Materials Science (cond-mat.mtrl-sci)

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    We demonstrate the fabrication of photonic crystal nanobeam cavities with rectangular cross section into bulk diamond. In simulation, these cavities have an unloaded quality factor (Q) of over 1 million. Measured cavity resonances show fundamental modes with spectrometer-limited quality factors larger than 14,000 within 1nm of the NV center's zero phonon line at 637nm. We find high cavity yield across the full diamond chip with deterministic resonance trends across the fabricated parameter sweeps.
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    Materials composed of two dimensional layers bonded to one another through weak van der Waals interactions often exhibit strongly anisotropic behaviors and can be cleaved into very thin specimens and sometimes into monolayer crystals. Interest in such materials is driven by the study of low dimensional physics and the design of functional heterostructures. Binary compounds with the compositions MX2 and MX3 where M is a metal cation and X is a halogen anion often form such structures. Magnetism can be incorporated by choosing a transition metal with a partially filled d-shell for M, enabling ferroic responses for enhanced functionality. Here a brief overview of binary transition metal dihalides and trihalides is given, summarizing their crystallographic properties and long-range-ordered magnetic structures, focusing on those materials with layered crystal structures and partially filled d-shells required for combining low dimensionality and cleavability with magnetism.
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    The extent to which time-dependent fracture criteria affect the dynamic behavior of fracture in a discrete structure is discussed in this work. The simplest case of a semi-infinite isotropic chain of oscillators has been studied. Two history-dependent criteria are compared to the classical one of threshold elongation for linear bonds. The results show that steady-state regimes can be reached in the low subsonic crack speed range which can not be according to the classical criterion. Repercussions in terms of load and crack opening versus velocity are explained in details. Once known the steady-state regimes of fracture propagation, a procedure for applying history-dependent criteria emerges as not restricted to the two examined ones and opens the way to different and more complex problems.
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    Although molecular dynamics (MD) are commonly used to predict the structure and properties of glasses, they are intrinsically limited to high cooling rates. Our lack of knowledge regarding the effects of the cooling rate on glasses' properties therefore render challenging meaningful comparisons between simulated and experimental results. Here, based on MD simulations of a sodium silicate glass with varying cooling rates, we show that the thermal history mostly affects the medium-range order structure, while leaving the short-range order largely unaffected. This yields a decoupling between the relaxations of the enthalpy and volume, namely, the enthalpy quickly plateaus as the cooling rate decreases whereas density exhibits a slower relaxation. Finally, we demonstrate that the outcomes of MD simulations can be meaningfully compared to experimental values if properly extrapolated toward lower cooling rates.
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    There has been renewed interest in the use of magnetic nanoparticles to convert high frequency electromagnetic energy into heat. During the last decade, numerous examples in the field of catalysis, lightweight thermoplastic composites for aeronautical and automotive engineering, and biomedical applications as well, have flourished. In a recent Letter "Ultrathin Interface Regime of Core-Shell Magnetic Nanoparticles for Effective Magnetism Tailoring", Moon et al. DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b04016 claim to have observed a new interface spin canting phenomenon in core-shell ferrrites that pushes heating efficiencies above 10,000 W/g. If this were true, it represents new opportunities for further tailoring nanoscale agents to be used in drug delivery and selective destruction of tumours by hyperthermia. But here I argue that these claims are inconsistent with the facts of physics.
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    In this paper the critical currents as well as the thermal stability of skyrmion racetrack like structures is investigated. It is reported that the pinning sites which are required in order to allow for thermally stable bits significantly increases the critical current densities to about $j_{crit}$ = 0.62 TA/m$^2$ to move the bits in skyrmion like structures. By calculating the thermal stability as well as the critical current we can derive the spin torque efficiency wich is $\eta$ = $\Delta/I_c = 0.19 k_BT_{300}~\mu$ A which is in similar range of simulated spin torque efficiency of MRAM structures. . Finally it is shown that the stochastic depinning process of any racetrack like device require very narrow switching or depinning time distribution in order to avoid thermally written in errors or special current profiles allowing for a clock cycle.
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    We calculate the effect of a static electric field on the critical temperature of a s-wave one band superconductor in the framework of proximity effect Eliashberg theory. In the weak electrostatic field limit the theory has no free parameters while, in general, the only free parameter is the thickness of the surface layer where the electric field acts. We conclude that the best situation for increasing the critical temperature is to have a very thin film of a superconducting material with a strong increase of electron-phonon (boson) constant upon charging.
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    We investigated the anisotropic magnetic properties of CePd$_2$As$_2$ by magnetic, thermal and electrical transport studies. X-ray diffraction confirmed the tetragonal ThCr$_2$Si$_2$-type structure and the high-quality of the single crystals. Magnetisation and magnetic susceptibility data taken along the different crystallographic directions evidence a huge crystalline electric field (CEF) induced Ising-type magneto-crystalline anisotropy with a large $c$-axis moment and a small in-plane moment at low temperature. A detailed CEF analysis based on the magnetic susceptibility data indicates an almost pure $\langle\pm5/2 \rvert$ CEF ground-state doublet with the dominantly $\langle\pm3/2 \rvert$ and the $\langle\pm1/2 \rvert$ doublets at 290 K and 330 K, respectively. At low temperature, we observe a uniaxial antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition at $T_N=14.7$ K with the crystallographic $c$-direction being the magnetic easy-axis. The magnetic entropy gain up to $T_N$ reaches almost $R\ln2$ indicating localised $4f$-electron magnetism without significant Kondo-type interactions. Below $T_N$, the application of a magnetic field along the $c$-axis induces a metamagnetic transition from the AFM to a field-polarised phase at $\mu_0H_{c0}=0.95$ T, exhibiting a text-book example of a spin-flip transition as anticipated for an Ising-type AFM.
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    We investigate the growth of the graphene buffer layer and the involved step bunching behavior of the SiC surface by means of atomic force microscopy on substrates with different starting properties. We show that the formation of large terraces with high step edges is closely linked to the formation of local buffer layer domains in very good agreement with the predictions of a two-dimensional model of step dynamics. The key to suppress step bunching is the homogenous nucleation of evenly distributed buffer layer domains on the terraces which limits surface diffusion and stabilizes the SiC surface. The analysis of the experimental results extends the current understanding of the graphene growth process by emphasizing the importance of nucleation and critical mass transport mechanisms. The control of these mechanisms enables one to achieve significant improvements with respect to reproducibility and graphene quality. The presented polymer-assisted sublimation growth method is well suited to reach these goals. It allows monolayer graphene growth without giant step bunching even on substrates with large miscut angle and on hydrogen etched SiC substrates.
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    Absorption of ultrashort laser pulses in a metallic grating deposited on a transparent sample launches coherent compression/dilatation acoustic pulses in directions of different orders of acoustic diffraction. Their propagation is detected by the delayed laser pulses, which are also diffracted by the metallic grating, through the measurement of the transient intensity change of the first order diffracted light. The obtained data contain multiple frequency components which are interpreted by considering all possible angles for the Brillouin scattering of light achieved through the multiplexing of the propagation directions of light and coherent sound by the metallic grating. The emitted acoustic field can be equivalently presented as a superposition of the plane inhomogeneous acoustic waves, which constitute an acoustic diffraction grating for the probe light. Thus, the obtained results can also be interpreted as a consequence of probe light diffraction by both metallic and acoustic gratings. The realized scheme of time-domain Brillouin scattering with metallic grating operating in reflection mode provides access to acoustic frequencies from the minimal to the maximal possible in a single experimental configuration for the directions of probe light incidence and scattered light detection. This is achieved by monitoring of the backward and forward Brillouin scattering processes in parallel. Applications include measurements of the acoustic dispersion, simultaneous determination of sound velocity and optical refractive index, and evaluation of the samples with a single direction of possible optical access.
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    Recent observations have shown that at a certain composition of solid solutions AgCl$_x$Br$_{1-x}$, AgCl-CdCl$_2$, AgBr-CdBr$_2$, of ionic crystals, the electrical conductivity exhibits a value appreciably larger than that of the end constituents. Here, we investigate the electrical conductivity $\sigma$ of LiH$_x$D$_{1-x}$ solid solutions -which are of prominent importance in fuel hydrogen storage applications- and find that in the whole composition range no maximum is likely to occur in the $\sigma$ versus x dependence.
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    The evolution of the aging process of glassy materials quenched from temperatures above their glass transition temperature $T_g$, when plotting the relaxed enthalpy versus the decrease in volume, leads to a slope comparable to the isothermal compressibility close to $T_g$. This empirical result was explained in an earlier publication (V. Katsika-Tsigourakou, G. E. Zardas J. Non-Cryst. Solids 356 (2010) 179-180) by means of a thermodynamical model. Here, we show that the same model enables the explanation of the rare cases of negative defect activation in solids.
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    Surface impurities and contamination often seriously degrade the properties of two-dimensional materials such as graphene. To remove contamination, thermal annealing is commonly used. We present a comparative analysis of annealing treatments in air and in vacuum, both ex situ and "pre-situ", where an ultra-high vacuum treatment chamber is directly connected to an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. While ex situ treatments do remove contamination, it is challenging to obtain atomically clean surfaces after ambient transfer. However, pre-situ cleaning with radiative or laser heating appears reliable and well suited to clean graphene without undue damage to its structure.
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    Recent experiments have revealed the possibility of precise electron beam manipulation of silicon impurities in graphene. Motivated by these findings and studies on metal surface quantum corrals, the question arises what kind of embedded Si structures are possible within the hexagonal lattice, and how these are limited by the distortion caused by the preference of Si for $sp^{3}$ hybridization. In this work, we study the geometry and stability of elementary Si patterns in graphene, including lines, hexagons, triangles, circles and squares. Due to the size of the required unit cells, to obtain the relaxed geometries we use an empirical bond-order potential as a starting point for density functional theory. Despite some interesting discrepancies, the classical geometries provide an effective route for the simulation of large structures.
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    The two-dimensional character and reduced screening in monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) lead to the ubiquitous formation of robust excitons with binding energies orders of magnitude larger than in bulk semiconductors. Focusing on neutral excitons, bound electron-hole pairs, that dominate the optical response in TMDs, it is shown that they can provide fingerprints for magnetic proximity effects in magnetic heterostructures. These proximity effects cannot be described by the widely used single-particle description, but instead reveal the possibility of a conversion between optically inactive and active excitons by rotating the magnetization of the magnetic substrate. With recent breakthroughs in fabricating Mo- and W-based magnetic TMD-heterostructures, this emergent optical response can be directly tested experimentally.
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    We discuss self-consistently obtained ground-state electronic properties of monolayers of graphene and a number of beyond graphene compounds, including films of transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), using the recently proposed strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) to the density functional theory. The SCAN meta-GGA results are compared with those based on the local density approximation (LDA) as well as the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). As expected, the GGA yields expanded lattices and softened bonds in relation to the LDA, but the SCAN meta-GGA systematically improves the agreement with experiment. Our study suggests the efficacy of the SCAN functional for accurate modeling of electronic structures of layered materials in high-throughput calculations more generally.
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    We consider an elastic composite material containing particulate inclusions in a soft elastic matrix that is bounded by a rigid wall, e.g., the substrate. If such a composite serves as a soft actuator, forces are imposed on or induced between the embedded particles. We investigate how the presence of the rigid wall affects the interactions between the inclusions in the elastic matrix. For no-slip boundary conditions, we transfer Blake's derivation of a corresponding Green's function from low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics to the linearly elastic case. Results for no-slip and free-slip surface conditions are compared to each other and to the bulk behavior. Our results suggest that walls with free-slip surface conditions are preferred when they serve as substrates for soft actuators made from elastic composite materials. As we further demonstrate, the presence of a rigid wall can qualitatively change the interactions between the inclusions. In effect, it can switch attractive interactions into repulsive ones (and vice versa). It should be straightforward to observe the effects in future experiments and to combine our results, e.g., with the modeling of biological cells and tissue on rigid surfaces.
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    Ammoniation in metal borohydrides (MBs) with the form $\mathcal{M}$(BH$_4$)$_x$ has been shown to lower their decomposition temperatures with $\mathcal{M}$ of low electronegativity ($\chi_p \lesssim 1.6$), but raise it for high-$\chi_p$ MBs ($\chi_p \gtrsim 1.6$). Although this behavior is just as desired, an understanding of the mechanisms that cause it is still lacking. Using \emphab initio methods, we elucidate those mechanisms and find that ammoniation always causes thermodynamic destabilization, explaining the observed lower decomposition temperatures for low-$\chi_p$ MBs. For high-$\chi_p$ MBs, we find that ammoniation blocks B$_2$H$_6$ formation---the preferred decomposition mechanism in these MBs---and thus kinetically stabilizes those phases. The shift in decomposition pathway that causes the distinct change from destabilization to stabilization around $\chi_p=1.6$ thus coincides with the onset of B$_2$H$_6$ formation in MBs. Furthermore, with our analysis we are also able to explain why these materials release either H$_2$ or NH$_3$ gas upon decomposition. We find that NH$_3$ is much more strongly coordinated with higher-$\chi_p$ metals and direct H$_2$ formation/release becomes more favorable in these materials. Our findings are of importance for unraveling the hydrogen release mechanisms in an important new and promising class of hydrogen storage materials, allowing for a guided tuning of their chemistry to further improve their properties.
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    In semiconductors, quantum confinement can greatly enhance the interaction between band carriers (electrons and holes) and dopant atoms. One manifestation of this enhancement is the increased stability of exciton magnetic polarons in magnetically-doped nanostructures. In the limit of very strong 0D confinement that is realized in colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, a single exciton can exert an effective exchange field $B_{\rm{ex}}$ on the embedded magnetic dopants that exceeds several tesla. Here we use the very sensitive method of resonant photoluminescence (PL) to directly measure the presence and properties of exciton magnetic polarons in colloidal Cd$_{1-x}$Mn$_x$Se nanocrystals. Despite small Mn$^{2+}$ concentrations ($x$=0.4-1.6\%), large polaron binding energies up to $\sim$26~meV are observed at low temperatures via the substantial Stokes shift between the pump laser and the resonant PL maximum, indicating nearly complete alignment of all Mn$^{2+}$ spins by $B_{\rm{ex}}$. Temperature and magnetic field-dependent studies reveal that $B_{\rm{ex}} \approx$ 10~T in these nanocrystals, in good agreement with theoretical estimates. Further, the emission linewidths provide direct insight into the statistical fluctuations of the Mn$^{2+}$ spins. These resonant PL studies provide detailed insight into collective magnetic phenomena, especially in lightly-doped nanocrystals where conventional techniques such as nonresonant PL or time-resolved PL provide ambiguous results.

Recent comments

Zoltán Zimborás Jan 07 2016 06:50 UTC

Interesting, both the 2nd and the 4th author is called Yuanping Chen... :)