Superconductivity (cond-mat.supr-con)

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    We propose a model and derive analytical expressions for conductivity in a heterogeneous fully anisotropic conductors with ellipsoid superconducting inclusions. This model and calculations are useful to analyze the observed temperature dependence of conductivity anisotropy in various anisotropic superconductors, where superconductivity onset happens inhomogeneously in the form of isolated superconducting islands. The results are applied to explain the experimental data on resistivity above the transition temperature $T_c$ in high-temperature superconductor YBa$_2$Cu$_4$O$_8$
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    The normal state of cuprate superconductors exhibit many exotic behaviors[1][2] qualitatively different from the Fermi liquid (FL), the foundation of condensed matter physics. Here we demonstrate that non-Fermi liquid behaviors emerge naturally from scattering against a two-orbital bosonic liquid of preformed pairs. Particularly, we find a finite zero-energy dissipation at low-temperature limit that grows linearly with respect to temperature, against the characteristics of Fermi liquid. In essence, unlike the diminishing low-energy phase space of FL, the peculiar feature of strong thermal fluctuation in a bosonic system with fixed particle number guarantees non-vanishing scattering channels even at low-temperature limit. Unexpectedly, our resulting quasiparticle dispersion also contains the experimentally observed "kink"[3-9], indicating that the widely investigated kink feature is in fact another manifestation of the non-FL scattering. Furthermore, the scattering rate also shows the observed puzzling correlation with the low-temperature superconducting gap[10]. Our findings provide a generic route for fermionic systems to generate non-Fermi liquid behavior, and suggest strongly that the cuprates be in this exotic regime in which doped holes develop bosonic features by forming tightly bound pairs, whose low-temperature condensation gives unconventional superconductivity.
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    In many superconducting devices, including qubits, quasiparticle excitations are detrimental. A normal metal ($N$) in contact with a superconductor ($S$) can trap these excitations; therefore such a trap can potentially improve the devices performances. The two materials influence each other, a phenomenon known as proximity effect which has drawn attention since the '60s. Here we study whether this mutual influence places a limitation on the possible performance improvement in superconducting qubits. We first revisit the proximity effect in uniform $NS$ bilayers; despite the long history of this problem, we present novel findings for the density of states. We then extend our results to describe a non-uniform system in the vicinity of a trap edge. Using these results together with a phenomenological model for the suppression of the quasiparticle density due to the trap, we find in a transmon qubit an optimum trap-junction distance at which the qubit relaxation rate is minimized. This optimum distance, of the order of 4 to 20 coherence lengths, originates from the competition between proximity effect and quasiparticle density suppression. We conclude that the harmful influence of the proximity effect can be avoided so long as the trap is farther away from the junction than this optimum.
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    We have investigated the in-gap bound states (IGBS) induced by a single nonmagnetic impurity in multiband superconductors with incipient bands. Contrary to the naive expectation, we found that even if the superconducting (SC) order parameter is sign-preserving s-wave on the Fermi surfaces, the incipient bands may still affect the appearance and locations of the IGBS, although the gap between the incipient bands and the Fermi level is much larger than the SC gap. Therefore in scanning tunneling microscopy experiments, the IGBS induced by a single nonmagnetic impurity are not the definitive evidences for the sign-changing order parameter on the Fermi surfaces. Our findings have special implications for the experimental determination of the pairing symmetry in the FeSe-based superconductors.
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    The properties of cuprate high-temperature superconductors are largely shaped by competing phases whose nature is often a mystery. Chiefly among them is the pseudogap phase, which sets in at a doping $p^*$ that is material-dependent. What determines $p^*$ is currently an open question. Here we show that the pseudogap cannot open on an electron-like Fermi surface, and can only exist below the doping $p_{FS}$ at which the large Fermi surface goes from hole-like to electron-like, so that $p^*$ $\leq$ $p_{FS}$. We derive this result from high-magnetic-field transport measurements in La$_{1.6-x}$Nd$_{0.4}$Sr$_x$CuO$_4$ under pressure, which reveal a large and unexpected shift of $p^*$ with pressure, driven by a corresponding shift in $p_{FS}$. This necessary condition for pseudogap formation, imposed by details of the Fermi surface, is a strong constraint for theories of the pseudogap phase. Our finding that $p^*$ can be tuned with a modest pressure opens a new route for experimental studies of the pseudogap.
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    We investigated transient optical responses in an optimally-doped high-Tc superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4 (x=0.15) by using 800-nm optical pump and terahertz probe spectroscopy. With increasing the photoexcitation intensities, the Josephson plasma resonance shows a gradual redshift, indicating the suppression of superconductivity by the photoexcitation. With further increasing the photoexcitation intensities, a new longitudinal mode in the loss function spectrum appears and grows from the high energy side, accompanied by a new transverse mode as manifested in the conductivity spectrum. The observed spectra are described by the multilayer model with alternating interlayer Josephson couplings. The new longitudinal and transverse modes sustain much longer than several hundred picoseconds after the photoexcitation, indicating that the new metastable phase with possessing alternating interlayer Josephson couplings is induced by the strong photoexcitation.
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    We report on experimentally measured light shifts of superconducting flux qubits deep-strongly-coupled to an LC oscillator, where the coupling constant is comparable to the qubit's transition frequency and the oscillator's resonance frequency. By using two-tone spectroscopy, the energies of the six-lowest levels of the coupled circuits are determined. We find a huge Lamb shift that exceeds 90% of the bare qubit frequencies and inversion of the qubits' ground and excited states when there is a finite number of photons in the oscillator. Our experimental results agree with theoretical predictions based on the quantum Rabi model.
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    We study magnitudes and temperature dependences of the electron-electron and electron-phonon interaction times which play the dominant role in the formation and relaxation of photon induced hotspot in two dimensional amorphous WSi films. The time constants are obtained through magnetoconductance measurements in perpendicular magnetic field in the superconducting fluctuation regime and through time-resolved photoresponse to optical pulses. The excess magnetoconductivity is interpreted in terms of the weak-localization effect and superconducting fluctuations. Aslamazov-Larkin, and Maki-Thompson superconducting fluctuation alone fail to reproduce the magnetic field dependence in the relatively high magnetic field range when the temperature is rather close to Tc because the suppression of the electronic density of states due to the formation of short lifetime Cooper pairs needs to be considered. The time scale \tau_i of inelastic scattering is ascribed to a combination of electron-electron (\tau_(e-e)) and electron-phonon (\tau_(e-ph)) interaction times, and a characteristic electron-fluctuation time (\tau_(e-fl)), which makes it possible to extract their magnitudes and temperature dependences from the measured \tau_i. The ratio of phonon-electron (\tau_(ph-e)) and electron-phonon interaction times is obtained via measurements of the optical photoresponse of WSi microbridges. Relatively large \tau_(e-ph)/\tau_(ph-e) and \tau_(e-ph)/\tau_(e-e) ratios ensure that in WSi the photon energy is more efficiently confined in the electron subsystem than in other materials commonly used in the technology of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs). We discuss the impact of interaction times on the hotspot dynamics and compare relevant metrics of SNSPDs from different materials.
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    A quantum system of particles can exist in a localized phase, exhibiting ergodicity breaking and maintaining forever a local memory of its initial conditions. We generalize this concept to a system of extended objects, such as strings and membranes, arguing that such a system can also exhibit localization in the presence of sufficiently strong disorder (randomness) in the Hamiltonian. We show that localization of large extended objects can be mapped to a lower-dimensional many-body localization problem. For example, motion of a string involves propagation of point-like signals down its length to keep the different segments in causal contact. For sufficiently strong disorder, all such internal modes will exhibit many-body localization, resulting in the localization of the entire string. The eigenstates of the system can then be constructed perturbatively through a convergent 'string locator expansion.' We propose a type of out-of-time-order string correlator as a diagnostic of such a string localized phase. Localization of other higher-dimensional objects, such as membranes, can also be studied through a hierarchical construction by mapping onto localization of lower-dimensional objects. Our arguments are 'asymptotic' (i.e. valid up to rare regions) but they extend the notion of localization (and localization protected order) to a host of settings where such ideas previously did not apply. These include high-dimensional ferromagnets with domain wall excitations, three-dimensional topological phases with loop-like excitations, and three-dimensional type-II superconductors with flux line excitations. In type-II superconductors, localization of flux lines could stabilize superconductivity at energy densities where a normal state would arise in thermal equilibrium.