Artificial Intelligence (cs.AI)

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    This paper explains why deep learning can generalize well, despite large capacity and possible algorithmic instability, nonrobustness, and sharp minima, effectively addressing an open problem in the literature. Based on our theoretical insight, this paper also proposes a family of new regularization methods. Its simplest member was empirically shown to improve base models and achieve state-of-the-art performance on MNIST and CIFAR-10 benchmarks. Moreover, this paper presents both data-dependent and data-independent generalization guarantees with improved convergence rates. Our results suggest several new open areas of research.
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    How can a delivery robot navigate reliably to a destination in a new office building, with minimal prior information? To tackle this challenge, this paper introduces a two-level hierarchical approach, which integrates model-free deep learning and model-based path planning. At the low level, a neural-network motion controller, called the intention-net, is trained end-to-end to provide robust local navigation. The intention-net maps images from a single monocular camera and "intentions" directly to robot controls. At the high level, a path planner uses a crude map, e.g., a 2-D floor plan, to compute a path from the robot's current location to the goal. The planned path provides intentions to the intention-net. Preliminary experiments suggest that the learned motion controller is robust against perceptual uncertainty and by integrating with a path planner, it generalizes effectively to new environments and goals.
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    If a robot can predict crowds in parts of its environment that are inaccessible to its sensors, then it can plan to avoid them. This paper proposes a fast, online algorithm that learns average crowd densities in different areas. It also describes how these densities can be incorporated into existing navigation architectures. In simulation across multiple challenging crowd scenarios, the robot reaches its target faster, travels less, and risks fewer collisions than if it were to plan with the traditional A* algorithm.
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    Flow is a new computational framework, built to support a key need triggered by the rapid growth of autonomy in ground traffic: controllers for autonomous vehicles in the presence of complex nonlinear dynamics in traffic. Leveraging recent advances in deep Reinforcement Learning (RL), Flow enables the use of RL methods such as policy gradient for traffic control and enables benchmarking the performance of classical (including hand-designed) controllers with learned policies (control laws). Flow integrates traffic microsimulator SUMO with deep reinforcement learning library rllab and enables the easy design of traffic tasks, including different networks configurations and vehicle dynamics. We use Flow to develop reliable controllers for complex problems, such as controlling mixed-autonomy traffic (involving both autonomous and human-driven vehicles) in a ring road. For this, we first show that state-of-the-art hand-designed controllers excel when in-distribution, but fail to generalize; then, we show that even simple neural network policies can solve the stabilization task across density settings and generalize to out-of-distribution settings.
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    We introduce a novel generative model for interpretable subgroup analysis for causal inference applications, Causal Rule Sets (CRS). A CRS model uses a small set of short rules to capture a subgroup where the average treatment effect is elevated compared to the entire population. We present a Bayesian framework for learning a causal rule set. The Bayesian framework consists of a prior that favors simpler models and a Bayesian logistic regression that characterizes the relation between outcomes, attributes and subgroup membership. We find maximum a posteriori models using discrete Monte Carlo steps in the joint solution space of rules sets and parameters. We provide theoretically grounded heuristics and bounding strategies to improve search efficiency. Experiments show that the search algorithm can efficiently recover a true underlying subgroup and CRS shows consistently competitive performance compared to other state-of-the-art baseline methods.
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    In this study, we systematically investigate the impact of class imbalance on classification performance of convolutional neural networks (CNNs) and compare frequently used methods to address the issue. Class imbalance is a common problem that has been comprehensively studied in classical machine learning, yet very limited systematic research is available in the context of deep learning. In our study, we use three benchmark datasets of increasing complexity, MNIST, CIFAR-10 and ImageNet, to investigate the effects of imbalance on classification and perform an extensive comparison of several methods to address the issue: oversampling, undersampling, two-phase training, and thresholding that compensates for prior class probabilities. Our main evaluation metric is area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC AUC) adjusted to multi-class tasks since overall accuracy metric is associated with notable difficulties in the context of imbalanced data. Based on results from our experiments we conclude that (i) the effect of class imbalance on classification performance is detrimental; (ii) the method of addressing class imbalance that emerged as dominant in almost all analyzed scenarios was oversampling; (iii) oversampling should be applied to the level that totally eliminates the imbalance, whereas undersampling can perform better when the imbalance is only removed to some extent; (iv) as opposed to some classical machine learning models, oversampling does not necessarily cause overfitting of CNNs; (v) thresholding should be applied to compensate for prior class probabilities when overall number of properly classified cases is of interest.
  • Oct 17 2017 cs.AI cs.DS arXiv:1710.05257v1
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    We present the Multi-vAlue Rule Set (MARS) model for interpretable classification with feature efficient presentations. MARS introduces a more generalized form of association rules that allows multiple values in a condition. Rules of this form are more concise than traditional single-valued rules in capturing and describing patterns in data. MARS mitigates the problem of dealing with continuous features and high-cardinality categorical features faced by rule-based models. Our formulation also pursues a higher efficiency of feature utilization, which reduces the cognitive load to understand the decision process. We propose an efficient inference method for learning a maximum a posteriori model, incorporating theoretically grounded bounds to iteratively reduce the search space to improve search efficiency. Experiments with synthetic and real-world data demonstrate that MARS models have significantly smaller complexity and fewer features, providing better interpretability while being competitive in predictive accuracy. We conducted a usability study with human subjects and results show that MARS is the easiest to use compared with other competing rule-based models, in terms of the correct rate and response time. Overall, MARS introduces a new approach to rule-based models that balance accuracy and interpretability with feature-efficient representations.
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    Propositional model counting is a fundamental problem in artificial intelligence with a wide variety of applications, such as probabilistic inference, decision making under uncertainty, and probabilistic databases. Consequently, the problem is of theoretical as well as practical interest. When the constraints are expressed as DNF formulas, Monte Carlo-based techniques have been shown to provide a fully polynomial randomized approximation scheme (FPRAS). For CNF constraints, hashing-based approximation techniques have been demonstrated to be highly successful. Furthermore, it was shown that hashing-based techniques also yield an FPRAS for DNF counting without usage of Monte Carlo sampling. Our analysis, however, shows that the proposed hashing-based approach to DNF counting provides poor time complexity compared to the Monte Carlo-based DNF counting techniques. Given the success of hashing-based techniques for CNF constraints, it is natural to ask: Can hashing-based techniques provide an efficient FPRAS for DNF counting? In this paper, we provide a positive answer to this question. To this end, we introduce two novel algorithmic techniques: \emphSymbolic Hashing and \emphStochastic Cell Counting, along with a new hash family of \emphRow-Echelon hash functions. These innovations allow us to design a hashing-based FPRAS for DNF counting of similar complexity (up to polylog factors) as that of prior works. Furthermore, we expect these techniques to have potential applications beyond DNF counting.
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    We study learning algorithms that are restricted to revealing little information about their input sample. Various manifestations of this notion have been recently studied. A central theme in these works, and in ours, is that such algorithms generalize. We study a category of learning algorithms, which we term d-bit information learners. These are algorithms whose output conveys at most d bits of information on their input. We focus on the learning capacity of such algorithms: we prove generalization bounds with tight dependencies on the confidence and error parameters. We observe connections with well studied notions such as PAC-Bayes and differential privacy. For example, it is known that pure differentially private algorithms leak little information. We complement this fact with a separation between bounded information and pure differential privacy in the setting of proper learning, showing that differential privacy is strictly more restrictive. We also demonstrate limitations by exhibiting simple concept classes for which every (possibly randomized) empirical risk minimizer must leak a lot of information. On the other hand, we show that in the distribution-dependent setting every VC class has empirical risk minimizers that do not leak a lot of information.
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    Networks are fundamental models for data used in practically every application domain. In most instances, several implicit or explicit choices about the network definition impact the translation of underlying data to a network representation, and the subsequent question(s) about the underlying system being represented. Users of downstream network data may not even be aware of these choices or their impacts. We propose a task-focused network model selection methodology which addresses several key challenges. Our approach constructs network models from underlying data and uses minimum description length (MDL) criteria for selection. Our methodology measures efficiency, a general and comparable measure of the network's performance of a local (i.e. node-level) predictive task of interest. Selection on efficiency favors parsimonious (e.g. sparse) models to avoid overfitting and can be applied across arbitrary tasks and representations (including networks and non-network models). We show stability, sensitivity, and significance testing in our methodology.
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    Social network analysis provides meaningful information about behavior of network members that can be used in diverse applications such as classification, link prediction, etc. however, network analysis is computationally expensive because of feature learning for different applications. In recent years, many researches have focused on feature learning methods in social networks. Network embedding represents the network in a lower dimensional representation space with the same properties which presents a compressed representation of the input network. In this paper, we introduce a novel algorithm named "CARE" for network embedding that can be used for different types of networks including weighted, directed and complex. While current methods try to preserve local neighborhood information of nodes, we utilize local neighborhood and community information of network nodes to cover both local and global structure of social networks. CARE builds customized paths, which are consisted of local and global structure of network nodes, as a basis for network embedding and uses skip-gram model to learn representation vector of nodes. Then, stochastic gradient descent is used to optimize our objective function and learn the final representation of nodes. Our method can be scalable when new nodes are appended to network without information loss. Parallelize generation of customized random walks is also used for speeding up CARE. We evaluate the performance of CARE on multi label classification and link prediction tasks. Experimental results on different networks indicate that the proposed method outperforms others in both Micro-f1 and Macro-f1 measures for different size of training data.
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    Because of the increasing availability of spatiotemporal data, a variety of data-analytic applications have become possible. Characterizing driving context, where context may be thought of as a combination of location and time, is a new challenging application. An example of such a characterization is finding the correlation between driving behavior and traffic conditions. This contextual information enables analysts to validate observation-based hypotheses about the driving of an individual. In this paper, we present DriveContext, a novel framework to find the characteristics of a context, by extracting significant driving patterns (e.g., a slow-down), and then identifying the set of potential causes behind patterns (e.g., traffic congestion). Our experimental results confirm the feasibility of the framework in identifying meaningful driving patterns, with improvements in comparison with the state-of-the-art. We also demonstrate how the framework derives interesting characteristics for different contexts, through real-world examples.
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    Modern socio-technical systems are increasingly complex. A fundamental problem is that the borders of such systems are often not well-defined a-priori, which among other problems can lead to unwanted behavior during runtime. Ideally, unwanted behavior should be prevented. If this is not possible the system shall at least be able to help determine potential cause(s) a-posterori, identify responsible parties and make them accountable for their behavior. Recently, several algorithms addressing these concepts have been proposed. However, the applicability of the corresponding approaches, specifically their effectiveness and performance, is mostly unknown. Therefore, in this paper, we propose ACCBench, a benchmark tool that allows to compare and evaluate causality algorithms under a consistent setting. Furthermore, we contribute an implementation of the two causality algorithms by Gößler and Metayer and Gößler and Astefanoaei as well as of a policy compliance approach based on some concepts of Main et al. Lastly, we conduct a case study of an Intelligent Door Control System, which exposes concrete strengths and weaknesses of all algorithms under different aspects. In the course of this, we show that the effectiveness of the algorithms in terms of cause detection as well as their performance differ to some extent. In addition, our analysis reports on some qualitative aspects that should be considered when evaluating each algorithm. For example, the human effort needed to configure the algorithm and model the use case is analyzed.
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    Optical Character Recognition (OCR) has been a topic of interest for many years. It is defined as the process of digitizing a document image into its constituent characters. Despite decades of intense research, developing OCR with capabilities comparable to that of human still remains an open challenge. Due to this challenging nature, researchers from industry and academic circles have directed their attentions towards Optical Character Recognition. Over the last few years, the number of academic laboratories and companies involved in research on Character Recognition has increased dramatically. This research aims at summarizing the research so far done in the field of OCR. It provides an overview of different aspects of OCR and discusses corresponding proposals aimed at resolving issues of OCR.
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    Finding semantically rich and computer-understandable representations for textual dialogues, utterances and words is crucial for dialogue systems (or conversational agents), as their performance mostly depends on understanding the context of conversations. Recent research aims at finding distributed vector representations (embeddings) for words, such that semantically similar words are relatively close within the vector-space. Encoding the "meaning" of text into vectors is a current trend, and text can range from words, phrases and documents to actual human-to-human conversations. In recent research approaches, responses have been generated utilizing a decoder architecture, given the vector representation of the current conversation. In this paper, the utilization of embeddings for answer retrieval is explored by using Locality-Sensitive Hashing Forest (LSH Forest), an Approximate Nearest Neighbor (ANN) model, to find similar conversations in a corpus and rank possible candidates. Experimental results on the well-known Ubuntu Corpus (in English) and a customer service chat dataset (in Dutch) show that, in combination with a candidate selection method, retrieval-based approaches outperform generative ones and reveal promising future research directions towards the usability of such a system.
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    Policy evaluation or value function or Q-function approximation is a key procedure in reinforcement learning (RL). It is a necessary component of policy iteration and can be used for variance reduction in policy gradient methods. Therefore its quality has a significant impact on most RL algorithms. Motivated by manifold regularized learning, we propose a novel kernelized policy evaluation method that takes advantage of the intrinsic geometry of the state space learned from data, in order to achieve better sample efficiency and higher accuracy in Q-function approximation. Applying the proposed method in the Least-Squares Policy Iteration (LSPI) framework, we observe superior performance compared to widely used parametric basis functions on two standard benchmarks in terms of policy quality.
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    In his seminal paper that inaugurated abstract argumentation, Dung proved that the set of complete extensions forms a complete semilattice with respect to set inclusion. In this note we demonstrate that this proof is incorrect with counterexamples. We then trace the error in the proof and explain why it arose. We then examine the implications for the grounded extension.
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    In this work, we propose an infinite restricted Boltzmann machine~(RBM), whose maximum likelihood estimation~(MLE) corresponds to a constrained convex optimization. We consider the Frank-Wolfe algorithm to solve the program, which provides a sparse solution that can be interpreted as inserting a hidden unit at each iteration, so that the optimization process takes the form of a sequence of finite models of increasing complexity. As a side benefit, this can be used to easily and efficiently identify an appropriate number of hidden units during the optimization. The resulting model can also be used as an initialization for typical state-of-the-art RBM training algorithms such as contrastive divergence, leading to models with consistently higher test likelihood than random initialization.
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    Both resources in the natural environment and concepts in a semantic space are distributed "patchily", with large gaps in between the patches. To describe people's internal and external foraging behavior, various random walk models have been proposed. In particular, internal foraging has been modeled as sampling: in order to gather relevant information for making a decision, people draw samples from a mental representation using random-walk algorithms such as Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). However, two common empirical observations argue against simple sampling algorithms such as MCMC. First, the spatial structure is often best described by a Lévy flight distribution: the probability of the distance between two successive locations follows a power-law on the distances. Second, the temporal structure of the sampling that humans and other animals produce have long-range, slowly decaying serial correlations characterized as $1/f$-like fluctuations. We propose that mental sampling is not done by simple MCMC, but is instead adapted to multimodal representations and is implemented by Metropolis-coupled Markov chain Monte Carlo (MC$^3$), one of the first algorithms developed for sampling from multimodal distributions. MC$^3$ involves running multiple Markov chains in parallel but with target distributions of different temperatures, and it swaps the states of the chains whenever a better location is found. Heated chains more readily traverse valleys in the probability landscape to propose moves to far-away peaks, while the colder chains make the local steps that explore the current peak or patch. We show that MC$^3$ generates distances between successive samples that follow a Lévy flight distribution and $1/f$-like serial correlations, providing a single mechanistic account of these two puzzling empirical phenomena.
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    Trees -- i.e., the type of data structure known under this name -- are central to many aspects of knowledge organization. We investigate some central design choices concerning the ontological modeling of such trees. In particular, we consider the limits of what is expressible in the Web Ontology Language, and provide a reusable ontology design pattern for trees.
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    This paper describes and motivates a new decision theory known as functional decision theory (FDT), as distinct from causal decision theory and evidential decision theory. Functional decision theorists hold that the normative principle for action is to treat one's decision as the output of a fixed mathematical function that answers the question, "Which output of this very function would yield the best outcome?" Adhering to this principle delivers a number of benefits, including the ability to maximize wealth in an array of traditional decision-theoretic and game-theoretic problems where CDT and EDT perform poorly. Using one simple and coherent decision rule, functional decision theorists (for example) achieve more utility than CDT on Newcomb's problem, more utility than EDT on the smoking lesion problem, and more utility than both in Parfit's hitchhiker problem. In this paper, we define FDT, explore its prescriptions in a number of different decision problems, compare it to CDT and EDT, and give philosophical justifications for FDT as a normative theory of decision-making.
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    Process mining has emerged as a way to analyze the behavior of an organization by extracting knowledge from event logs and by offering techniques to discover, monitor and enhance real processes. In the discovery of process models, retrieving a complex one, i.e., a hardly readable process model, can hinder the extraction of information. Even in well-structured process models, there is information that cannot be obtained with the current techniques. In this paper, we present WoMine, an algorithm to retrieve frequent behavioural patterns from the model. Our approach searches in process models extracting structures with sequences, selections, parallels and loops, which are frequently executed in the logs. This proposal has been validated with a set of process models, including some from BPI Challenges, and compared with the state of the art techniques. Experiments have validated that WoMine can find all types of patterns, extracting information that cannot be mined with the state of the art techniques.

Recent comments

Bin Shi Oct 05 2017 00:07 UTC

Welcome to give the comments for this paper!

Māris Ozols Oct 21 2016 21:06 UTC

Very nice! Now we finally know how to fairly cut a cake in a finite number of steps! What is more, the number of steps is expected to go down from the whopping $n^{n^{n^{n^{n^n}}}}$ to just barely $n^{n^n}$. I can't wait to get my slice!

https://www.quantamagazine.org/20161006-new-algorithm-solve

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anti-plagiarism Jul 09 2015 15:11 UTC

This paper "**Tree-based convolution for sentence modeling**" is a deliberate plagiarism. The texts, models and ideas overlap significantly with previous work on arXiv.

- TBCNN: A **Tree-based Convolutional** Neural Network for Programming
Language Processing (arXiv:1409.5718)
- **Tree-based

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