Statistical Mechanics (cond-mat.stat-mech)

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    We theoretically study a simple non-equilibrium quantum network whose dynamics can be expressed and exactly solved in terms of a time-local master equation. Specifically, we consider a pair of coupled fermionic modes, each one locally exchanging energy and particles with an independent, macroscopic thermal reservoir. We show that the generator of the asymptotic master equation is not additive, i.e. it cannot be expressed as a sum of contributions describing the action of each reservoir alone. Instead, we identify an additional interference term that generates coherences in the energy eigenbasis, associated with the current of conserved particles flowing in the steady state. Notably, non-additivity arises even for wide-band reservoirs coupled arbitrarily weakly to the system. Our results shed light on the non-trivial interplay between multiple thermal noise sources in modular open quantum systems.
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    The Gardner transition is the transition that at mean-field level separates a stable glass phase from a marginally stable phase. This transition has similarities with the de Almeida-Thouless transition of spin glasses. We have studied a well-understood problem, that of disks moving in a narrow channel, which shows many features usually associated with the Gardner transition. However, we can show that some of these features are artifacts that arise when a disk escapes its local cage during the quench to higher densities. There is evidence that the Gardner transition becomes an avoided transition, in that the correlation length becomes quite large, of order 15 particle diameters, even in our quasi-one-dimensional system.
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    Many systems in nature and laboratories are far from equilibrium and exhibit significant fluctuations, invalidating the key assumptions of small fluctuations and short memory time in or near equilibrium. A full knowledge of Probability Distribution Functions (PDFs), especially time-dependent PDFs, becomes essential in understanding far-from-equilibrium processes. We consider a stochastic logistic model with multiplicative noise, which has gamma distributions as stationary PDFs. We numerically solve the transient relaxation problem, and show that as the strength of the stochastic noise increases the time-dependent PDFs increasingly deviate from gamma distributions. For sufficiently strong noise a transition occurs whereby the PDF never reaches a stationary state, but instead forms a peak that becomes ever more narrowly concentrated at the origin. The addition of an arbitrarily small amount of additive noise regularizes these solutions, and re-establishes the existence of stationary solutions. In addition to diagnostic quantities such as mean value, standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis, the transitions between different solutions are analyzed in terms of entropy and information length, the total number of statistically distinguishable states that a system passes through in time.
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    We solve an adaptive search model where a random walker or Lévy flight stochastically resets to previously visited sites on a $d$-dimensional lattice containing one trapping site. Due to reinforcement, a phase transition occurs when the resetting rate crosses a threshold above which non-diffusive stationary states emerge, localized around the inhomogeneity. The threshold depends on the trapping strength and on the walker's return probability in the memoryless case. The transition belongs to the same class as the self-consistent theory of Anderson localization. These results show that similarly to many living organisms and unlike the well-studied Markovian walks, non-Markov movement processes can allow agents to learn about their environment and promise to bring adaptive solutions in search tasks.
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    We investigate the mean first passage time of an active Brownian particle in one dimension using numerical simulations. The activity in one dimension is modeled as a two state model; the particle moves with a constant propulsion strength but its orientation switches from one state to other as in a random telegraphic process. We study the influence of a finite resetting rate $r$ on the mean first passage time to a fixed target of a single free Active Brownian Particle and map this result using an effective diffusion process. As in the case of a passive Brownian particle, we can find an optimal resetting rate $r^*$ for an active Brownian particle for which the target is found with the minimum average time. In the case of the presence of an external potential, we find good agreement between the theory and numerical simulations using an effective potential approach.
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    In this paper we study the one-dimensional Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation (KPZ) with correlated noise by field-theoretic dynamic renormalization group techniques (DRG). We focus on spatially correlated noise where the correlations are characterized by a "sinc"-profile in Fourier-space with a certain correlation length $\xi$. The influence of this correlation length on the dynamics of the KPZ equation is analyzed. It is found that its large-scale behavior is controlled by the "standard" KPZ fixed point, i.e. in this limit the KPZ system forced by "sinc"-noise with arbitrarily large but finite correlation length $\xi$ behaves as if it were excited with pure white noise. A similar result has been found by Mathey et al. [Phys.Rev.E 95, 032117] in 2017 for a spatial noise correlation of Gaussian type ($\sim e^{-x^2/(2\xi^2)}$), using a different method. These two findings together suggest that the KPZ dynamics is universal with respect to the exact noise structure, provided the noise correlation length $\xi$ is finite.
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    To investigate frequency-dependent current noise (FDCN) in open quantum systems at steady states, we present a theory which combines Markovian quantum master equations with a finite time full counting statistics. Our formulation of the FDCN generalizes previous zero-frequency expressions and can be viewed as an application of MacDonald's formula for electron transport to heat transfer. As a demonstration, we consider the paradigmatic example of quantum heat transfer in the context of a non-equilibrium spin-boson model. We adopt a recently developed polaron-transformed Redfield equation which allows us to accurately investigate heat transfer with arbitrary system-reservoir coupling strength, arbitrary values of spin bias as well as temperature differences. We observe maximal values of FDCN in moderate coupling regimes, similar to the zero-frequency cases. We find the FDCN with varying coupling strengths or bias displays a universal Lorentzian-shape scaling form in the weak coupling regime, and a white noise spectrum emerges with zero bias in the strong coupling regime due to a distinctive spin dynamics. We also find the bias can suppress the FDCN in the strong coupling regime, in contrast to its zero-frequency counterpart which is insensitive to bias changes. Furthermore, we utilize the Saito-Utsumi relation as a benchmark to validate our theory and study the impact of temperature differences at finite frequencies. Together, our results provide detailed dissections of the finite time fluctuation of heat current in open quantum systems.
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    Much of our understanding of ecological and evolutionary mechanisms derives from analysis of low-dimensional models: with few interacting species, or few axes defining "fitness". It is not always clear to what extent the intuition derived from low-dimensional models applies to the complex, high-dimensional reality. For instance, most naturally occurring microbial communities are strikingly diverse, harboring a large number of coexisting species, each of which contributes to shaping the environment of others. Understanding the eco-evolutionary interplay in these systems is an important challenge, and an exciting new domain for statistical physics. Recent work identified a promising new platform for investigating highly diverse ecosystems, based on the classic resource competition model of MacArthur. Here, we describe how the same analytical framework can be used to study evolutionary questions. Our analysis illustrates how, at high dimension, the intuition promoted by a one-dimensional (scalar) notion of fitness becomes structurally incorrect. Specifically, while the low-dimensional picture emphasizes organism cost or efficiency, we exhibit a regime where cost becomes irrelevant for survival, and link this observation to generic properties of high-dimensional geometry.
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    We study a two-species reaction-diffusion system with the reactions $A+A\to (0, A)$ and $A+B\to A$, with general diffusion constants $D_A$ and $D_B$. Previous studies showed that for dimensions $d\leq 2$ the $B$ particle density decays with a nontrivial, universal exponent that includes an anomalous dimension resulting from field renormalization. We demonstrate via renormalization group methods that the $B$ particle correlation function has a distinct anomalous dimension resulting in the asymptotic scaling $C_{BB}(r,t) \sim t^{\phi}f(r/\sqrt{t})$, where the exponent $\phi$ results from the renormalization of the square of the field associated with the $B$ particles. We compute this exponent to first order in $\epsilon=2-d$, a calculation that involves 61 Feynman diagrams, and also determine the logarithmic corrections at the upper critical dimension $d=2$. Finally, we determine the exponent $\phi$ numerically utilizing a mapping to a four-walker problem for the special case of $A$ particle coalescence in one spatial dimension.
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    Classical game theory addresses decision problems in multi-agent environment where one rational agent's decision affects other agents' payoffs. Game theory has widespread application in economic, social and biological sciences. In recent years quantum versions of classical games have been proposed and studied. In this paper, we consider a quantum version of the classical Barro-Gordon game which captures the problem of time inconsistency in monetary economics. Such time inconsistency refers to the temptation of weak policy maker to implement high inflation when the public expects low inflation. The inconsistency arises when the public punishes the weak policy maker in the next cycle. We first present a quantum version of the Barro-Gordon game. Next, we show that in a particular case of the quantum game, time-consistent Nash equilibrium could be achieved when public expects low inflation, thus resolving the game.
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    Motivated by multi-hop communication in unreliable wireless networks, we present a percolation theory for time-varying networks on regular lattices. Using renormalization group theory, we show how the time-dependent probability to find a path of active links connecting two designated nodes converges towards an effective Bernoulli process as the hop distance between nodes increases. Our work extends classical percolation theory to the dynamic case and elucidates temporal correlations of message losses, with implications for the design of wireless communication and control protocols.
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    The balance equations for thermodynamic quantities are derived from the nonlocal quantum kinetic equation. The nonlocal collisions lead to molecular contributions to the observables and currents. The corresponding correlated part of the observables is found to be given by the rate to form a molecule multiplied with its lifetime which can be considered as collision duration. Explicit expressions of these molecular contributions are given in terms of the scattering phase shifts. The two-particle form of the entropy is derived. This extends the Landau quasiparticle picture by two-particle molecular contributions. There is a continuous exchange of correlations into kinetic parts condensing into the rate of correlated variables for energy and momentum. For the entropy, an explicit gain remains and Boltzmann's H-theorem is proved including the molecular parts of the entropy.

Recent comments

Thomas Klimpel Apr 20 2017 09:16 UTC

This paper [appeared][1] in February 2016 in the peer reviewed interdisciplinary journal Chaos by the American Institute of Physics (AIP).

It has been reviewed publicly by amateurs both [favorably][2] and [unfavorably][3]. The favorable review took the last sentence of the abstract ("These invalid

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Māris Ozols Sep 15 2016 21:30 UTC

Here is a link for those who also haven't heard of SciPost before: https://scipost.org/

Zoltán Zimborás Sep 15 2016 18:12 UTC

This is the very first paper of SciPost, waiting for the first paper of "Quantum" (http://quantum-journal.org). There are radical (and good!) changes going on in scientific publishing.

Stephen Jordan Apr 15 2016 15:02 UTC

This is a beautiful set of lecture notes.

Mile Gu Nov 20 2015 05:04 UTC

Good question! There shouldn't be any contradiction with the correspondence principle. The reason here is that the quantum models are built to simulate the output behaviour of macroscopic, classical systems, and are not necessarily macroscopic themselves. When we compare quantum and classical comple

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hong Nov 20 2015 00:40 UTC

Interesting results. But, just wondering, does it contradict to the correspondence principle?

Marco Tomamichel Jul 17 2015 05:12 UTC

I am no expert at all on strongly correlated systems or topological order, but since you refer to information theory in your abstract, let me still ask you: What is the justification for using $I_2(A:B) = H_2(A) + H_2(B) - H_2(AB)$ for the Rényi mutual information? This quantity has no information-t

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Jonathan Oppenehim May 06 2015 14:29 UTC

This article has generated a fair bit of discussion. But I found a few of the statements puzzling (Edgar Lozano also). Take for example, Theorem 1 (ii) (reversibility) which appears to contradict a number of previous results. Should we understand your work function as "work in the paradigm where we

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Chris Perry Apr 08 2015 09:02 UTC

Hi Felix,

Thanks a lot for your comments. Yes, $X$ can be any state and we've made this clearer now in the paper - we don't need to assume that it is diagonal.

We've also noted more prominently that achievability of our result in the full thermodynamics case is only when the target state is b

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Felix Leditzky Apr 03 2015 11:06 UTC

A question to Theorem 1:

In the process description in eq. (2), you mention that $X$ is any arbitrary state. However, in the proof of Theorem 1, in the converse part you assume that $[X,\sigma]=0$, or equivalently that $X$ is diagonal in the eigenbasis of $\sigma$. Similarly, in the achievability

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