Superconductivity (cond-mat.supr-con)

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    Superconducting detectors are now well-established tools for low-light optics, and in particular quantum optics, boasting high-efficiency, fast response and low noise. Similarly, lithium niobate is an important platform for integrated optics given its high second-order nonlinearity, used for high-speed electro-optic modulation and polarization conversion, as well as frequency conversion and sources of quantum light. Combining these technologies addresses the requirements for a single platform capable of generating, manipulating and measuring quantum light in many degrees of freedom, in a compact and potentially scalable manner. We will report on progress integrating tungsten transition-edge sensors (TESs) and amorphous tungsten silicide superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) on titanium in-diffused lithium niobate waveguides. The travelling-wave design couples the evanescent field from the waveguides into the superconducting absorber. We will report on simulations and measurements of the absorption, which we can characterize at room temperature prior to cooling down the devices. Independently, we show how the detectors respond to flood illumination, normally incident on the devices, demonstrating their functionality.
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    We address the question about the origin of the $\frac12 \frac{e^2}{h}$ conductance plateau observed in a recent experiment on an integer quantum Hall (IQH) film covered by a superconducting (SC) film. Since 1-dimensional (1D) chiral Majorana fermions can give rise to the half quantized plateau, such a plateau was regarded as a smoking-gun evidence for the chiral Majorana fermions. However, in this paper we give another mechanism for the $\frac12 \frac{e^2}{h}$ conductance plateau. We find the $\frac12 \frac{e^2}{h}$ conductance plateau to be a general feature of a good electric contact between the IQH film and SC film, and cannot distinguish the existence or non-existence of 1D chiral Majorana fermions.
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    We report on the fabrication and electrical transport properties of superconducting junctions made of \beta-Ag$_{2}$Se topological insulator (TI) nanowires in contact with Al superconducting electrodes. The temperature dependence of the critical current indicates that the superconducting junction belongs to a short and diffusive junction regime. As a characteristic feature of the narrow junction, the critical current decreases monotonously with increasing magnetic field. The stochastic distribution of the switching current exhibits the macroscopic quantum tunneling behavior, which is robust up to T = 0.8 K. Our observations indicate that the TI nanowire-based Josephson junctions can be a promising building block for the development of nanohybrid superconducting quantum bits.
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    We report an unexpected positive hydrostatic pressure derivative of the superconducting transition temperature in the doped topological insulator \NBS via $dc$ SQUID magnetometry in pressures up to 0.6 GPa. This result is contrary to reports on the homologues \CBS and \SBS where smooth suppression of $T_c$ is observed. Our results are consistent with recent Ginzburg-Landau theory predictions of a pressure-induced enhancement of $T_c$ in the nematic multicomponent $E_u$ state proposed to explain observations of rotational symmetry breaking in doped Bi$_2$Se$_3$ superconductors.
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    Controlling both the amplitude and phase of the quantum order parameter (\psi) in nanostructures is important for next-generation information and communication technologies. The long-range coherence of attractive electrons in superconductors render these materials as a nearly ideal platform for such applications. To-date, control over \psi has remained limited to the macroscopic scale, either by adjusting untunable materials properties, such as film thickness, stoichiometry and homogeneity or by tuning external magnetic fields. Yet, although local tuning of \psi is desired, the lack of electric resistance in superconductors, which may be advantageous for some technologies hinders convenient voltage-bias tuning. Likewise, challenges related to nanoscale fabrication of superconductors encumber local tunability of \psi. Here, we demonstrate local tunability of \psi, obtained by patterning with a single lithography step a Nb nano superconducting quantum interference device (nano-SQUID) that is biased at its nano bridges. Our design helped us reveal also unusual electric characteristics-effective zero inductance, which is promising for quantum technologies and nanoscale magnetic sensing. Finally, we accompanied our experimental results by a semi-classical model, which not only is extending the applicability of our devices, but is also useful for describing planar nano-SQUIDs in general.
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    We report the discovery of superconductivity in pressurized CeRhGe3, until now the only remaining non-superconducting member of the isostructural family of non-centrosymmetric heavy-fermion compounds CeTX3 (T = Co, Rh, Ir and X = Si, Ge). Superconductivity appears in CeRhGe3 at a pressure of 19.6 GPa and the transition temperature Tc reaches a maximum value of 1.3 K at 21.5 GPa. This finding provides an opportunity to establish systematic correlations between superconductivity and materials properties within this family. Though ambient-pressure unit-cell volumes and critical pressures for superconductivity vary substantially across the series, all family members reach a maximum Tcmax at a common critical cell volume Vcrit, and Tcmax at Vcrit increases with increasing spin-orbit coupling strength of the d-electrons. These correlations show that substantial Kondo hybridization and spin-orbit coupling favor superconductivity in this family, the latter reflecting the role of broken centro-symmetry.
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    A two-dimensional time-reversal symmetric topological superconductors is fully a gapped system possessing a helical Majorana mode on the edges. This helical Majorana edge mode (HMEM), which is a Kramer's pair of two chiral Majorana edge modes in the opposite propagating directions, is robust under the time-reversal symmetry protection. We propose a feasible setup and accessible measurement to provide the preliminary step of the HMEM realization by studying superconducting antiferromagnetic quantum spin Hall insulators. Since this antiferromagnetic topological insulator hosts a helical electron edge mode and preserves effective time-reversal symmetry, which is the combination of time-reversal symmetry and crystalline symmetry, the proximity effect of the conventional $s$-wave superconducting pairing can induce a single HMEM. We further show the HMEM leads to the observation of a $e^2/h$ conductance and this quantized conductance survives in the presence of small symmetry-breaking disorders.