Graphics (cs.GR)

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    Tracking the full skeletal pose of the hands and fingers is a challenging problem that has a plethora of applications for user interaction. Existing techniques either require wearable hardware, add restrictions to user pose, or require significant computation resources. This research explores a new approach to tracking hands, or any articulated model, by using an augmented rigid body simulation. This allows us to phrase 3D object tracking as a linear complementarity problem with a well-defined solution. Based on a depth sensor's samples, the system generates constraints that limit motion orthogonal to the rigid body model's surface. These constraints, along with prior motion, collision/contact constraints, and joint mechanics, are resolved with a projected Gauss-Seidel solver. Due to camera noise properties and attachment errors, the numerous surface constraints are impulse capped to avoid overpowering mechanical constraints. To improve tracking accuracy, multiple simulations are spawned at each frame and fed a variety of heuristics, constraints and poses. A 3D error metric selects the best-fit simulation, helping the system handle challenging hand motions. Such an approach enables real-time, robust, and accurate 3D skeletal tracking of a user's hand on a variety of depth cameras, while only utilizing a single x86 CPU core for processing.
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    This work presents an evaluation study using a force feedback evaluation framework for a novel direct needle force volume rendering concept in the context of liver puncture simulation. PTC/PTCD puncture interventions targeting the bile ducts have been selected to illustrate this concept. The haptic algorithms of the simulator system are based on (1) partially segmented patient image data and (2) a non-linear spring model effective at organ borders. The primary aim is to quantitatively evaluate force errors caused by our patient modeling approach, in comparison to haptic force output obtained from using gold-standard, completely manually-segmented data. The evaluation of the force algorithms compared to a force output from fully manually segmented gold-standard patient models, yields a low mean of 0.12 N root mean squared force error and up to 1.6 N for systematic maximum absolute errors. Force errors were evaluated on 31,222 preplanned test paths from 10 patients. Only twelve percent of the emitted forces along these paths were affected by errors. This is the first study evaluating haptic algorithms with deformable virtual patients in silico. We prove haptic rendering plausibility on a very high number of test paths. Important errors are below just noticeable differences for the hand-arm system.