Soft Condensed Matter (cond-mat.soft)

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    We consider capillary condensation transitions occurring in open slits of width $L$ and finite height $H$ immersed in a reservoir of vapour. In this case the pressure at which condensation occurs is closer to saturation compared to that occurring in an infinite slit ($H=\infty$) due to the presence of two menisci which are pinned near the open ends. Using macroscopic arguments we derive a modified Kelvin equation for the pressure, $p_{cc}(L;H)$, at which condensation occurs and show that the two menisci are characterised by an edge contact angle $\theta_e$ which is always larger than the equilibrium contact angle $\theta$, only equal to it in the limit of macroscopic $H$. For walls which are completely wet ($\theta=0$) the edge contact angle depends only on the aspect ratio of the capillary and is well described by $\theta_e\approx \sqrt{\pi L/2H}$ for large $H$. Similar results apply for condensation in cylindrical pores of finite length. We have tested these predictions against numerical results obtained using a microscopic density functional model where the presence of an edge contact angle characterising the shape of the menisci is clearly visible from the density profiles. Below the wetting temperature $T_w$ we find very good agreement for slit pores of widths of just a few tens of molecular diameters while above $T_w$ the modified Kelvin equation only becomes accurate for much larger systems.
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    We use computer simulations to study the phase behaviour for hard, right rhombic prisms as a function of the angle of their rhombic face (the "slant" angle). More specifically, using a combination of event-driven molecular dynamics simulations, Monte Carlo simulations, and free-energy calculations, we determine and characterize the equilibrium phases formed by these particles for various slant angles and densities. Surprisingly, we find that the equilibrium crystal structure for a large range of slant angles and densities is the simple cubic crystal - despite the fact that the particles do not have cubic symmetry. Moreover, we find that the equilibrium vacancy concentration in this simple cubic phase is extremely high and depends only on the packing fraction, and not the particle shape. At higher densities, a rhombic crystal appears as the equilibrium phase. We summarize the phase behaviour of this system by drawing a phase diagram in the slant angle - packing fraction plane.
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    Time correlation functions in the Lebwohl-Lasher model of nematic liquid crystals are studied using theory and molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, the autocorrelation functions of angular momentum and nematic director fluctuations are calculated in the long-wavelength limit. The constitutive relations for the hydrodynamic currents are derived using a standard procedure based on non-negativity of the entropy production. The continuity equations are then linearized and solved to calculate the correlation functions. We find that the transverse angular momentum fluctuations are coupled to the director fluctuations, and are both propagative. The propagative nature of the fluctuations suppress the anticipated hydrodynamic long-time tails in the single-particle autocorrelation functions. The fluctuations in the isotropic phase are however diffusive, leading to $t^{-d/2}$ long-time tails in $d$ spatial dimensions. The Frank elastic constant measured using the time-correlation functions are in good agreement with previously reported results.
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    We study the partitioning of cosolute particles in a thin film of a semi-flexible polymer network by a combination of coarse-grained (implicit-solvent) stochastic dynamics simulations and mean-field theory. We focus on a wide range of solvent qualities and cosolute-network interactions for selected polymer flexibilities. Our investigated ensemble (isothermal-isobaric) allows the network to undergo a volume transition from extended to collapsed state while the cosolutes can distribute in bulk and network, correspondingly. We find a rich topology of equilibrium states of the network and transitions between them, qualitatively depending on solvent quality, polymer flexibility, and cosolute-network interactions. In particular, we find a novel `cosolute-induced' collapsed state, where strongly attractive cosolutes bridge network monomers albeit the latter interact mutually repulsive. Finally, the cosolutes' global partitioning `landscape', computed as a function of solvent quality and cosolute-network interactions, exhibits very different topologies depending on polymer flexibility. The simulation results are supported by theoretical predictions obtained with a two-component mean-field approximation for the Helmholtz free energy that considers the chain elasticity and the particle interactions in terms of a virial expansion. Our findings have implications on the interpretation of transport processes and permeability in hydrogel films, as realized in filtration or macromolecular carrier systems.
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    The dynamics of membrane undulations inside a viscous solvent is governed by distinctive, anomalous, power laws. Inside a viscoelastic continuous medium these universal behaviors are modified by the specific bulk viscoelastic spectrum. Yet, in structured fluids the continuum limit is reached only beyond a characteristic correlation length. We study the crossover to this asymptotic bulk dynamics. The analysis relies on a recent generalization of the hydrodynamic interaction in structured fluids, which shows a slow spatial decay of the interaction toward the bulk limit. For membranes which are weakly coupled to the structured medium we find a wide crossover regime characterized by different, universal, dynamic power laws. We discuss various systems for which this behavior is relevant, and delineate the time regime over which it may be observed.
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    Soil creeps imperceptibly downhill, but also fails catastrophically to create landslides. Despite the importance of these processes as hazards and in sculpting landscapes, there is no agreed upon model that captures the full range of behavior. Here we examine the granular origins of hillslope soil transport by Discrete Element Method simulations, and re-analysis of measurements in natural landscapes. We find creep for slopes below a critical gradient, where average particle velocity (sediment flux) increases exponentially with friction coefficient (gradient). At critical there is a continuous transition to a dense-granular flow rheology, consistent with previous laboratory experiments. Slow earthflows and landslides thus exhibit glassy dynamics characteristic of a wide range of disordered materials; they are described by a two-phase flux equation that emerges from grain-scale friction alone. This glassy model reproduces topographic profiles of natural hillslopes, showing its promise for predicting hillslope evolution over geologic timescales.
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    Motivated by observations of snap-through phenomena in buckled elastic strips subject to clamping and lateral end translations, we experimentally explore the multi-stability and bifurcations of thin bands of various widths and compare these results with numerical continuation of a perfectly anisotropic Kirchhoff rod. Our choice of boundary conditions is not easily satisfied by the anisotropic structures, forcing a cooperation between bending and twisting deformations. We find that, despite clear physical differences between rods and strips, a naive Kirchhoff model works surprisingly well as an organizing framework for the experimental observations. In the context of this model, we observe that anisotropy creates new states and alters the connectivity between existing states. Our results are a preliminary look at relatively unstudied boundary conditions for rods and strips that may arise in a variety of engineering applications, and may guide the avoidance of jump phenomena in such settings.
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    We demonstrate the passive control of viscous flow in a channel by using an elastic arch embedded in the flow. Depending on the fluid flux, the arch may `snap' between two states --- constricting and unconstricting --- that differ in hydraulic conductivity by up to an order of magnitude. We use a combination of experiments at a macroscopic scale and theory to study the constricting and unconstricting states, and determine the critical flux required to transition between them. We show that such a device may be precisely tuned for use in a range of applications, and in particular has potential as a passive microfluidic fuse to prevent excessive fluxes in rigid-walled channels.
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    Fluids with spatial density variations of single or mixed molecules play a key role in biophysics, soft matter and materials science. The fluid structures usually form via spinodal decomposition or nucleation following an instantaneous destabilisation of the initially disordered fluid. However, in practice an instantaneous quench is often not viable and the rate of destabilisation may be gradual rather than instantaneous. In this work we show that the commonly used phenomenological descriptions of fluid structuring are inadequate under these conditions. We come to that conclusion in the context of heterogeneous catalysis, where we employ kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to describe the unimolecular adsorption of gaseous molecules onto a metal surface. The adsorbates diffuse at the surface and, as a consequence of lateral interactions and due to an ongoing increase the surface coverage, phase separate into coexisting low- and high-density regions. We find the typical size of these regions to depend on the rate of adsorption much more strongly than predicted from recently reported phenomenological models.
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    Confining a liquid crystal imposes topological constraints on the orientational order, allowing global control of equilibrium systems by manipulation of anchoring boundary conditions. In this letter, we investigate whether a similar strategy allows control of active liquid crystals. We study a hydrodynamic model of an extensile active nematic confined in containers, with different anchoring conditions that impose different net topological charges on the nematic director. We show that the dynamics are controlled by a complex interplay between topological defects in the director and their induced vortical flows. We find three distinct states by varying confinement and the strength of the active stress: a topologically minimal state, a circulating defect state, and a turbulent state. In contrast to equilibrium systems, we find that anchoring conditions are screened by the active flow, preserving system behavior across different topological constraints. This observation identifies a fundamental difference between active and equilibrium materials.
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    Discrete particle simulations are used to study the shear rheology of dense, stabilized, frictional particulate suspensions in a viscous liquid, toward development of a constitutive model for steady shear flows at arbitrary stress. These suspensions undergo increasingly strong continuous shear thickening (CST) as solid volume fraction $\phi$ increases above a critical volume fraction, and discontinuous shear thickening (DST) is observed for a range of $\phi$. When studied at controlled stress, the DST behavior is associated with non-monotonic flow curves of the steady-state stress as a function of shear rate. Recent studies have related shear thickening to a transition between mostly lubricated to predominantly frictional contacts with the increase in stress. In this study, the behavior is simulated over a wide range of the dimensionless parameters $(\phi,\tilde{\sigma}$, and $\mu)$, with $\tilde{\sigma} = \sigma/\sigma_0$ the dimensionless shear stress and $\mu$ the coefficient of interparticle friction: the dimensional stress is $\sigma$, and $\sigma_0 \propto F_0/ a^2$, where $F_0$ is the magnitude of repulsive force at contact and $a$ is the particle radius. The data have been used to populate the model of the lubricated-to-frictional rheology of Wyart and Cates [Phys. Rev. Lett.\bf 112, 098302 (2014)], which is based on the concept of two viscosity divergences or \textquotedblleft jamming\textquotedblright points at volume fraction $\phi_{\rm J}^0 = \phi_{\rm rcp}$ (random close packing) for the low-stress lubricated state, and at $\phi_{\rm J} (\mu) < \phi_{\rm J}^0$ for any nonzero $\mu$ in the frictional state; a generalization provides the normal stress response as well as the shear stress. A flow state map of this material is developed based on the simulation results.
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    We present a simple $^1$H NMR approach for characterizing intermediate to fast regime molecular motions using $^1$H time-domain NMR at low magnetic field. The method is based on a Goldmann Shen dipolar filter (DF) followed by a Mixed Magic Sandwich Echo (MSE). The dipolar filter suppresses the signals arising from molecular segments presenting sub kHz mobility, so only signals from mobile segments are detected. Thus, the temperature dependence of the signal intensities directly evidences the onset of molecular motions with rates higher than kHz. The DF-MSE signal intensity is described by an analytical function based on the Anderson Weiss theory, from where parameters related to the molecular motion (e.g. correlation times and activation energy) can be estimated when performing experiments as function of the temperature. Furthermore, we propose the use of the Tikhonov regularization for estimating the width of the distribution of correlation times.
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    Motivated by a freely suspended graphene and polymerized membranes in soft and biological matter we present a detailed study of a tensionless elastic sheet in the presence of thermal fluctuations and quenched disorder. The manuscript is based on an extensive draft dating back to 1993, that was circulated privately. It presents the general theoretical framework and calculational details of numerous results, partial forms of which have been published in brief Letters (Le Doussal and Radzihovsky 1992). The experimental realization of atom-thin graphene sheets has driven a resurgence in this fascinating subject, making our dated predictions and their detailed derivations timely. To this end we analyze the statistical mechanics of a generalized D-dimensional elastic "membrane" embedded in d dimensions using a self-consistent screening approximation (SCSA), that has proved to be unprecedentedly accurate in this system, exact in three complementary limits: d --> infinity, D --> 4, and D=d. Focusing on the critical "flat" phase, for a homogeneous two-dimensional membrane embedded in three dimensions, we predict its universal length-scale dependent roughness, elastic moduli exponents, and a universal negative Poisson ratio of -1/3. We also extend these results to short- and long-range correlated random heterogeneity, predicting a variety of glassy wrinkled membrane states. Finally, we also predict and analyze a continuous crumpling transition in a "phantom" elastic sheet. We hope that this detailed presentation of the SCSA theory will be useful for further theoretical developments and corresponding experimental investigations on freely suspended graphene.
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    The nucleation and growth of calcite is an important research in scientific and industrial field. Both the macroscopic and microscopic observation of calcite growth have been reported. Now, with the development of microfluidic device, we could focus the nucleation and growth of one single calcite. By changing the flow rate of fluid, the concentration of fluid is controlled. We introduced a new method to study calcite growth in situ and measured the growth rate of calcite in microfluidic channel.
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    One of the varieties of pores, often found in natural or artificial building materials, are the so-called blind pores of dead-end or saccate type. Three-dimensional model of such kind of pore has been developed in this work. This model has been used for simulation of water vapor interaction with individual pore by molecular dynamics in combination with the diffusion equation method. Special investigations have been done to find dependencies between thermostats implementations and conservation of thermodynamic and statistical values of water vapor - pore system. The two types of evolution of water-pore system have been investigated: drying and wetting of the pore. Full research of diffusion coefficient, diffusion velocity and other diffusion parameters has been made.