Materials Science (cond-mat.mtrl-sci)

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    Identification of microscopic configuration of point defects acting as quantum bits is a key step in the advance of quantum information processing and sensing. Among the numerous candidates, silicon vacancy related centers in silicon carbide (SiC) have shown remarkable properties owing to their particular spin-3/2 ground and excited states. Although, these centers were observed decades ago, still two competing models, the isolated negatively charged silicon vacancy and the complex of negatively charged silicon vacancy and neutral carbon vacancy [Phys. Rev. Lett.\ \textbf115, 247602 (2015)] are argued as an origin. By means of high precision first principles calculations and high resolution electron spin resonance measurements, we here unambiguously identify the Si-vacancy related qubits in hexagonal SiC as isolated negatively charged silicon vacancies. Moreover, we identify the Si-vacancy qubit configurations that provide room temperature optical readout.
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    In search of a reliable methodology for the prediction of light absorption and emission of Ce$^{3+}$-doped luminescent materials, 13 representative materials are studied with first-principles and semiempirical approaches. In the first-principles approach, that combines constrained density-functional theory and $\Delta$SCF, the atomic positions are obtained for both ground and excited states of the Ce$^{3+}$ ion. The structural information is fed into Dorenbos' semiempirical model. Absorption and emission energies are calculated with both methods and compared with experiment. The first-principles approach matches experiment within 0.3 eV, with two exceptions at 0.5 eV. In contrast, the semiempirical approach does not perform as well (usually more than 0.5 eV error). The general applicability of the present first-principles scheme, with an encouraging predictive power, opens a novel avenue for crystal site engineering and high-throughput search for new phosphors and scintillators.
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    We study from first principles two lanthanum silicate nitride compounds, LaSi$_{3}$N$_{5}$ and La$_{3}$Si$_{6}$N$_{11}$, pristine as well as doped with Ce$^{3+}$ ion, in view of explaining their different emission color, and characterising the luminescent center. The electronic structures of the two undoped hosts are similar, and do not give a hint to quantitatively describe such difference. The $4f\rightarrow 5d$ neutral excitation of the Ce$^{3+}$ ions is simulated through a constrained density-functional theory method coupled with a ${\Delta}$SCF analysis of total energies, yielding absorption energies. Afterwards, atomic positions in the excited state are relaxed, yielding the emission energies and Stokes shifts. Based on these results, the luminescent centers in LaSi$_{3}$N$_{5}$:Ce and La$_{3}$Si$_{6}$N$_{11}$:Ce are identified. The agreement with the experimental data for the computed quantities is quite reasonable and explains the different color of the emitted light. Also, the Stokes shifts are obtained within 20\% difference relative to experimental data.
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    Recent studies (J. Alloys Compd. 695 (2017) 2661) of the electronic structure and properties of $(TiZrNbCu)_{1-x}$$Ni_{x}$ (x$\leq$0.25) amorphous high entropy alloys (a-HEA) have been extended to x=0.5 in order to compare behaviours of a-HEA and conventional Ni-base metallic glasses (MG). The amorphous state of all samples was verified by thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD). XRD indicated a probable change in local atomic arrangements, i.e. short-range-order (SRO) for x$\geq$0.35. Simultaneously, thermal parameters, such as the first crystallization temperature $T_{x}$ and the liquidus temperature showed a tendency to saturate for x$\geq$0.35 . The same tendency also appeared in the magnetic susceptibility $\chi_{exp}$ and the linear term in the low temperature specific heat \gamma. The Debye temperatures and Youngs moduli also tend to saturate for x$\geq$0.35. These unusual changes in SRO and all properties within the amorphous phase seem correlated with the change of valence electron number (VEC) on increasing x.
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    Mallinson's idea that some spin textures in planar magnetic structures could produce an enhancement of the magnetic flux on one side of the plane at the expense of the other gave rise to permanent magnet configurations known as Halbach magnet arrays. Applications range from wiggler magnets in particle accelerators and free electron lasers, to motors, to magnetic levitation trains, but exploiting Halbach arrays in micro- or nanoscale spintronics devices requires solving the problem of fabrication and field metrology below 100 \mum size. In this work we show that a Halbach configuration of moments can be obtained over areas as small as 1 x 1 \mum^2 in sputtered thin films with Néel-type domain walls of unique domain wall chirality, and we measure their stray field at a controlled probe-sample distance of 12.0 x 0.5 nm. Because here chirality is determined by the interfacial Dyzaloshinkii-Moriya interaction the field attenuation and amplification is an intrinsic property of this film, allowing for flexibility of design based on an appropriate definition of magnetic domains. 100 nm-wide skyrmions illustrate the smallest kind of such structures, for which our measurement of stray magnetic fields and mapping of the spin structure shows they funnel the field toward one specific side of the film given by the sign of the Dyzaloshinkii-Moriya interaction parameter D.
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    Boron carbide (B4C) is one of the few materials that is expected to be mostly resilient with respect to the extremely high brilliance of the photon beam generated by free electron lasers (FELs) and is thus of considerable interest for optical applications in this field. However, as in the case of many other optics operated at modern light source facilities, B4C-coated optics are subject to ubiquitous carbon contaminations. These contaminations represent a serious issue for the operation of high performance FEL beamlines due to severe reduction of photon flux, beam coherence, creation of destructive interference, and scattering losses. A variety of B4C cleaning technologies were developed at different laboratories with varying success. We present a study regarding the low-pressure RF plasma cleaning of carbon contaminated B4C test samples via inductively coupled O2/Ar, H2/Ar, and pure O2 RF plasma produced following previous studies using the same IBSS GV10x downstream plasma source. Results regarding the chemistry, morphology as well as other aspects of the B4C optical coating before and after the plasma cleaning are reported. We conclude from these comparative plasma processes that pure O2 feedstock plasma only exhibits the required chemical selectivity for maintaining the integrity of the B4C optical coating.
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    As a strongly spin-orbit coupled metallic model with ferromagnetism, we have considered an extended Stoner model to the relativistic regime, named Dirac ferromagnet in three dimensions. In the previous paper~[Phys. Rev. B 90, 214418 (2014)], we studied the transport properties giving rise to the anisotropic magnetoresistance~(AMR) and the anomalous Hall effect~(AHE) with the impurity potential being taken into account only as the self-energy. The effects of the vertex corrections~(VCs) to AMR and AHE are reported in this paper. AMR is found not to change quantitatively when the VCs is considered, although the transport lifetime is different from the one-electron lifetime and the charge current includes additional contributions from the correlation with spin currents. The side-jump and the skew-scattering contributions to AHE are also calculated. The skew-scattering contribution is dominant in the clean case as can be seen in the spin Hall effect in the non-magnetic Dirac electron system.
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    Dopant concentration and $\alpha$, $\beta$ phase fraction is studied in doped W thin films. Oxygen doped $\beta$ W films are found to have 9.0~$\pm$~0.9 at.\% of oxygen as measured from \acSIMS. Whereas, nitrogen doped $\beta$ W films have 0.15~$\pm$~0.02 at.\% of nitrogen, much lower than the theoretically predicted value of 11 at.\%. $\beta$-W films partially phase transform to $\alpha$ by annealing at 175~$^{\circ}$C, up to maximum time of 72 hours. Weak dependence between dopant concentration and phase fraction is observed in the annealed films. The growth exponent of the phase transformation was calculated to be $<$1 in both the films, indicating a non-uniform nucleation of the $\alpha$ phase.
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    Machine learning (ML) of quantum mechanical properties shows promise for accelerating chemical discovery. For transition metal chemistry where accurate calculations are computationally costly and available training data sets are small, the molecular representation becomes a critical ingredient in ML model predictive accuracy. We introduce a series of revised autocorrelation functions (RACs) that encode relationships between the heuristic atomic properties (e.g., size, connectivity, and electronegativity) on a molecular graph. We alter the starting point, scope, and nature of the quantities evaluated in standard ACs to make these RACs amenable to inorganic chemistry. On an organic molecule set, we first demonstrate superior standard AC performance to other presently-available topological descriptors for ML model training, with mean unsigned errors (MUEs) for atomization energies on set-aside test molecules as low as 6 kcal/mol. For inorganic chemistry, our RACs yield 1 kcal/mol ML MUEs on set-aside test molecules in spin-state splitting in comparison to 15-20x higher errors from feature sets that encode whole-molecule structural information. Systematic feature selection methods including univariate filtering, recursive feature elimination, and direct optimization (e.g., random forest and LASSO) are compared. Random-forest- or LASSO-selected subsets 4-5x smaller than RAC-155 produce sub- to 1-kcal/mol spin-splitting MUEs, with good transferability to metal-ligand bond length prediction (0.004-5 Å MUE) and redox potential on a smaller data set (0.2-0.3 eV MUE). Evaluation of feature selection results across property sets reveals the relative importance of local, electronic descriptors (e.g., electronegativity, atomic number) in spin-splitting and distal, steric effects in redox potential and bond lengths.
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    Noncollinear antiferromagnets have recently been attracting considerable interest partly due to recent surprising discoveries of the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in them and partly because they have promising applications in antiferromagnetic spintronics. Here we study the anomalous Nernst effect (ANE), a phenomenon having the same origin as the AHE, and also the spin Nernst effect (SNE) as well as AHE and the spin Hall effect (SHE) in noncollinear antiferromagnetic Mn$_3X$ ($X$ = Sn, Ge, Ga) within the Berry phase formalism based on \it ab initio relativistic band structure calculations. For comparison, we also calculate the anomalous Nernst conductivity (ANC) and anomalous Hall conductivity (AHC) of ferromagnetic iron as well as the spin Nernst conductivity (SNC) of platinum metal. Remarkably, the calculated ANC at room temperature (300 K) for all three alloys is huge, being 10$\sim$40 times larger than that of iron. Moreover, the calculated SNC for Mn$_3$Sn and Mn$_3$Ga is also larger, being about five times larger than that of platinum. This suggests that these anitferromagnets would be useful materials for thermoelectronic devices and spin caloritronic devices. The calculated ANC of Mn$_3$Sn and iron are in reasonably good agreement with the very recent experiments. The calculated SNC of platinum also agrees with the very recent experiments in both sign and magnitude. The calculated thermoelectric and thermomagnetic properties are analyzed in terms of the band structures as well as the energy-dependent AHC, ANC, SNC and spin Hall conductivity via the Mott relations.
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    The knowledge of effective masses is a key ingredient to analyze numerous properties of semiconductors, like carrier mobilities, (magneto-)transport properties, or band extrema characteristics yielding carrier densities and density of states. Currently, these masses are usually calculated using finite-difference estimation of density functional theory (DFT) electronic band curvatures. However, finite differences require an additional convergence study and are prone to numerical noise. Moreover, the concept of effective mass breaks down at degenerate band extrema. We assess the former limitation by developing a method that allows to obtain the Hessian of DFT bands directly, using density functional perturbation theory (DFPT). Then, we solve the latter issue by adapting the concept of `transport equivalent effective mass' to the $\vec{k} \cdot \hat{\vec{p}}$ framework. The numerical noise inherent to finite-difference methods is thus eliminated, along with the associated convergence study. The resulting method is therefore more general, more robust and simpler to use, which makes it especially appropriate for high-throughput computing. After validating the developed techniques, we apply them to the study of silicon, graphane, and arsenic. The formalism is implemented into the ABINIT software and supports the norm-conserving pseudopotential approach, the projector augmented-wave method, and the inclusion of spin-orbit coupling. The derived expressions also apply to the ultrasoft pseudopotential method.
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    Raman spectra obtained by the inelastic scattering of light by crystalline solids contain contributions from first-order vibrational processes (e.g. the emission or absorption of one phonon, a quantum of vibration) as well as higher-order processes with at least two phonons being involved. At second order, coupling with the entire phonon spectrum induces a response that may strongly depend on the excitation energy, and reflects complex processes more difficult to interpret. In particular, excitons (i.e. bound electron-hole pairs) may enhance the absorption and emission of light, and couple strongly with phonons in resonance conditions. We design and implement a first-principles methodology to compute second-order Raman scattering, incorporating dielectric responses and phonon eigenstates obtained from density-functional theory and many-body theory. We demonstrate our approach for the case of silicon, relating frequency-dependent relative Raman intensities, that are in excellent agreement with experiment, to different vibrations and regions of the Brillouin zone. We show that exciton-phonon coupling, computed from first principles, indeed strongly affect the spectrum in resonance conditions. The ability to analyze second-order Raman spectra thus provides direct insight into this interaction.
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    We introduce a topological theory to study quasiparticles in interacting and/or disordered many-body systems, which have a finite lifetime due to inelastic and/or elastic scattering. The one-body quasiparticle Hamiltonian includes both the Bloch Hamiltonian of band theory and the self-energy due to interactions, which is non-Hermitian when quasiparticle lifetime is finite. We study the topology of non-Hermitian quasiparticle Hamiltonians in momentum space, whose energy spectrum is complex. The interplay of band structure and quasiparticle lifetime is found to have remarkable consequences in zero- and small-gap systems. In particular, we predict the existence of topological exceptional point and bulk Fermi arc in Dirac materials with two distinct quasiparticle lifetimes.
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    In topological semimetals such as Weyl, Dirac and nodal-line semimetals, the band gap closes at points or along lines in k space, which are not located at high-symmetry positions in the Brillouin zone. Therefore, it is not straightforward to find these topological semimetals by ab initio calculations, because the band structure is usually calculated only along high-symmetry lines. In this paper, we review recent studies on topological semimetals by ab initio calculations. We explain theoretical frameworks which can be used for material search of topological semimetals, and some numerical methods used in the ab initio calculations.
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    Motivated by a freely suspended graphene and polymerized membranes in soft and biological matter we present a detailed study of a tensionless elastic sheet in the presence of thermal fluctuations and quenched disorder. The manuscript is based on an extensive draft dating back to 1993, that was circulated privately. It presents the general theoretical framework and calculational details of numerous results, partial forms of which have been published in brief Letters (Le Doussal and Radzihovsky 1992). The experimental realization of atom-thin graphene sheets has driven a resurgence in this fascinating subject, making our dated predictions and their detailed derivations timely. To this end we analyze the statistical mechanics of a generalized D-dimensional elastic "membrane" embedded in d dimensions using a self-consistent screening approximation (SCSA), that has proved to be unprecedentedly accurate in this system, exact in three complementary limits: d --> infinity, D --> 4, and D=d. Focusing on the critical "flat" phase, for a homogeneous two-dimensional membrane embedded in three dimensions, we predict its universal length-scale dependent roughness, elastic moduli exponents, and a universal negative Poisson ratio of -1/3. We also extend these results to short- and long-range correlated random heterogeneity, predicting a variety of glassy wrinkled membrane states. Finally, we also predict and analyze a continuous crumpling transition in a "phantom" elastic sheet. We hope that this detailed presentation of the SCSA theory will be useful for further theoretical developments and corresponding experimental investigations on freely suspended graphene.

Recent comments

Zoltán Zimborás Jan 07 2016 06:50 UTC

Interesting, both the 2nd and the 4th author is called Yuanping Chen... :)