Computer Science and Game Theory (cs.GT)

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    Individuals interact strategically with their network neighbors, as in effort investment with spillovers among peers, or production decisions among firms connected by a supply chain. A planner can shape their incentives in pursuit of some goal -- for instance, maximizing utilitarian welfare or minimizing the volatility of aggregate activity. We offer an approach to solving such intervention problems that exploits the singular value decomposition of network interaction matrices. The approach works by (i) describing the game in new coordinates given by the singular value decomposition of the network on which the game is played; and (ii) using that to deduce which components, and hence which individuals, a given type of intervention will focus on. Across a variety of intervention problems, simple orderings of the principal components characterize the planner's priorities.
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    Fog computing, which provides low-latency computing services at the network edge, is an enabler for the emerging Internet of Things (IoT) systems. In this paper, we study the allocation of fog computing resources to the IoT users in a hierarchical computing paradigm including fog and remote cloud computing services. We formulate a computation offloading game to model the competition between IoT users and allocate the limited processing power of fog nodes efficiently. Each user aims to maximize its own quality of experience (QoE), which reflects its satisfaction of using computing services in terms of the reduction in computation energy and delay. Utilizing a potential game approach, we prove the existence of a pure Nash equilibrium and provide an upper bound for the price of anarchy. Since the time complexity to reach the equilibrium increases exponentially in the number of users, we further propose a near-optimal resource allocation mechanism and prove that in a system with $N$ IoT users, it can achieve an $\epsilon$-Nash equilibrium in $O(N/\epsilon)$ time. Through numerical studies, we evaluate the users' QoE as well as the equilibrium efficiency. Our results reveal that by utilizing the proposed mechanism, more users benefit from computing services in comparison to an existing offloading mechanism. We further show that our proposed mechanism significantly reduces the computation delay and enables low-latency fog computing services for delay-sensitive IoT applications.

Recent comments

Māris Ozols Oct 21 2016 21:06 UTC

Very nice! Now we finally know how to fairly cut a cake in a finite number of steps! What is more, the number of steps is expected to go down from the whopping $n^{n^{n^{n^{n^n}}}}$ to just barely $n^{n^n}$. I can't wait to get my slice!

https://www.quantamagazine.org/20161006-new-algorithm-solve

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Piotr Migdał Apr 18 2014 18:43 UTC

A podcast summarizing this paper, by Geoff Engelstein: [The Dice Tower # 351 - Dealing with the Mockers (43:55 - 50:36)](http://dicetower.coolstuffinc.com/tdt-351-dealing-with-the-mockers), and [an alternative link on the BoardGameGeek](http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgamepodcastepisode/117163/tdt-351

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