Computational Geometry (cs.CG)

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    We are developing a rule-based implementation of a tool to analyse and generate graphs. It is currently used in the domain of mason's marks. For thousands of years, stonemasons have been inscribing these symbolic signs on dressed stone. Geometrically, mason's marks are line drawings. They consist of a pattern of straight lines, sometimes circles and arcs. We represent mason's marks by connected planar graphs. Our prototype tool for analysis and generation of graphs is written in the rule-based declarative language Constraint Handling Rules. It features - a vertex-centric logical graph representation as constraints, - derivation of properties and statistics from graphs, - recognition of (sub)graphs and patterns in a graph, - automatic generation of graphs from given constrained subgraphs, - drawing graphs by visualization using svg graphics. In particular, we started to use the tool to classify and to invent mason's marks. In principe, our tool can be applied to any problem domain that admits a modeling as graphs.
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    In this work, we present a collection of new results on two fundamental problems in geometric data structures: orthogonal point location and rectangle stabbing. -We give the first linear-space data structure that supports 3-d point location queries on $n$ disjoint axis-aligned boxes with optimal $O\left( \log n\right)$ query time in the (arithmetic) pointer machine model. This improves the previous $O\left( \log^{3/2} n \right)$ bound of Rahul [SODA 2015]. We similarly obtain the first linear-space data structure in the I/O model with optimal query cost, and also the first linear-space data structure in the word RAM model with sub-logarithmic query time. -We give the first linear-space data structure that supports 3-d $4$-sided and $5$-sided rectangle stabbing queries in optimal $O(\log_wn+k)$ time in the word RAM model. We similarly obtain the first optimal data structure for the closely related problem of 2-d top-$k$ rectangle stabbing in the word RAM model, and also improved results for 3-d 6-sided rectangle stabbing. For point location, our solution is simpler than previous methods, and is based on an interesting variant of the van Emde Boas recursion, applied in a round-robin fashion over the dimensions, combined with bit-packing techniques. For rectangle stabbing, our solution is a variant of Alstrup, Brodal, and Rauhe's grid-based recursive technique (FOCS 2000), combined with a number of new ideas.
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    Persistence diagrams (PDs) are now routinely used to summarize the underlying topology of sophisticated data encountered in challenging learning problems. Despite several appealing properties, integrating PDs in learning pipelines can be challenging because their natural geometry is not Hilbertian. In particular, algorithms to average a family of PDs have only been considered recently and are known to be computationally prohibitive. We propose in this article a tractable framework to carry out fundamental tasks on PDs, namely evaluating distances, computing barycenters and carrying out clustering. This framework builds upon a formulation of PD metrics as optimal transport (OT) problems, for which recent computational advances, in particular entropic regularization and its convolutional formulation on regular grids, can all be leveraged to provide efficient and (GPU) scalable computations. We demonstrate the efficiency of our approach by carrying out clustering on PDs at scales never seen before in the literature.