Soft Condensed Matter (cond-mat.soft)

  • PDF
    Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTIL) are a new class of organic salts whose melting temperature falls below the conventional limit of 100C. Their low vapor pressure, moreover, has made these ionic compounds the solvents of choice of the so-called green chemistry. For these and other peculiar characteristics, they are increasingly used in industrial applications. However, studies of their interaction with living organisms have highlighted mild to severe health hazards. Since their cytotoxicity shows a positive correlation with their lipo-philicity, several chemical-physical studies of their interaction with biomembranes have been carried out in the last few years, aiming to identify the microscopic mechanisms behind their toxicity. Cation chain length and anion nature have been seen to affect the lipo-philicity and, in turn, the toxicity of RTILs. The emerging picture, however, raises new questions, points to the need to assess toxicity on a case-by-case basis, but also suggests a potential positive role of RTILs in pharmacology, bio-medicine, and, more in general, bio-nano-technology. Here, we review this new subject of research, and comment on the future and the potential importance of this new field of study.
  • PDF
    The friction of a stationary moving skate on smooth ice is investigated, in particular in relation to the formation of a thin layer of water between skate and ice. It is found that the combination of ploughing and sliding gives a friction force that is rather insensitive for parameters such as velocity and temperature. The weak dependence originates from the pressure adjustment inside the water layer. For instance, high velocities, which would give rise to high friction, also lead to large pressures, which, in turn, decrease the contact zone and so lower the friction. The theory is a combination and completion of two existing but conflicting theories on the formation of the water layer.
  • PDF
    The effectiveness of molecular-based light harvesting relies on transport of optical excitations, excitons, to charg-transfer sites. Measuring exciton migration has, however, been challenging because of the mismatch between nanoscale migration lengths and the diffraction limit. In organic semiconductors, common bulk methods employ a series of films terminated at quenching substrates, altering the spatioenergetic landscape for migration. Here we instead define quenching boundaries all-optically with sub-diffraction resolution, thus characterizing spatiotemporal exciton migration on its native nanometer and picosecond scales without disturbing morphology. By transforming stimulated emission depletion microscopy into a time-resolved ultrafast approach, we measure a 16-nm migration length in CN-PPV conjugated polymer films. Combining these experiments with Monte Carlo exciton hopping simulations shows that migration in CN-PPV films is essentially diffusive because intrinsic chromophore energetic disorder is comparable to inhomogeneous broadening among chromophores. This framework also illustrates general trends across materials. Our new approach's sub-diffraction resolution will enable previously unattainable correlations of local material structure to the nature of exciton migration, applicable not only to photovoltaic or display-destined organic semiconductors but also to explaining the quintessential exciton migration exhibited in photosynthesis.
  • PDF
    The formalism proposed in Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 078001 (2016) for determination of the normal and tangential inter-particle forces in frictional disks from visual data was criticized in a comment to that paper. However the theory developed in the original publication is aimed at finding the forces when provided with accurate measurements while the comment addresses a different problem, being the statistics of forces in a configuration with uncertainty of the relevant parameters. We address this difference in perspectives and point out that even with experimental errors one can improve the results using an iterative procedure proposed in Phys. Rev. E. Rapid Communication, 93, 060601(R) (2016).
  • PDF
    Aptamers are single stranded DNA, RNA or peptide sequences having the ability to bind a variety of specific targets (proteins, molecules as well as ions). Therefore, aptamer production and selection for therapeutic and diagnostic applications is very challenging. Usually they are in vitro generated, but, recently, computational approaches have been developed for the in silico selection, with a higher affinity for the specific target. Anyway, the mechanism of aptamer-ligand formation is not completely clear, and not obvious to predict. This paper aims to develop a computational model able to describe aptamer-ligand affinity performance by using the topological structure of the corresponding graphs, assessed by means of numerical tools such as the conventional degree distribution, but also the rank-degree distribution (hierarchy) and the node assortativity. Calculations are applied to the thrombin binding aptamer (TBA), and the TBA-thrombin complex, produced in the presence of Na+ or K+. The topological analysis reveals different affinity performances between the macromolecules in the presence of the two cations, as expected by previous investigations in literature. These results nominate the graph topological analysis as a novel theoretical tool for testing affinity. Otherwise, starting from the graphs, an electrical network can be obtained by using the specific electrical properties of amino acids and nucleobases. Therefore, a further analysis concerns with the electrical response, which reveals that the resistance sensitively depends on the presence of sodium or potassium thus posing resistance as a crucial physical parameter for testing affinity.
  • PDF
    The uniform director field obtained for the nematic ground state of the hard-rod model of liquid crystals in two dimensions reflects the high symmetry of the constituents of the liquid; It is a manifestation of the constituents' local tendency to avoid splaying and bending with respect to one another. In contrast, bent-core (or banana shaped) liquid-crystal-forming-molecules locally favor a state of zero splay and constant bend. However, such a structure cannot be realized in the plane and the resulting liquid-crystalline phase is frustrated and must exhibit some compromise of these two mutually contradicting local intrinsic tendencies. The generation of geometric frustration from the intrinsic geometry of the constituents of a material is not only natural and ubiquitous but also leads to a striking variety of morphologies of ground states and exotic response properties. In this work we establish the necessary and sufficient conditions for two scalar functions, $s$ and $b$ to describe the splay and bend of a director field in the plane. We generalize these compatibility conditions for geometries with non-vanishing constant Gaussian curvature, and provide a reconstruction formula for the director field depending only on the splay and bend fields and their derivatives. Last, we discuss optimal compromises for simple incompatible cases where the locally preferred values of the splay and bend cannot be globally achieved.
  • PDF
    In unicellular flagellates, growing evidence suggests control over a complex repertoire of swimming gaits is conferred intracellularly by ultrastructural components, resulting in motion that depends on flagella number and configuration. We report the discovery of a novel, tripartite motility in an octoflagellate alga, comprising a forward gait ($run$), a fast knee-jerk response with dramatic reversals in beat waveform ($shock$), and, remarkably, long quiescent periods ($stop$) within which the flagella quiver. In a reaction graph representation, transition probabilities show that gait switching is only weakly reversible. Shocks occur spontaneously but are also triggered by direct mechanical contact. In this primitive alga, the capability for a millisecond stop-start switch from rest to full speed implicates an early evolution of excitable signal transduction to and from peripheral appendages.
  • PDF
    Confinement of a slender body into a granular array induces stress localization in the geometrically nonlinear structure, and jamming, reordering, and vertical dislocation of the surrounding granular medium. By varying the initial packing density of grains and the length of a confined elastica, we identify the critical length necessary to induce jamming, and demonstrate an intricate coupling between folds that localize along grain boundaries. Above the jamming threshold, the characteristic length of elastica deformation is shown to scale with the length over which force field fluctuations propagate in a jammed state, suggesting the ordering of the granular array governs the deformation of the slender structure. However, over confinement of the elastica will induce a form of stress relaxation in the granular medium by dislocating grains through two distinct mechanisms that depend on the geometry of the confined structure.