Quantum Gases (cond-mat.quant-gas)

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    Studying chemical reactions on a state-to-state level tests and improves our fundamental understanding of chemical processes. For such investigations it is convenient to make use of ultracold atomic and molecular reactants as they can be prepared in well defined internal and external quantum states$^{1-4}$. In general, even cold reactions have many possible final product states$^{5-15}$ and reaction channels are therefore hard to track individually$^{16}$. In special cases, however, only a single reaction channel is essentially participating, as observed e.g. in the recombination of two atoms forming a Feshbach molecule$^{17-19}$ or in atom-Feshbach molecule exchange reactions$^{20,21}$. Here, we investigate a single-channel reaction of two Li$_2$-Feshbach molecules where one of the molecules dissociates into two atoms $2\mathrm{AB}\Rightarrow \mathrm{AB}+\mathrm{A}+\mathrm{B}$. The process is a prototype for a class of four-body collisions where two reactants produce three product particles. We measure the collisional dissociation rate constant of this process as a function of collision energy/ temperature and scattering length. We confirm an Arrhenius-law dependence on the collision energy, an $a^4$ power-law dependence on the scattering length $a$ and determine a universal four body reaction constant.
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    We study ultra-cold dipolar excitons confined in a 10$\mu$m trap of a double GaAs quantum well. Based on the local density approximation, we unveil for the first time the equation of state of excitons at pure thermodynamic equilibrium. In this regime we show that, below a critical temperature of about $1$ Kelvin, a superfluid forms in the inner region of the trap at a local exciton density $n \sim 2-3 \, 10^{10} \text{cm}^{-2}$, encircled by a more dilute and normal component in the outer rim of the trap. Remarkably, this spatial arrangement correlates directly with the concentration of defects in the exciton density which exhibits a sudden decrease at the onset of superfluidity, thus pointing towards an underlying Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless mechanism.
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    We measure the superradiant emission in a one-dimensional (1D) superradiance lattice (SL) in ultracold atoms. Resonantly excited to a superradiant state, the atoms are further coupled to other collectively excited states, which form a 1D SL. The directional emission of one of the superradiant excited states in the 1D SL is measured. The emission spectra depend on the band structure, which can be controlled by the frequency and intensity of the coupling laser fields. This work provides a platform for investigating the collective Lamb shift of resonantly excited superradiant states in Bose-Einstein condensates and paves the way for realizing higher dimensional superradiance lattices.
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    We predict wide-band suppression of tunneling of spin-orbit-coupled atoms (or noninteracting Bose-Einstein condensate) in a double-well potential with periodically varying depths of the potential wells. The suppression of tunneling is possible for a single state and for superposition of two states, i.e. for a qbit. By varying spin-orbit coupling one can drastically increase the range of modulation frequencies in which an atom remains localized in one of the potential wells, the effect connected with crossing of energy levels. This range of frequencies is limited because temporal modulation may also excite resonant transitions between lower and upper states in different wells. The resonant transitions enhance tunneling and are accompanied by pseudo-spin switching. Since the frequencies of the resonant transitions are independent of potential modulation depth, in contrast to frequencies at which suppression of tunneling occurs, by varying this depth one can dynamically control both spatial localization and pseudo-spin of the final state.
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    Dark and grey soliton-like states are shown to emerge from numerically constructed superpositions of translationally-invariant eigenstates of the interacting Bose gas in a toroidal trap. The exact quantum many-body dynamics reveals a density depression with superdiffusive spreading that is absent in the mean-field treatment of solitons. A simple theory based on finite-size bound states of holes with quantum-mechanical center-of-mass motion quantitatively explains the time-evolution of the superposition states and predicts quantum effects that could be observed in ultra-cold gas experiments. The soliton phase step is shown to be a key ingredient of an accurate finite size approximation, which enables us to compare the theory with numerical simulations. The fundamental soliton width, an invariant property of the quantum dark soliton, is shown to deviate from the Gross-Pitaevskii predictions in the interacting regime and vanishes in the Tonks-Girardeau limit.
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    The effect of disorder in the intensity of the driving laser on the dynamics of a disordered three-cavity system of four-level atoms is investigated. This system can be described by a Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian for dark-state polaritons. We examine the evolution of the first- and second-order correlation functions, the photon and atomic excitation numbers and the basis state occupation probabilities. We use the full Hamiltonian and the approximate Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian with uniform and speckle disorder, as well as with different dipole couplings. We find that the results for the two Hamiltonians are in good agreement. We also find that it is possible to obtain bunching and antibunching of the polaritons by varying the dipole couplings and that polaritons can be driven into a purely photonic state by varying the laser intensity.
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    The superfluid to insulator quantum phase transition of a three-dimensional particle-hole symmetric system of disordered bosons is studied. To this end, a site-diluted quantum rotor Hamiltonian is mapped onto a classical (3+1)-dimensional XY model with columnar disorder and analyzed by means of large-scale Monte Carlo simulations. The superfluid-Mott insulator transition of the clean, undiluted system is in the 4D XY universality class and shows mean-field critical behavior with logarithmic corrections. The clean correlation length exponent $\nu = 1/2$ violates the Harris criterion, indicating that disorder must be a relevant perturbation. For nonzero dilutions below the lattice percolation threshold of $p_c = 0.688392$, our simulations yield conventional power-law critical behavior with dilution-independent critical exponents $z=1.67(6)$, $\nu = 0.90(5)$, $\beta/\nu = 1.09(3)$, and $\gamma/\nu = 2.50(3)$. The critical behavior of the transition across the lattice percolation threshold is controlled by the classical percolation exponents. Our results are discussed in the context of a classification of disordered quantum phase transitions, as well as experiments in superfluids, superconductors and magnetic systems.
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    The effect of disorder in the intensity of the driving laser on a coupled array of cavities described by a Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian for dark-state polaritons is investigated. A canonically-transformed Gutzwiller wave function is used to investigate the phase diagram and dynamics of a one-dimensional system with uniformly distributed disorder in the Rabi frequency. In the phase diagram, we find the emergence of a Bose glass phase that increases in extent as the strength of the disorder increases. We study the dynamics of the system when subject to a ramp in the Rabi frequency which, starting from the superfluid phase, is decreased linearly and then increased to its initial value. We investigate the dependence of the density of excitations, the relaxation of the superfluid order parameter and the excess energy pumped into the system on the inverse ramp rate, $\tau$. We find that, in the absence of disorder, the defect density oscillates with a constant envelope, while the relaxation of the order parameter and excess energy oscillate with $\tau^{-1.5}$ and $\tau^{-2}$ envelopes respectively. In the presence of disorder in the Rabi frequency, the defect density oscillates with a decaying envelope, the relaxation of the order parameter no longer decreases as $\tau$ increases while the residual energy decreases as $\tau$ increases. The rate at which the envelope of the defect density decays increases with increasing disorder strength, while the excess energy falls off more slowly with increasing disorder strength.
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    We numerically investigate the low-lying entanglement spectrum of the ground state of random one dimensional spin chains obtained after a partition of the chain in two equal halves. We consider two paradigmatic models: the spin-1/2 random transverse field Ising model, solved exactly, and the spin-1 random Heisenberg model, simulated using the density matrix renormalization group. In both cases we analyse the mean Schmidt gap, defined as the difference of the two largest eigenvalues of the reduced density matrix of one of the two partitions, averaged over many disorder realizations. We find that the Schmidt gap detects very well the critical point and scales with universal critical exponents.
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    We discuss the effect of anomalous quantum-reflection of Bose-Einstein condensates as a screening effect, that is created by the condensate itself. We derive an effective, time-independent single-mode approach, that allows us to define different paths of reflection. We compare our theory with experimental results.

Recent comments

Maciej Malinowski Jul 26 2017 15:56 UTC

In what sense is the ground state for large detuning ordered and antiferromagnetic? I understand that there is symmetry breaking, but other than that, what is the fundamental difference between ground states for large negative and large positive detunings? It seems to be they both exhibit some order

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Māris Ozols Sep 15 2016 21:30 UTC

Here is a link for those who also haven't heard of SciPost before: https://scipost.org/

Zoltán Zimborás Sep 15 2016 18:12 UTC

This is the very first paper of SciPost, waiting for the first paper of "Quantum" (http://quantum-journal.org). There are radical (and good!) changes going on in scientific publishing.