Other Condensed Matter (cond-mat.other)

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    Metal atoms and small clusters introduced into superfluid helium (He II) concentrate there in quantized vortices to form (by further coagulation) the thin nanowires. The nanowires' thickness and structure are well predicted by a double-staged mechanism. On the first stage the coagulation of cold particles in the vortex cores leads to melting of their fusion product, which acquires a spherical shape due to surface tension. Then (second stage) when these particles reach a certain size they do not possess sufficient energy to melt and eventually coalesce into the nanowires. Nevertheless the assumption of melting for such refractory metal as tungsten, especially in He II, which possesses an extremely high thermal conductivity, induces natural skepticism. That is why we decided to register directly the visible thermal emission accompanying metals coagulation in He II. The brightness temperatures of this radiation for the tungsten, molybdenum, and platinum coagulation were found to be noticeably higher than even the metals' melting temperatures. The region of He II that contained suspended metal particles expanded with the velocity of 50 m/s, being close to the Landau velocity, but coagulation took place even more quickly, so that the whole process of nanowire growth is completed at distances about 1.5 mm from the place of metal injection into He II. High rate of coagulation of guest metal particles as well as huge local overheating are associated with them concentrating in quantized vortex cores. The same process should take place not only for metals but for any atoms, molecules and small clusters embedded into He II.

Recent comments

Stefano Pirandola Nov 30 2016 06:45 UTC

Dear Mark, thx for your comment. There are indeed missing citations to previous works by Rafal, Janek and Lorenzo that we forgot to add. Regarding your paper, I did not read it in detail but I have two main comments:

1- What you are using is completely equivalent to the tool of "quantum simulatio

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Mark M. Wilde Nov 30 2016 02:18 UTC

An update http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 of this paper has appeared, one day after the arXiv post http://arxiv.org/abs/1611.09165 . The paper http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 now includes (without citation) some results for bosonic Gaussian channels found independently in http://arxiv.org/abs/16

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Mark M. Wilde Oct 06 2016 15:44 UTC

The following paper found a setting in which adaptive operations do not help in quantum channel discrimination:

https://arxiv.org/abs/1408.3373

It is published as

Communications in Mathematical Physics, vol. 344, no. 3, pages 797-829, June 2016

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2

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Jaeyoon Cho Jul 16 2014 06:15 UTC

Dear Spiros,

Thank you very much for your generous comments and please forgive me for a terribly late reply.

Your remark on the local-TQO is very interesting. Let me first clarify that the condition (1) alone does not tell you anything about the internal structure of the ground state. It merel

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Spiros May 02 2014 01:47 UTC

Dear Jaeyoon,

This is a very nice result. Condition 1 is reminiscent of the Local-TQO condition necessary for stability of frustration-free gapped Hamiltonians (see Corollary 3 and 4 in http://arxiv.org/abs/1109.1588). Local-TQO is supposed to be generic (see Section VI in http://arxiv.org/1306.4

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Sergey Filippov Aug 02 2013 12:17 UTC

Physicists may be also interested in a realistic proposal of DFS computation with solid-state qubits: Phys. Lett. A 374, 3285 (2010), arXiv:0903.1056 [quant-ph]