Computation and Language (cs.CL)

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    In visual question answering (VQA), an algorithm must answer text-based questions about images. While multiple datasets for VQA have been created since late 2014, they all have flaws in both their content and the way algorithms are evaluated on them. As a result, evaluation scores are inflated and predominantly determined by answering easier questions, making it difficult to compare different methods. In this paper, we analyze existing VQA algorithms using a new dataset. It contains over 1.6 million questions organized into 12 different categories. We also introduce questions that are meaningless for a given image to force a VQA system to reason about image content. We propose new evaluation schemes that compensate for over-represented question-types and make it easier to study the strengths and weaknesses of algorithms. We analyze the performance of both baseline and state-of-the-art VQA models, including multi-modal compact bilinear pooling (MCB), neural module networks, and recurrent answering units. Our experiments establish how attention helps certain categories more than others, determine which models work better than others, and explain how simple models (e.g. MLP) can surpass more complex models (MCB) by simply learning to answer large, easy question categories.
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    While humor has been historically studied from a psychological, cognitive and linguistic standpoint, its study from a computational perspective is an area yet to be explored in Computational Linguistics. There exist some previous works, but a characterization of humor that allows its automatic recognition and generation is far from being specified. In this work we build a crowdsourced corpus of labeled tweets, annotated according to its humor value, letting the annotators subjectively decide which are humorous. A humor classifier for Spanish tweets is assembled based on supervised learning, reaching a precision of 84% and a recall of 69%.
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    We describe a prototype dialogue response generation model for the customer service domain at Amazon. The model, which is trained in a weakly supervised fashion, measures the similarity between customer questions and agent answers using a dual encoder network, a Siamese-like neural network architecture. Answer templates are extracted from embeddings derived from past agent answers, without turn-by-turn annotations. Responses to customer inquiries are generated by selecting the best template from the final set of templates. We show that, in a closed domain like customer service, the selected templates cover $>$70\% of past customer inquiries. Furthermore, the relevance of the model-selected templates is significantly higher than templates selected by a standard tf-idf baseline.
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    The use of alluring headlines (clickbait) to tempt the readers has become a growing practice nowadays. For the sake of existence in the highly competitive media industry, most of the on-line media including the mainstream ones, have started following this practice. Although the wide-spread practice of clickbait makes the reader's reliability on media vulnerable, a large scale analysis to reveal this fact is still absent. In this paper, we analyze 1.67 million Facebook posts created by 153 media organizations to understand the extent of clickbait practice, its impact and user engagement by using our own developed clickbait detection model. The model uses distributed sub-word embeddings learned from a large corpus. The accuracy of the model is 98.3%. Powered with this model, we further study the distribution of topics in clickbait and non-clickbait contents.
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    The problem of fake news has gained a lot of attention as it is claimed to have had a significant impact on 2016 US Presidential Elections. Fake news is not a new problem and its spread in social networks is well-studied. Often an underlying assumption in fake news discussion is that it is written to look like real news, fooling the reader who does not check for reliability of the sources or the arguments in its content. Through a unique study of three data sets and features that capture the style and the language of articles, we show that this assumption is not true. Fake news in most cases is more similar to satire than to real news, leading us to conclude that persuasion in fake news is achieved through heuristics rather than the strength of arguments. We show overall title structure and the use of proper nouns in titles are very significant in differentiating fake from real. This leads us to conclude that fake news is targeted for audiences who are not likely to read beyond titles and is aimed at creating mental associations between entities and claims.
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    The package cleanNLP provides a set of fast tools for converting a textual corpus into a set of normalized tables. The underlying natural language processing pipeline utilizes Stanford's CoreNLP library, exposing a number of annotation tasks for text written in English, French, German, and Spanish. Annotators include tokenization, part of speech tagging, named entity recognition, entity linking, sentiment analysis, dependency parsing, coreference resolution, and information extraction.

Recent comments

Noon van der Silk Jul 13 2015 10:44 UTC

There's some code for this here: https://github.com/ryankiros/skip-thoughts

anti-plagiarism Jul 09 2015 15:11 UTC

This paper "**Tree-based convolution for sentence modeling**" is a deliberate plagiarism. The texts, models and ideas overlap significantly with previous work on arXiv.

- TBCNN: A **Tree-based Convolutional** Neural Network for Programming
Language Processing (arXiv:1409.5718)
- **Tree-based

...(continued)
lucy.vanderwende May 07 2015 16:13 UTC

The authors will want to look at work that Simone Teufel has done, in particular her Argumentative Zoning, which discusses the stance that the paper author takes with respect to the citations in that paper.