Soft Condensed Matter (cond-mat.soft)

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    Allosteric effects are often underlying the activity of proteins and elucidating generic design aspects and functional principles which are unique to allosteric phenomena represents a major challenge. Here an approach which consists in the in silico design of synthetic structures which, as the principal element of allostery, encode dynamical long-range coupling among two sites is presented. The structures are represented by elastic networks, similar to coarse-grained models of real proteins. A strategy of evolutionary optimization was implemented to iteratively improve allosteric coupling. In the designed structures allosteric interactions were analyzed in terms of strain propagation and simple pathways which emerged during evolution were identified as signatures through which long-range communication was established. Moreover, robustness of allosteric performance with respect to mutations was demonstrated. As it turned out, the designed prototype structures reveal dynamical properties resembling those found in real allosteric proteins. Hence, they may serve as toy models of complex allosteric systems, such as proteins.
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    Using classical density functional theory (DFT) we calculate the density profile $\rho({\mathbf r})$ and local compressibility $\chi({\mathbf r})$ of a simple liquid solvent in which a pair of blocks with (microscopic) rectangular cross-section are immersed. We consider blocks that are solvophobic, solvophilic and also ones that have both solvophobic and solvophilic patches. Large values of $\chi({\mathbf r})$ correspond to regions in space where the liquid density is fluctuating most strongly. We seek to elucidate how enhanced density fluctuations correlate with the solvent mediated force between the blocks, as the distance between the blocks and the chemical potential of the liquid reservoir vary. For sufficiently solvophobic blocks, at small block separations and small deviations from bulk gas-liquid coexistence, we observe a strongly attractive (near constant) force, stemming from capillary evaporation to form a low density gas-like intrusion between the blocks. The accompanying $\chi({\mathbf r})$ exhibits structure which reflects the incipient gas-liquid interfaces that develop. We argue that our model system provides a means to understanding the basic physics of solvent mediated interactions between nanostructures, and between objects such as proteins in water, that possess hydrophobic and hydrophilic patches.
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    Stochastic exponential growth is observed in a variety of contexts, including molecular autocatalysis, nuclear fission, population growth, inflation of the universe, viral social media posts, and financial markets. Yet literature on modeling the phenomenology of these stochastic dynamics has predominantly focused on one model, Geometric Brownian Motion (GBM), which can be described as the solution of a Langevin equation with linear drift and linear multiplicative noise. Using recent experimental results on stochastic exponential growth of individual bacterial cell sizes, we motivate the need for a more general class of phenomenological models of stochastic exponential growth, which are consistent with the observation that the mean-rescaled distributions are approximately stationary at long times. We show that this behavior is not consistent with GBM, instead it is consistent with power law multiplicative noise with positive fractional powers. Therefore, we consider this general class of phenomenological models for stochastic exponential growth, provide analytical solutions, and identify the important dimensionless combination of model parameters which determines the shape of the mean-rescaled distribution. We also provide a prescription for robustly inferring model parameters from experimentally observed stochastic growth trajectories.
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    The emergence of structure through aggregation is a fascinating topic and of both fundamental and practical interest. Here we demonstrate that self-generated solvent flow can be used to generate long-range attractions on the colloidal scale, with sub-pico Newton forces extending into the millimeter-range. We observe a rich dynamic behavior with the formation and fusion of small clusters resembling molecules, the dynamics of which is governed by an effective conservative energy that decays as $1/r$. Breaking the flow symmetry, these clusters can be made active.
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    Crystals with low latent heat are predicted to melt from an entropically stabilized body-centered cubic symmetry. At this weakly first-order transition, strongly correlated fluctuations are expected to emerge, which could change the nature of the transition. Here we show how large fluctuations stabilize bcc crystals formed from charged colloids, giving rise to strongly power-law correlated heterogeneous dynamics. Moreover, we find that significant nonaffine particle displacements lead to a vanishing of the nonaffine shear modulus at the transition. We interpret these observations by reformulating the Born-Huang theory to account for nonaffinity, illustrating a scenario of ordered solids reaching a state where classical lattice dynamics fail.
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    The transmission of low-energy (<1.8eV) photoelectrons through the shell of core-shell aerosol particles is studied for liquid squalane, squalene, and DEHS shells. The photoelectrons are exclusively formed in the core of the particles by two-photon ionization. The total photoelectron yield recorded as a function of shell thickness (1-80nm) shows a bi-exponential attenuation. For all substances, the damping parameter for shell thicknesses below 15nm lies between 8 and 9nm, and is tentatively assigned to the electron attenuation length at electron kinetic energies of ~0.5-1eV. The significantly larger damping parameters for thick shells (> 20nm) are presumably a consequence of distorted core-shell structures. A first comparison of aerosol and traditional thin film overlayer methods is provided.
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    We present a promising mode coupling theory study for the relaxation and glassy dynamics of a system of strongly interacting self-propelled particles, wherein the self-propulsion force is described by Ornstein-Uhlenbeck colored noise and thermal noises are included. Our starting point is an effective Smoluchowski equation governing the distribution function of particle's positions, from which we derive a memory function equation for the time dependence of density fluctuations in nonequilibrium steady states. With the basic assumption of absence of macroscopic currents and standard mode coupling approximation, we can obtain expressions for the irreducible memory function and other relevant dynamic terms. With these equations obtained, we study the glassy dynamics of this thermal self-propelled particles system by investigating the Debye-Waller factor f_q and relaxation time \tau_\alpha as functions of the persistence time \tau_p of self-propulsion, the single particle effective temperature T_\texteff as well as the number density \rho. Consequently, we find the critical density \rho_c for given \tau_p shifts to larger values with increasing magnitude of propulsion force or effective temperature, in good accordance with previous reported simulation works. In addition, the theory facilitates us to study the critical effective temperature T_\texteff^c for fixed \rho as well as its dependence on \tau_p. We find that T_\texteff^c increases with \tau_p and in the limit \tau_p\to0, it approaches the value for a simple passive Brownian system as expected. Our theory also well recovers the results for passive systems and can be easily extended to more complex systems such as active-passive mixtures.
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    Recent surveys have shown that the number of nanoparticle-based formulations actually used at the clinical level is significantly lower than expected a decade ago. One reason for this is that the nanoparticle physicochemical properties fall short for handling the complexity of biological environments and for preventing nonspecific protein adsorption. In this study, we address the issue of the interactions of plasma proteins with polymer coated surfaces. To this aim, we use a non-covalent grafting-to method to functionalize iron oxide sub-10 nm nanoparticles and iron oxide flat substrates, and compare their protein responses. The functionalized copolymers consist in alternating poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains and phosphonic acid grafted on the same backbone. Quartz Crystal Microbalance with dissipation was used to monitor the polymer adsorption kinetics and to evaluate the resistance to protein adsorption. On flat substrates, functionalized PEG copolymers adsorb and form a brush in the moderate or in the highly stretched regimes, with density between 0.15 and 1.5 nm-2. PEG layers using phosphonic acid as linkers exhibit excellent protein resistance. In contrast, layers prepared with carboxylic acid as grafting agent exhibit mitigated protein responses and layer destructuration. The present study establishes a correlation between the long-term stability of PEG coated particles in biofluids and the protein resistance of surfaces coated with the same polymers.
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    We study the indentation of ultrathin elastic sheets clamped to the edge of a circular hole. This classical setup has received considerable attention lately, being used by various experimental groups as a probe to measure the surface properties and stretching modulus of thin solid films. Despite the apparent simplicity of this method, the geometric nonlinearity inherent in the mechanical response of thin solid objects renders the analysis of the resulting data a nontrivial task. Importantly, the essence of this difficulty is in the geometric coupling between in-plane stress and out-of-plane deformations, and hence is present in the behaviour of Hookean solids even when the slope of the deformed membrane remains small. Here we take a systematic approach to address this problem, using the membrane limit of the Föppl-von-Kármán equations. This approach highlights some of the dangers in the use of approximate formulae in the metrology of solid films, which can introduce large errors; we suggest how such errors may be avoided in performing experiments and analyzing the resulting data.