Computer Science and Game Theory (cs.GT)

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    We analyse the Tangle --- a DAG-valued stochastic process where new vertices get attached to the graph at Poissonian times, and the attachment's locations are chosen by means of random walks on that graph. We prove existence of ("almost symmetric") Nash equilibria for the system where a part of players tries to optimize their attachment strategies. Then, we also present simulations that show that the "selfish" players will nevertheless cooperate with the network by choosing attachment strategies that are similar to the default one.
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    We cast the problem of combinatorial auction design in a Bayesian framework in order to incorporate prior information into the auction process and minimize the number of rounds to convergence. We first develop a generative model of agent valuations and market prices such that clearing prices become maximum a posteriori estimates given observed agent valuations. This generative model then forms the basis of an auction process which alternates between refining estimates of agent valuations and computing candidate clearing prices. We provide an implementation of the auction using assumed density filtering to estimate valuations and expectation maximization to compute prices. An empirical evaluation over a range of valuation domains demonstrates that our Bayesian auction mechanism is highly competitive against the combinatorial clock auction in terms of rounds to convergence, even under the most favorable choices of price increment for this baseline.
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    Two-player games have had a long and fruitful history of applications stretching across the social, biological, and physical sciences. Most applications of two-player games assume synchronous decisions or moves even when the games are iterated. But different strategies may emerge as preferred when the decisions or moves are sequential, or the games are iterated. Zero-determinant strategies developed by Press and Dyson are a new class of strategies that have been developed for synchronous two-player games, most notably the iterated prisoner's dilemma. Here we apply the Press-Dyson analysis to sequential or asynchronous two-player games. We focus on the asynchronous prisoner's dilemma. As a first application of the Press-Dyson analysis of the asynchronous prisoner's dilemma, tit-for-tat is shown to be an efficient defense against extortionate zero-determinant strategies. Nice strategies like tit-for-tat are also shown to lead to Pareto optimal payoffs for both players in repeated prisoner's dilemma.

Recent comments

Māris Ozols Oct 21 2016 21:06 UTC

Very nice! Now we finally know how to fairly cut a cake in a finite number of steps! What is more, the number of steps is expected to go down from the whopping $n^{n^{n^{n^{n^n}}}}$ to just barely $n^{n^n}$. I can't wait to get my slice!

https://www.quantamagazine.org/20161006-new-algorithm-solve

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Piotr Migdał Apr 18 2014 18:43 UTC

A podcast summarizing this paper, by Geoff Engelstein: [The Dice Tower # 351 - Dealing with the Mockers (43:55 - 50:36)](http://dicetower.coolstuffinc.com/tdt-351-dealing-with-the-mockers), and [an alternative link on the BoardGameGeek](http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgamepodcastepisode/117163/tdt-351

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