Logic in Computer Science (cs.LO)

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    We analyse how the standard reductions between constraint satisfaction problems affect their proof complexity. We show that, for the most studied propositional, algebraic, and semi-algebraic proof systems, the classical constructions of pp-interpretability, homomorphic equivalence and addition of constants to a core preserve the proof complexity of the CSP. As a result, for those proof systems, the classes of constraint languages for which small unsatisfiability certificates exist can be characterised algebraically. We illustrate our results by a gap theorem saying that a constraint language either has resolution refutations of constant width, or does not have bounded-depth Frege refutations of subexponential size. The former holds exactly for the widely studied class of constraint languages of bounded width. This class is also known to coincide with the class of languages with refutations of sublinear degree in Sums-of-Squares and Polynomial Calculus over the real-field, for which we provide alternative proofs. We then ask for the existence of a natural proof system with good behaviour with respect to reductions and simultaneously small size refutations beyond bounded width. We give an example of such a proof system by showing that bounded-degree Lovász-Schrijver satisfies both requirements. Finally, building on the known lower bounds, we demonstrate the applicability of the method of reducibilities and construct new explicit hard instances of the graph 3-coloring problem for all studied proof systems.
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    We formally verify several computational reductions concerning the Post correspondence problem (PCP) using the proof assistant Coq. Our verifications include a reduction of a string rewriting problem generalising the halting problem for Turing machines to PCP, and reductions of PCP to the intersection problem and the palindrome problem for context-free grammars. Interestingly, rigorous correctness proofs for some of the reductions are missing in the literature.
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    This paper introduces the order-theoretic concept of lattices along with the concept of consistent quantification where lattice elements are mapped to real numbers in such a way that preserves some aspect of the order-theoretic structure. Symmetries, such as associativity, constrain consistent quantification, and lead to a constraint equation known as the sum rule. Distributivity in distributive lattices also constrains consistent quantification and leads to a product rule. The sum and product rules, which are familiar from, but not unique to, probability theory, arise from the fact that logical statements form a distributive (Boolean) lattice, which exhibits the requisite symmetries.

Recent comments

Zoltán Zimborás May 28 2014 04:42 UTC

It's a bit funny to look at a formally verified proof of the CLT :), here it is online:
https://github.com/avigad/isabelle.