Soft Condensed Matter (cond-mat.soft)

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    We use Newtonian and overdamped Langevin dynamics to study long flexible polymers dragged by an external force at a constant velocity $v$. The work $W$ by that force depends on the initial state of the polymer and the details of the process. Jarzynski equality can be used to relate the non-equilibrium work distribution $P(W)$ obtained from repeated experiments to equilibrium free energy difference $\Delta F$ between the initial and final states. We use the power law dependence of the geometrical and dynamical characteristics of the polymer on the number of monomers $N$ to suggest the existence of a critical velocity $v_c(N)$, such that for $v<v_c$ the reconstruction of $\Delta F$ is an easy task, while for $v$ significantly exceeding $v_c$ it becomes practically impossible. We demonstrate the existence of such $v_c$ analytically for ideal polymer in free space and numerically for a polymer being dragged away from a repulsive wall. Our results suggest that the distribution of the dissipated work $W_{\rm d}=W-\Delta F$ in properly scaled variables approaches a limiting shape for large $N$.
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    This work is dedicated to the study of the Maier-Saupe model in the presence of competing interactions. The competition induces modulated structures in the phase diagram which, in the case of liquid crystals, can be identified as cholesteric (modulated) phases. Using a mean-field approach and Monte Carlo simulations, we show that the proposed model exhibits isotropic and nematic phases, and also a series of cholesteric phases that meet at a multicritical point; a Lifshitz point. Though the Monte Carlo and mean-field phase diagrams show some quantitative disagreements, the Monte Carlo simulations corroborate the general behavior found within the mean-field approximation.
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    We consider an elastic composite material containing particulate inclusions in a soft elastic matrix that is bounded by a rigid wall, e.g., the substrate. If such a composite serves as a soft actuator, forces are imposed on or induced between the embedded particles. We investigate how the presence of the rigid wall affects the interactions between the inclusions in the elastic matrix. For no-slip boundary conditions, we transfer Blake's derivation of a corresponding Green's function from low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics to the linearly elastic case. Results for no-slip and free-slip surface conditions are compared to each other and to the bulk behavior. Our results suggest that walls with free-slip surface conditions are preferred when they serve as substrates for soft actuators made from elastic composite materials. As we further demonstrate, the presence of a rigid wall can qualitatively change the interactions between the inclusions. In effect, it can switch attractive interactions into repulsive ones (and vice versa). It should be straightforward to observe the effects in future experiments and to combine our results, e.g., with the modeling of biological cells and tissue on rigid surfaces.
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    The analogy between soap films thinning under border capillary suction and lamellar stacks of surfactant bilayers dehydrated by osmotic stress is explored, in particular in the highly dehydrated limit where the soap film becomes a Newton black film. The nature of short-range repulsive interactions between surfactant-covered interfaces and acting across water channels in both cases will be discussed.
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    We investigate the swelling dynamics driven by solvent absorption in a hydrogel sphere immersed in a solvent bath, through an accurate computational model and numerical study. We extensively describe the transient process from dry to wet and discuss the onset of surface instabilities through a measure of the lack of smoothness of the outer surface and a morphological pattern of that surface with respect to the two material parameters driving the swelling dynamics.
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    Topological solitons are knots in continuous physical fields classified by non-zero Hopf index values. Despite arising in theories that span many branches of physics, from elementary particles to condensed matter and cosmology, they remain experimentally elusive and poorly understood. We introduce a method of experimental and numerical analysis of such localized structures in liquid crystals that, similar to the mathematical Hopf maps, relates all points of the medium's order parameter space to their closed-loop preimages within the three-dimensional solitons. We uncover a surprisingly large diversity of naturally occurring and laser-generated topologically nontrivial solitons with differently knotted nematic fields, which previously have not been realized in theories and experiments alike. We discuss the implications of the liquid crystal's non-polar nature on the knot soliton topology and how the medium's chirality, confinement and elastic anisotropy help to overcome the constrains of the Hobart-Derrick theorem, yielding static three-dimensional solitons without or with additional defects. Our findings will establish chiral nematics as a model system for experimental exploration of topological solitons and may impinge on understanding of such nonsingular field configurations in other branches of physics, as well as may lead to technological applications