Computers and Society (cs.CY)

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    As online shopping becomes ever more prevalent, customers rely increasingly on product rating websites for making purchase decisions. The reliability of online ratings, however, is potentially compromised by the so-called herding effect: when rating a product, customers may be biased to follow other customers' previous ratings of the same product. This is problematic because it skews long-term customer perception through haphazard early ratings. The study of herding poses methodological challenges. Observational studies are impeded by the lack of counterfactuals: simply correlating early with subsequent ratings is insufficient because we cannot know what the subsequent ratings would have looked like had the first ratings been different. The methodology introduced here exploits a setting that comes close to an experiment, although it is purely observational-a natural experiment. Our key methodological device consists in studying the same product on two separate rating sites, focusing on products that received a high first rating on one site, and a low first rating on the other. This largely controls for confounds such as a product's inherent quality, advertising, and producer identity, and lets us isolate the effect of the first rating on subsequent ratings. In a case study, we focus on beers as products and jointly study two beer rating sites, but our method applies to any pair of sites across which products can be matched. We find clear evidence of herding in beer ratings. For instance, if a beer receives a very high first rating, its second rating is on average half a standard deviation higher, compared to a situation where the identical beer receives a very low first rating. Moreover, herding effects tend to last a long time and are noticeable even after 20 or more ratings. Our results have important implications for the design of better rating systems.
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    Rapid developments in hardware, software, and communication technologies have allowed the emergence of Internet-connected sensory devices that provide observation and data measurement from the physical world. By 2020, it is estimated that the total number of Internet-connected devices being used will be between 25 and 50 billion. As the numbers grow and technologies become more mature, the volume of data published will increase. Internet-connected devices technology, referred to as Internet of Things (IoT), continues to extend the current Internet by providing connectivity and interaction between the physical and cyber worlds. In addition to increased volume, the IoT generates Big Data characterized by velocity in terms of time and location dependency, with a variety of multiple modalities and varying data quality. Intelligent processing and analysis of this Big Data is the key to developing smart IoT applications. This article assesses the different machine learning methods that deal with the challenges in IoT data by considering smart cities as the main use case. The key contribution of this study is presentation of a taxonomy of machine learning algorithms explaining how different techniques are applied to the data in order to extract higher level information. The potential and challenges of machine learning for IoT data analytics will also be discussed. A use case of applying Support Vector Machine (SVM) on Aarhus Smart City traffic data is presented for a more detailed exploration.
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    Social media, as a major platform for communication and information exchange, is a rich repository of the opinions and sentiments of 2.3 billion users about a vast spectrum of topics. To sense the whys of certain social user's demands and cultural-driven interests, however, the knowledge embedded in the 1.8 billion pictures which are uploaded daily in public profiles has just started to be exploited since this process has been typically been text-based. Following this trend on visual-based social analysis, we present a novel methodology based on Deep Learning to build a combined image-and-text based personality trait model, trained with images posted together with words found highly correlated to specific personality traits. So the key contribution here is to explore whether OCEAN personality trait modeling can be addressed based on images, here called \emphMindPics, appearing with certain tags with psychological insights. We found that there is a correlation between those posted images and their accompanying texts, which can be successfully modeled using deep neural networks for personality estimation. The experimental results are consistent with previous cyber-psychology results based on texts or images. In addition, classification results on some traits show that some patterns emerge in the set of images corresponding to a specific text, in essence to those representing an abstract concept. These results open new avenues of research for further refining the proposed personality model under the supervision of psychology experts.

Recent comments

Noon van der Silk Jan 27 2016 03:39 UTC

Great institute name ...

Piotr Migdał Jun 07 2014 09:08 UTC

[Carl Linnaeus](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Linnaeus) appears to benefit a lot from this particular algorithm (and perhaps any other taking all links with the same value). Just look at [inbound links](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:WhatLinksHere/Carl_Linnaeus) - vast majority of them ref

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