Soft Condensed Matter (cond-mat.soft)

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    Chiral active particles (or self-propelled circle swimmers) feature a rich collective behavior, comprising rotating macro-clusters and micro-flock patterns which consist of phase-synchronized rotating clusters with a characteristic self-limited size. These patterns emerge from the competition of alignment interactions and rotations suggesting that they might occur generically in many chiral active matter systems. However, although excluded volume interactions occur naturally among typical circle swimmers, it is not yet clear if macro-clusters and micro-flock patterns survive their presence. The present work shows that both types of pattern do survive but feature strongly enhance fluctuations regarding the size and shape of the individual clusters. Despite these fluctuations, we find that the average micro-flock size still follows the same characteristic scaling law as in the absence of excluded volume interactions, i.e. micro-flock sizes scale linearly with the single-swimmer radius.
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    Recent computational and theoretical studies have shown that the deformation of colloidal suspensions under a steady shear is highly heterogeneous at the particle level and demonstrate a critical influence on the macroscopic deformation behavior. Despite its relevance to a wide variety of industrial applications of colloidal suspensions, scattering studies focusing on addressing the heterogeneity of the non-equilibrium colloidal structure are scarce thus far. Here, we report the first experimental result using small-angle neutron scattering. From the evolution of strain heterogeneity, we conclude that the shear-induced deformation transforms from nearly affine behavior at low shear rates, to plastic rearrangements when the shear rate is high.
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    Micro- and nanoscale objects with anisotropic shape are key components of a variety of biological systems and inert complex materials, and represent fundamental building blocks of novel self-assembly strategies. The time scale of their thermal motion is set by their translational and rotational diffusion coefficients, whose measurement may become difficult for relatively large particles with small optical contrast. Here we show that Dark Field Differential Dynamic Microscopy is the ideal tool for probing the roto-translational Brownian motion of shape anisotropic particles. We demonstrate our approach by successful application to aqueous dispersions of non-motile bacteria and of colloidal aggregates of spherical particles.
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    This paper presents a new approach to study the effects of temperature on the poro- elastic and viscoelastic behavior of articular cartilage. Biphasic solid-fluid mixture theory is applied to study the poro-mechancial behavior of articular cartilage in a fully saturated state. The balance of linear momentum, mass, and energy are considered to describe deformation of the solid skeleton, pore fluid pressure, and temperature distribution in the mixture. The mechanical model assumes both linear elastic and viscoelastic isotropic materials, infinitesimal strain theory, and a time-dependent response. The influence of temperature on the mixture behavior is modeled through temperature dependent mass density and volumetric thermal strain. The fluid flow through the porous medium is described by the Darcy's law. The stress-strain relation for time-dependent viscoelastic deformation in the solid skeleton is described using the generalized Maxwell model. A verification example is presented to illustrate accuracy and efficiency of the developed finite element model. The influence of temperature is studied through examining the behavior of articular cartilage for confined and unconfined boundary conditions. Furthermore, articular cartilage under partial loading condition is modeled to investigate the deformation, pore fluid pressure, and temperature dissipation processes. The results suggest significant impacts of temperature on both poro- elastic and viscoelastic behavior of articular cartilage.
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    In this thesis we study the lateral electrostatic interaction between a pair of non-identical, moderately charged colloidal particles trapped at an electrolyte interface in the limit of short inter-particle separations. Using a simplified model system we solve the problem analytically within the framework of linearised Poisson-Boltzmann theory and classical density functional theory. In the first step, we calculate the electrostatic potential inside the system exactly as well as within the widely used superposition approximation. Then these results are used to calculate the surface and line interaction energy densities between the particles. Contrary to the case of identical particles, depending upon the parameters of the system, we obtain that both the surface and the line interaction can vary non-monotonically with varying separation between the particles and the superposition approximation fails to predict the correct qualitative behaviours in most cases. Additionally, the superposition approximation is unable to predict the energy contributions quantitatively even at large distances. We also provide expression for the constant (independent of the inter-particle separation) interaction parameters, i.e., the surface tension, the line tension and the interfacial tension. Our results are expected to be of use for modelling particle-interaction at fluid interfaces and, in particular, for emulsion stabilization using oppositely charged particles.
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    We consider a collection of self-driven apolar particles on a substrate that organize into an active nematic phase at sufficiently high density or low noise. Using the dynamical renormalization group, we systematically study the 2d fluctuating ordered phase in a coarse-grained hydrodynamic description involving both the nematic director and the conserved density field. In the presence of noise, we show that the system always displays only quasi-long ranged orientational order beyond a crossover scale. A careful analysis of the nonlinearities permitted by symmetry reveals that activity is dangerously irrelevant over the linearized description, allowing giant number fluctuations to persist though now with strong finite-size effects and a non-universal scaling exponent. Nonlinear effects from the active currents lead to power law correlations in the density field thereby preventing macroscopic phase separation in the thermodynamic limit.
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    In directed assembly, small building clocks are assembled into an organized structures under the influence of guiding fields. Capillary interactions provide a versatile route for structure formation. Colloids adsorbed on fluid interfaces distort the interface, which creates an associated energy field. When neighboring distortions overlap, colloids interact to minimize interfacial area. Contact line pinning, particle shape and surface chemistry play important roles in structure formation. Interface curvature acts like an external field; particles migrate and assemble in patterns dictated by curvature gradients. We review basic analysis and recent findings in this rapidly evolving literature. Understanding the roles of assembly is essential for tuning the mechanical, physical, and optical properties of the structure.
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    Fluids confined in nanopores exhibit properties different from the properties of the same fluids in bulk, among these properties are the isothermal compressibility or elastic modulus. Modulus of a fluid in nanopores can be extracted from ultrasonic experiments or calculated from molecular simulations. Using Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble, we calculated the modulus for liquid argon at 87.3~K adsorbed in model silica pores of two different morphologies and various sizes. For both spherical and cylindrical pores, for all the pore sizes exceeding 2~nm, we obtained the logarithmic dependence of fluid modulus on the vapor pressure. Calculation of modulus at saturation showed that the modulus of the fluid in the spherical pores is a linear function of the reciprocal pore size. The calculation for cylindrical pores shows a similar trend, however, it is hard to make quantitative conclusions from the highly scattered resulting data. Both of the observed regularities for the modulus stem from the Tait-Murnaghan equation applied to the confined fluid. Our results, along with the development of the effective medium theories for nanoporous media, set the groundwork for analysis of the experimentally-measured elastic properties of fluid-saturated nanoporous materials.
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    Recent progress in extraction of unconventional hydrocarbon resources has ignited the interest in the studies of nanoporous media. Since many thermodynamic and mechanical properties of nanoscale solids and fluids differ from the analogous bulk materials, it is not obvious whether wave propagation in nanoporous media can be described using the same framework as in macroporous one. Here we test the validity of Gassmann equations using two published sets of ultrasonic measurements for a model nanoporous medium, Vycor glass, saturated with two different fluids, argon and n-hexane. Predictions of the Gassmann theory depend on the bulk and shear moduli of the dry samples, which are known from ultrasonic measurements, and the bulk moduli of the solid and fluid constituents. The solid bulk modulus can be estimated from adsorption-induced deformation or from elastic effective medium theory. The fluid modulus can be calculated according to Tait-Murnaghan equation at the solvation pressure in the pore. Substitution of these parameters into Gassmann equation provides predictions consistent with measured data. Our findings set up a theoretical framework for investigation of fluid-saturated nanoporous media using ultrasound.
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    We study mechanical behavior of soft rubber-like digital materials used in Polyjet multi-material 3D-printing to create deformable composite materials and flexible structures. These soft digital materials are frequently treated as linear elastic materials in the literature. However, our experiments clearly show that these materials exhibit significant non-linearities under large strain regime. Moreover, the materials demonstrate pronounced rate-dependent behavior. In particular, their instantaneous moduli as well as ultimate strain and stress significantly depend on the strain rate. To take into account both hyper- and viscoelasticity phenomena, we employ the Quasi-Linear Viscoelastic (QLV) model with instantaneous Yeoh strain-energy density function. We show that the QLV-Yeoh model accurately describes the mechanical behavior of the majority of the soft digital materials under uniaxial tension.
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    We develop a critical-state model of fused silica plasticity on the basis of data mined from molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. The MD data is suggestive of an irreversible densification transition in volumetric compression resulting in permanent, or plastic, densification upon unloading. The MD data also reveals an evolution towards a critical state of constant volume under pressure-shear deformation. The trend towards constant volume is from above, when the glass is overconsolidated, or from below, when it is underconsolidated. We show that these characteristic behaviors are well-captured by a critical state model of plasticity, where the densification law for glass takes the place of the classical consolidation law of granular media and the locus of constant volume states denotes the critical-state line. A salient feature of the critical-state line of fused silica, as identified from the MD data, that renders its yield behavior anomalous is that it is strongly non-convex, owing to the existence of two well-differentiated phases at low and high pressures. We argue that this strong non-convexity of yield explains the patterning that is observed in molecular dynamics calculations of amorphous solids deforming in shear. We employ an explicit and exact rank-2 envelope construction to upscale the microscopic critical-state model to the macroscale. Remarkably, owing to the equilibrium constraint the resulting effective macroscopic behavior is still characterized by a non-convex critical-state line. Despite this lack of convexity, the effective macroscopic model is stable against microstructure formation and defines well-posed boundary-value problems.