Information Retrieval (cs.IR)

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    This paper concerns a deep learning approach to relevance ranking in information retrieval (IR). Existing deep IR models such as DSSM and CDSSM directly apply neural networks to generate ranking scores, without explicit understandings of the relevance. According to the human judgement process, a relevance label is generated by the following three steps: 1) relevant locations are detected, 2) local relevances are determined, 3) local relevances are aggregated to output the relevance label. In this paper we propose a new deep learning architecture, namely DeepRank, to simulate the above human judgment process. Firstly, a detection strategy is designed to extract the relevant contexts. Then, a measure network is applied to determine the local relevances by utilizing a convolutional neural network (CNN) or two-dimensional gated recurrent units (2D-GRU). Finally, an aggregation network with sequential integration and term gating mechanism is used to produce a global relevance score. DeepRank well captures important IR characteristics, including exact/semantic matching signals, proximity heuristics, query term importance, and diverse relevance requirement. Experiments on both benchmark LETOR dataset and a large scale clickthrough data show that DeepRank can significantly outperform learning to ranking methods, and existing deep learning methods.
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    Finding semantically rich and computer-understandable representations for textual dialogues, utterances and words is crucial for dialogue systems (or conversational agents), as their performance mostly depends on understanding the context of conversations. Recent research aims at finding distributed vector representations (embeddings) for words, such that semantically similar words are relatively close within the vector-space. Encoding the "meaning" of text into vectors is a current trend, and text can range from words, phrases and documents to actual human-to-human conversations. In recent research approaches, responses have been generated utilizing a decoder architecture, given the vector representation of the current conversation. In this paper, the utilization of embeddings for answer retrieval is explored by using Locality-Sensitive Hashing Forest (LSH Forest), an Approximate Nearest Neighbor (ANN) model, to find similar conversations in a corpus and rank possible candidates. Experimental results on the well-known Ubuntu Corpus (in English) and a customer service chat dataset (in Dutch) show that, in combination with a candidate selection method, retrieval-based approaches outperform generative ones and reveal promising future research directions towards the usability of such a system.
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    This short empirical paper investigates how well topic modeling and database meta-data characteristics can classify web and other proof-of-concept (PoC) exploits for publicly disclosed software vulnerabilities. By using a dataset comprised of over 36 thousand PoC exploits, near a 0.9 accuracy rate is obtained in the empirical experiment. Text mining and topic modeling are a significant boost factor behind this classification performance. In addition to these empirical results, the paper contributes to the research tradition of enhancing software vulnerability information with text mining, providing also a few scholarly observations about the potential for semi-automatic classification of exploits in the existing tracking infrastructures.
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    Topic popularity prediction in social networks has drawn much attention recently. Various elegant models have been proposed for this issue. However, different datasets and evaluation metrics they use lead to low comparability. So far there is no unified scheme to evaluate them, making it difficult to select and compare models. We conduct a comprehensible survey, propose an evaluation scheme and apply it to existing methods. Our scheme consists of four modules: classification; qualitative evaluation on several metrics; quantitative experiment on real world data; final ranking with risk matrix and $\textit{MinDis}$ to reflect performances under different scenarios. Furthermore, we analyze the efficiency and contribution of features used in feature oriented methods. The results show that feature oriented methods are more suitable for scenarios requiring high accuracy, while relation based methods have better consistency. Our work helps researchers compare and choose methods appropriately, and provides insights for further improvements.

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SHUAI ZHANG Jul 26 2017 00:20 UTC

I am still working on improving this survey. If you have any suggestions, questions or find any mistakes, please do not hesitate to contact me: shuai.zhang@student.unsw.edu.au.