Human-Computer Interaction (cs.HC)

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    Although chatbots have been very popular in recent years, they still have some serious weaknesses which limit the scope of their applications. One major weakness is that they cannot learn new knowledge during the conversation process, i.e., their knowledge is fixed beforehand and cannot be expanded or updated during conversation. In this paper, we propose to build a general knowledge learning engine for chatbots to enable them to continuously and interactively learn new knowledge during conversations. As time goes by, they become more and more knowledgeable and better and better at learning and conversation. We model the task as an open-world knowledge base completion problem and propose a novel technique called lifelong interactive learning and inference (LiLi) to solve it. LiLi works by imitating how humans acquire knowledge and perform inference during an interactive conversation. Our experimental results show LiLi is highly promising.
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    Latest research revealed a considerable lack of reliability within user feedback and discussed striking impacts for the assessment of adaptive web systems and content personalisation approaches, e.g. ranking errors, systematic biases to accuracy metrics as well as its natural offset (the magic barrier). In order to perform holistic assessments and to improve web systems, a variety of strategies have been proposed to deal with this so-called human uncertainty. In this contribution we discuss the most relevant strategies to handle uncertain feedback and demonstrate that these approaches are more or less ineffective to fulfil their objectives. In doing so, we consider human uncertainty within a purely probabilistic framework and utilise hypothesis testing as well as a generalisation of the magic barrier to compare the effects of recently proposed algorithms. On this basis we recommend a novel strategy of acceptance which turns away from mere filtering and discuss potential benefits for the community of the WWW.
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    In this paper we consider the neuroscientific theory of the Bayesian brain in the light of adaptive web systems and content personalisation. In particular, we elaborate on neural mechanisms of human decision-making and the origin of lacking reliability of user feedback, often denoted as noise or human uncertainty. To this end, we first introduce an adaptive model of cognitive agency in which populations of neurons provide an estimation for states of the world. Subsequently, we present various so-called decoder functions with which neuronal activity can be translated into quantitative decisions. The interplay of the underlying cognition model and the chosen decoder function leads to different model-based properties of decision processes. The goal of this paper is to promote novel user models and exploit them to naturally associate users to different clusters on the basis of their individual neural characteristics and thinking patterns. These user models might be able to turn the variability of user behaviour into additional information for improving web personalisation and its experience.
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    Mixed reality (MR) technology is now gaining ground due to advances in computer vision, sensor fusion, and realistic display technologies. With most of the research and development focused on delivering the promise of MR, there is only barely a few working on the privacy and security implications of this technology. This survey paper aims to put in to light these risks, and to look into the latest security and privacy work on MR. Specifically, we list and review the different protection approaches that have been proposed to ensure user and data security and privacy in MR. We extend the scope to include work on related technologies such as augmented reality (AR), virtual reality (VR), and human-computer interaction (HCI) as crucial components, if not the origins, of MR, as well as a number of work from the larger area of mobile devices, wearables, and Internet-of-Things (IoT). We highlight the lack of investigation, implementation, and evaluation of data protection approaches in MR. Further challenges and directions on MR security and privacy are also discussed.
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    Traditionally, there have been few options for navigational aids for the blind and visually impaired (BVI) in large indoor spaces. Some recent indoor navigation systems allow users equipped with smartphones to interact with low cost Bluetoothbased beacons deployed strategically within the indoor space of interest to navigate their surroundings. A major challenge in deploying such beacon-based navigation systems is the need to employ a time and labor-expensive beacon planning process to identify potential beacon placement locations and arrive at a topological structure representing the indoor space. This work presents a technique called IBeaconMap for creating such topological structures to use with beacon-based navigation that only needs the floor plans of the indoor spaces of interest. IBeaconMap employs a combination of computer vision and machine learning techniques to arrive at the required set of beacon locations and a weighted connectivity graph (with directional orientations) for subsequent navigational needs. Evaluations show IBeaconMap to be both fast and reasonably accurate, potentially proving to be an essential tool to be utilized before mass deployments of beacon-based indoor wayfinding systems of the future.

Recent comments

phaeladr Nov 14 2016 11:03 UTC

[magic mirrors][1] really?

[1]: http://buchderFarben.de