Strongly Correlated Electrons (cond-mat.str-el)

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    We introduce a toy holographic correspondence based on the multi-scale entanglement renormalization ansatz (MERA) representation of ground states of local Hamiltonians. Given a MERA representation of the ground state of a local Hamiltonian acting on an one dimensional `boundary' lattice, we lift it to a tensor network representation of a quantum state of a dual two dimensional `bulk' hyperbolic lattice. The dual bulk degrees of freedom are associated with the bonds of the MERA, which describe the renormalization group flow of the ground state, and the bulk tensor network is obtained by inserting tensors with open indices on the bonds of the MERA. We explore properties of `copy bulk states'---particular bulk states that correspond to inserting the copy tensor on the bonds of the MERA. We show that entanglement in copy bulk states is organized according to holographic screens, and that expectation values of certain extended operators in a copy bulk state, dual to a critical ground state, are proportional to $n$-point correlators of the critical ground state. We also present numerical results to illustrate e.g. that copy bulk states, dual to ground states of several critical spin chains, have exponentially decaying correlations, and that the correlation length generally decreases with increase in central charge for these models. Our toy model illustrates a possible approach for deducing an emergent bulk description from the MERA, in light of the on-going dialogue between tensor networks and holography.
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    Kitaev's quantum double models, including the toric code, are canonical examples of quantum topological models on a 2D spin lattice. Their Hamiltonian define the groundspace by imposing an energy penalty to any nontrivial flux or charge, but treats any such violation in the same way. Thus, their energy spectrum is very simple. We introduce a new family of quantum double Hamiltonians with adjustable coupling constants that allow us to tune the energy of anyons while conserving the same groundspace as Kitaev's original construction. Those Hamiltonians are made of commuting four-body projectors that provide an intricate splitting of the Hilbert space.
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    A Chern-Simons theory in 3D is accomplished by the so-called $\theta$-term in the action, $(\theta/2)\int F\wedge F$, which contributes only to observable effects on the boundaries of such a system. When electromagnetic radiation interacts with the system, the wave is reflected and its polarization is rotated at the interface, even when both the $\theta$-system and the environment are pure vacuum. These topics have been studied extensively. Here, we investigate the optical properties of a thin $\theta$-film, where multiple internal reflections could interfere coherently. The cases of pure vacuum and a material with magneto-electric properties are analyzed. It is found that the film reflectance is enhanced compared to ordinary non-$\theta$ systems and the interplay between magneto-electric properties and $\theta$ parameter yield film opacity and polarization properties which could be interesting in the case of topological insulators, among other topological systems.
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    The study of localization phenomena - pioneered in Anderson's seminal work on the absence of diffusion in certain random lattices [1] - is receiving redoubled attention in the context of the physics of interacting systems showing many-body localization [2-5]. While in these systems the presence of quenched disorder plays a central role, suggestions for interaction-induced localization in disorder-free systems appeared early in the context of solid Helium [6]. However, all of these are limited to settings having inhomogeneous initial states [7-9]. Whether quenched disorder is a general precondition for localization has remained an open question. Here, we provide an explicit example to demonstrate that a disorder-free system can generate its own randomness dynamically, which leads to localization in one of its subsystems. Our model is exactly soluble, thanks to an extensive number of conserved quantities, which we identify, allowing access to the physics of the long-time limit. The model can be extended while preserving its solubility, in particular towards investigations of disorder-free localization in higher dimensions.
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    Many complex oxides (including titanates, nickelates and cuprates) show a regime in which resistivity follows a power law in temperature ($\rho\propto T^2$). By analogy to a similar phenomenon observed in some metals at low temperature, this has often been attributed to electron-electron (Baber) scattering. We show that Baber scattering results in a $T^2$ power law only under several crucial assumptions which may not hold for complex oxides. We illustrate this with sodium metal ($\rho_\text{el-el}\propto T^2$) and strontium titanate ($\rho_\text{el-el}\not\propto T^2$). We conclude that an observation of $\rho\propto T^2$ is not sufficient evidence for electron-electron scattering.
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    The Heisenberg model for S=1/2 describes the interacting spins of electrons localized on lattice sites due to strong repulsion. It is the simplest strong-coupling model in condensed matter physics with wide-spread applications. Its relevance has been boosted further by the discovery of curate high-temperature superconductors. In leading order, their undoped parent compounds realize the Heisenberg model on square-lattices. Much is known about the model, but mostly at small wave vectors, i.e., for long-range processes, where the physics is governed by spin waves (magnons), the Goldstone bosons of the long-range ordered antiferromagnetic phase. Much less, however, is known for short-range processes, i.e., at large wave vectors. Yet these processes are decisive for understanding high-temperature superconductivity. Recent reports suggest that one has to resort to qualitatively different fractional excitations, spinons. By contrast, we present a comprehensive picture in terms of dressed magnons with strong mutual attraction on short length scales. The resulting spectral signatures agree strikingly with experimental data
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    We introduce a matrix-product state based method to efficiently obtain dynamical response functions for two-dimensional microscopic Hamiltonians, which we apply to different phases of the Kitaev-Heisenberg model. We find significant broad high energy features beyond spin-wave theory even in the ordered phases proximate to spin liquids. This includes the phase with zig-zag order of the type observed in $\alpha$-RuCl$_3$, where we find high energy features like those seen in inelastic neutron scattering experiments. Our results provide an example of a natural path for proximate spin liquid features to arise at high energies above a conventionally ordered state, as the diffuse remnants of spin-wave bands intersect to yield a broad peak at the Brillouin zone center.
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    Molecular wires of the acene-family can be viewed as a physical realization of a two-rung ladder Hamiltonian. For acene-ladders, closed-shell ab-initio calculations and elementary zone-folding arguments predict incommensurate gap oscillations as a function of the number of repetitive ring units, $N_{\text{R}}$, exhibiting a period of about ten rings. %% Results employing open-shell calculations and a mean-field treatment of interactions suggest anti-ferromagnetic correlations that could potentially open a large gap and wash out the gap oscillations. % Within the framework of a Hubbard model with repulsive on-site interaction, $U$, we employ a Hartree-Fock analysis and the density matrix renormalization group to investigate the interplay of gap oscillations and interactions. % We confirm the persistence of incommensurate oscillations in acene-type ladder systems for a significant fraction of parameter space spanned by $U$ and $N_{\text{R}}$.
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    We consider the spontaneous formation of striped structures in a holographic model which possesses explicit translational symmetry breaking, dual to an ionic lattice with spatially modulated chemical potential. We focus on the perturbative study of the marginal modes which drive the transition to a phase exhibiting spontaneous stripes. We study the wave-vectors of the instabilities with largest critical temperature in a wide range of backgrounds characterized by the period and the amplitude of the chemical potential modulation. We report the first holographic observation of the commensurate lock-in between the spontaneous stripes and the underlying ionic lattice, which takes place when the amplitude of the lattice is large enough. We also observe an incommensurate regime in which the amplitude of the lattice is finite, but the preferred stripe wave-vector is different from that of the lattice. We find that the new commensurate phase, arising due to the above mentioned instabilities, presents features that make it a promising candidate for a holographic dual of a Mott insulator.
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    Recent experiments on quantum criticality in the Ge-substituted heavy-electron material YbRh2Si2 under magnetic field have revealed a possible non-Fermi liquid (NFL) strange metal (SM) state over a finite range of fields at low temperatures, which still remains a puzzle. In the SM region, the zero-field antiferromagnetism is suppressed. Above a critical field, it gives way to a heavy Fermi liquid with Kondo correlation. The T (temperature)-linear resistivity and the T-logarithmic followed by a power-law singularity in the specific heat coefficient at low T, salient NFL behaviours in the SM region, are un-explained. We offer a mechanism to address these open issues theoretically based on the competition between a quasi-2d fluctuating short-ranged resonant- valence-bonds (RVB) spin-liquid and the Kondo correlation near criticality. Via a field-theoretical renormalization group analysis on an effective field theory beyond a large-N approach to an anti- ferromagnetic Kondo-Heisenberg model, we identify the critical point, and explain remarkably well both the crossovers and the SM behaviour.
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    Wavefunctions restricted to electron-pair states are promising models to describe static/nondynamic electron correlation effects encountered, for instance, in bond-dissociation processes and transition-metal and actinide chemistry. To reach spectroscopic accuracy, however, the missing dynamic electron correlation effects that cannot be described by electron-pair states need to be included \textita posteriori. In this article, we extend the previously presented perturbation theory models with an Antisymmetric Product of 1-reference orbital Geminal (AP1roG) reference function that allow us to describe both static/nondynamic and dynamic electron correlation effects. Specifically, our perturbation theory models combine a diagonal and off-diagonal zero-order Hamiltonian, a single-reference and multi-reference dual state, and different excitation operators used to construct the projection manifold. We benchmark all proposed models as well as an \textita posteriori linearized coupled cluster correction on top of AP1roG against CR-CCSD(T) reference data for reaction energies of several closed-shell molecules that are extrapolated to the basis set limit. Moreover, we test the performance of our new methods for multiple bond breaking processes in the N$_2$, C$_2$, and BN dimers against MRCI-SD and MRCI-SD+Q reference data. Our numerical results indicate that the best performance is obtained from a linearized coupled cluster correction as well as second-order perturbation theory corrections employing a diagonal and off-diagonal zero-order Hamiltonian and a single-determinant dual state. These dynamic corrections on top of AP1roG allow us to reliably model molecular systems dominated by static/nondynamic as well as dynamic electron correlation.
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    We explore the magnetic phases in a Kondo lattice model on the geometrically frustrated Shastry-Sutherland lattice at metallic electron densities, searching for topologically non-trivial chiral spin textures. Motivated by experimental observations in many rare earth based frustrated metallic magnets, we treat the local moments as classical spins and set the coupling between the itinerant electrons and local moments as the largest energy scale in the problem. Our results show that a canted flux state with non-zero static chirality is stabilized over an extended range of Hamiltonian parameters. The chiral spin state can be quenched efficiently by external fields like temperature and magnetic field as well as by varying the degree of frustration in the electronic itinerancy. Interestingly, unlike insulating electron densities, a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction between the local moments is not essential for the emergence of their non-coplanar ordering.
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    The thermal and electrical transport properties of single-crystalline LaBe$_{13}$ have been investigated by specific-heat ($C$) and electrical-resistivity ($\rho$) measurements. The specific-heat measurements in a wide temperature range revealed the presence of a hump anomaly near 40 K in the $C$($T$)/$T$ curve, indicating that LaBe$_{13}$ has a low-energy Einstein-like-phonon mode with a characteristic temperature of $\sim$ 177 K. In addition, a superconducting transition was observed in the $\rho$ measurements at the transition temperature of 0.53 K, which is higher than the value of 0.27 K reported previously by Bonville et al. Furthermore, an unusual $T^3$ dependence was found in $\rho$($T$) below $\sim$ 50 K, in contrast to the behavior expected from the electron--electron scattering or the electron--Debye phonon scattering.

Recent comments

JRW Aug 18 2016 16:42 UTC

A video of a talk I gave this morning will be [here][1], if it ever finishes uploading.

[1]: https://youtu.be/I8cMY0AmIY0

Valentin Zauner-Stauber Jul 18 2016 09:54 UTC

Conjugate Gradient IS a Krylov-space method...

Stephen Jordan Apr 15 2016 15:02 UTC

This is a beautiful set of lecture notes.

Bill Plick Sep 16 2015 13:11 UTC

Ha!

For some background:

http://schroedingersrat.blogspot.fr/2014/07/letter-to-european-research-council.html

Marco Tomamichel Jul 17 2015 05:12 UTC

I am no expert at all on strongly correlated systems or topological order, but since you refer to information theory in your abstract, let me still ask you: What is the justification for using $I_2(A:B) = H_2(A) + H_2(B) - H_2(AB)$ for the Rényi mutual information? This quantity has no information-t

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