Learning (cs.LG)

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    In many-body physics, renormalization techniques are used to extract aspects of a statistical or quantum state that are relevant at large scale, or for low energy experiments. Recent works have proposed that these features can be formally identified as those perturbations of the states whose distinguishability most resist coarse-graining. Here, we examine whether this same strategy can be used to identify important features of an unlabeled dataset. This approach indeed results in a technique very similar to kernel PCA (principal component analysis), but with a kernel function that is automatically adapted to the data, or "learned". We test this approach on handwritten digits, and find that the most relevant features are significantly better for classification than those obtained from a simple gaussian kernel.
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    Stochastic convex optimization algorithms are the most popular way to train machine learning models on large-scale data. Scaling up the training process of these models is crucial in many applications, but the most popular algorithm, Stochastic Gradient Descent (SGD), is a serial algorithm that is surprisingly hard to parallelize. In this paper, we propose an efficient distributed stochastic optimization method based on adaptive step sizes and variance reduction techniques. We achieve a linear speedup in the number of machines, small memory footprint, and only a small number of synchronization rounds -- logarithmic in dataset size -- in which the computation nodes communicate with each other. Critically, our approach is a general reduction than parallelizes any serial SGD algorithm, allowing us to leverage the significant progress that has been made in designing adaptive SGD algorithms. We conclude by implementing our algorithm in the Spark distributed framework and exhibit dramatic performance gains on large-scale logistic regression problems.
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    Due to the substantial computational cost, training state-of-the-art deep neural networks for large-scale datasets often requires distributed training using multiple computation workers. However, by nature, workers need to frequently communicate gradients, causing severe bottlenecks, especially on lower bandwidth connections. A few methods have been proposed to compress gradient for efficient communication, but they either suffer a low compression ratio or significantly harm the resulting model accuracy, particularly when applied to convolutional neural networks. To address these issues, we propose a method to reduce the communication overhead of distributed deep learning. Our key observation is that gradient updates can be delayed until an unambiguous (high amplitude, low variance) gradient has been calculated. We also present an efficient algorithm to compute the variance with negligible additional cost. We experimentally show that our method can achieve very high compression ratio while maintaining the result model accuracy. We also analyze the efficiency using computation and communication cost models and provide the evidence that this method enables distributed deep learning for many scenarios with commodity environments.
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    In this paper, we consider an online optimization process, where the objective functions are not convex (nor concave) but instead belong to a broad class of continuous submodular functions. We first propose a variant of the Frank-Wolfe algorithm that has access to the full gradient of the objective functions. We show that it achieves a regret bound of $O(\sqrt{T})$ (where $T$ is the horizon of the online optimization problem) against a $(1-1/e)$-approximation to the best feasible solution in hindsight. However, in many scenarios, only an unbiased estimate of the gradients are available. For such settings, we then propose an online stochastic gradient ascent algorithm that also achieves a regret bound of $O(\sqrt{T})$ regret, albeit against a weaker $1/2$-approximation to the best feasible solution in hindsight. We also generalize our results to $\gamma$-weakly submodular functions and prove the same sublinear regret bounds. Finally, we demonstrate the efficiency of our algorithms on a few problem instances, including non-convex/non-concave quadratic programs, multilinear extensions of submodular set functions, and D-optimal design.
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    We study the problem of policy evaluation and learning from batched contextual bandit data when treatments are continuous, going beyond previous work on discrete treatments. Previous work for discrete treatment/action spaces focuses on inverse probability weighting (IPW) and doubly robust (DR) methods that use a rejection sampling approach for evaluation and the equivalent weighted classification problem for learning. In the continuous setting, this reduction fails as we would almost surely reject all observations. To tackle the case of continuous treatments, we extend the IPW and DR approaches to the continuous setting using a kernel function that leverages treatment proximity to attenuate discrete rejection. Our policy estimator is consistent and we characterize the optimal bandwidth. The resulting continuous policy optimizer (CPO) approach using our estimator achieves convergent regret and approaches the best-in-class policy for learnable policy classes. We demonstrate that the estimator performs well and, in particular, outperforms a discretization-based benchmark. We further study the performance of our policy optimizer in a case study on personalized dosing based on a dataset of Warfarin patients, their covariates, and final therapeutic doses. Our learned policy outperforms benchmarks and nears the oracle-best linear policy.
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    Distance metric learning (DML), which learns a distance metric from labeled "similar" and "dissimilar" data pairs, is widely utilized. Recently, several works investigate orthogonality-promoting regularization (OPR), which encourages the projection vectors in DML to be close to being orthogonal, to achieve three effects: (1) high balancedness -- achieving comparable performance on both frequent and infrequent classes; (2) high compactness -- using a small number of projection vectors to achieve a "good" metric; (3) good generalizability -- alleviating overfitting to training data. While showing promising results, these approaches suffer three problems. First, they involve solving non-convex optimization problems where achieving the global optimal is NP-hard. Second, it lacks a theoretical understanding why OPR can lead to balancedness. Third, the current generalization error analysis of OPR is not directly on the regularizer. In this paper, we address these three issues by (1) seeking convex relaxations of the original nonconvex problems so that the global optimal is guaranteed to be achievable; (2) providing a formal analysis on OPR's capability of promoting balancedness; (3) providing a theoretical analysis that directly reveals the relationship between OPR and generalization performance. Experiments on various datasets demonstrate that our convex methods are more effective in promoting balancedness, compactness, and generalization, and are computationally more efficient, compared with the nonconvex methods.
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    With malware detection techniques increasingly adopting machine learning approaches, the creation of precise training sets becomes more and more important. Large data sets of realistic web traffic, correctly classified as benign or malicious are needed, not only to train classic and deep learning algorithms, but also to serve as evaluation benchmarks for existing malware detection products. Interestingly, despite the vast number and versatility of threats a user may encounter when browsing the web, actual malicious content is often hard to come by, since prerequisites such as browser and operating system type and version must be met in order to receive the payload from a malware distributing server. In combination with privacy constraints on data sets of actual user traffic, it is difficult for researchers and product developers to evaluate anti-malware solutions against large-scale data sets of realistic web traffic. In this paper we present WebEye, a framework that autonomously creates realistic HTTP traffic, enriches recorded traffic with additional information, and classifies records as malicious or benign, using different classifiers. We are using WebEye to collect malicious HTML and JavaScript and show how datasets created with WebEye can be used to train machine learning based malware detection algorithms. We regard WebEye and the data sets it creates as a tool for researchers and product developers to evaluate and improve their AI-based anti-malware solutions against large-scale benchmarks.
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    Recent developments in the field of robot grasping have shown great improvements in the grasp success rates when dealing with unknown objects. In this work we improve on one of the most promising approaches, the Grasp Quality Convolutional Neural Network (GQ-CNN) trained on the DexNet 2.0 dataset. We propose a new architecture for the GQ-CNN and describe practical improvements that increase the model validation accuracy from 92.2% to 95.8% and from 85.9% to 88.0% on respectively image-wise and object-wise training and validation splits.
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    We define and address the problem of unsupervised learning of disentangled representations on data generated from independent factors of variation. We propose FactorVAE, a method that disentangles by encouraging the distribution of representations to be factorial and hence independent across the dimensions. We show that it improves upon $\beta$-VAE by providing a better trade-off between disentanglement and reconstruction quality. Moreover, we highlight the problems of a commonly used disentanglement metric and introduce a new metric that does not suffer from them.
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    Learning sparse linear models with two-way interactions is desirable in many application domains such as genomics. l1-regularised linear models are popular to estimate sparse models, yet standard implementations fail to address specifically the quadratic explosion of candidate two-way interactions in high dimensions, and typically do not scale to genetic data with hundreds of thousands of features. Here we present WHInter, a working set algorithm to solve large l1-regularised problems with two-way interactions for binary design matrices. The novelty of WHInter stems from a new bound to efficiently identify working sets while avoiding to scan all features, and on fast computations inspired from solutions to the maximum inner product search problem. We apply WHInter to simulated and real genetic data and show that it is more scalable and two orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art.
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    One of the challenges in the study of generative adversarial networks is the instability of its training. In this paper, we propose a novel weight normalization technique called spectral normalization to stabilize the training of the discriminator. Our new normalization technique is computationally light and easy to incorporate into existing implementations. We tested the efficacy of spectral normalization on CIFAR10, STL-10, and ILSVRC2012 dataset, and we experimentally confirmed that spectrally normalized GANs (SN-GANs) is capable of generating images of better or equal quality relative to the previous training stabilization techniques.
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    In this paper, we study the problem of locating a predefined sequence of patterns in a time series. In particular, the studied scenario assumes a theoretical model is available that contains the expected locations of the patterns. This problem is found in several contexts, and it is commonly solved by first synthesizing a time series from the model, and then aligning it to the true time series through dynamic time warping. We propose a technique that increases the similarity of both time series before aligning them, by mapping them into a latent correlation space. The mapping is learned from the data through a machine-learning setup. Experiments on data from non-destructive testing demonstrate that the proposed approach shows significant improvements over the state of the art.
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    Estimating causal models from observational data is a crucial task in data analysis. For continuous-valued data, Shimizu et al. have proposed a linear acyclic non-Gaussian model to understand the data generating process, and have shown that their model is identifiable when the number of data is sufficiently large. However, situations in which continuous and discrete variables coexist in the same problem are common in practice. Most existing causal discovery methods either ignore the discrete data and apply a continuous-valued algorithm or discretize all the continuous data and then apply a discrete Bayesian network approach. These methods possibly loss important information when we ignore discrete data or introduce the approximation error due to discretization. In this paper, we define a novel hybrid causal model which consists of both continuous and discrete variables. The model assumes: (1) the value of a continuous variable is a linear function of its parent variables plus a non-Gaussian noise, and (2) each discrete variable is a logistic variable whose distribution parameters depend on the values of its parent variables. In addition, we derive the BIC scoring function for model selection. The new discovery algorithm can learn causal structures from mixed continuous and discrete data without discretization. We empirically demonstrate the power of our method through thorough simulations.
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    For a speech-enhancement algorithm, it is highly desirable to simultaneously improve perceptual quality and recognition rate. Thanks to computational costs and model complexities, it is challenging to train a model that effectively optimizes both metrics at the same time. In this paper, we propose a method for speech enhancement that combines local and global contextual structures information through convolutional-recurrent neural networks that improves perceptual quality. At the same time, we introduce a new constraint on the objective function using a language model/decoder that limits the impact on recognition rate. Based on experiments conducted with real user data, we demonstrate that our new context-augmented machine-learning approach for speech enhancement improves PESQ and WER by an additional 24.5% and 51.3%, respectively, when compared to the best-performing methods in the literature.
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    The area of online machine learning in big data streams covers algorithms that are (1) distributed and (2) work from data streams with only a limited possibility to store past data. The first requirement mostly concerns software architectures and efficient algorithms. The second one also imposes nontrivial theoretical restrictions on the modeling methods: In the data stream model, older data is no longer available to revise earlier suboptimal modeling decisions as the fresh data arrives. In this article, we provide an overview of distributed software architectures and libraries as well as machine learning models for online learning. We highlight the most important ideas for classification, regression, recommendation, and unsupervised modeling from streaming data, and we show how they are implemented in various distributed data stream processing systems. This article is a reference material and not a survey. We do not attempt to be comprehensive in describing all existing methods and solutions; rather, we give pointers to the most important resources in the field. All related sub-fields, online algorithms, online learning, and distributed data processing are hugely dominant in current research and development with conceptually new research results and software components emerging at the time of writing. In this article, we refer to several survey results, both for distributed data processing and for online machine learning. Compared to past surveys, our article is different because we discuss recommender systems in extended detail.
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    Given a pair of random variables $(X,Y)\sim P_{XY}$ and two convex functions $f_1$ and $f_2$, we introduce two bottleneck functionals as the lower and upper boundaries of the two-dimensional convex set that consists of the pairs $\left(I_{f_1}(W; X), I_{f_2}(W; Y)\right)$, where $I_f$ denotes $f$-information and $W$ varies over the set of all discrete random variables satisfying the Markov condition $W \to X \to Y$. Applying Witsenhausen and Wyner's approach, we provide an algorithm for computing boundaries of this set for $f_1$, $f_2$, and discrete $P_{XY}$, . In the binary symmetric case, we fully characterize the set when (i) $f_1(t)=f_2(t)=t\log t$, (ii) $f_1(t)=f_2(t)=t^2-1$, and (iii) $f_1$ and $f_2$ are both $\ell^\beta$ norm function for $\beta > 1$. We then argue that upper and lower boundaries in (i) correspond to Mrs. Gerber's Lemma and its inverse (which we call Mr. Gerber's Lemma), in (ii) correspond to estimation-theoretic variants of Information Bottleneck and Privacy Funnel, and in (iii) correspond to Arimoto Information Bottleneck and Privacy Funnel.
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    Model selection on validation data is an essential step in machine learning. While the mixing of data between training and validation is considered taboo, practitioners often violate it to increase performance. Here, we offer a simple, practical method for using the validation set for training, which allows for a continuous, controlled trade-off between performance and overfitting of model selection. We define the notion of on-average-validation-stable algorithms as one in which using small portions of validation data for training does not overfit the model selection process. We then prove that stable algorithms are also validation stable. Finally, we demonstrate our method on the MNIST and CIFAR-10 datasets using stable algorithms as well as state-of-the-art neural networks. Our results show significant increase in test performance with a minor trade-off in bias admitted to the model selection process.
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    In this paper, we unify causal and non-causal feature feature selection methods based on the Bayesian network framework. We first show that the objectives of causal and non-causal feature selection methods are equal and are to find the Markov blanket of a class attribute, the theoretically optimal feature set for classification. We demonstrate that causal and non-causal feature selection take different assumptions of dependency among features to find Markov blanket, and their algorithms are shown different level of approximation for finding Markov blanket. In this framework, we are able to analyze the sample and error bounds of casual and non-causal methods. We conducted extensive experiments to show the correctness of our theoretical analysis.
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    Advances in unsupervised learning enable reconstruction and generation of samples from complex distributions, but this success is marred by the inscrutability of the representations learned. We propose an information-theoretic approach to characterizing disentanglement and dependence in representation learning using multivariate mutual information, also called total correlation. The principle of total Cor-relation Ex-planation (CorEx) has motivated successful unsupervised learning applications across a variety of domains, but under some restrictive assumptions. Here we relax those restrictions by introducing a flexible variational lower bound to CorEx. Surprisingly, we find that this lower bound is equivalent to the one in variational autoencoders (VAE) under certain conditions. This information-theoretic view of VAE deepens our understanding of hierarchical VAE and motivates a new algorithm, AnchorVAE, that makes latent codes more interpretable through information maximization and enables generation of richer and more realistic samples.
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    Low-rank matrix completion (MC) has achieved great success in many real-world data applications. A latent feature model formulation is usually employed and, to improve prediction performance, the similarities between latent variables can be exploited by pairwise learning, e.g., the graph regularized matrix factorization (GRMF) method. However, existing GRMF approaches often use a squared L2 norm to measure the pairwise difference, which may be overly influenced by dissimilar pairs and lead to inferior prediction. To fully empower pairwise learning for matrix completion, we propose a general optimization framework that allows a rich class of (non-)convex pairwise penalty functions. A new and efficient algorithm is further developed to uniformly solve the optimization problem, with a theoretical convergence guarantee. In an important situation where the latent variables form a small number of subgroups, its statistical guarantee is also fully characterized. In particular, we theoretically characterize the complexity-regularized maximum likelihood estimator, as a special case of our framework. It has a better error bound when compared to the standard trace-norm regularized matrix completion. We conduct extensive experiments on both synthetic and real datasets to demonstrate the superior performance of this general framework.
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    We extend variational autoencoders (VAEs) to collaborative filtering for implicit feedback. This non-linear probabilistic model enables us to go beyond the limited modeling capacity of linear factor models which still largely dominate collaborative filtering research.We introduce a generative model with multinomial likelihood and use Bayesian inference for parameter estimation. Despite widespread use in language modeling and economics, the multinomial likelihood receives less attention in the recommender systems literature. We introduce a different regularization parameter for the learning objective, which proves to be crucial for achieving competitive performance. Remarkably, there is an efficient way to tune the parameter using annealing. The resulting model and learning algorithm has information-theoretic connections to maximum entropy discrimination and the information bottleneck principle. Empirically, we show that the proposed approach significantly outperforms several state-of-the-art baselines, including two recently-proposed neural network approaches, on several real-world datasets. We also provide extended experiments comparing the multinomial likelihood with other commonly used likelihood functions in the latent factor collaborative filtering literature and show favorable results. Finally, we identify the pros and cons of employing a principled Bayesian inference approach and characterize settings where it provides the most significant improvements.
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    In this paper we investigate the use of MPC-inspired neural network policies for sequential decision making. We introduce an extension to the DAgger algorithm for training such policies and show how they have improved training performance and generalization capabilities. We take advantage of this extension to show scalable and efficient training of complex planning policy architectures in continuous state and action spaces. We provide an extensive comparison of neural network policies by considering feed forward policies, recurrent policies, and recurrent policies with planning structure inspired by the Path Integral control framework. Our results suggest that MPC-type recurrent policies have better robustness to disturbances and modeling error.
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    Training modern deep learning models requires large amounts of computation, often provided by GPUs. Scaling computation from one GPU to many can enable much faster training and research progress but entails two complications. First, the training library must support inter-GPU communication. Depending on the particular methods employed, this communication may entail anywhere from negligible to significant overhead. Second, the user must modify his or her training code to take advantage of inter-GPU communication. Depending on the training library's API, the modification required may be either significant or minimal. Existing methods for enabling multi-GPU training under the TensorFlow library entail non-negligible communication overhead and require users to heavily modify their model-building code, leading many researchers to avoid the whole mess and stick with slower single-GPU training. In this paper we introduce Horovod, an open source library that improves on both obstructions to scaling: it employs efficient inter-GPU communication via ring reduction and requires only a few lines of modification to user code, enabling faster, easier distributed training in TensorFlow. Horovod is available under the Apache 2.0 license at https://github.com/uber/horovod.
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    Deep neural network architectures designed for application domains other than sound, especially image recognition, may not optimally harness the time-frequency representation when adapted to the sound recognition problem. In this work, we explore the ConditionaL Neural Network (CLNN) and the Masked ConditionaL Neural Network (MCLNN) for multi-dimensional temporal signal recognition. The CLNN considers the inter-frame relationship, and the MCLNN enforces a systematic sparseness over the network's links to enable learning in frequency bands rather than bins allowing the network to be frequency shift invariant mimicking a filterbank. The mask also allows considering several combinations of features concurrently, which is usually handcrafted through exhaustive manual search. We applied the MCLNN to the environmental sound recognition problem using the ESC-10 and ESC-50 datasets. MCLNN achieved competitive performance, using 12% of the parameters and without augmentation, compared to state-of-the-art Convolutional Neural Networks.
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    Variational autoencoders (VAEs) are powerful generative models with the salient ability to perform inference. Here, we introduce a \emphquantum variational autoencoder (QVAE): a VAE whose latent generative process is implemented as a quantum Boltzmann machine (QBM). We show that our model can be trained end-to-end by maximizing a well-defined loss-function: a "quantum" lower-bound to a variational approximation of the log-likelihood. We use quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations to train and evaluate the performance of QVAEs. To achieve the best performance, we first create a VAE platform with discrete latent space generated by a restricted Boltzmann machine (RBM). Our model achieves state-of-the-art performance on the MNIST dataset when compared against similar approaches that only involve discrete variables in the generative process. We consider QVAEs with a smaller number of latent units to be able to perform QMC simulations, which are computationally expensive. We show that QVAEs can be trained effectively in regimes where quantum effects are relevant despite training via the quantum bound. Our findings open the way to the use of quantum computers to train QVAEs to achieve competitive performance for generative models. Placing a QBM in the latent space of a VAE leverages the full potential of current and next-generation quantum computers as sampling devices.
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    With the excellent accuracy and feasibility, the Neural Networks have been widely applied into the novel intelligent applications and systems. However, with the appearance of the Adversarial Attack, the NN based system performance becomes extremely vulnerable:the image classification results can be arbitrarily misled by the adversarial examples, which are crafted images with human unperceivable pixel-level perturbation. As this raised a significant system security issue, we implemented a series of investigations on the adversarial attack in this work: We first identify an image's pixel vulnerability to the adversarial attack based on the adversarial saliency analysis. By comparing the analyzed saliency map and the adversarial perturbation distribution, we proposed a new evaluation scheme to comprehensively assess the adversarial attack precision and efficiency. Then, with a novel adversarial saliency prediction method, a fast adversarial example generation framework, namely "ASP", is proposed with significant attack efficiency improvement and dramatic computation cost reduction. Compared to the previous methods, experiments show that ASP has at most 12 times speed-up for adversarial example generation, 2 times lower perturbation rate, and high attack success rate of 87% on both MNIST and Cifar10. ASP can be also well utilized to support the data-hungry NN adversarial training. By reducing the attack success rate as much as 90%, ASP can quickly and effectively enhance the defense capability of NN based system to the adversarial attacks.
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    We present a stochastic algorithm to compute the barycenter of a set of probability distributions under the Wasserstein metric from optimal transport. Unlike previous approaches, our method extends to continuous input distributions and allows the support of the barycenter to be adjusted in each iteration. We tackle the problem without regularization, allowing us to recover a sharp output whose support is contained within the support of the true barycenter. We give examples where our algorithm recovers a more meaningful barycenter than previous work. Our method is versatile and can be extended to applications such as generating super samples from a given distribution and recovering blue noise approximations.
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    We present a systematic weight pruning framework of deep neural networks (DNNs) using the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). We first formulate the weight pruning problem of DNNs as a constrained nonconvex optimization problem, and then adopt the ADMM framework for systematic weight pruning. We show that ADMM is highly suitable for weight pruning due to the computational efficiency it offers. We achieve a much higher compression ratio compared with prior work while maintaining the same test accuracy, together with a faster convergence rate.
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    We study the question of fair clustering under the \em disparate impact doctrine, where each protected class must have approximately equal representation in every cluster. We formulate the fair clustering problem under both the $k$-center and the $k$-median objectives, and show that even with two protected classes the problem is challenging, as the optimum solution can violate common conventions---for instance a point may no longer be assigned to its nearest cluster center! En route we introduce the concept of fairlets, which are minimal sets that satisfy fair representation while approximately preserving the clustering objective. We show that any fair clustering problem can be decomposed into first finding good fairlets, and then using existing machinery for traditional clustering algorithms. While finding good fairlets can be NP-hard, we proceed to obtain efficient approximation algorithms based on minimum cost flow. We empirically quantify the value of fair clustering on real-world datasets with sensitive attributes.
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    In this paper we propose a tensor-based nonlinear model for high-order data classification. The advantages of the proposed scheme are that (i) it significantly reduces the number of weight parameters, and hence of required training samples, and (ii) it retains the spatial structure of the input samples. The proposed model, called \textitRank-1 FNN, is based on a modification of a feedforward neural network (FNN), such that its weights satisfy the \it rank-1 canonical decomposition. We also introduce a new learning algorithm to train the model, and we evaluate the \textitRank-1 FNN on third-order hyperspectral data. Experimental results and comparisons indicate that the proposed model outperforms state of the art classification methods, including deep learning based ones, especially in cases with small numbers of available training samples.
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    Voice cloning is a highly desired feature for personalized speech interfaces. Neural network based speech synthesis has been shown to generate high quality speech for a large number of speakers. In this paper, we introduce a neural voice cloning system that takes a few audio samples as input. We study two approaches: speaker adaptation and speaker encoding. Speaker adaptation is based on fine-tuning a multi-speaker generative model with a few cloning samples. Speaker encoding is based on training a separate model to directly infer a new speaker embedding from cloning audios and to be used with a multi-speaker generative model. In terms of naturalness of the speech and its similarity to original speaker, both approaches can achieve good performance, even with very few cloning audios. While speaker adaptation can achieve better naturalness and similarity, the cloning time or required memory for the speaker encoding approach is significantly less, making it favorable for low-resource deployment.

Recent comments

Noon van der Silk Apr 06 2017 07:23 UTC

This is interesting work.

Did the authors happen to make their code available? I think there might be a few other fun experiments to run, and in particular I'd be interested to know how to use this framework for picking a network that does best at _both_ tasks (from the experiments section). That

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Noon van der Silk Mar 08 2017 04:45 UTC

I feel that while the proliferation of GUNs is unquestionable a good idea, there are many unsupervised networks out there that might use this technology in dangerous ways. Do you think Indifferential-Privacy networks are the answer? Also I fear that the extremist binary networks should be banned ent

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Omar Shehab Sep 12 2016 12:50 UTC

I am still trying to understand the following statement from II.A.

> This leads to the condition that the first- and second-order moments
> of the model and data distributions should be equal for the parameters
> to be optimal.

Alessandro Dec 09 2015 01:12 UTC

Hey, I've already seen this title! http://arxiv.org/abs/1307.0401

Noon van der Silk Jul 13 2015 10:44 UTC

There's some code for this here: https://github.com/ryankiros/skip-thoughts

anti-plagiarism Jul 09 2015 15:11 UTC

This paper "**Tree-based convolution for sentence modeling**" is a deliberate plagiarism. The texts, models and ideas overlap significantly with previous work on arXiv.

- TBCNN: A **Tree-based Convolutional** Neural Network for Programming
Language Processing (arXiv:1409.5718)
- **Tree-based

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