Soft Condensed Matter (cond-mat.soft)

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    We show that application of voltage between two electrically conducting bodies separated by a thin dielectric layer is equivalent to an adhesive contact with an effective separation energy depending quadratically on the applied stress. Under assumption of Coulomb friction in the contact interface, a closed form equation for the friction force is derived.
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    We study experimentally-using Janus colloids-and theoretically-using Active Brownian Particles- the sedimentation of dilute active colloids. We first confirm the existence of an exponential density profile. We show experimentally the emergence of a polarized steady state outside the effective equilibrium regime, i.e. when v_s is not much smaller than the propulsion speed. The experimental distribution of polarization is very well described by the theoretical prediction with no fitting parameter. We then discuss and compare three different definitions of pressure for sedimenting particles: the weight of particles above a given height, the flux of momentum and active impulse, and the force density measured by pressure gauges.
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    We demonstrate that the ubiquitous laboratory magnetic stirrer provides a simple passive method of magnetic levitation, in which the so-called `flea' levitates indefinitely. We study the onset of levitation and quantify the flea's motion (a combination of vertical oscillation, spinning and "waggling"), finding excellent agreement with a mechanical analytical model. The waggling motion drives recirculating flow, producing a centripetal reaction force that stabilises the flea. Our findings have implications for the locomotion of artificial swimmers, for the development of bidirectional microfluidic pumps and provide an alternative to sophisticated commercial levitators.
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    Glass is a liquid that has lost its ability to flow. Why this particular substance undergoes its dramatic slowing down in kinetics while remaining barely distinguishable in structure from the fluid state upon cooling constitutes the central question of glass transition physics. Here, we experimentally tested the pathway of kinetic slowing down in glass$\textrm{-}$forming liquids that consisted of ellipsoidal or binary spherical colloids. In contrast to rotational motion, the exponential scaling between diffusion coefficient and excess entropy in translational motion was revealed to break down at startlingly low area fractions ($\phi_\textrm{T}$) due to glassy effects. At $\phi_\textrm{T}$, anormalous translation-rotation coupling was enhanced and the topography of the free energy landscape became rugged. Basing on the positive correlation between $\phi_\textrm{T}$ and fragility, the measurement of $\phi_\textrm{T}$ offers a novel method for predicting liquids' relaxation while circumventing the prohibitive increase in equilibrium times required in high density regions. Our results highlight the role that thermodynamical entropy plays in glass transitions.
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    The structure of entangled polymers is perturbed by strong shear, resulting in a non-linear response. However, practical limitations make it difficult to probe the molecular structure far from equilibrium, and its understanding is currently incomplete. Here we report \emphin situ measurements of the form factor of a semi-dilute polymer solution under a steady shear flow, as revealed by small angle neutron scattering. A simple analytical formula is derived with only four parameters, giving an excellent fit to the anisotropic 2D scattering pattern in the flow-vorticity plane. There emerges a length scale below which the polymer is not perturbed by shear, while above it there is elongation along the flow and contraction perpendicular to it. Similar patterns have earlier been reported for polymer melts, which now amounts to two greatly different dynamical systems producing the same time-averaged form factor.
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    We report a computational strategy to obtain the charges of individual dielectric particles from experimental observation of their interactions as a function of time. This strategy uses evolutionary optimization to minimize the difference between trajectories extracted from experiment and simulated trajectories based on many-particle force fields. The force fields include both Coulombic interactions and dielectric polarization effects that arise due to particle-particle charge mismatch and particle-environment dielectric contrast. The strategy was applied to systems of free falling charged granular particles in vacuum, where electrostatic interactions are the only driving forces that influence the particles' motion. We show that when the particles' initial positions and velocities are known, the optimizer requires only an initial and final particle configuration of a short trajectory in order to accurately infer the particles' charges; when the initial velocities are unknown and only the initial positions are given, the optimizer can learn from multiple frames along the trajectory to determine the particles' initial velocities and charges. While the results presented here offer a proof-of-concept demonstration of the proposed ideas, the proposed strategy could be extended to more complex systems of electrostatically charged granular matter.
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    We discuss the locomotion of a three-sphere microswimmer in a viscoelastic structured fluid characterized by typical length and time scales. We derive a general expression to link the average swimming velocity to the sphere mobilities. In this relationship, a viscous contribution exists when the time-reversal symmetry is broken, whereas an elastic contribution is present when the structural symmetry of the microswimmer is broken. As an example of a structured fluid, we consider a polymer gel, which is described by a "two-fluid" model. We demonstrate in detail that the competition between the swimmer size and the polymer mesh size gives rise to the rich dynamics of a three-sphere microswimmer.
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    In the framework of the suggested in [arxiv:1803.08247 [cond-mat.mtrl-sci]] statistical theory of the flow stress, including yield strength, ${\sigma}_y$, of polycrystalline materials under quasi-static (in case of tensile strain) plastic deformation in dependence on average size, d, of the crystallites (grains) in the range, $10^{-8}$ m - $10^{-2}$ m it is found the coincidences of the theoretical and experimental data of ${\sigma}_y$ for the materials with BCC (${\alpha}$- Fe), FCC (Cu, Al, Ni) and HCP (${\alpha}$-Ti, Zr) crystal lattice at T=300K. The temperature dependence of the strength characteristics is studied. It is shown on the example of Al, that the yield strength grows with decreasing of the temperature for all grains with d greater than $3*d_0$ (with $d_0$ being extremal size of the grain for maximal ${\sigma}_y$) and then ${\sigma}_y$ decreases in the nano-crystalline region. Stress-strain curves, ${\sigma}={\sigma}({\epsilon})$, are constructed for the pure crystalline phase of ${\alpha}$- Fe with Backofen-Considére fracture criterion validity. The single-phase model of polycrystalline material is extended by means of inclusion of a softening grain boundary phase.

Recent comments

Dan Elton Mar 16 2018 04:36 UTC

Comments are appreciated. Message me here or on twitter @moreisdifferent

Code is open source and available at :
[https://github.com/delton137/PIMD-F90][1]

[1]: https://github.com/delton137/PIMD-F90