Statistical Mechanics (cond-mat.stat-mech)

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    We show how a weak force, $f$, enables intruder motion through dense granular materials subject to external mechanical excitations, in the present case stepwise shearing. A force acts on a Teflon disc in a two dimensional system of photoelastic discs. This force is much smaller than the smallest force needed to move the disc without any external excitation. In a cycle, material + intruder are sheared quasi-statically from $\gamma = 0$ to $\gamma_{max}$, and then backwards to $\gamma = 0$. During various cycle phases, fragile and jammed states form. Net intruder motion, $\delta$, occurs during fragile periods generated by shear reversals. $\delta$ per cycle, e.g. the quasistatic rate $c$, is constant, linearly dependent on $\gamma_{max}$ and $f$. It vanishes as, $c \propto (\phi_c - \phi)^a$, with $a \simeq 3$ and $\phi_c \simeq \phi_J$, reflecting the stiffening of granular systems under shear as $\phi \rightarrow \phi_J$. The intruder motion induces large scale grain circulation. In the intruder frame, this motion is a granular analogue to fluid flow past a cylinder, where $f$ is the drag force exerted by the flow.
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    A method for calculating the eigenvalue of a many-body system without solving the eigenfunction is suggested. In many cases, we only need the knowledge of eigenvalues rather than eigenfunctions, so we need a method solving only the eigenvalue, leaving alone the eigenfunction. In this paper, the method is established based on statistical mechanics. In statistical mechanics, calculating thermodynamic quantities needs only the knowledge of eigenvalues and, then, the information of eigenvalues is embodied in thermodynamic quantities. The method suggested in the present paper is indeed a method for extracting the eigenvalue from thermodynamic quantities. As applications, we calculate the eigenvalues for some many-body systems. Especially, the method is used to calculate the quantum exchange energies in quantum many-body systems. Moreover, using the method we calculate the influence of the topological effect on eigenvalues.
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    Recently generalizations of the harmonic lattice model has been introduced as a discrete approximation of bosonic field theories with Lifshitz symmetry with a generic dynamical exponent z. In such models in (1+1) and (2+1)-dimensions, we study logarithmic negativity in the vacuum state and also finite temperature states. We investigate various features of logarithmic negativity such as the universal term, its z-dependence and also its temperature dependence in various configurations. We present both analytical and numerical evidences for linear z-dependence of logarithmic negativity in almost all range of parameters both in (1+1) and (2+1)-dimensions. We also investigate the validity of area law behavior of logarithmic negativity in these generalized models and find that this behavior is still correct for small enough dynamical exponents.
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    Exciton-polaritons under driven-dissipative conditions exhibit a condensation transition which belongs to a different universality class than equilibrium Bose-Einstein condensates. By numerically solving the generalized Gross-Pitaevskii equation with realistic experimental parameters, we show that one-dimensional exciton-polaritons display fine features of Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) dynamics. Beyond the scaling exponents, we show that their phase distribution follows the Tracy-Widom form predicted for KPZ growing interfaces. We moreover evidence a crossover to the stationary Baik-Rains statistics. We finally show that these features are unaffected on a certain timescale by the presence of a smooth disorder often present in experimental setups.
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    We give a general condition for a discrete spin system with nearest-neighbor interactions on the $\mathbb{Z}^d$ lattice to exhibit long-range order. The condition is applicable to systems with residual entropy in which the long-range order is entropically driven. As a main example we consider the antiferromagnetic $q$-state Potts model and rigorously prove the existence of a broken sub-lattice symmetry phase at low temperature and high dimension --- a new result for $q\ge 4$. As further examples, we prove the existence of an ordered phase in a clock model with hard constraints and extend the known regime of the demixed phase in the lattice Widom-Rowlinson model.
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    We study the Loschmidt echo for quenches in open one-dimensional lattice models with symmetry protected topological phases. For quenches where dynamical quantum phase transitions do occur we find that cusps in the bulk return rate at critical times tc are associated with sudden changes in the boundary contribution. For our main example, the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model, we show that these sudden changes are related to the periodical appearance of two eigenvalues close to zero in the dynamical Loschmidt matrix. We demonstrate, furthermore, that the structure of the Loschmidt spectrum is linked to the periodic creation of long-range entanglement between the edges of the system.
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    Inhomogeneous quantum critical systems in one spatial dimension have been studied by using conformal field theory in static curved backgrounds. Two interesting examples are the free fermion gas in the harmonic trap and the inhomogeneous XX spin chain called rainbow chain. For conformal field theories defined on static curved spacetimes characterised by a metric which is Weyl equivalent to the flat metric, with the Weyl factor depending only on the spatial coordinate, we study the entanglement hamiltonian and the entanglement spectrum of an interval adjacent to the boundary of a segment where the same boundary condition is imposed at the endpoints. A contour function for the entanglement entropies corresponding to this configuration is also considered, being closely related to the entanglement hamiltonian. The analytic expressions obtained by considering the curved spacetime which characterises the rainbow model have been checked against numerical data for the rainbow chain, finding an excellent agreement.
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    We study probe corrections to the Eigenstate Thermalization Hypothesis (ETH) in the context of 2D CFTs with large central charge and a sparse spectrum of low dimension operators. In particular, we focus on observables in the form of non-local composite operators $\mathcal{O}_{obs}(x)=\mathcal{O}_L(x)\mathcal{O}_L(0)$ with $h_L\ll c$. As a light probe, $\mathcal{O}_{obs}(x)$ is constrained by ETH and satisfies $\langle \mathcal{O}_{obs}(x)\rangle_{h_H}\approx \langle \mathcal{O}_{obs}(x)\rangle_{\text{micro}}$ for a high energy energy eigenstate $| h_H\rangle$. In the CFTs of interests, $\langle \mathcal{O}_{obs}(x)\rangle_{h_H}$ is related to a Heavy-Heavy-Light-Light (HL) correlator, and can be approximated by the vacuum Virasoro block, which we focus on computing. A sharp consequence of ETH for $\mathcal{O}_{obs}(x)$ is the so called "forbidden singularities", arising from the emergent thermal periodicity in imaginary time. Using the monodromy method, we show that finite probe corrections of the form $\mathcal{O}(h_L/c)$ drastically alter both sides of the ETH equality %for $x_\tau\geq \beta$%, replacing each thermal singularity with a pair of branch-cuts. Via the branch-cuts, the vacuum blocks are connected to infinitely many additional "saddles". We discuss and verify how such violent modification in analytic structure leads to a natural guess for the blocks at finite $c$: a series of zeros that condense into branch cuts as $c\to\infty$. We also discuss some interesting evidences connecting these to the Stoke's phenomena, which are non-perturbative $e^{-c}$ effects. As a related aspect of these probe modifications, we also compute the Renyi-entropy $S_n$ in high energy eigenstates on a circle. For subsystems much larger than the thermal length, we obtain a WKB solution to the monodromy problem, and deduce from this the entanglement spectrum.
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    The microcanonical Gross-Pitaevskii (aka semiclassical Bose-Hubbard) lattice model dynamics is characterized by a pair of energy and norm densities. The grand canonical Gibbs distribution fails to describe a part of the density space, due to the boundness of its kinetic energy spectrum. We define Poincare equilibrium manifolds and compute the statistics of microcanonical excursion times off them. The distribution function tails quantify the proximity of the many body dynamics to nonergodic phases. We find that a crossover to nonergodic dynamics takes place \sl inside the nonGibbs phase, being \sl unnoticed by the largest Lyapunov exponent. Thus the Gibbs distribution should be replacable by a modified one, and the dynamics will formally remain ergodic, yet with rapidly diverging relaxation times. We relate our findings to the corresponding integrable limit, close to which the actions are interacting locally.
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    Thermal rectification is of importance not only for fundamental physics, but also for potential applications in thermal manipulations and thermal management. However, thermal rectification effect usually decays rapidly with system size. Here, we show that a mass-graded system, with two diffusive leads separated by a ballistic spacer, can exhibit large thermal rectification effect, with the rectification factor independent of system size. The underlying mechanism is explained in terms of the effective size-independent thermal gradient and the match/mismatch of the phonon bands. We also show the robustness of the thermal diode upon variation of the model's parameters. Our finding suggests a promising way for designing realistic efficient thermal diodes.
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    We investigate a heating phenomenon in periodically driven integrable systems that can be mapped to free-fermion models. We find that heating to the high-temperature state, which is a typical scenario in non-integrable systems, can also appear in integrable time-periodic systems; the amount of energy absorption rises drastically near a frequency threshold where the Floquet-Magnus expansion diverges. As the driving period increases, we also observe that the effective temperatures of the generalized Gibbs ensemble for conserved quantities go to infinity. By the use of the scaling analysis, we reveal that in the limit of infinite system size and driving period, the steady state after a long time is equivalent to the infinite-temperature state. We obtain the asymptotic behavior $L^{-1}$ and $T^{-2}$ as to how the steady state approaches the infinite-temperature state as the system size $L$ and the driving period $T$ increase.
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    Jamming describes a transition from a flowing or liquid state to a solid or rigid state in a loose assembly of particles such as grains or bubbles. In contrast, clogging describes the ceasing of the flow of particulate matter through a bottleneck. It is not clear how to distinguish jamming from clogging, nor is it known whether they are distinct phenomena or fundamentally the same. We examine an assembly of disks moving through a random obstacle array and identify a transition from clogging to jamming behavior as the disk density increases. The clogging transition has characteristics of an absorbing phase transition, with the disks evolving into a heterogeneous phase-separated clogged state after a critical diverging transient time. In contrast, jamming is a rapid process in which the disks form a homogeneous motionless packing, with a rigidity length scale that diverges as the jamming density is approached.

Recent comments

Thomas Klimpel Apr 20 2017 09:16 UTC

This paper [appeared][1] in February 2016 in the peer reviewed interdisciplinary journal Chaos by the American Institute of Physics (AIP).

It has been reviewed publicly by amateurs both [favorably][2] and [unfavorably][3]. The favorable review took the last sentence of the abstract ("These invalid

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Māris Ozols Sep 15 2016 21:30 UTC

Here is a link for those who also haven't heard of SciPost before: https://scipost.org/

Zoltán Zimborás Sep 15 2016 18:12 UTC

This is the very first paper of SciPost, waiting for the first paper of "Quantum" (http://quantum-journal.org). There are radical (and good!) changes going on in scientific publishing.

Stephen Jordan Apr 15 2016 15:02 UTC

This is a beautiful set of lecture notes.

Mile Gu Nov 20 2015 05:04 UTC

Good question! There shouldn't be any contradiction with the correspondence principle. The reason here is that the quantum models are built to simulate the output behaviour of macroscopic, classical systems, and are not necessarily macroscopic themselves. When we compare quantum and classical comple

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hong Nov 20 2015 00:40 UTC

Interesting results. But, just wondering, does it contradict to the correspondence principle?

Marco Tomamichel Jul 17 2015 05:12 UTC

I am no expert at all on strongly correlated systems or topological order, but since you refer to information theory in your abstract, let me still ask you: What is the justification for using $I_2(A:B) = H_2(A) + H_2(B) - H_2(AB)$ for the Rényi mutual information? This quantity has no information-t

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Jonathan Oppenehim May 06 2015 14:29 UTC

This article has generated a fair bit of discussion. But I found a few of the statements puzzling (Edgar Lozano also). Take for example, Theorem 1 (ii) (reversibility) which appears to contradict a number of previous results. Should we understand your work function as "work in the paradigm where we

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Chris Perry Apr 08 2015 09:02 UTC

Hi Felix,

Thanks a lot for your comments. Yes, $X$ can be any state and we've made this clearer now in the paper - we don't need to assume that it is diagonal.

We've also noted more prominently that achievability of our result in the full thermodynamics case is only when the target state is b

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Felix Leditzky Apr 03 2015 11:06 UTC

A question to Theorem 1:

In the process description in eq. (2), you mention that $X$ is any arbitrary state. However, in the proof of Theorem 1, in the converse part you assume that $[X,\sigma]=0$, or equivalently that $X$ is diagonal in the eigenbasis of $\sigma$. Similarly, in the achievability

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