Artificial Intelligence (cs.AI)

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    This paper introduces SC2LE (StarCraft II Learning Environment), a reinforcement learning environment based on the StarCraft II game. This domain poses a new grand challenge for reinforcement learning, representing a more difficult class of problems than considered in most prior work. It is a multi-agent problem with multiple players interacting; there is imperfect information due to a partially observed map; it has a large action space involving the selection and control of hundreds of units; it has a large state space that must be observed solely from raw input feature planes; and it has delayed credit assignment requiring long-term strategies over thousands of steps. We describe the observation, action, and reward specification for the StarCraft II domain and provide an open source Python-based interface for communicating with the game engine. In addition to the main game maps, we provide a suite of mini-games focusing on different elements of StarCraft II gameplay. For the main game maps, we also provide an accompanying dataset of game replay data from human expert players. We give initial baseline results for neural networks trained from this data to predict game outcomes and player actions. Finally, we present initial baseline results for canonical deep reinforcement learning agents applied to the StarCraft II domain. On the mini-games, these agents learn to achieve a level of play that is comparable to a novice player. However, when trained on the main game, these agents are unable to make significant progress. Thus, SC2LE offers a new and challenging environment for exploring deep reinforcement learning algorithms and architectures.
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    We show a proof of principle for warping, a method to interpret the inner working of neural networks in the context of gene expression analysis. Warping is an efficient way to gain insight to the inner workings of neural nets and make them more interpretable. We demonstrate the ability of warping to recover meaningful information for a given class on a samplespecific individual basis. We found warping works well in both linearly and nonlinearly separable datasets. These encouraging results show that warping has a potential to be the answer to neural networks interpretability in computational biology.
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    T-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding (tSNE) is a popular and prize-winning approach for dimensionality reduction and visualizing high-dimensional data. However, tSNE is non-parametric: once visualization is built, tSNE is not designed to incorporate additional data into existing representation. It highly limits the applicability of tSNE to the scenarios where data are added or updated over time (like dashboards or series of data snapshots). In this paper we propose, analyze and evaluate LION-tSNE (Local Interpolation with Outlier coNtrol) - a novel approach for incorporating new data into tSNE representation. LION-tSNE is based on local interpolation in the vicinity of training data, outlier detection and a special outlier mapping algorithm. We show that LION-tSNE method is robust both to outliers and to new samples from existing clusters. We also discuss multiple possible improvements for special cases. We compare LION-tSNE to a comprehensive list of possible benchmark approaches that include multiple interpolation techniques, gradient descent for new data, and neural network approximation.
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    Many popular knowledge graphs such as Freebase, YAGO or DBPedia maintain a list of non-discrete attributes for each entity. Intuitively, these attributes such as height, price or population count are able to richly characterize entities in knowledge graphs. This additional source of information may help to alleviate the inherent sparsity and incompleteness problem that are prevalent in knowledge graphs. Unfortunately, many state-of-the-art relational learning models ignore this information due to the challenging nature of dealing with non-discrete data types in the inherently binary-natured knowledge graphs. In this paper, we propose a novel multi-task neural network approach for both encoding and prediction of non-discrete attribute information in a relational setting. Specifically, we train a neural network for triplet prediction along with a separate network for attribute value regression. Via multi-task learning, we are able to learn representations of entities, relations and attributes that encode information about both tasks. Moreover, such attributes are not only central to many predictive tasks as an information source but also as a prediction target. Therefore, models that are able to encode, incorporate and predict such information in a relational learning context are highly attractive as well. We show that our approach outperforms many state-of-the-art methods for the tasks of relational triplet classification and attribute value prediction.
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    Missing data and noisy observations pose significant challenges for reliably predicting events from irregularly sampled multivariate time series (longitudinal) data. Imputation methods, which are typically used for completing the data prior to event prediction, lack a principled mechanism to account for the uncertainty due to missingness. Alternatively, state-of-the-art joint modeling techniques can be used for jointly modeling the longitudinal and event data and compute event probabilities conditioned on the longitudinal observations. These approaches, however, make strong parametric assumptions and do not easily scale to multivariate signals with many observations. Our proposed approach consists of several key innovations. First, we develop a flexible and scalable joint model based upon sparse multiple-output Gaussian processes. Unlike state-of-the-art joint models, the proposed model can explain highly challenging structure including non-Gaussian noise while scaling to large data. Second, we derive an optimal policy for predicting events using the distribution of the event occurrence estimated by the joint model. The derived policy trades-off the cost of a delayed detection versus incorrect assessments and abstains from making decisions when the estimated event probability does not satisfy the derived confidence criteria. Experiments on a large dataset show that the proposed framework significantly outperforms state-of-the-art techniques in event prediction.
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    Training model to generate data has increasingly attracted research attention and become important in modern world applications. We propose in this paper a new geometry-based optimization approach to address this problem. Orthogonal to current state-of-the-art density-based approaches, most notably VAE and GAN, we present a fresh new idea that borrows the principle of minimal enclosing ball to train a generator G\left(\bz\right) in such a way that both training and generated data, after being mapped to the feature space, are enclosed in the same sphere. We develop theory to guarantee that the mapping is bijective so that its inverse from feature space to data space results in expressive nonlinear contours to describe the data manifold, hence ensuring data generated are also lying on the data manifold learned from training data. Our model enjoys a nice geometric interpretation, hence termed Geometric Enclosing Networks (GEN), and possesses some key advantages over its rivals, namely simple and easy-to-control optimization formulation, avoidance of mode collapsing and efficiently learn data manifold representation in a completely unsupervised manner. We conducted extensive experiments on synthesis and real-world datasets to illustrate the behaviors, strength and weakness of our proposed GEN, in particular its ability to handle multi-modal data and quality of generated data.
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    Accurately predicting the time of occurrence of an event of interest is a critical problem in longitudinal data analysis. One of the main challenges in this context is the presence of instances whose event outcomes become unobservable after a certain time point or when some instances do not experience any event during the monitoring period. Such a phenomenon is called censoring which can be effectively handled using survival analysis techniques. Traditionally, statistical approaches have been widely developed in the literature to overcome this censoring issue. In addition, many machine learning algorithms are adapted to effectively handle survival data and tackle other challenging problems that arise in real-world data. In this survey, we provide a comprehensive and structured review of the representative statistical methods along with the machine learning techniques used in survival analysis and provide a detailed taxonomy of the existing methods. We also discuss several topics that are closely related to survival analysis and illustrate several successful applications in various real-world application domains. We hope that this paper will provide a more thorough understanding of the recent advances in survival analysis and offer some guidelines on applying these approaches to solve new problems that arise in applications with censored data.
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    Previous research on automatic pain estimation from facial expressions has focused primarily on "one-size-fits-all" metrics (such as PSPI). In this work, we focus on directly estimating each individual's self-reported visual-analog scale (VAS) pain metric, as this is considered the gold standard for pain measurement. The VAS pain score is highly subjective and context-dependent, and its range can vary significantly among different persons. To tackle these issues, we propose a novel two-stage personalized model, named DeepFaceLIFT, for automatic estimation of VAS. This model is based on (1) Neural Network and (2) Gaussian process regression models, and is used to personalize the estimation of self-reported pain via a set of hand-crafted personal features and multi-task learning. We show on the benchmark dataset for pain analysis (The UNBC-McMaster Shoulder Pain Expression Archive) that the proposed personalized model largely outperforms the traditional, unpersonalized models: the intra-class correlation improves from a baseline performance of 19\% to a personalized performance of 35\% while also providing confidence in the model\textquotesingle s estimates -- in contrast to existing models for the target task. Additionally, DeepFaceLIFT automatically discovers the pain-relevant facial regions for each person, allowing for an easy interpretation of the pain-related facial cues.
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    Sum-product networks (SPNs) are a class of probabilistic graphical models that allow tractable marginal inference. However, the maximum a posteriori (MAP) inference in SPNs is NP-hard. We investigate MAP inference in SPNs from both theoretical and algorithmic perspectives. For the theoretical part, we reduce general MAP inference to its special case without evidence and hidden variables; we also show that it is NP-hard to approximate the MAP problem to $2^{n^\epsilon}$ for fixed $0 \leq \epsilon < 1$, where $n$ is the input size. For the algorithmic part, we first present an exact MAP solver that runs reasonably fast and could handle SPNs with up to 1k variables and 150k arcs in our experiments. We then present a new approximate MAP solver with a good balance between speed and accuracy, and our comprehensive experiments on real-world datasets show that it has better overall performance than existing approximate solvers.
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    This paper continues the research that considers a new cognitive model. In particular, it considers the neural binding structure of an earlier paper. To help with this, the paper describes some new methods in the areas of image processing and high-level behaviour simulation. The work is all based on earlier research by the author and the new additions are intended to fit in with the overall design. For image processing, a grid-like structure is used with 'full linking'. Each cell in the classifier grid stores a list of all other cells it gets associated with and this is used as the learned image that new input is compared to. For the behaviour metric, a new prediction equation is suggested, as part of a simulation, that uses feedback and history to dynamically determine its course of action. While the new methods are from widely different topics, both can be compared with the binary-analog type of interface that is the main focus of the paper. It is suggested that the simplest of linking between a tree and ensemble can explain neural binding and variable signal strengths.
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    Stochastic gradient descent (SGD) is a popular stochastic optimization method in machine learning. Traditional parallel SGD algorithms, e.g., SimuParallel SGD, often require all nodes to have the same performance or to consume equal quantities of data. However, these requirements are difficult to satisfy when the parallel SGD algorithms run in a heterogeneous computing environment; low-performance nodes will exert a negative influence on the final result. In this paper, we propose an algorithm called weighted parallel SGD (WP-SGD). WP-SGD combines weighted model parameters from different nodes in the system to produce the final output. WP-SGD makes use of the reduction in standard deviation to compensate for the loss from the inconsistency in performance of nodes in the cluster, which means that WP-SGD does not require that all nodes consume equal quantities of data. We also analyze the theoretical feasibility of running two other parallel SGD algorithms combined with WP-SGD in a heterogeneous environment. The experimental results show that WP-SGD significantly outperforms the traditional parallel SGD algorithms on distributed training systems with an unbalanced workload.
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    Biometrics have a long-held hope of replacing passwords by establishing a non-repudiated identity and providing authentication with convenience. Convenience drives consumers toward biometrics-based access management solutions. Unlike passwords, biometrics cannot be script-injected; however, biometric data is considered highly sensitive due to its personal nature and unique association with users. Biometrics differ from passwords in that compromised passwords may be reset. Compromised biometrics offer no such relief. A compromised biometric offers unlimited risk in privacy (anyone can view the biometric) and authentication (anyone may use the biometric). Standards such as the Biometric Open Protocol Standard (BOPS) (IEEE 2410-2016) provide a detailed mechanism to authenticate biometrics based on pre-enrolled devices and a previous identity by storing the biometric in encrypted form. This paper describes a biometric-agnostic approach that addresses the privacy concerns of biometrics through the implementation of BOPS. Specifically, two novel concepts are introduced. First, a biometric is applied to a neural network to create a feature vector. This neural network alone can be used for one-to-one matching (authentication), but would require a search in linear time for the one-to-many case (identity lookup). The classifying algorithm described in this paper addresses this concern by producing normalized floating-point values for each feature vector. This allows authentication lookup to occur in up to polynomial time, allowing for search in encrypted biometric databases with speed, accuracy and privacy.
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    There is sufficient information in the far-field of a radiating dipole antenna to rediscover the Maxwell Equations and the wave equations of light, including the speed of light $c.$ TheoSea is a Julia program that does this in about a second, and the key insight is that the compactness of theories drives the search. The program is a computational embodiment of the scientific method: observation, consideration of candidate theories, and validation.

Recent comments

Māris Ozols Oct 21 2016 21:06 UTC

Very nice! Now we finally know how to fairly cut a cake in a finite number of steps! What is more, the number of steps is expected to go down from the whopping $n^{n^{n^{n^{n^n}}}}$ to just barely $n^{n^n}$. I can't wait to get my slice!

https://www.quantamagazine.org/20161006-new-algorithm-solve

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anti-plagiarism Jul 09 2015 15:11 UTC

This paper "**Tree-based convolution for sentence modeling**" is a deliberate plagiarism. The texts, models and ideas overlap significantly with previous work on arXiv.

- TBCNN: A **Tree-based Convolutional** Neural Network for Programming
Language Processing (arXiv:1409.5718)
- **Tree-based

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