Computers and Society (cs.CY)

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    In this paper we explore city-level traffic and parking data to determine how much cruising for curbside parking contributes to overall traffic congestion. To this end, we describe a new kind of queueing network and present a data-informed model based on this new queuing network. We leverage the data-informed model in developing and validating a simulation tool. In addition, we utilize curbside parking and arterial traffic volume data to produce an estimate of the proportion of traffic searching for parking along high occupancy arterials. Somewhat surprisingly, we find that while percentage increase in travel time to through traffic vehicles depends on time of day, it does not appear to depend on high volumes of through traffic. Moreover, we show that the probability of a block-face being full is a much more viable metric for directly controlling congestion than average occupancy rate, typically used by municipalities.
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    In order to obtain reliable accuracy estimates for automatic MOOC dropout predictors, it is important to train and test them in a manner consistent with how they will be used in practice. Yet most prior research on MOOC dropout prediction has measured test accuracy on the same course used for training the classifier, which can lead to overly optimistic accuracy estimates. In order to understand better how accuracy is affected by the training+testing regime, we compared the accuracy of a standard dropout prediction architecture (clickstream features + logistic regression) across 4 different training paradigms. Results suggest that (1) training and testing on the same course ("post-hoc") can overestimate accuracy by several percentage points; (2) dropout classifiers trained on proxy labels based on students' persistence are surprisingly competitive with post-hoc training (87.33% versus 90.20% AUC averaged over 8 weeks of 40 HarvardX MOOCs); and (3) classifier performance does not vary significantly with the academic discipline. Finally, we also research new dropout prediction architectures based on deep, fully-connected, feed-forward neural networks and find that (4) networks with as many as 5 hidden layers can statistically significantly increase test accuracy over that of logistic regression.
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    Our century has unprecedented new challenges, which need creative solutions and deep thinking. Contemplative, deep thinking became an "endangered species" in our rushing world of Tweets, elevator pitches and fast decisions. Here we describe that important aspects of both creativity and deep thinking can be understood as network phenomena of conceptual and social networks. "Creative nodes" occupy highly dynamic, boundary spanning positions in social networks. Creative thinking requires alternating plasticity-dominated and rigidity-dominated mindsets, which can be helped by dynamically changing social network structures. In the closing section we present three case studies which demonstrate the applications of the concept in the Hungarian research student movement, the Hungarian Templeton Program and the Youth Platform of the European Talent Support Network. These examples show how talent support programs can mobilize the power of social networks to enhance creative, deliberative, deep thinking of talented young minds, influencing social opinion, leading to community action, and developing charismatic leadership skills.
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    Food is an integral part of our life and what and how much we eat crucially affects our health. Our food choices largely depend on how we perceive certain characteristics of food, such as whether it is healthy, delicious or if it qualifies as a salad. But these perceptions differ from person to person and one person's "single lettuce leaf" might be another person's "side salad". Studying how food is perceived in relation to what it actually is typically involves a laboratory setup. Here we propose to use recent advances in image recognition to tackle this problem. Concretely, we use data for 1.9 million images from Instagram from the US to look at systematic differences in how a machine would objectively label an image compared to how a human subjectively does. We show that this difference, which we call the "perception gap", relates to a number of health outcomes observed at the county level. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that image recognition is being used to study the "misalignment" of how people describe food images vs. what they actually depict.
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    Human mobility data has been ubiquitously collected through cellular networks and mobile applications, and publicly released for academic research and commercial purposes for the last decade. Since releasing individual's mobility records usually gives rise to privacy issues, datasets owners tend to only publish aggregated mobility data, such as the number of users covered by a cellular tower at a specific timestamp, which is believed to be sufficient for preserving users' privacy. However, in this paper, we argue and prove that even publishing aggregated mobility data could lead to privacy breach in individuals' trajectories. We develop an attack system that is able to exploit the uniqueness and regularity of human mobility to recover individual's trajectories from the aggregated mobility data without any prior knowledge. By conducting experiments on two real-world datasets collected from both mobile application and cellular network, we reveal that the attack system is able to recover users' trajectories with accuracy about 73%~91% at the scale of tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands users, which indicates severe privacy leakage in such datasets. Through the investigation on aggregated mobility data, our work recognizes a novel privacy problem in publishing statistic data, which appeals for immediate attentions from both academy and industry.
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    In this work, we have designed and implemented, based on traditional board games such as the game of the Goose or Parchis, an educational software that aim to reinforce the learning of children. The idea that we are going to develop to do this is very simple: the children play with the same rules as in the traditional game but we add the functionality that after throwing the dice the system asks a question randomly chosen from a predefined database that can be easily modified, and the game piece only moves in the case the question is answered correctly.

Recent comments

Noon van der Silk Jan 27 2016 03:39 UTC

Great institute name ...

Piotr Migdał Jun 07 2014 09:08 UTC

[Carl Linnaeus](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Linnaeus) appears to benefit a lot from this particular algorithm (and perhaps any other taking all links with the same value). Just look at [inbound links](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:WhatLinksHere/Carl_Linnaeus) - vast majority of them ref

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