Computational Geometry (cs.CG)

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    Edge bundling is an important concept, heavily used for graph visualization purposes. To enable the comparison with other established nearly-planarity models in graph drawing, we formulate a new edge-bundling model which is inspired by the recently introduced fan-planar graphs. In particular, we restrict the bundling to the endsegments of the edges. As in 1-planarity, we call our model 1-fan-bundle-planarity, as we allow at most one crossing per bundle. For the two variants where we allow either one or, more naturally, both endsegments of each edge to be part of bundles, we present edge density results and consider various recognition questions, not only for general graphs, but also for the outer and 2-layer variants. We conclude with a series of challenging questions.
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    Airborne laser scanning (lidar) point clouds can be process to extract tree-level information over large forested landscapes. Existing procedures typically detect more than 90% of overstory trees, yet they barely detect 60% of understory trees because of reduced number of lidar points penetrating the top canopy layer. Although understory trees provide limited financial value, they offer habitat for numerous wildlife species and are important for stand development. Here we model tree identification accuracy according to point cloud density by decomposing lidar point cloud into overstory and multiple understory canopy layers, estimating the fraction of points representing the different layers, and inspecting tree identification accuracy as a function of point density. We show at a density of about 170 pt/m2 understory tree identification accuracy likely plateaus, which we regard as the required point density for reasonable identification of understory trees. Given the advancements of lidar sensor technology, point clouds can feasibly reach the required density to enable effective identification of individual understory trees, ultimately making remote quantification of forest resources more accurate. The layer decomposition methodology can also be adopted for other similar remote sensing or advanced imaging applications such as geological subsurface modelling or biomedical tissue analysis.