Soft Condensed Matter (cond-mat.soft)

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    We show how a weak force, $f$, enables intruder motion through dense granular materials subject to external mechanical excitations, in the present case stepwise shearing. A force acts on a Teflon disc in a two dimensional system of photoelastic discs. This force is much smaller than the smallest force needed to move the disc without any external excitation. In a cycle, material + intruder are sheared quasi-statically from $\gamma = 0$ to $\gamma_{max}$, and then backwards to $\gamma = 0$. During various cycle phases, fragile and jammed states form. Net intruder motion, $\delta$, occurs during fragile periods generated by shear reversals. $\delta$ per cycle, e.g. the quasistatic rate $c$, is constant, linearly dependent on $\gamma_{max}$ and $f$. It vanishes as, $c \propto (\phi_c - \phi)^a$, with $a \simeq 3$ and $\phi_c \simeq \phi_J$, reflecting the stiffening of granular systems under shear as $\phi \rightarrow \phi_J$. The intruder motion induces large scale grain circulation. In the intruder frame, this motion is a granular analogue to fluid flow past a cylinder, where $f$ is the drag force exerted by the flow.
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    In this paper we study a system of entangled chains that bear reversible cross-links in a melt state. The cross-links are tethered uniformly on the backbone of each chain. A slip-link type model for the system is presented and solved for the relaxation modulus. The effects of entanglements and reversible cross-linkers are modelled as discrete form of constraints that influence the motion of the primitive path. In contrast to a non-associating entangled system the model calculations demonstrate that the elastic modulus has a much higher first plateau and a delayed terminal relaxation. These effects are attributed to the evolution of the entangled chains as influenced by tethered reversible linkers. The model is solved for the case when linker survival time $\tau_s$ is greater than the entanglement time $\tau_e$ but less than the Rouse time $\tau_R$.
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    Dendritic polyelectrolytes constitute high potential drugs and carrier systems for biomedical purposes, still their biomolecular interaction modes, in particular those determining the binding affinity to proteins, have not been rationalized. We study the interaction of the drug candidate dendritic polyglycerol sulfate (dPGS) with serum proteins using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) interpreted and complemented with molecular computer simulations. Lysozyme is first studied as a well-defined model protein to verify theoretical concepts, which are then applied to the important cell adhesion protein family of selectins. We demonstrate that the driving force of the strong complexation originates mainly from the release of only a few condensed counterions from the dPGS upon binding. The binding constant shows a surprisingly weak dependence on dPGS size (and bare charge) which can be understood by colloidal charge-renormalization effects and by the fact that the magnitude of the dominating counterion-release mechanism almost exclusively depends on the interfacial charge structure of the protein-specific binding patch. Our findings explain the high selectivity of P- and L- selectins over E-selectin for dPGS to act as a highly anti-inflammatory drug. The entire analysis demonstrates that the interaction of proteins with charged polymeric drugs can be predicted by simulations with unprecedented accuracy. Thus, our results open new perspectives for the rational design of charged polymeric drugs and carrier systems.
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    We investigated the complexation of thermoresponsive anionic poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAM) microgels and cationic $\epsilon$-polylysine ($\epsilon$-PLL) chains. By combining electrophoresis, light scattering, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dielectric spectroscopy (DS) we studied the adsorption of $\epsilon$-PLL onto the microgel networks and its effect on the stability of the suspensions. We show that the volume phase transition (VPT) of the microgels triggers a large polyion adsorption. Two interesting phenomena with unique features occur: a temperature-dependent microgel overcharging and a complex reentrant condensation. The latter may occur at fixed polyion concentration, when temperature is raised above the VPT of microgels, or by increasing the number density of polycations at fixed temperature. TEM and DS measurements unambiguously show that short PLL chains adsorb onto microgels and act as electrostatic glue above the VPT. By performing thermal cycles, we further show that polyion-induced clustering is a quasi-reversible process: within the time of our experiments large clusters form above the VPT and partially re-dissolve as the mixtures are cooled down. Finally we give a proof that the observed phenomenology is purely electrostatic in nature: an increase of the ionic strength gives rise to the polyion desorption from the microgel outer shell.
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    We present an efficient approach for simulating Coulomb systems confined by planar polarizable surfaces. The method is based on the solution of Poisson equation using periodic Green functions. It is shown that the electrostatic energy arising from surface polarization can be decoupled from the energy of periodic replicas. This allows us to combine an efficient Ewald summation method for the replicas with the polarization contribution calculated using Green function techniques. We apply the method to calculate density profiles of ions confined between charged dielectric and metal interfaces.
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    Single polymer dynamics offers a powerful approach to study molecular-level interactions and dynamic microstructure in materials. Direct visualization of single chain dynamics has uncovered new ideas regarding the rheology and non-equilibrium dynamics of macromolecules, including the importance of molecular individualism, dynamic heterogeneity, and molecular sub-populations that govern macroscale behavior. In recent years, the field of single polymer dynamics has been extended to increasingly complex materials, including architecturally complex polymers such as combs, bottlebrushes, and ring polymers and entangled solutions of long chain polymers in flow. Single molecule visualization, complemented by modeling and simulation techniques such as Brownian dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, allow for unparalleled access to the molecular-scale dynamics of polymeric materials. In this review, recent progress in the field of single polymer dynamics is examined by highlighting major developments and new physics to emerge from these techniques. The molecular properties of DNA as a model polymer are examined, including the role of flexibility, excluded volume interactions, and hydrodynamic interactions in governing behavior. Recent developments in studying polymer dynamics in time-dependent flows, new chemistries and new molecular topologies, and the role of intermolecular interactions in concentrated solutions are considered. Moreover, cutting-edge methods in simulation techniques are further reviewed as an ideal complementary method to single polymer experiments. Future work aimed at extending the field of single polymer dynamics to new materials promises to uncover original and unexpected information regarding the flow dynamics of polymeric systems.
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    Surface stress, which is always neglected in classical elastic theories, has recently emerged as a key role in the mechanics of highly deformable soft solids. In this paper, the effect of surface stress on the deformation and instability of soft hollow cylinder are analyzed. By incorporating surface energy density function into the constitutive model of a hyper-elastic theory, explicit solutions are obtained for the deformation of soft hollow cylinder under the conditions of uniform pressure loading and geometric everting. It is found that surface tension evidently alters the deformation of the soft cylinder. Specifically, the surface stiffness resists the deformation, but the residual surface stress is inclined to larger deformation. Effects of surface stress on the instability of the soft hollow cylinder is also explored. For both the pressure loading and geometric everting conditions, significant changes in critical condition of the creases are found by varying the surface parameter. The results in this work reveal that surface energy obviously influences both the deformation and the instability of soft hollow cylinder at finite deformation. The obtained results will be helpful for understanding and predicting the mechanical behavior of soft structures accurately.
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    We predict the dynamics and shapes of nanobubbles growing in a supersaturated solution confined within a tapered, Hele-Shaw device with a small opening angle $\Phi \ll 1$. Our study is inspired by experimental observations of the growth and translation of nanoscale bubbles, ranging in diameter from tens to hundreds of nanometers, carried out with liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy. In our experiments, the electron beam plays a dual role: it supersaturates the solution with gaseous radiolysis products, which lead to bubble nucleation and growth, and it provides a means to image the bubbles in-situ with nanoscale resolution. To understand our experimental data, we propose a migration mechanism, based on Blake-Haynes theory, which is applicable in the asymptotic limits of zero capillary and Bond numbers and high confinement. Consistent with experimental data, our model predicts that in the presence of confinement, growth rates are orders of magnitude slower compared to a bubble growing in the bulk and that the combination of a tapered channel and contact line pinning create tear-drop shaped bubbles.
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    Jamming describes a transition from a flowing or liquid state to a solid or rigid state in a loose assembly of particles such as grains or bubbles. In contrast, clogging describes the ceasing of the flow of particulate matter through a bottleneck. It is not clear how to distinguish jamming from clogging, nor is it known whether they are distinct phenomena or fundamentally the same. We examine an assembly of disks moving through a random obstacle array and identify a transition from clogging to jamming behavior as the disk density increases. The clogging transition has characteristics of an absorbing phase transition, with the disks evolving into a heterogeneous phase-separated clogged state after a critical diverging transient time. In contrast, jamming is a rapid process in which the disks form a homogeneous motionless packing, with a rigidity length scale that diverges as the jamming density is approached.
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    We study dynamical properties of confined, self-propelled Brownian particles in an inhomogeneous activity profile. Using Brownian dynamics simulations, we show that an inhomogeneous activity strongly biases the probability of an active particle to reach a target which is located at higher activities, bearing strong resemblance to chemotaxis. Similarly, the first passage time is strongly reduced when the target is located at higher activites. We present a theoretical approach which is based on a coarse-grained equation of motion of an active particle in which the orientational degrees of freedom are integrated out. We further derive an approximate Fokker-Planck equation and show that the theoretical predictions are in very good agreement with the Brownian dynamics simulations.
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    Measuring the eye's mechanical properties in vivo and with minimally invasive techniques can be the key for individualized solutions to a number of eye pathologies. The development of such techniques largely relies on a computational modelling of the eyeball and, it optimally requires the synergic interplay between experimentation and numerical simulation. In Astrophysics and Geophysics the remote measurement of structural properties of the systems of their realm is performed on the basis of (helio-)seismic techniques. As a biomechanical system, the eyeball possesses normal vibrational modes encompassing rich information about its structure and mechanical properties. However, the integral analysis of the eyeball vibrational modes has not been performed yet. Here we develop a new finite difference method to compute both the spheroidal and, specially, the toroidal eigenfrequencies of the human eye. Using this numerical model, we show that the vibrational eigenfrequencies of the human eye fall in the interval 100 Hz - 10 MHz. We find that compressible vibrational modes may release a trace on high frequency changes of the intraocular pressure, while incompressible normal modes could be registered analyzing the scattering pattern that the motions of the vitreous humour leave on the retina. Existing contact lenses with embebed devices operating at high sampling frequency could be used to register the microfluctuations of the eyeball shape we obtain. We advance that an inverse problem to obtain the mechanical properties of a given eye (e.g., Young's modulus, Poisson ratio) measuring its normal frequencies is doable. These measurements can be done using non-invasive techniques, opening very interesting perspectives to estimate the mechanical properties of eyes in vivo. Future research might relate various ocular pathologies with anomalies in measured vibrational frequencies of the eye.
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    Intraocular pressure, resulting from the balance of aqueous humor (AH) production and drainage, is the only approved treatable risk factor in glaucoma. AH production is determined by the concurrent function of ionic pumps and aquaporins in the ciliary processes but their individual contribution is difficult to characterize experimentally. In this work, we propose a novel unified modeling and computational framework for the finite element simulation of the role of the main ionic pumps involved in AH secretion, namely, the sodium potassium pump, the calcium-sodium pump, the anion channel and the hydrogenate-sodium pump. The theoretical model is developed at the cellular scale and is based on the coupling between electrochemical and fluid-dynamical transmembrane mechanisms characterized by a novel description of the electric pressure exerted by the ions on the intrachannel fluid that includes electrochemical and osmotic corrections. Considering a realistic geometry of the ionic pumps, the proposed model is demonstrated to correctly predict their functionality as a function of (1) the permanent electric charge density over the channel pump surface; (2) the osmotic gradient coefficient; (3) the stoichiometric ratio between the ionic pump currents enforced at the inlet and outlet sections of the channel. In particular, theoretical predictions of the transepithelial membrane potential for each simulated pump/channel allow us to perform a first significant model comparison with experimental data for monkeys. This is a significant step for future multidisciplinary studies on the action of molecules on AH production.