Learning (cs.LG)

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    The computational complexity of solving nonlinear support vector machine (SVM) is prohibitive on large-scale data. In particular, this issue becomes very sensitive when the data represents additional difficulties such as highly imbalanced class sizes. Typically, nonlinear kernels produce significantly higher classification quality to linear kernels but introduce extra kernel and model parameters. Thus, the parameter fitting is required to increase the quality but it reduces the performance dramatically. We introduce a generalized fast multilevel framework for SVM and discuss several versions of its algorithmic components that lead to a good trade-off between quality and time. Our framework is implemented using PETSc which allows integration with scientific computing tasks. The experimental results demonstrate significant speed up compared to the state-of-the-art SVM libraries.
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    Purpose: To develop a deep learning approach to digitally-stain optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the optic nerve head (ONH). Methods: A horizontal B-scan was acquired through the center of the ONH using OCT (Spectralis) for 1 eye of each of 100 subjects (40 normal & 60 glaucoma). All images were enhanced using adaptive compensation. A custom deep learning network was then designed and trained with the compensated images to digitally stain (i.e. highlight) 6 tissue layers of the ONH. The accuracy of our algorithm was assessed (against manual segmentations) using the Dice coefficient, sensitivity, and specificity. We further studied how compensation and the number of training images affected the performance of our algorithm. Results: For images it had not yet assessed, our algorithm was able to digitally stain the retinal nerve fiber layer + prelamina, the retinal pigment epithelium, all other retinal layers, the choroid, and the peripapillary sclera and lamina cribrosa. For all tissues, the mean dice coefficient was $0.84 \pm 0.03$, the mean sensitivity $0.92 \pm 0.03$, and the mean specificity $0.99 \pm 0.00$. Our algorithm performed significantly better when compensated images were used for training. Increasing the number of images (from 10 to 40) to train our algorithm did not significantly improve performance, except for the RPE. Conclusion. Our deep learning algorithm can simultaneously stain neural and connective tissues in ONH images. Our approach offers a framework to automatically measure multiple key structural parameters of the ONH that may be critical to improve glaucoma management.
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    Deep neural networks have become a primary tool for solving problems in many fields. They are also used for addressing information retrieval problems and show strong performance in several tasks. Training these models requires large, representative datasets and for most IR tasks, such data contains sensitive information from users. Privacy and confidentiality concerns prevent many data owners from sharing the data, thus today the research community can only benefit from research on large-scale datasets in a limited manner. In this paper, we discuss privacy preserving mimic learning, i.e., using predictions from a privacy preserving trained model instead of labels from the original sensitive training data as a supervision signal. We present the results of preliminary experiments in which we apply the idea of mimic learning and privacy preserving mimic learning for the task of document re-ranking as one of the core IR tasks. This research is a step toward laying the ground for enabling researchers from data-rich environments to share knowledge learned from actual users' data, which should facilitate research collaborations.
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    In this work we present the novel ASTRID method for investigating which attribute interactions classifiers exploit when making predictions. Attribute interactions in classification tasks mean that two or more attributes together provide stronger evidence for a particular class label. Knowledge of such interactions makes models more interpretable by revealing associations between attributes. This has applications, e.g., in pharmacovigilance to identify interactions between drugs or in bioinformatics to investigate associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms. We also show how the found attribute partitioning is related to a factorisation of the data generating distribution and empirically demonstrate the utility of the proposed method.
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    The progression of breast cancer can be quantified in lymph node whole-slide images (WSIs). We describe a novel method for effectively performing classification of whole-slide images and patient level breast cancer grading. Our method utilises a deep neural network. The method performs classification on small patches and uses model averaging for boosting. In the first step, region of interest patches are determined and cropped automatically by color thresholding and then classified by the deep neural network. The classification results are used to determine a slide level class and for further aggregation to predict a patient level grade. Fast processing speed of our method enables high throughput image analysis.
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    We present a simple method for assessing the quality of generated images in Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs). The method can be applied in any kind of GAN without interfering with the learning procedure or affecting the learning objective. The central idea is to define a likelihood function that correlates with the quality of the generated images. In particular, we derive a Gaussian likelihood function from the distribution of the embeddings (hidden activations) of the real images in the discriminator, and based on this, define two simple measures of how likely it is that the embeddings of generated images are from the distribution of the embeddings of the real images. This yields a simple measure of fitness for generated images, for all varieties of GANs. Empirical results on CIFAR-10 demonstrate a strong correlation between the proposed measures and the perceived quality of the generated images.
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    Natural language inference (NLI) is a central problem in language understanding. End-to-end artificial neural networks have reached state-of-the-art performance in NLI field recently. In this paper, we propose Character-level Intra Attention Network (CIAN) for the NLI task. In our model, we use the character-level convolutional network to replace the standard word embedding layer, and we use the intra attention to capture the intra-sentence semantics. The proposed CIAN model provides improved results based on a newly published MNLI corpus.
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    In this paper, we study the combinatorial multi-armed bandit problem (CMAB) with probabilistically triggered arms (PTAs). Under the assumption that the arm triggering probabilities (ATPs) are positive for all arms, we prove that a class of upper confidence bound (UCB) policies, named Combinatorial UCB with exploration rate $\kappa$ (CUCB-$\kappa$), and Combinatorial Thompson Sampling (CTS), which estimates the expected states of the arms via Thompson sampling, achieve bounded regret. In addition, we prove that CUCB-$0$ and CTS incur $O(\sqrt{T})$ gap-independent regret. These results improve the results in previous works, which show $O(\log T)$ gap-dependent and $O(\sqrt{T\log T})$ gap-independent regrets, respectively, under no assumptions on the ATPs. Then, we numerically evaluate the performance of CUCB-$\kappa$ and CTS in a real-world movie recommendation problem, where the actions correspond to recommending a set of movies, the arms correspond to the edges between the movies and the users, and the goal is to maximize the total number of users that are attracted by at least one movie. Our numerical results complement our theoretical findings on bounded regret. Apart from this problem, our results also directly apply to the online influence maximization (OIM) problem studied in numerous prior works.
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    Scaling regression to large datasets is a common problem in many application areas. We propose a two step approach to scaling regression to large datasets. Using a regression tree (CART) to segment the large dataset constitutes the first step of this approach. The second step of this approach is to develop a suitable regression model for each segment. Since segment sizes are not very large, we have the ability to apply sophisticated regression techniques if required. A nice feature of this two step approach is that it can yield models that have good explanatory power as well as good predictive performance. Ensemble methods like Gradient Boosted Trees can offer excellent predictive performance but may not provide interpretable models. In the experiments reported in this study, we found that the predictive performance of the proposed approach matched the predictive performance of Gradient Boosted Trees.
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    Machine translation is a natural candidate problem for reinforcement learning from human feedback: users provide quick, dirty ratings on candidate translations to guide a system to improve. Yet, current neural machine translation training focuses on expensive human-generated reference translations. We describe a reinforcement learning algorithm that improves neural machine translation systems from simulated human feedback. Our algorithm combines the advantage actor-critic algorithm (Mnih et al., 2016) with the attention-based neural encoder-decoder architecture (Luong et al., 2015). This algorithm (a) is well-designed for problems with a large action space and delayed rewards, (b) effectively optimizes traditional corpus-level machine translation metrics, and (c) is robust to skewed, high-variance, granular feedback modeled after actual human behaviors.
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    This paper presents a data-driven approach for multi-robot coordination in partially-observable domains based on Decentralized Partially Observable Markov Decision Processes (Dec-POMDPs) and macro-actions (MAs). Dec-POMDPs provide a general framework for cooperative sequential decision making under uncertainty and MAs allow temporally extended and asynchronous action execution. To date, most methods assume the underlying Dec-POMDP model is known a priori or a full simulator is available during planning time. Previous methods which aim to address these issues suffer from local optimality and sensitivity to initial conditions. Additionally, few hardware demonstrations involving a large team of heterogeneous robots and with long planning horizons exist. This work addresses these gaps by proposing an iterative sampling based Expectation-Maximization algorithm (iSEM) to learn polices using only trajectory data containing observations, MAs, and rewards. Our experiments show the algorithm is able to achieve better solution quality than the state-of-the-art learning-based methods. We implement two variants of multi-robot Search and Rescue (SAR) domains (with and without obstacles) on hardware to demonstrate the learned policies can effectively control a team of distributed robots to cooperate in a partially observable stochastic environment.
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    Texture classification is an important and challenging problem in many image processing applications. While convolutional neural networks (CNNs) achieved significant successes for image classification, texture classification remains a difficult problem since textures usually do not contain enough information regarding the shape of object. In image processing, texture classification has been traditionally studied well with spectral analyses which exploit repeated structures in many textures. Since CNNs process images as-is in the spatial domain whereas spectral analyses process images in the frequency domain, these models have different characteristics in terms of performance. We propose a novel CNN architecture, wavelet CNNs, which integrates a spectral analysis into CNNs. Our insight is that the pooling layer and the convolution layer can be viewed as a limited form of a spectral analysis. Based on this insight, we generalize both layers to perform a spectral analysis with wavelet transform. Wavelet CNNs allow us to utilize spectral information which is lost in conventional CNNs but useful in texture classification. The experiments demonstrate that our model achieves better accuracy in texture classification than existing models. We also show that our model has significantly fewer parameters than CNNs, making our model easier to train with less memory.
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    We adopt the perspective of an aggregator, which seeks to coordinate its purchase of demand reductions from a fixed group of residential electricity customers, with its sale of the aggregate demand reduction in a two-settlement wholesale energy market. The aggregator procures reductions in demand by offering its customers a uniform price for reductions in consumption relative to their predetermined baselines. Prior to its realization of the aggregate demand reduction, the aggregator must also determine how much energy to sell into the two-settlement energy market. In the day-ahead market, the aggregator commits to a forward contract, which calls for the delivery of energy in the real-time market. The underlying aggregate demand curve, which relates the aggregate demand reduction to the aggregator's offered price, is assumed to be affine and subject to unobservable, random shocks. Assuming that both the parameters of the demand curve and the distribution of the random shocks are initially unknown to the aggregator, we investigate the extent to which the aggregator might dynamically adapt its offered prices and forward contracts to maximize its expected profit over a time window of $T$ days. Specifically, we design a dynamic pricing and contract offering policy that resolves the aggregator's need to learn the unknown demand model with its desire to maximize its cumulative expected profit over time. The proposed pricing policy is proven to be asymptotically optimal --- exhibiting a regret over $T$ days that is no greater than $O(\sqrt{T})$.
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    Standard accuracy metrics indicate that reading comprehension systems are making rapid progress, but the extent to which these systems truly understand language remains unclear. To reward systems with real language understanding abilities, we propose an adversarial evaluation scheme for the Stanford Question Answering Dataset (SQuAD). Our method tests whether systems can answer questions about paragraphs that contain adversarially inserted sentences, which are automatically generated to distract computer systems without changing the correct answer or misleading humans. In this adversarial setting, the accuracy of sixteen published models drops from an average of $75\%$ F1 score to $36\%$; when the adversary is allowed to add ungrammatical sequences of words, average accuracy on four models decreases further to $7\%$. We hope our insights will motivate the development of new models that understand language more precisely.
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    This letter proposes a multiple parametric dictionary learning algorithm for direction of arrival (DOA) estimation in presence of array gain-phase error and mutual coupling. It jointly solves both the DOA estimation and array imperfection problems to yield a robust DOA estimation in presence of array imperfection errors and off-grid. In the proposed method, a multiple parametric dictionary learning-based algorithm with an steepest-descent iteration is used for learning the parametric perturbation matrices and the steering matrix simultaneously. It also exploits the multiple snapshots information to enhance the performance of DOA estimation. Simulation results show the efficiency of the proposed algorithm when both off-grid problem and array imperfection exist.
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    We suggest a general approach to quantification of different types of uncertainty in regression tasks performed by deep neural networks. It is based on the simultaneous training of two neural networks with a joint loss function. One of the networks performs regression and the other quantifies the uncertainty of predictions of the first one. Unlike in many standard uncertainty quantification methods, the targets are not assumed to be sampled from an a priori given probability distribution. We analyze how the hyperparameters affect the learning process and, additionally, show that our method even allows for better predictions compared to standard neural networks without uncertainty counterparts. Finally, we show that a particular case of our approach is the mean-variance estimation given by a Gaussian network.
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    Trans-dimensional random field language models (TRF LMs) have recently been introduced, where sentences are modeled as a collection of random fields. The TRF approach has been shown to have the advantages of being computationally more efficient in inference than LSTM LMs with close performance and being able to flexibly integrating rich features. In this paper we propose neural TRFs, beyond of the previous discrete TRFs that only use linear potentials with discrete features. The idea is to use nonlinear potentials with continuous features, implemented by neural networks (NNs), in the TRF framework. Neural TRFs combine the advantages of both NNs and TRFs. The benefits of word embedding, nonlinear feature learning and larger context modeling are inherited from the use of NNs. At the same time, the strength of efficient inference by avoiding expensive softmax is preserved. A number of technical contributions, including employing deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) to define the potentials and incorporating the joint stochastic approximation (JSA) strategy in the training algorithm, are developed in this work, which enable us to successfully train neural TRF LMs. Various LMs are evaluated in terms of speech recognition WERs by rescoring the 1000-best lists of WSJ'92 test data. The results show that neural TRF LMs not only improve over discrete TRF LMs, but also perform slightly better than LSTM LMs with only one fifth of parameters and 16x faster inference efficiency.
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    The immense amount of daily generated and communicated data presents unique challenges in their processing. Clustering, the grouping of data without the presence of ground-truth labels, is an important tool for drawing inferences from data. Subspace clustering (SC) is a relatively recent method that is able to successfully classify nonlinearly separable data in a multitude of settings. In spite of their high clustering accuracy, SC methods incur prohibitively high computational complexity when processing large volumes of high-dimensional data. Inspired by random sketching approaches for dimensionality reduction, the present paper introduces a randomized scheme for SC, termed Sketch-SC, tailored for large volumes of high-dimensional data. Sketch-SC accelerates the computationally heavy parts of state-of-the-art SC approaches by compressing the data matrix across both dimensions using random projections, thus enabling fast and accurate large-scale SC. Performance analysis as well as extensive numerical tests on real data corroborate the potential of Sketch-SC and its competitive performance relative to state-of-the-art scalable SC approaches.
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    Complex computer simulators are increasingly used across fields of science as generative models tying parameters of an underlying theory to experimental observations. Inference in this setup is often difficult, as simulators rarely admit a tractable density or likelihood function. We introduce Adversarial Variational Optimization (AVO), a likelihood-free inference algorithm for fitting a non-differentiable generative model incorporating ideas from empirical Bayes and variational inference. We adapt the training procedure of generative adversarial networks by replacing the differentiable generative network with a domain-specific simulator. We solve the resulting non-differentiable minimax problem by minimizing variational upper bounds of the two adversarial objectives. Effectively, the procedure results in learning a proposal distribution over simulator parameters, such that the corresponding marginal distribution of the generated data matches the observations. We present results of the method with simulators producing both discrete and continuous data.
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    Research is a tertiary priority in the EHR, where the priorities are patient care and billing. Because of this, the data is not standardized or formatted in a manner easily adapted to machine learning approaches. Data may be missing for a large variety of reasons ranging from individual input styles to differences in clinical decision making, for example, which lab tests to issue. Few patients are annotated at a research quality, limiting sample size and presenting a moving gold standard. Patient progression over time is key to understanding many diseases but many machine learning algorithms require a snapshot, at a single time point, to create a usable vector form. Furthermore, algorithms that produce black box results do not provide the interpretability required for clinical adoption. This chapter discusses these challenges and others in applying machine learning techniques to the structured EHR (i.e. Patient Demographics, Family History, Medication Information, Vital Signs, Laboratory Tests, Genetic Testing). It does not cover feature extraction from additional sources such as imaging data or free text patient notes but the approaches discussed can include features extracted from these sources.
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    This paper proposed a method for stock prediction. In terms of feature extraction, we extract the features of stock-related news besides stock prices. We first select some seed words based on experience which are the symbols of good news and bad news. Then we propose an optimization method and calculate the positive polar of all words. After that, we construct the features of news based on the positive polar of their words. In consideration of sequential stock prices and continuous news effects, we propose a recurrent neural network model to help predict stock prices. Compared to SVM classifier with price features, we find our proposed method has an over 5% improvement on stock prediction accuracy in experiments.
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    Outlier detection is a crucial part of robust evaluation for crowdsourceable assessment of Quality of Experience (QoE) and has attracted much attention in recent years. In this paper, we propose some simple and fast algorithms for outlier detection and robust QoE evaluation based on the nonconvex optimization principle. Several iterative procedures are designed with or without knowing the number of outliers in samples. Theoretical analysis is given to show that such procedures can reach statistically good estimates under mild conditions. Finally, experimental results with simulated and real-world crowdsourcing datasets show that the proposed algorithms could produce similar performance to Huber-LASSO approach in robust ranking, yet with nearly 8 or 90 times speed-up, without or with a prior knowledge on the sparsity size of outliers, respectively. Therefore the proposed methodology provides us a set of helpful tools for robust QoE evaluation with crowdsourcing data.
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    Plants monitor their surrounding environment and control their physiological functions by producing an electrical response. We recorded electrical signals from different plants by exposing them to Sodium Chloride (NaCl), Ozone (O3) and Sulfuric Acid (H2SO4) under laboratory conditions. After applying pre-processing techniques such as filtering and drift removal, we extracted few statistical features from the acquired plant electrical signals. Using these features, combined with different classification algorithms, we used a decision tree based multi-class classification strategy to identify the three different external chemical stimuli. We here present our exploration to obtain the optimum set of ranked feature and classifier combination that can separate a particular chemical stimulus from the incoming stream of plant electrical signals. The paper also reports an exhaustive comparison of similar feature based classification using the filtered and the raw plant signals, containing the high frequency stochastic part and also the low frequency trends present in it, as two different cases for feature extraction. The work, presented in this paper opens up new possibilities for using plant electrical signals to monitor and detect other environmental stimuli apart from NaCl, O3 and H2SO4 in future.

Recent comments

Noon van der Silk Apr 06 2017 07:23 UTC

This is interesting work.

Did the authors happen to make their code available? I think there might be a few other fun experiments to run, and in particular I'd be interested to know how to use this framework for picking a network that does best at _both_ tasks (from the experiments section). That

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Noon van der Silk Mar 08 2017 04:45 UTC

I feel that while the proliferation of GUNs is unquestionable a good idea, there are many unsupervised networks out there that might use this technology in dangerous ways. Do you think Indifferential-Privacy networks are the answer? Also I fear that the extremist binary networks should be banned ent

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Omar Shehab Sep 12 2016 12:50 UTC

I am still trying to understand the following statement from II.A.

> This leads to the condition that the first- and second-order moments
> of the model and data distributions should be equal for the parameters
> to be optimal.

Alessandro Dec 09 2015 01:12 UTC

Hey, I've already seen this title! http://arxiv.org/abs/1307.0401

Noon van der Silk Jul 13 2015 10:44 UTC

There's some code for this here: https://github.com/ryankiros/skip-thoughts

anti-plagiarism Jul 09 2015 15:11 UTC

This paper "**Tree-based convolution for sentence modeling**" is a deliberate plagiarism. The texts, models and ideas overlap significantly with previous work on arXiv.

- TBCNN: A **Tree-based Convolutional** Neural Network for Programming
Language Processing (arXiv:1409.5718)
- **Tree-based

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