Soft Condensed Matter (cond-mat.soft)

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    The calculation of discrete or continuous relaxation time spectra from rheometric measurables of polydisperse polymers is an ill-posed problem. In this paper, a curve fitting method for solving this problem is presented and compared to selected models from the literature. It is shown that the new method is capable of correctly predicting the molecular mass distributions of linear polydisperse polymer melts as well as their relaxation time spectra.
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    Experimental studies of the variation of the mean square displacement (MSD) of a particle in a confined colloid suspension that exhibits density variations on the scale length of the particle diameter are not in agreement with the prediction that the spatial variation in MSD should mimic the spatial variation in density. The predicted behavior is derived from the expectation that the MSD of a particle depends on the system density and the assumption that the force acting on a particle is a point function of position. The experimental data come from studies of the MSDs of particles in narrow ribbon channels and between narrowly spaced parallel plates, and from new data, reported herein, of the radial and azimuthal MSDs of a colloid particle in a dense colloid suspension confined to a small circular cavity. In each of these geometries a dense colloid suspension exhibits pronounced density oscillations with spacing of a particle diameter. We remove the discrepancy between prediction and experiment using the Fisher-Methfessel interpretation of how local equilibrium in an inhomogeneous system is maintained to argue that the force acting on a particle is delocalized over a volume with radius equal to a particle diameter. Our interpretation has relevance to the relationship between the scale of inhomogeneity and the utility of translation of the particle MSD into a position dependent diffusion coefficient, and to the use of a spatially dependent diffusion coefficient to describe mass transport in a heterogeneous system.
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    It is a promising extension of the quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach to incorporate the solvent molecules surrounding the QM solute into the QM region to ensure the adequate description of the electronic polarization of the solute. However, the solvent molecules in the QM region inevitably diffuse into the MM bulk during the QM/MM simulation. In this article we developed a simple and efficient method, referred to as boundary constraint with correction (BCC), to prevent the diffusion of the solvent water molecules by means of a constraint po- tential. The point of the BCC method is to compensate the error in a statistical property due to the bias potential by adding a correction term obtained through a set of QM/MM simulations. The BCC method is designed so that the effect of the bias potential completely vanishes when the QM solvent is identical with the MM solvent. Furthermore, the desirable conditions, that is, the continuities of energy and force and the conservations of energy and momentum, are fulfilled in principle. We applied the QM/MM-BCC method to a hydronium ion in aqueous solution to construct the radial distribution function(RDF) of the solvent around the solute. It was demonstrated that the correction term fairly compensated the error and led the RDF in good agreement with the result given by an ab initio molecular dynamics simulation.
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    We investigate the swim pressure exerted by non-chiral and chiral active particles on convex or concave circular boundaries. Active particles are modeled as non-interacting and non-aligning self-propelled Brownian particles. The convex and concave circular boundaries are used as models representing a fixed inclusion immersed in an active bath and a cavity (or container) enclosing the active particles, respectively. We first present a detailed analysis of the role of convex versus concave boundary curvature and of the chirality of active particles on their spatial distribution, chirality-induced currents, and the swim pressure they exert on the bounding surfaces. The results will then be used to predict the mechanical equilibria of suspended fluid enclosures (generically referred to as 'droplets') in a bulk with active particles being present either inside the bulk fluid or within the suspended droplets. We show that, while droplets containing active particles and suspended in a normal bulk behave in accordance with standard capillary paradigms, those containing a normal fluid exhibit anomalous behaviors when suspended in an active bulk. In the latter case, the excess swim pressure results in non-monotonic dependence of the inside droplet pressure on the droplet radius. As a result, we find a regime of anomalous capillarity for a single droplet, where the inside droplet pressure increases upon increasing the droplet size. In the case of two interconnected droplets, we show that mechanical equilibrium can occur also when they have different sizes. We further identify a regime of anomalous ripening, where two unequal-sized droplets can reach a final state of equal sizes upon interconnection, in stark contrast with the standard Ostwald ripening phenomenon, implying shrinkage of the smaller droplet in favor of the larger one.
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    This review explores particle resuspension from surfaces due to fluid flows. The objective of this review is to provide a general framework and terminology for particle resuspension while highlighting the future developments needed to deepen our understanding of these phenomena. For that purpose, the manuscript is organized with respect to three mechanisms identified in particle resuspension, namely: the incipient motion of particles (i.e. how particles are set in motion), their migration on the surface (i.e. rolling or sliding motion) and their re-entrainment in the flow (i.e. their motion in the near-wall region after detachment). Recent measurements and simulations of particle resuspension are used to underline our current understanding of each mechanism for particle resuspension. These selected examples also highlight the limitations in the present knowledge of particle resuspension, while providing insights into future developments that need to be addressed. In particular, the paper addresses the issue of adhesion forces between complex surfaces - where more detailed characterizations of adhesion force distributions are needed - and the issue of particle sliding/rolling motion on the surface - which can lead to particles halting/being trapped in regions with high adhesion forces.
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    We study numerically the behaviour of a mixture of a passive isotropic fluid and an active polar gel, in the presence of a surfactant favouring emulsification. Focussing on parameters for which the underlying free energy favours the lamellar phase in the passive limit, we show that the interplay between nonequilibrium and thermodynamic forces creates a range of multifarious exotic emulsions. When the active component is contractile (e.g., an actomyosin solution), moderate activity enhances the efficiency of lamellar ordering, whereas strong activity favours the creation of passive droplets within an active matrix. For extensile activity (occurring, e.g., in microtubule-motor suspensions), instead, we observe an emulsion of spontaneously rotating droplets of different size. By tuning the overall composition, we can create high internal phase emulsions, which undergo sudden phase inversion when activity is switched off. Therefore, we find that activity provides a single control parameter to design composite materials with a strikingly rich range of morphologies.
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    We consider patchy gold nanoparticles decorated by liquid crystalline ligands. The cases of two, three, four and six symmetrically arranged patches of ligands are discussed, as well as the cases of their equatorial and uniform arrangement. A solution of decorated nanoparticles is considered within a flat pore with the solid walls and the interior filled by a polar solvent. The ligands form physical crosslinks between the nanoparticles due to strong liquid crystalline interaction, turning the solution into a gel-like structure. Gelation is done repeatedly starting each time from freshly equilibrated dispersed state of nanoparticles. The gelation dynamics and the range of network characteristics of gel are examined, depending on the type of patchy decoration and the solution density. The emphasis is given to the suitability of a gel for catalytic applications