Discrete Mathematics (cs.DM)

  • PDF
    Consider a graph $G=(V,E)$ and an initial random coloring where each vertex $v \in V$ is blue with probability $P_b$ and red otherwise, independently from all other vertices. In each round, all vertices simultaneously switch their color to the most frequent color in their neighborhood and in case of a tie, a vertex keeps its current color. The main goal of the present paper is to analyze the behavior of this basic and natural process on the random $d$-regular graph $\mathbb{G}_{n,d}$. It is shown that for all $\epsilon>0$, $P_b \le 1/2-\epsilon$ results in final complete occupancy by red in $\mathcal{O}(\log_d\log n)$ rounds with high probability, provided that $d\geq c/\epsilon^2$ for a suitable constant $c$. Furthermore, we show that with high probability, $\mathbb{G}_{n,d}$ is immune; i.e., the smallest dynamic monopoly is of linear size. A dynamic monopoly is a subset of vertices that can take over in the sense that a commonly chosen initial color eventually spreads throughout the whole graph, irrespective of the colors of other vertices. This answers an open question of Peleg.
  • PDF
    We introduce a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm which samples from the space of spanning trees of complete graphs using local rewiring operations only. The probability distribution of graphs of this kind is shown to depend on the symmetries of these graphs, which are reflected in the equilibrium distribution of the Markov chain. We prove that the algorithm is ergodic and proceed to estimate the probability distribution for small graph ensembles with exactly known probabilities. The autocorrelation time of the graph diameter demonstrates that the algorithm generates independent configurations efficiently as the system size increases. Finally, the mean graph diameter is estimated for spanning trees of sizes ranging over three orders of magnitude. The mean graph diameter results agree with theoretical asymptotic values.
  • PDF
    An important problem in phylogenetics is the construction of phylogenetic trees. One way to approach this problem, known as the supertree method, involves inferring a phylogenetic tree with leaves consisting of a set $X$ of species from a collection of trees, each having leaf-set some subset of $X$. In the 1980's characterizations, certain inference rules were given for when a collection of 4-leaved trees, one for each 4-element subset of $X$, can all be simultaneously displayed by a single supertree with leaf-set $X$. Recently, it has become of interest to extend such results to phylogenetic networks. These are a generalization of phylogenetic trees which can be used to represent reticulate evolution (where species can come together to form a new species). It has been shown that a certain type of phylogenetic network, called a level-1 network, can essentially be constructed from 4-leaved trees. However, the problem of providing appropriate inference rules for such networks remains unresolved. Here we show that by considering 4-leaved networks, called quarnets, as opposed to 4-leaved trees, it is possible to provide such rules. In particular, we show that these rules can be used to characterize when a collection of quarnets, one for each 4-element subset of $X$, can all be simultaneously displayed by a level-1 network with leaf-set $X$. The rules are an intriguing mixture of tree inference rules, and an inference rule for building up a cyclic ordering of $X$ from orderings on subsets of $X$ of size 4. This opens up several new directions of research for inferring phylogenetic networks from smaller ones, which could yield new algorithms for solving the supernetwork problem in phylogenetics.
  • PDF
    This paper introduces the order-theoretic concept of lattices along with the concept of consistent quantification where lattice elements are mapped to real numbers in such a way that preserves some aspect of the order-theoretic structure. Symmetries, such as associativity, constrain consistent quantification, and lead to a constraint equation known as the sum rule. Distributivity in distributive lattices also constrains consistent quantification and leads to a product rule. The sum and product rules, which are familiar from, but not unique to, probability theory, arise from the fact that logical statements form a distributive (Boolean) lattice, which exhibits the requisite symmetries.