Human-Computer Interaction (cs.HC)

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    Articulated hand pose estimation is a challenging task for human-computer interaction. The state-of-the-art hand pose estimation algorithms work only with one or a few subjects for which they have been calibrated or trained. Particularly, the hybrid methods based on learning followed by model fitting or model based deep learning do not explicitly consider varying hand shapes and sizes. In this work, we introduce a novel hybrid algorithm for estimating the 3D hand pose as well as bone-lengths of the hand skeleton at the same time, from a single depth image. The proposed CNN architecture learns hand pose parameters and scale parameters associated with the bone-lengths simultaneously. Subsequently, a new hybrid forward kinematics layer employs both parameters to estimate 3D joint positions of the hand. For end-to-end training, we combine three public datasets NYU, ICVL and MSRA-2015 in one unified format to achieve large variation in hand shapes and sizes. Among hybrid methods, our method shows improved accuracy over the state-of-the-art on the combined dataset and the ICVL dataset that contain multiple subjects. Also, our algorithm is demonstrated to work well with unseen images.
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    We use the term borg to refer to the complex organizations composed of people, machines, and processes with which users frequently interact using computer interfaces and websites. Unlike interfaces to pure machines, we contend that borg-human interaction (BHI) happens in a context combining the anthropomorphization of the interface, conflict with users, and dramatization of the interaction process. We believe this context requires designers to construct the human facet of the borg, a structure encompassing the borg's personality, social behavior, and embodied actions; and the strategies to co-create dramatic narratives with the user. To design the human facet of a borg, different concepts and models are explored and discussed, borrowing ideas from psychology, sociology, and arts. Based on those foundations, we propose six design methodologies to complement traditional computer-human interface design techniques, including play-and-freeze enactment of conflicts and the use of giant puppets as interface prototypes.
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    This paper presents the design, development, methodology, and the results of a pilot study on using an intelligent, emotive and perceptive social robot (aka Companionbot) for improving the quality of life of elderly people with dementia and/or depression. Ryan Companionbot prototyped in this project, is a rear-projected life-like conversational robot. Ryan is equipped with features that can (1) interpret and respond to users' emotions through facial expressions and spoken language, (2) proactively engage in conversations with users, and (3) remind them about their daily life schedules (e.g. taking their medicine on time). Ryan engages users in cognitive games and reminiscence activities. We conducted a pilot study with six elderly individuals with moderate dementia and/or depression living in a senior living facility in Denver. Each individual had 24/7 access to a Ryan in his/her room for a period of 4-6 weeks. Our observations of these individuals, interviews with them and their caregivers, and analyses of their interactions during this period revealed that they established rapport with the robot and greatly valued and enjoyed having a Companionbot in their room.
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    Cybersecurity games are an attractive and popular method of active learning. However, the majority of current games are created for advanced players, which often leads to frustration in less experienced learners. Therefore, we decided to focus on a diagnostic assessment of participants entering the games. We assume that information about the players' knowledge, skills, and experience enables tutors or learning environments to suitably assist participants with game challenges and maximize learning in their virtual adventure. In this paper, we present a pioneering experiment examining the predictive value of a short quiz and self-assessment for identifying learners' readiness before playing a cybersecurity game. We hypothesized that these predictors would model players' performance. A linear regression analysis showed that the game performance can be accurately predicted by well-designed prerequisite testing, but not by self-assessment. At the same time, we identified major challenges related to the design of pretests for cybersecurity games: calibrating test questions with respect to the skills relevant for the game, minimizing the quiz's length while maximizing its informative value, and embedding the pretest in the game. Our results are relevant for educational researchers and cybersecurity instructors of students at all learning levels.
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    Gift giving is a ubiquitous social phenomenon, and red packets have been used as monetary gifts in Asian countries for thousands of years. In recent years, online red packets have become widespread in China through the WeChat platform. Exploiting a unique dataset consisting of 61 million group red packets and seven million users, we conduct a large-scale, data-driven study to understand the spread of red packets and the effect of red packets on group activity. We find that the cash flows between provinces are largely consistent with provincial GDP rankings, e.g., red packets are sent from users in the south to those in the north. By distinguishing spontaneous from reciprocal red packets, we reveal the behavioral patterns in sending red packets: males, seniors, and people with more in-group friends are more inclined to spontaneously send red packets, while red packets from females, youths, and people with less in-group friends are more reciprocal. Furthermore, we use propensity score matching to study the external effects of red packets on group dynamics. We show that red packets increase group participation and strengthen in-group relationships, which partly explain the benefits and motivations for sending red packets.

Recent comments

phaeladr Nov 14 2016 11:03 UTC

[magic mirrors][1] really?

[1]: http://buchderFarben.de