Artificial Intelligence (cs.AI)

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    This paper presents a statistical method for music transcription that can estimate score times of note onsets and offsets from polyphonic MIDI performance signals. Because performed note durations can deviate largely from score-indicated values, previous methods had the problem of not being able to accurately estimate offset score times (or note values) and thus could only output incomplete musical scores. Based on observations that the pitch context and onset score times are influential on the configuration of note values, we construct a context-tree model that provides prior distributions of note values using these features and combine it with a performance model in the framework of Markov random fields. Evaluation results showed that our method reduces the average error rate by around 40 percent compared to existing/simple methods. We also confirmed that, in our model, the score model plays a more important role than the performance model, and it automatically captures the voice structure by unsupervised learning.
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    Recently, research on accelerated stochastic gradient descent methods (e.g., SVRG) has made exciting progress (e.g., linear convergence for strongly convex problems). However, the best-known methods (e.g., Katyusha) requires at least two auxiliary variables and two momentum parameters. In this paper, we propose a fast stochastic variance reduction gradient (FSVRG) method, in which we design a novel update rule with the Nesterov's momentum and incorporate the technique of growing epoch size. FSVRG has only one auxiliary variable and one momentum weight, and thus it is much simpler and has much lower per-iteration complexity. We prove that FSVRG achieves linear convergence for strongly convex problems and the optimal $\mathcal{O}(1/T^2)$ convergence rate for non-strongly convex problems, where $T$ is the number of outer-iterations. We also extend FSVRG to directly solve the problems with non-smooth component functions, such as SVM. Finally, we empirically study the performance of FSVRG for solving various machine learning problems such as logistic regression, ridge regression, Lasso and SVM. Our results show that FSVRG outperforms the state-of-the-art stochastic methods, including Katyusha.
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    When using reinforcement learning (RL) algorithms to evaluate a policy it is common, given a large state space, to introduce some form of approximation architecture for the value function (VF). The exact form of this architecture can have a significant effect on the accuracy of the VF estimate, however, and determining a suitable approximation architecture can often be a highly complex task. Consequently there is a large amount of interest in the potential for allowing RL algorithms to adaptively generate (i.e. to learn) approximation architectures. We investigate a method of adapting approximation architectures which uses feedback regarding the frequency with which an agent has visited certain states to guide which areas of the state space to approximate with greater detail. We introduce an algorithm based upon this idea which adapts a state aggregation approximation architecture on-line. Assuming $S$ states, we demonstrate theoretically that - provided the following relatively non-restrictive assumptions are satisfied: (a) the number of cells $X$ in the state aggregation architecture is of order $\sqrt{S}\ln{S}\log_2{S}$ or greater, (b) the policy and transition function are close to deterministic, and (c) the prior for the transition function is uniformly distributed - our algorithm can guarantee, assuming we use an appropriate scoring function to measure VF error, error which is arbitrarily close to zero as $S$ becomes large. It is able to do this despite having only $O(X\log_2{S})$ space complexity (and negligible time complexity). We conclude by generating a set of empirical results which support the theoretical results.
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    Diversification-Based Learning (DBL) derives from a collection of principles and methods introduced in the field of metaheuristics that have broad applications in computing and optimization. We show that the DBL framework goes significantly beyond that of the more recent Opposition-based learning (OBL) framework introduced in Tizhoosh (2005), which has become the focus of numerous research initiatives in machine learning and metaheuristic optimization. We unify and extend earlier proposals in metaheuristic search (Glover, 1997, Glover and Laguna, 1997) to give a collection of approaches that are more flexible and comprehensive than OBL for creating intensification and diversification strategies in metaheuristic search. We also describe potential applications of DBL to various subfields of machine learning and optimization.
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    Convolutional Neural Networks have been a subject of great importance over the past decade and great strides have been made in their utility for producing state of the art performance in many computer vision problems. However, the behavior of deep networks is yet to be fully understood and is still an active area of research. In this work, we present an intriguing behavior: pre-trained CNNs can be made to improve their predictions by structurally perturbing the input. We observe that these perturbations - referred as Guided Perturbations - enable a trained network to improve its prediction performance without any learning or change in network weights. We perform various ablative experiments to understand how these perturbations affect the local context and feature representations. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this idea can improve performance of several existing approaches on semantic segmentation and scene labeling tasks on the PASCAL VOC dataset and supervised classification tasks on MNIST and CIFAR10 datasets.
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    We propose a supervised algorithm for generating type embeddings in the same semantic vector space as a given set of entity embeddings. The algorithm is agnostic to the derivation of the underlying entity embeddings. It does not require any manual feature engineering, generalizes well to hundreds of types and achieves near-linear scaling on Big Graphs containing many millions of triples and instances by virtue of an incremental execution. We demonstrate the utility of the embeddings on a type recommendation task, outperforming a non-parametric feature-agnostic baseline while achieving 15x speedup and near-constant memory usage on a full partition of DBpedia. Using state-of-the-art visualization, we illustrate the agreement of our extensionally derived DBpedia type embeddings with the manually curated domain ontology. Finally, we use the embeddings to probabilistically cluster about 4 million DBpedia instances into 415 types in the DBpedia ontology.
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    Knowledge bases of real-world facts about entities and their relationships are useful resources for a variety of natural language processing tasks. However, because knowledge bases are typically incomplete, it is useful to be able to perform knowledge base completion, i.e., predict whether a relationship not in the knowledge base is likely to be true. This article presents an overview of embedding models of entities and relationships for knowledge base completion, with up-to-date experimental results on two standard evaluation tasks of link prediction (i.e. entity prediction) and triple classification.
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    This thesis is in the area called computational social choice which is an intersection area of algorithms and social choice theory.
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    Many efforts have been dedicated to identifying restrictions on ontologies expressed as tuple-generating dependencies (tgds), a.k.a. existential rules, that lead to the decidability for the problem of answering ontology-mediated queries (OMQs). This has given rise to three families of formalisms: guarded, non-recursive, and sticky sets of tgds. In this work, we study the containment problem for OMQs expressed in such formalisms, which is a key ingredient for solving static analysis tasks associated with them. Our main contribution is the development of specially tailored techniques for OMQ containment under the classes of tgds stated above. This enables us to obtain sharp complexity bounds for the problems at hand. We also apply our techniques to pinpoint the complexity of problems associated with two emerging applications of OMQ containment: distribution over components and UCQ rewritability of OMQs.
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    We consider the problem of a robot learning the mechanical properties of objects through physical interaction with the object, and introduce a practical, data-efficient approach for identifying the motion models of these objects. The proposed method utilizes a physics engine, where the robot seeks to identify the inertial and friction parameters of the object by simulating its motion under different values of the parameters and identifying those that result in a simulation which matches the observed real motions. The problem is solved in a Bayesian optimization framework. The same framework is used for both identifying the model of an object online and searching for a policy that would minimize a given cost function according to the identified model. Experimental results both in simulation and using a real robot indicate that the proposed method outperforms state-of-the-art model-free reinforcement learning approaches.

Recent comments

Māris Ozols Oct 21 2016 21:06 UTC

Very nice! Now we finally know how to fairly cut a cake in a finite number of steps! What is more, the number of steps is expected to go down from the whopping $n^{n^{n^{n^{n^n}}}}$ to just barely $n^{n^n}$. I can't wait to get my slice!

https://www.quantamagazine.org/20161006-new-algorithm-solve

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anti-plagiarism Jul 09 2015 15:11 UTC

This paper "**Tree-based convolution for sentence modeling**" is a deliberate plagiarism. The texts, models and ideas overlap significantly with previous work on arXiv.

- TBCNN: A **Tree-based Convolutional** Neural Network for Programming
Language Processing (arXiv:1409.5718)
- **Tree-based

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