one-class classifier. Anomalous items in a testing sequence are detected when the sequence is not accepted by the learned model.
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    We propose a choreographic model of reversible computations based on a conservative extension of global graphs and communicating finite-state machines. The main advantage of our approach is that does not require to instrument models in order to control reversibility but for a minor decoration of branches. We show that our models are conservative extensions of existing ones and that the reversible semantics guarantees causal consistency.
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    Colimits are a powerful tool for the combination of objects in a category. In the context of modeling and specification, they are used in the institution-independent semantics (1) of instantiations of parameterised specifications (e.g. in the specification language CASL), and (2) of combinations of networks of specifications (in the OMG standardised language DOL).
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    We develop an assume-guarantee contract framework for the design of cyber-physical systems, modeled as closed-loop control systems, under probabilistic requirements. We use a variant of signal temporal logic, namely, Stochastic Signal Temporal Logic (StSTL) to specify system behaviors as well as contract assumptions and guarantees, thus enabling automatic reasoning about requirements of stochastic systems. Given a stochastic linear system representation and a set of requirements captured by bounded StSTL contracts, we propose algorithms that can check contract compatibility, consistency, and refinement, and generate a controller to guarantee that a contract is satisfied, following a stochastic model predictive control approach. Our algorithms leverage encodings of the verification and control synthesis tasks into mixed integer optimization problems, and conservative approximations of probabilistic constraints that produce both sound and tractable problem formulations. We illustrate the effectiveness of our approach on a few examples, including the design of embedded controllers for aircraft power distribution networks.
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    A program schema defines a class of programs, all of which have identical statement structure, but whose functions and predicates may differ. A schema thus defines an entire class of programs according to how its symbols are interpreted. A subschema of a schema is obtained from a schema by deleting some of its statements. We prove that given a schema $S$ which is predicate-linear, free and liberal, such that the true and false parts of every if predicate satisfy a simple additional condition, and a slicing criterion defined by the final value of a given variable after execution of any program defined by $S$, the minimal subschema of $S$ which respects this slicing criterion contains all the function and predicate symbols `needed' by the variable according to the data dependence and control dependence relations used in program slicing, which is the symbol set given by Weiser's static slicing algorithm. Thus this algorithm gives predicate-minimal slices for classes of programs represented by schemas satisfying our set of conditions. We also give an example to show that the corresponding result with respect to the slicing criterion defined by termination behaviour is incorrect. This complements a result by the authors in which $S$ was required to be function-linear, instead of predicate-linear.

Recent comments

Zoltán Zimborás May 28 2014 04:42 UTC

It's a bit funny to look at a formally verified proof of the CLT :), here it is online:
https://github.com/avigad/isabelle.