Human-Computer Interaction (cs.HC)

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    Researchers often summarize their work in the form of scientific posters. Posters provide a coherent and efficient way to convey core ideas expressed in scientific papers. Generating a good scientific poster, however, is a complex and time consuming cognitive task, since such posters need to be readable, informative, and visually aesthetic. In this paper, for the first time, we study the challenging problem of learning to generate posters from scientific papers. To this end, a data-driven framework, that utilizes graphical models, is proposed. Specifically, given content to display, the key elements of a good poster, including attributes of each panel and arrangements of graphical elements are learned and inferred from data. During the inference stage, an MAP inference framework is employed to incorporate some design principles. In order to bridge the gap between panel attributes and the composition within each panel, we also propose a recursive page splitting algorithm to generate the panel layout for a poster. To learn and validate our model, we collect and release a new benchmark dataset, called NJU-Fudan Paper-Poster dataset, which consists of scientific papers and corresponding posters with exhaustively labelled panels and attributes. Qualitative and quantitative results indicate the effectiveness of our approach.
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    Bias is a common problem in today's media, appearing frequently in text and in visual imagery. Users on social media websites such as Twitter need better methods for identifying bias. Additionally, activists --those who are motivated to effect change related to some topic, need better methods to identify and counteract bias that is contrary to their mission. With both of these use cases in mind, in this paper we propose a novel tool called UnbiasedCrowd that supports identification of, and action on bias in visual news media. In particular, it addresses the following key challenges (1) identification of bias; (2) aggregation and presentation of evidence to users; (3) enabling activists to inform the public of bias and take action by engaging people in conversation with bots. We describe a preliminary study on the Twitter platform that explores the impressions that activists had of our tool, and how people reacted and engaged with online bots that exposed visual bias. We conclude by discussing design and implication of our findings for creating future systems to identify and counteract the effects of news bias.
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    Successful analysis of player skills in video games has important impacts on the process of enhancing player experience without undermining their continuous skill development. Moreover, player skill analysis becomes more intriguing in team-based video games because such form of study can help discover useful factors in effective team formation. In this paper, we consider the problem of skill decomposition in MOBA (MultiPlayer Online Battle Arena) games, with the goal to understand what player skill factors are essential for the outcome of a game match. To understand the construct of MOBA player skills, we utilize various skill-based predictive models to decompose player skills into interpretative parts, the impact of which are assessed in statistical terms. We apply this analysis approach on two widely known MOBAs, namely League of Legends (LoL) and Defense of the Ancients 2 (DOTA2). The finding is that base skills of in-game avatars, base skills of players, and players' champion-specific skills are three prominent skill components influencing LoL's match outcomes, while those of DOTA2 are mainly impacted by in-game avatars' base skills but not much by the other two.
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    Recognizing human activities in a sequence is a challenging area of research in ubiquitous computing. Most approaches use a fixed size sliding window over consecutive samples to extract features---either handcrafted or learned features---and predict a single label for all samples in the window. Two key problems emanate from this approach: i) the samples in one window may not always share the same label. Consequently, using one label for all samples within a window inevitably lead to loss of information; ii) the testing phase is constrained by the window size selected during training while the best window size is difficult to tune in practice. We propose an efficient algorithm that can predict the label of each sample, which we call dense labeling, in a sequence of human activities of arbitrary length using a fully convolutional network. In particular, our approach overcomes the problems posed by the sliding window step. Additionally, our algorithm learns both the features and classifier automatically. We release a new daily activity dataset based on a wearable sensor with hospitalized patients. We conduct extensive experiments and demonstrate that our proposed approach is able to outperform the state-of-the-arts in terms of classification and label misalignment measures on three challenging datasets: Opportunity, Hand Gesture, and our new dataset.
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    Social media and user-generated content (UGC) are increasingly important features of journalistic work in a number of different ways. However, their use presents major challenges, not least because information posted on social media is not always reliable and therefore its veracity needs to be checked before it can be considered as fit for use in the reporting of news. We report on the results of a series of in-depth ethnographic studies of journalist work practices undertaken as part of the requirements gathering for a prototype of a social media verification 'dashboard' and its subsequent evaluation. We conclude with some reflections upon the broader implications of our findings for the design of tools to support journalistic work.
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    Identification of intended movement type and movement phase of hand grasp shaping are critical features for the control of volitional neuroprosthetics. We demonstrate that neural dynamics during visually-guided imagined grasp shaping can encode intended movement. We apply Procrustes analysis and LASSO regression to achieve 72% accuracy (chance = 25%) in distinguishing between visually-guided imagined grasp trajectories. Further, we can predict the stage of grasp shaping in the form of elapsed time from start of trial (R2=0.4). Our approach contributes to more accurate single-trial decoding of higher-level movement goals and the phase of grasping movements in individuals not trained with brain-computer interfaces. We also find that the overall time-varying trajectory structure of imagined movements tend to be consistent within individuals, and that transient trajectory deviations within trials return to the task-dependent trajectory mean. These overall findings may contribute to the further understanding of the cortical dynamics of human motor imagery.
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    Live interactions have the potential to meaningfully engage audiences during musical performances, and modern technologies promise unique ways to facilitate these interactions. This work presents findings from three co-design sessions with children that investigated how audiences might want to interact with live music performances, including design considerations and opportunities. Findings from these sessions also formed a Spectrum of Audience Interactivity in live musical performances, outlining ways to encourage interactivity in music performances from the child perspective.

Recent comments

phaeladr Nov 14 2016 11:03 UTC

[magic mirrors][1] really?

[1]: http://buchderFarben.de