Superconductivity (cond-mat.supr-con)

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    Josephson junctions made from aluminium and its oxide are the most commonly used functional elements for superconducting circuits and qubits. It is generally known that the disordered thin-film AlOx contains atomic tunneling systems. Coherent tunneling systems may couple strongly to a qubit via their electric dipole moment, giving rise to spectral level repulsion. In addition, slowly fluctuating tunneling systems are observable when they are located close to coherent ones and distort their potentials. This interaction causes telegraphic switching of the coherent tunneling systems' energy splitting. Here, we measure such switching induced by individual fluctuators on time scales from hours to minutes using a superconducting qubit as a detector. Moreover, we extend the range of measurable switching times to millisecond scales by employing a highly sensitive single-photon qubit swap spectroscopy and statistical analysis of the measured qubit states.
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    Mott insulators form because of strong electron repulsions, being at the heart of strongly correlated electron physics. Conventionally these are understood as classical "traffic jams" of electrons described by a short-ranged entangled product ground state. Exploiting the holographic duality, which maps the physics of densely entangled matter onto gravitational black hole physics, we show how Mott-insulators can be constructed departing from entangled non-Fermi liquid metallic states, such as the strange metals found in cuprate superconductors. These "entangled Mott insulators" have traits in common with the "classical" Mott insulators, such as the formation of Mott gap in the optical conductivity, super-exchange-like interactions, and form "stripes" when doped. They also exhibit new properties: the ordering wave vectors are detached from the number of electrons in the unit cell, and the DC resistivity diverges algebraically instead of exponentially as function of temperature. These results may shed light on the mysterious ordering phenomena observed in underdoped cuprates.
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    The recent discovery of superconductivity in a metallic aromatic hydrocarbon, alkali-doped p-Terphenyl, has attracted considerable interest. The critical temperature Tc ranges from few to 123 K, the record for organic superconductors, due to uncontrolled competition of multiple phases and dopant concentration. In the proposed mechanism of Fano resonance in a superlattice of quantum wires with coexisting polarons and Fermi particles, the lattice properties play a key role. Here we report a study of the temperature evolution of the parent compound p-Terphenyl crystal structure proposed to be made of a self-assembled supramolecular network of nanoscale nanoribbons. Using temperature dependent synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction we report the anisotropic thermal expansion in the ab plane, which supports the presence of a nanoscale network of one-dimensional nanoribbons running in the b-axis direction in the P21/a structure. Below the enantiotropic phase transition at 193 K the order parameter of the C-1 structure follows a power law behaviour with the critical exponent 0.34 and the thermal expansion of the a-axis and b-axis show major changes supporting the formation of a two-dimensional bonds network. The large temperature range of the orientation fluctuations in a double well potential of the central phenyl has been determined.
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    We study the effect of phase slips in a quasi 1d superconducting channel along which a current flows and report a new phenomenon where an avalanche of phase slips occurs. This limits the critical current in thin films and wires and drives the system to a topological phase transition at a temperature lower than the bulk critical temperature. We describe the mechanism of such a catastrophic phase slip avalanche and, following Kosterlitz and Thouless, we use group renormalization techniques to derive an exact analytical expression for the critical current as a function of film width and temperature. Our results are in very good agreement with, and reproduce, the available experimental data on superconducting MgB$_2$ thin films. The phenomenon we describe is very general and can be used in the construction of new devices where the superconducting state can coexist with the normal state.
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    We find a series of topological phase transitions of increasing order, beyond the more standard second-order phase transition in a one-dimensional topological superconductor. The jumps in the order of the transitions depend on the range of the pairing interaction, which is parametrized by an algebraic decay with exponent $\alpha$. Remarkably, in the limit $\alpha = 1$ the order of the topological transition becomes infinite. We compute the critical exponents for the series of higher-order transitions in exact form and find that they fulfil the hyperscaling relation. We also study the critical behaviour at the boundary of the system and discuss potential experimental platforms of magnetic atoms in superconductors.
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    Substantial experimental investigation has provided evidence for spin-triplet pairing in diverse classes of materials and in a variety of artificial heterostructures. A fundamental challenge in actual experiments is how to manipulate the topological behavior of $p$-wave superconductors (PSCs) that could open perspectives for applications. Such a control knob is naturally provided by the spin-triplet character of the PSC order parameter, described by the spin d-vector. Therefore, in this work we investigate the magnetic field response of one-dimensional (1d) PSCs and demonstrate that the structure of the Cooper pair spin-configuration is crucial to set topological phases with an enhanced number of Majorana fermions per edge, N, ranging from N=0 to 4. The topological phase diagram, consisting of phases with Majorana modes at the edge, becomes significantly modified when one tunes the strength of the applied field and allows for long range hopping amplitudes in the 1d PSC. We find transitions between phases with different number of Majorana fermions per edge that can be both induced by a variation of the hopping strength and a spin rotation of the d-vector. Hence, the interplay of the applied magnetic field and the internal spin degree of freedom of the PSC opens a new promising route for engineering topological phases with large number of Majorana modes.
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    We theoretically explore the superconducting critical temperature of hole doped blue phosphorene. Implementing the density functional theory calculations, we show that for the hole doped blue phosphorene, the isotropic superconducting state is induced owing to the quite strong electron-phonon coupling. The theory is based on the Migdal-Eliashberg formalism and the critical temperature is obtained through set-of-equations, self-consistency. In addition, we include a vertex correction diagram to the Migdal-Eliashberg formalism. The inclusion of the vertex correction beyond the Migdal-Eliashberg formalism changes the $T_c$ about $\pm20$K, depending on the level of the doping. Our accurate numerical results show that the superconducting critical temperature is still quite high, even in the cases that the vertex correction is implemented.
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    When magnetic field is applied to metals and semimetals quantum oscillations appear as individual Landau levels cross the Fermi level. Quantum oscillations generally do not occur in superconductors (SC) because magnetic field is either expelled from the sample interior or, if strong enough, drives the material into the normal state. In addition, elementary excitations of a superconductor -- Bogoliubov quasiparticles -- do not carry a well defined electric charge and therefore do not couple in a simple way to the applied magnetic field. We predict here that in Weyl superconductors certain types of elastic strain have the ability to induce chiral pseudo-magnetic field which can reorganize the electronic states into Dirac-Landau levels with linear band crossings at low energy. The resulting quantum oscillations in the quasiparticle density of states and thermal conductivity can be experimentally observed under a bending deformation of a thin film Weyl SC and provide new insights into this fascinating family of materials.
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    This paper presents a simple approach to increase the normal zone propagation velocity in (RE)BaCuO thin films grown on a flexible metallic substrate, also called superconducting tapes. The key idea behind this approach is to use a specific geometry of the silver thermal stabilizer that surrounds the superconducting tape. More specifically, a very thin layer of silver stabilizer is deposited on top of the superconductor layer, typically less than 100 nm, while the remaining stabilizer (still silver) is deposited on the substrate side. Normal zone propagation velocities up to 170 cm/s have been measured experimentally, corresponding to a stabilizer thickness of 20 nm on top of the superconductor layer. This is one order of magnitude faster than the speed measured on actual commercial tapes. Our results clearly demonstrate that a very thin stabilizer on top of the superconductor layer leads to high normal zone propagation velocities. The experimental values are in good agreement with predictions realized by finite element simulations. Furthermore, the propagation of the normal zone during the quench was recorded in situ and in real time using a high-speed camera. Due to high Joule losses generated on both edges of the tape sample, a "U-shaped" profile could be observed at the boundaries between the superconducting and the normal zones, which matches very closely the profile predicted by the simulations.
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    Experimental evidence for Majorana bound states (MBSs) is so far mainly based on the robustness of a zero-bias conductance peak. However, similar features can also arise due to Andreev bound states (ABSs) localized at the end of an island. We show that these two scenarios can be distinguished by an interferometry experiment based on embedding a Coulomb-blockaded island into an Aharonov-Bohm ring. For two ABSs, when the ground state is nearly degenerate, cotunneling can change the state of the island and interference is suppressed. By contrast, for two MBSs the ground state is nondegenerate and cotunneling has to preserve the island state, which leads to $h / e$-periodic conductance oscillations with magnetic flux. Such interference setups can be realized with semiconducting nanowires or two-dimensional electron gases with proximity-induced superconductivity and may also be a useful spectroscopic tool for parity-flip mechanisms.
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    We consider multi-time correlators for output signals from linear detectors, continuously measuring several qubit observables at the same time. Using the quantum Bayesian formalism, we show that for unital (symmetric) evolution in the absence of phase backaction, an $N$-time correlator can be expressed as a product of two-time correlators when $N$ is even. For odd $N$, there is a similar factorization, which also includes a single-time average. Theoretical predictions agree well with experimental results for two detectors, which simultaneously measure non-commuting qubit observables.
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    Superconducting transport properties of granular materials are greatly influenced by the microstructure. We show that in heavily boron-doped diamond films (HBDDF) films some sharp transport features can be manipulated by applying a magnetic field and controlled finite bias current. We demonstrate the conductivity cross-over from dirty metal to the superconducting state through an insulating peak arising at a very low current or magnetic field region and particularly pronounced negative magnetoresistance with periodic oscillatory features. The current-voltage characteristics show features of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) phase transitions which verifies the two-dimensional structure in HBDDF observed recently. A zero bias conductance peak can be attributed to the Andreev bound state formed at the grain boundaries of diamond nanocrystals. The set of observations can be qualitatively explained consistently through the concept of a superconducting transition with a non-s wave order parameter in the diamond heterostructures.
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    We study operation of a new device, the superconducting differential double contour interferometer (DDCI), in application for the ultra sensitive detection of magnetic flux and for digital read out of the state of the superconducting flux qubit. DDCI consists of two superconducting contours weakly coupled by Josephson Junctions. In such a device a change of the critical current and the voltage happens in a step-like manner when the angular momentum quantum number changes in one of the two contours. The DDCI may outperform traditional Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices when the change of the quantum number occurs in a narrow magnetic field region near the half of the flux quantum due to thermal fluctuations, quantum fluctuations, or the switching a loop segment in the normal state for a while by short pulse of an external current.