Computer Science (cs)

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    We generalise some well-known graph parameters to operator systems by considering their underlying quantum channels. In particular, we introduce the quantum complexity as the dimension of the smallest co-domain Hilbert space a quantum channel requires to realise a given operator system as its non-commutative confusability graph. We describe quantum complexity as a generalised minimum semidefinite rank and, in the case of a graph operator system, as a quantum intersection number. The quantum complexity and a closely related quantum version of orthogonal rank turn out to be upper bounds for the Shannon zero-error capacity of a quantum channel, and we construct examples for which these bounds beat the best previously known general upper bound for the capacity of quantum channels, given by the quantum Lovász theta number.
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    Statistics are bleak for youth aging out of the United States foster care system. They are often left with few resources, are likely to experience homelessness, and are at increased risk of incarceration and exploitation. The Think of Us platform is a service for foster youth and their advocates to create personalized goals and access curated content specific to aging out of the foster care system. In this paper, we propose the use of a machine learning algorithm within the Think of Us platform to better serve youth transitioning to life outside of foster care. The algorithm collects and collates publicly available figures and data to inform caseworkers and other mentors chosen by the youth on how to best assist foster youth. It can then provide valuable resources for the youth and their advocates targeted directly towards their specific needs. Finally, we examine machine learning as a support system and aid for caseworkers to buttress and protect vulnerable young adults during their transition to adulthood.
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    The City of Detroit maintains an active fleet of over 2500 vehicles, spending an annual average of over \$5 million on new vehicle purchases and over \$7.7 million on maintaining this fleet. Understanding the existence of patterns and trends in this data could be useful to a variety of stakeholders, particularly as Detroit emerges from Chapter 9 bankruptcy, but the patterns in such data are often complex and multivariate and the city lacks dedicated resources for detailed analysis of this data. This work, a data collaboration between the Michigan Data Science Team (http://midas.umich.edu/mdst) and the City of Detroit's Operations and Infrastructure Group, seeks to address this unmet need by analyzing data from the City of Detroit's entire vehicle fleet from 2010-2017. We utilize tensor decomposition techniques to discover and visualize unique temporal patterns in vehicle maintenance; apply differential sequence mining to demonstrate the existence of common and statistically unique maintenance sequences by vehicle make and model; and, after showing these time-dependencies in the dataset, demonstrate an application of a predictive Long Short Term Memory (LSTM) neural network model to predict maintenance sequences. Our analysis shows both the complexities of municipal vehicle fleet data and useful techniques for mining and modeling such data.
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    In the realm of multimodal communication, sign language is, and continues to be, one of the most understudied areas. In line with recent advances in the field of deep learning, there are far reaching implications and applications that neural networks can have for sign language interpretation. In this paper, we present a method for using deep convolutional networks to classify images of both the the letters and digits in American Sign Language.
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    The principle goal of computational mechanics is to define pattern and structure so that the organization of complex systems can be detected and quantified. Computational mechanics developed from efforts in the 1970s and early 1980s to identify strange attractors as the mechanism driving weak fluid turbulence via the method of reconstructing attractor geometry from measurement time series and in the mid-1980s to estimate equations of motion directly from complex time series. In providing a mathematical and operational definition of structure it addressed weaknesses of these early approaches to discovering patterns in natural systems. Since then, computational mechanics has led to a range of results from theoretical physics and nonlinear mathematics to diverse applications---from closed-form analysis of Markov and non-Markov stochastic processes that are ergodic or nonergodic and their measures of information and intrinsic computation to complex materials and deterministic chaos and intelligence in Maxwellian demons to quantum compression of classical processes and the evolution of computation and language. This brief review clarifies several misunderstandings and addresses concerns recently raised regarding early works in the field (1980s). We show that misguided evaluations of the contributions of computational mechanics are groundless and stem from a lack of familiarity with its basic goals and from a failure to consider its historical context. For all practical purposes, its modern methods and results largely supersede the early works. This not only renders recent criticism moot and shows the solid ground on which computational mechanics stands but, most importantly, shows the significant progress achieved over three decades and points to the many intriguing and outstanding challenges in understanding the computational nature of complex dynamic systems.
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    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a growing public health problem with an estimated incidence of one million people annually in US. Neurocognitive tests are used to both assess the patient condition and to monitor the patient progress. This work aims to directly use MR images taken shortly after injury to detect whether a patient suffers from mTBI, by incorporating machine learning and computer vision techniques to learn features suitable discriminating between mTBI and normal patients. We focus on 3 regions in brain, and extract multiple patches from them, and use bag-of-visual-word technique to represent each subject as a histogram of representative patterns derived from patches from all training subjects. After extracting the features, we use greedy forward feature selection, to choose a subset of features which achieves highest accuracy. We show through experimental studies that BoW features perform better than the simple mean value features which were used previously.
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    In this work, we pose the question of whether, by considering qualitative information such as a sample target image as input, one can produce a rendered image of scientific data that is similar to the target. The algorithm resulting from our research allows one to ask the question of whether features like those in the target image exists in a given dataset. In that way, our method is one of imagery query or reverse engineering, as opposed to manual parameter tweaking of the full visualization pipeline. For target images, we can use real-world photographs of physical phenomena. Our method leverages deep neural networks and evolutionary optimization. Using a trained similarity function that measures the difference between renderings of a phenomenon and real-world photographs, our method optimizes rendering parameters. We demonstrate the efficacy of our method using a superstorm simulation dataset and images found online. We also discuss a parallel implementation of our method, which was run on NCSA's Blue Waters.
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    University curriculum, both on a campus level and on a per-major level, are affected in a complex way by many decisions of many administrators and faculty over time. As universities across the United States share an urgency to significantly improve student success and success retention, there is a pressing need to better understand how the student population is progressing through the curriculum, and how to provide better supporting infrastructure and refine the curriculum for the purpose of improving student outcomes. This work has developed a visual knowledge discovery system called eCamp that pulls together a variety of populationscale data products, including student grades, major descriptions, and graduation records. These datasets were previously disconnected and only available to and maintained by independent campus offices. The framework models and analyzes the multi-level relationships hidden within these data products, and visualizes the student flow patterns through individual majors as well as through a hierarchy of majors. These results support analytical tasks involving student outcomes, student retention, and curriculum design. It is shown how eCamp has revealed student progression information that was previously unavailable.
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    Despite the appeal of deep neural networks that largely replace the traditional handmade filters, they still suffer from isolated cases that cannot be properly handled only by the training of convolutional filters. Abnormal factors, including real-world noise, blur, or other quality degradations, ruin the output of a neural network. These unexpected problems can produce critical complications, and it is surprising that there has only been minimal research into the effects of noise in the deep neural network model. Therefore, we present an exhaustive investigation into the effect of noise in image classification and suggest a generalized architecture of a dual-channel model to treat quality degraded input images. We compare the proposed dual-channel model with a simple single model and show it improves the overall performance of neural networks on various types of quality degraded input datasets.
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    Maddah-Ali and Niesen's original coded caching scheme for shared-link broadcast networks is now known to be optimal to within a factor two, and has been applied to other types of networks. For practical reasons, this paper considers that a server communicates to cache-aided users through $H$ intermediate relays. In particular, it focuses on combination networks where each of the $K = \binom{H}{r}$ users is connected to a distinct $r$-subsets of relays. By leveraging the symmetric topology of the network, this paper proposes a novel method to general multicast messages and to deliver them to the users. By numerical evaluations, the proposed scheme is shown to reduce the download time compared to the schemes available in the literature. The idea is then extended to decentralized combination networks, more general relay networks, and combination networks with cache-aided relays and users. Also in these cases the proposed scheme outperforms known ones.
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    We present an algorithm that generates a collision-free configuration-space path that closely follows, according to the discrete Fréchet metric, a desired path in task space. By leveraging the Fréchet metric and other tools from computational geometry, we approximate the search space using a cross-product graph. This structure allows us to efficiently search for the solution using a simple variant of Dijkstra's graph search algorithm. Additionally, we can incrementally update and improve the solution in an anytime fashion. We compare multiple proposed densification strategies and show that our algorithm outperforms a previously proposed optimization-based approach.
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    Deep neural networks (DNNs) have become increasingly important due to their excellent empirical performance on a wide range of problems. However, regularization is generally achieved by indirect means, largely due to the complex set of functions defined by a network and the difficulty in measuring function complexity. There exists no method in the literature for additive regularization based on a norm of the function, as is classically considered in statistical learning theory. In this work, we propose sampling-based approximations to weighted function norms as regularizers for deep neural networks. We provide, to the best of our knowledge, the first proof in the literature of the NP-hardness of computing function norms of DNNs, motivating the necessity of a stochastic optimization strategy. Based on our proposed regularization scheme, stability-based bounds yield a $\mathcal{O}(N^{-\frac{1}{2}})$ generalization error for our proposed regularizer when applied to convex function sets. We demonstrate broad conditions for the convergence of stochastic gradient descent on our objective, including for non-convex function sets such as those defined by DNNs. Finally, we empirically validate the improved performance of the proposed regularization strategy for both convex function sets as well as DNNs on real-world classification and segmentation tasks.
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    In this paper, we propose an approach for the detection of clickbait posts in online social media (OSM). Clickbait posts are short catchy phrases that attract a user's attention to click to an article. The approach is based on a machine learning (ML) classifier capable of distinguishing between clickbait and legitimate posts published in OSM. The suggested classifier is based on a variety of features, including image related features, linguistic analysis, and methods for abuser detection. In order to evaluate our method, we used two datasets provided by Clickbait Challenge 2017. The best performance obtained by the ML classifier was an AUC of 0.8, an accuracy of 0.812, precision of 0.819, and recall of 0.966. In addition, as opposed to previous studies, we found that clickbait post titles are statistically significant shorter than legitimate post titles. Finally, we found that counting the number of formal English words in the given content is useful for clickbait detection.
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    Dropout Variational Inference, or Dropout Sampling, has been recently proposed as an approximation technique for Bayesian Deep Learning and evaluated for image classification and regression tasks. This paper investigates the utility of Dropout Sampling for object detection for the first time. We demonstrate how label uncertainty can be extracted from a state-of-the-art object detection system via Dropout Sampling. We show that this uncertainty can be utilized to increase object detection performance under the open-set conditions that are typically encountered in robotic vision. We evaluate this approach on a large synthetic dataset with 30,000 images, and a real-world dataset captured by a mobile robot in a versatile campus environment.
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    We introduce a novel approach to visualizing temporal clickstream behaviour in the context of a degree-satisfying online course, Habitable Worlds, offered through Arizona State University. The current practice for visualizing behaviour within a digital learning environment has been to utilize state space graphs and other plots of descriptive statistics on resource transitions. While these forms can be visually engaging, they rely on conditional frequency tabulations which lack contextual depth and require assumptions about the patterns being sought. Skip-grams and other representation learning techniques position elements into a vector space which can capture a wide scope of regularities in the data. These regularities can then be projected onto a two-dimensional perceptual space using dimensionality reduction techniques designed to retain relationships information encoded in the learned representations. While these visualization techniques have been used before in the broader machine learning community to better understand the makeup of a neural network hidden layer or the relationship between word vectors, we apply them to online behavioral learner data and go a step further; exploring the impact of the parameters of the model on producing tangible, non-trivial observations of behaviour that are illuminating and suggestive of pedagogical improvement to the course designers and instructors. The methodology introduced in this paper led to an improved understanding of passing and non-passing student behavior in the course and is widely applicable to other datasets of clickstream activity where investigators and stakeholders wish to organically surface principal behavioral patterns.
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    Recently, feature representation by learning algorithms has drawn great attention. In the music domain, it is either unsupervised or supervised by semantic labels such as music genre. However, finding discriminative features in an unsupervised way is challenging, and supervised feature learning using semantic labels may involve noisy or expensive annotation. In this paper, we present a feature learning approach that utilizes artist labels attached in every single music track as an objective meta data. To this end, we train a deep convolutional neural network to classify audio tracks into a large number of artists. We regard it as a general feature extractor and apply it to artist recognition, genre classification and music auto-tagging in transfer learning settings. The results show that the proposed approach outperforms or is comparable to previous state-of-the-art methods, indicating that the proposed approach effectively captures general music audio features.
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    Inverse problems appear in many applications such as image deblurring and inpainting. The common approach to address them is to design a specific algorithm for each problem. The Plug-and-Play (P&P) framework, which has been recently introduced, allows solving general inverse problems by leveraging the impressive capabilities of existing denoising algorithms. While this fresh strategy has found many applications, a burdensome parameter tuning is often required in order to obtain high-quality results. In this work, we propose an alternative method for solving inverse problems using denoising algorithms, that requires less parameter tuning. We demonstrate that it is competitive with task-specific techniques and the P&P approach for image inpainting and deblurring.
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    Lexical ambiguity can impede NLP systems from accurate understanding of semantics. Despite its potential benefits, the integration of sense-level information into NLP systems has remained understudied. By incorporating a novel disambiguation algorithm into a state-of-the-art classification model, we create a pipeline to integrate sense-level information into downstream NLP applications. We show that a simple disambiguation of the input text can lead to consistent performance improvement on multiple topic categorization and polarity detection datasets, particularly when the fine granularity of the underlying sense inventory is reduced and the document is sufficiently large. Our results also point to the need for sense representation research to focus more on in vivo evaluations which target the performance in downstream NLP applications rather than artificial benchmarks.
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    The ICDAR Robust Reading Competition (RRC), initiated in 2003 and re-established in 2011, has become the de-facto evaluation standard for the international community. Concurrent with its second incarnation in 2011, a continuous effort started to develop an online framework to facilitate the hosting and management of competitions. This short paper briefly outlines the Robust Reading Competition Annotation and Evaluation Platform, the backbone of the Robust Reading Competition, comprising a collection of tools and processes that aim to simplify the management and annotation of data, and to provide online and offline performance evaluation and analysis services.
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    At VAST 2016, a characterization of guidance has been presented. It includes a definition of guidance and a model of guidance based on van Wijk's model of visualization. This note amends the original characterization of guidance in two aspects. First, we provide a clarification of what guidance actually is (and is not). Second, we insert into the model a conceptually relevant link that was missing in the original version.
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    Given a real-world graph, how can we measure relevance scores for ranking and link prediction? Random walk with restart (RWR) provides an excellent measure for this and has been applied to various applications such as friend recommendation, community detection, anomaly detection, etc. However, RWR suffers from two problems: 1) using the same restart probability for all the nodes limits the expressiveness of random walk, and 2) the restart probability needs to be manually chosen for each application without theoretical justification. We have two main contributions in this paper. First, we propose Random Walk with Extended Restart (RWER), a random walk based measure which improves the expressiveness of random walks by using a distinct restart probability for each node. The improved expressiveness leads to superior accuracy for ranking and link prediction. Second, we propose SuRe (Supervised Restart for RWER), an algorithm for learning the restart probabilities of RWER from a given graph. SuRe eliminates the need to heuristically and manually select the restart parameter for RWER. Extensive experiments show that our proposed method provides the best performance for ranking and link prediction tasks, improving the MAP (Mean Average Precision) by up to 15.8% on the best competitor.
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    Automated segmentation approaches are crucial to quantitatively analyze large-scale 3D microscopy images. Particularly in deep tissue regions, automatic methods still fail to provide error-free segmentations. To improve the segmentation quality throughout imaged samples, we present a new supervoxel-based 3D segmentation approach that outperforms current methods and reduces the manual correction effort. The algorithm consists of gentle preprocessing and a conservative super-voxel generation method followed by supervoxel agglomeration based on local signal properties and a postprocessing step to fix under-segmentation errors using a Convolutional Neural Network. We validate the functionality of the algorithm on manually labeled 3D confocal images of the plant Arabidopis thaliana and compare the results to a state-of-the-art meristem segmentation algorithm.
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    Learning social media data embedding by deep models has attracted extensive research interest as well as boomed a lot of applications, such as link prediction, classification, and cross-modal search. However, for social images which contain both link information and multimodal contents (e.g., text description, and visual content), simply employing the embedding learnt from network structure or data content results in sub-optimal social image representation. In this paper, we propose a novel social image embedding approach called Deep Multimodal Attention Networks (DMAN), which employs a deep model to jointly embed multimodal contents and link information. Specifically, to effectively capture the correlations between multimodal contents, we propose a multimodal attention network to encode the fine-granularity relation between image regions and textual words. To leverage the network structure for embedding learning, a novel Siamese-Triplet neural network is proposed to model the links among images. With the joint deep model, the learnt embedding can capture both the multimodal contents and the nonlinear network information. Extensive experiments are conducted to investigate the effectiveness of our approach in the applications of multi-label classification and cross-modal search. Compared to state-of-the-art image embeddings, our proposed DMAN achieves significant improvement in the tasks of multi-label classification and cross-modal search.
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    Experience replay is a key technique behind many recent advances in deep reinforcement learning. Allowing the agent to learn from earlier memories can speed up learning and break undesirable temporal correlations. Despite its wide-spread application, very little is understood about the properties of experience replay. How does the amount of memory kept affect learning dynamics? Does it help to prioritize certain experiences? In this paper, we address these questions by formulating a dynamical systems ODE model of Q-learning with experience replay. We derive analytic solutions of the ODE for a simple setting. We show that even in this very simple setting, the amount of memory kept can substantially affect the agent's performance. Too much or too little memory both slow down learning. Moreover, we characterize regimes where prioritized replay harms the agent's learning. We show that our analytic solutions have excellent agreement with experiments. Finally, we propose a simple algorithm for adaptively changing the memory buffer size which achieves consistently good empirical performance.
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    A number of recent papers have provided evidence that practical design questions about neural networks may be tackled theoretically by studying the behavior of random networks. However, until now the tools available for analyzing random neural networks have been relatively ad-hoc. In this work, we show that the distribution of pre-activations in random neural networks can be exactly mapped onto lattice models in statistical physics. We argue that several previous investigations of stochastic networks actually studied a particular factorial approximation to the full lattice model. For random linear networks and random rectified linear networks we show that the corresponding lattice models in the wide network limit may be systematically approximated by a Gaussian distribution with covariance between the layers of the network. In each case, the approximate distribution can be diagonalized by Fourier transformation. We show that this approximation accurately describes the results of numerical simulations of wide random neural networks. Finally, we demonstrate that in each case the large scale behavior of the random networks can be approximated by an effective field theory.
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    An increasing number of sensors on mobile, Internet of things (IoT), and wearable devices generate time-series measurements of physical activities. Though access to the sensory data is critical to the success of many beneficial applications such as health monitoring or activity recognition, a wide range of potentially sensitive information about the individuals can also be discovered through these datasets and this cannot easily be protected using traditional privacy approaches. In this paper, we propose an integrated sensing framework for managing access to personal time-series data in order to provide utility while protecting individuals' privacy. We introduce \textitReplacement AutoEncoder, a novel feature-learning algorithm which learns how to transform discriminative features of multidimensional time-series that correspond to sensitive inferences, into some features that have been more observed in non-sensitive inferences, to protect users' privacy. The main advantage of Replacement AutoEncoder is its ability to keep important features of desired inferences unchanged to preserve the utility of the data. We evaluate the efficacy of the algorithm with an activity recognition task in a multi-sensing environment using extensive experiments on three benchmark datasets. We show that it can retain the recognition accuracy of state-of-the-art techniques while simultaneously preserving the privacy of sensitive information. We use a Generative Adversarial Network to attempt to detect the replacement of sensitive data with fake non-sensitive data. We show that this approach does not detect the replacement unless the network can train using the users' original unmodified data.
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    Person Re-identification (ReID) is to identify the same person across different cameras. It is a challenging task due to the large variations in person pose, occlusion, background clutter, etc How to extract powerful features is a fundamental problem in ReID and is still an open problem today. In this paper, we design a Multi-Scale Context-Aware Network (MSCAN) to learn powerful features over full body and body parts, which can well capture the local context knowledge by stacking multi-scale convolutions in each layer. Moreover, instead of using predefined rigid parts, we propose to learn and localize deformable pedestrian parts using Spatial Transformer Networks (STN) with novel spatial constraints. The learned body parts can release some difficulties, eg pose variations and background clutters, in part-based representation. Finally, we integrate the representation learning processes of full body and body parts into a unified framework for person ReID through multi-class person identification tasks. Extensive evaluations on current challenging large-scale person ReID datasets, including the image-based Market1501, CUHK03 and sequence-based MARS datasets, show that the proposed method achieves the state-of-the-art results.
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    We describe Honk, an open-source PyTorch reimplementation of convolutional neural networks for keyword spotting that are included as examples in TensorFlow. These models are useful for recognizing "command triggers" in speech-based interfaces (e.g., "Hey Siri"), which serve as explicit cues for audio recordings of utterances that are sent to the cloud for full speech recognition. Evaluation on Google's recently released Speech Commands Dataset shows that our reimplementation is comparable in accuracy and provides a starting point for future work on the keyword spotting task.
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    In this research, we have developed the data driven computational walking model to overcome the problem with traditional kinematics based model. Our model is adaptable and can adjust the parameter morphological similar to human. The human walk is a combination of different discrete sub-phases with their continuous dynamics. Any system which exhibits the discrete switching logic and continuous dynamics can be represented using a hybrid system. In this research, the bipedal locomotion is analyzed which is important for understanding the stability and to negotiate with the external perturbations. We have also studied the other important behavior push recovery. The Push recovery is also a very important behavior acquired by human with continuous interaction with environment. The researchers are trying to develop robots that must have the capability of push recovery to safely maneuver in a dynamic environment. The push is a very commonly experienced phenomenon in cluttered environment. The human beings can recover from external push up to a certain extent using different strategies of hip, knee and ankle. The different human beings have different push recovery capabilities. For example a wrestler has a better push negotiation capability compared to normal human beings. The push negotiation capability acquired by human, therefore, is based on learning but the learning mechanism is still unknown to researchers. The research community across the world is trying to develop various humanoid models to solve this mystery. Seeing all the conventional mechanics and control based models have some inherent limitations, a learning based computational model has been developed to address effectively this issue. In this research we will discuss how we have framed this problem as hybrid system.
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    Deep reinforcement learning (RL) has proven a powerful technique in many sequential decision making domains. However, Robotics poses many challenges for RL, most notably training on a physical system can be expensive and dangerous, which has sparked significant interest in learning control policies using a physics simulator. While several recent works have shown promising results in transferring policies trained in simulation to the real world, they often do not fully utilize the advantage of working with a simulator. In this work, we exploit the full state observability in the simulator to train better policies which take as input only partial observations (RGBD images). We do this by employing an actor-critic training algorithm in which the critic is trained on full states while the actor (or policy) gets rendered images as input. We show experimentally on a range of simulated tasks that using these asymmetric inputs significantly improves performance. Finally, we combine this method with domain randomization and show real robot experiments for several tasks like picking, pushing, and moving a block. We achieve this simulation to real world transfer without training on any real world data.
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    Handling the massive number of devices needed in numerous applications such as smart cities is a major challenge given the scarcity of spectrum resources. Dynamic spectrum access (DSA) is seen as a potential candidate to support the connectivity and spectrum access of these devices. We propose an efficient technique that relies on particle filtering to enable distributed resource allocation and sharing for large-scale dynamic spectrum access networks. More specifically, we take advantage of the high tracking capability of particle filtering to efficiently assign the available spectrum and power resources among cognitive users. Our proposed technique maximizes the per-user throughput while ensuring fairness among users, and it does so while accounting for the different users' quality of service requirements and the channel gains' variability. Through intensive simulations, we show that our proposed approach performs well by achieving high overall throughput while improving user's fairness under different objective functions. Furthermore, it achieves higher performance when compared to state-of-the-art techniques.
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    Subjectivity detection is the task of identifying objective and subjective sentences. Objective sentences are those which do not exhibit any sentiment. So, it is desired for a sentiment analysis engine to find and separate the objective sentences for further analysis, e.g., polarity detection. In subjective sentences, opinions can often be expressed on one or multiple topics. Aspect extraction is a subtask of sentiment analysis that consists in identifying opinion targets in opinionated text, i.e., in detecting the specific aspects of a product or service the opinion holder is either praising or complaining about.
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    A key challenge in multi-robot and multi-agent systems is generating solutions that are robust to other self-interested or even adversarial parties who actively try to prevent the agents from achieving their goals. The practicality of existing works addressing this challenge is limited to only small-scale synchronous decision-making scenarios or a single agent planning its best response against a single adversary with fixed, procedurally characterized strategies. In contrast this paper considers a more realistic class of problems where a team of asynchronous agents with limited observation and communication capabilities need to compete against multiple strategic adversaries with changing strategies. This problem necessitates agents that can coordinate to detect changes in adversary strategies and plan the best response accordingly. Our approach first optimizes a set of stratagems that represent these best responses. These optimized stratagems are then integrated into a unified policy that can detect and respond when the adversaries change their strategies. The near-optimality of the proposed framework is established theoretically as well as demonstrated empirically in simulation and hardware.
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    In this work we propose Lasagne, a methodology to learn locality and structure aware graph node embeddings in an unsupervised way. In particular, we show that the performance of existing random-walk based approaches depends strongly on the structural properties of the graph, e.g., the size of the graph, whether the graph has a flat or upward-sloping Network Community Profile (NCP), whether the graph is expander-like, whether the classes of interest are more k-core-like or more peripheral, etc. For larger graphs with flat NCPs that are strongly expander-like, existing methods lead to random walks that expand rapidly, touching many dissimilar nodes, thereby leading to lower-quality vector representations that are less useful for downstream tasks. Rather than relying on global random walks or neighbors within fixed hop distances, Lasagne exploits strongly local Approximate Personalized PageRank stationary distributions to more precisely engineer local information into node embeddings. This leads, in particular, to more meaningful and more useful vector representations of nodes in poorly-structured graphs. We show that Lasagne leads to significant improvement in downstream multi-label classification for larger graphs with flat NCPs, that it is comparable for smaller graphs with upward-sloping NCPs, and that is comparable to existing methods for link prediction tasks.
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    Physical systems can be naturally modeled by combining continuous and discrete models. Such hybrid models may simplify the modeling task of complex system, as well as increase simulation performance. Moreover, modern simulation engines can often efficiently generate simulation traces, but how do we know that the simulation results are correct? If we detect an error, is the error in the model or in the simulation itself? This paper discusses the problem of simulation safety, with the focus on hybrid modeling and simulation. In particular, two key aspects are studied: safe zero-crossing detection and deterministic hybrid event handling. The problems and solutions are discussed and partially implemented in Modelica and Ptolemy II.
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    In this paper, we propose a knowledge-guided pose grammar network to tackle the problem of 3D human pose estimation. Our model directly takes 2D poses as inputs and learns the generalized 2D-3D mapping function, which renders high applicability. The proposed network consists of a base network which efficiently captures pose-aligned features and a hierarchy of Bidirectional RNNs on top of it to explicitly incorporate a set of knowledge (e.g., kinematics, symmetry, motor coordination) and thus enforce high-level constraints over human poses. In learning, we develop a pose-guided sample simulator to augment training samples in virtual camera views, which further improves the generalization ability of our model. We validate our method on public 3D human pose benchmarks and propose a new evaluation protocol working on cross-view setting to verify the generalization ability of different methods. We empirically observe that most state-of-the-arts face difficulty under such setting while our method obtains superior performance.
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    Human gait or the walking manner is a biometric feature that allows to identify a person when other biometric features such as face or iris are not visible. In this paper we present a new pose-based convolutional neural network model for gait recognition. Unlike many methods considering the full-height silhouettes of a moving person, we consider motion of points in the areas around the human joints. To extract the motion information we estimate the optical flow between current and subsequent frames. We propose the deep convolutional model which computes pose-based gait descriptors. We compare different network architectures and aggregation methods. Besides, we experiment with different sets of body parts and learn which of them are the most important for gait recognition. In addition, we investigate the generalization ability of the algorithms transferring them from one dataset to another. The results of the experiments show that our approach outperforms the state-of-the-art methods.
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    We present a scene parsing method that utilizes global context information based on both the parametric and non- parametric models. Compared to previous methods that only exploit the local relationship between objects, we train a context network based on scene similarities to generate feature representations for global contexts. In addition, these learned features are utilized to generate global and spatial priors for explicit classes inference. We then design modules to embed the feature representations and the priors into the segmentation network as additional global context cues. We show that the proposed method can eliminate false positives that are not compatible with the global context representations. Experiments on both the MIT ADE20K and PASCAL Context datasets show that the proposed method performs favorably against existing methods.
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    Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) currently achieve state-of-the-art accuracy in image classification. With a growing number of classes, the accuracy usually drops as the possibilities of confusion increase. Interestingly, the class confusion patterns follow a hierarchical structure over the classes. We present visual-analytics methods to reveal and analyze this hierarchy of similar classes in relation with CNN-internal data. We found that this hierarchy not only dictates the confusion patterns between the classes, it furthermore dictates the learning behavior of CNNs. In particular, the early layers in these networks develop feature detectors that can separate high-level groups of classes quite well, even after a few training epochs. In contrast, the latter layers require substantially more epochs to develop specialized feature detectors that can separate individual classes. We demonstrate how these insights are key to significant improvement in accuracy by designing hierarchy-aware CNNs that accelerate model convergence and alleviate overfitting. We further demonstrate how our methods help in identifying various quality issues in the training data.
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    Spectral efficiency of low-density spreading non-orthogonal multiple access channels in the presence of fading is derived for linear detection with independent decoding as well as optimum decoding. The large system limit, where both the number of users and number of signal dimensions grow with fixed ratio, called load, is considered. In the case of optimum decoding, it is found that low-density spreading underperforms dense spreading for all loads. Conversely, linear detection is characterized by different behaviors in the underloaded vs. overloaded regimes. In particular, it is shown that spectral efficiency changes smoothly as load increases. However, in the overloaded regime, the spectral efficiency of low- density spreading is higher than that of dense spreading.
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    In this work we present a unified method of relative camera pose estimation from points and lines correspondences. Given a set of 2D points and lines correspondences in three views, of which two are known, a method has been developed for estimating the camera pose of the third view. Novelty of this algorithm is to combine both points and lines correspondences in the camera pose estimation which enables us to compute relative camera pose with a small number of feature correspondences. Our central idea is to exploit the tri-linear relationship between three views and generate a set of linear equations from the points and lines correspondences in the three views. The desired solution to the system of equations are expressed as a linear combination of the singular vectors and the coefficients are computed by solving a small set of quadratic equations generated by imposing orthonormality constraints for general camera motion. The advantages of the proposed method are demonstrated by experimenting on publicly available data set. Results show the robustness and efficiency of the method in relative camera pose estimation for both small and large camera motion with a small set of points and line features.
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Recent comments

Bin Shi Oct 05 2017 00:07 UTC

Welcome to give the comments for this paper!

gae Jul 26 2017 21:19 UTC

For those interested in the literature on teleportation simulation of quantum channels, a detailed and *comprehensive* review is provided in Supplementary Note 8 of https://images.nature.com/original/nature-assets/ncomms/2017/170426/ncomms15043/extref/ncomms15043-s1.pdf
The note describes well the t

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SHUAI ZHANG Jul 26 2017 00:20 UTC

I am still working on improving this survey. If you have any suggestions, questions or find any mistakes, please do not hesitate to contact me: shuai.zhang@student.unsw.edu.au.

Eddie Smolansky May 26 2017 05:23 UTC

Updated summary [here](https://github.com/eddiesmo/papers).

# How they made the dataset
- collect youtube videos
- automated filtering with yolo and landmark detection projects
- crowd source final filtering (AMT - give 50 face images to turks and ask which don't belong)
- quality control through s

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Stefano Pirandola May 05 2017 05:45 UTC

Today I have seen on the arXiv the version 2 of this paper on quantum reading. I am sorry to say that this revision still misses to acknowledge important contributions from previous works, especially in relation to the methods on channel simulation and teleportation that are crucial for its claims.

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Lei Cui May 03 2017 09:00 UTC

what's the value for $n$ of n-grams?

Robin Blume-Kohout Apr 07 2017 20:30 UTC

Zak, David: thanks! So (I think) this is a relation problem, not a decision problem (or even a partial function). Which is fine -- I'm happier with relation problems than with sampling problems, and the quantum part of Shor's algorithm is solving a relation problem, which is a pretty good pedigre

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