Mesoscale and Nanoscale Physics (cond-mat.mes-hall)

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    Materials composed of two dimensional layers bonded to one another through weak van der Waals interactions often exhibit strongly anisotropic behaviors and can be cleaved into very thin specimens and sometimes into monolayer crystals. Interest in such materials is driven by the study of low dimensional physics and the design of functional heterostructures. Binary compounds with the compositions MX2 and MX3 where M is a metal cation and X is a halogen anion often form such structures. Magnetism can be incorporated by choosing a transition metal with a partially filled d-shell for M, enabling ferroic responses for enhanced functionality. Here a brief overview of binary transition metal dihalides and trihalides is given, summarizing their crystallographic properties and long-range-ordered magnetic structures, focusing on those materials with layered crystal structures and partially filled d-shells required for combining low dimensionality and cleavability with magnetism.
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    The fundamental idea that many body systems in complex materials may self-organise into long range order under highly non-equilibrium conditions leads to the notion that entirely new emergent states with new and unexpected functionalities might be created. In this paper we show for the first time that a complex metastable state with long range order can be created through a non-equilibrium topological transformation in a transition metal dichalcogenide. Combining ultrafast optical pulse excitation with orbitally-resolved large-area scanning tunnelling microscopy we find subtle, but unambiguous evidence for long range electronic order which is different from all other known states in the system, and whose complex domain structure is not random, but is described by harmonics of the underlying charge density wave order. We show that the structure of the state is topologically distinct from the ground state, elucidating the origins of its remarkable metastability. These fundamental insights on the mechanism open the way to in-situ engineering of the emergent properties of metastable materials with ultrafast laser pulses.
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    Clustered quantum materials provide a new platform for the experimental study of many-body entanglement. Here we address a simple model of a single-molecule nano-magnet featuring N interacting spins in a transverse field. The field can induce an entanglement transition (ET). We calculate the magnetisation, low-energy gap and neutron-scattering cross-section and find that the ET has distinct signatures, detectable at temperatures as high as 5% of the interaction strength. The signatures are stronger for smaller clusters.
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    All-solid-state strong light-matter coupling systems with large vacuum Rabi splitting are great important for quantum information application, such as quantum manipulation, quantum information storage and processing. The monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have been explored as excellent candidates for the strong light-matter interaction, due to their extraordinary exciton binding energies and remarkable optical properties. Here, for both of experimental and theoretical aspects, we explored resonance coupling effect between exciton and plasmonic nanocavity in heterostructures consisting of monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) and an individual Au nanorod. We also study the influences on the resonance coupling of various parameters, including localized surface plasmon resonances of Au nanorods with varied topological aspects, separation between Au nanorod and monolayer WSe2 surface, and the thickness of WSe2. More importantly, the resonance coupling can approach the strong coupling regime at room-temperature by selecting appropriate parameters, where an anti-crossing behavior with the vacuum Rabi splitting strength of 98 meV was observed on the energy diagram.
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    The charge transport in a dirty 2-dimensional electron system biased in the presence of a lateral potential barrier under magnetic field is theoretically studied. The quantum tunneling across the barrier provides the quantum interference of the edge states localized on its both sides that results in giant oscillations of the charge current flowing perpendicular to the lateral junction. Our theoretical analysis is in a good agreement with the experimental observations presented in Ref.8. In particular, positions of the conductance maxima coincide with the Landau levels while the conductance itself is essentially suppressed even at the energies at which the resonant tunneling occurs and hence these puzzling observations can be resolved without taking into account the electron-electron interaction.
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    We study the energy spectra of bound states in quantum dots (QDs) formed by an electrostatic potential in two-dimensional topological insulator (TI) and their transformation with changes in QD depth and radius. It is found that, unlike a trivial insulator, the energy difference between the levels of the ground state and first excited state can decrease with decreasing the radius and increasing the depth of the QD so that these levels intersect under some critical conditions. The crossing of the levels results in unusual features of optical properties caused by intracenter electron transitions. In particular, it leads to significant changes of light absorption due to electron transitions between such levels and to the transient electroluminescence induced by electrical tuning of QD and TI parameters. In the case of magnetic TIs, the polarization direction of the absorbed or emitted circularly polarized light is changed due to the level crossing.
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    Laterally periodic nanostructures were investigated with grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) by using the diffraction patterns to reconstruct the surface shape. To model visible light scattering, rigorous calculations of the near and far field by numerically solving Maxwell's equations with a finite-element method are well established. The application of this technique to X-rays is still challenging, due to the discrepancy between incident wavelength and finite-element size. This drawback vanishes for GISAXS due to the small angles of incidence, the conical scattering geometry and the periodicity of the surface structures, which allows a rigorous computation of the diffraction efficiencies with sufficient numerical precision. To develop dimensional metrology tools based on GISAXS, lamellar gratings with line widths down to 55 nm were produced by state-of-the-art e-beam lithography and then etched into silicon. The high surface sensitivity of GISAXS in conjunction with a Maxwell solver allows a detailed reconstruction of the grating line shape also for thick, non-homogeneous substrates. The reconstructed geometrical line shape models are statistically validated by applying a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling technique which reveals that GISAXS is able to reconstruct critical parameters like the widths of the lines with sub-nm uncertainty.
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    Magnetic skyrmions are topological spin configurations in materials with chiral Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI), that are potentially useful for storing or processing information. To date, DMI has been found in few bulk materials, but can also be induced in atomically thin magnetic films in contact with surfaces with large spin-orbit interactions. Recent experiments have reported that isolated magnetic skyrmions can be stabilized even near room temperature in few-atom thick magnetic layers sandwiched between materials that provide asymmetric spin-orbit coupling. Here we present the minimum-energy path analysis of three distinct mechanisms for the skyrmion collapse, based on ab initio input and the performed atomic-spin simulations. We focus on the stability of a skyrmion in three atomic layers of Co, either epitaxial on the Pt(111) surface, or within a hybrid multilayer where DMI nontrivially varies per monolayer due to competition between different symmetry-breaking from two sides of the Co film. In laterally finite systems, their constrained geometry causes poor thermal stability of the skyrmion toward collapse at the boundary, which we show to be resolved by designing the high-DMI structure within an extended film with lower or no DMI.
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    Surface energies play a dominant role in the self-assembly of three dimensional (3D) nanostructures. In this letter, we show that using surfactants to modify surface energies can provide a means to externally control nanostructure self-assembly, enabling the synthesis of novel hierarchical nanostructures. We explore Bi as a surfactant in the growth of InAs on the 1-10 sidewall facets of GaAs nanowires. The presence of surface Bi induces the formation of InAs 3D islands by a process resembling the Stranski-Krastanov mechanism, which does not occur in the absence of Bi on these surfaces. The InAs 3D islands nucleate at the corners of the 1-10 facets above a critical shell thickness and then elongate along <110> directions in the plane of the nanowire sidewalls. Exploiting this growth mechanism, we realize a series of novel hierarchical nanostructures, ranging from InAs quantum dots on single 1-10 nanowire facets to zig-zag shaped nanorings completely encircling nanowire cores. Photoluminescence spectroscopy and cathodoluminescence spectral line scans reveal that small surfactant-induced InAs 3D islands behave as optically active quantum dots. This work illustrates how surfactants can provide an unprecedented level of external control over nanostructure self-assembly.
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    We argue that quantum fluctuations of the phase of the order parameter may strongly affect the electron density of states (DOS) in ultrathin superconducting wires. We demonstrate that the effect of such fluctuations is equivalent to that of a quantum dissipative environment formed by sound-like plasma modes propagating along the wire. We derive a non-perturbative expression for the local electron DOS in superconducting nanowires which fully accounts for quantum phase fluctuations. At any non-zero temperature these fluctuations smear out the square-root singularity in DOS near the superconducting gap and generate quasiparticle states at subgap energies. Furthermore, at sufficiently large values of the wire impedance this singularity is suppressed down to $T=0$ in which case DOS tends to zero at subgap energies and exhibits the power-law behavior above the gap. Our predictions can be directly tested in tunneling experiments with superconducting nanowires.
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    It has been recently demonstrated that a singlet-triplet spin qubit in semiconductor double quantum dots can be controlled by changing the height of the potential barrier between the two dots ("barrier control"), which has led to a considerable reduction of charge noises as compared to the traditional tilt control method. In this paper we show, through a molecular-orbital-theoretic calculation of double quantum dots influenced by a charged impurity, that the relative charge noise for a system under the barrier control not only is smaller than that for the tilt control, but actually decreases as a function of an increasing exchange interaction. This is understood as a combined consequence of the greatly suppressed detuning noise when the two dots are symmetrically operated, as well as an enhancement of the inter-dot hopping energy of an electron when the barrier is lowered which in turn reduces the relative charge noise at large exchange interaction values. We have also studied the response of the qubit to charged impurities at different locations, and found that the improvement of barrier control is least for impurities equidistant from the two dots due to the small detuning noise they cause, but is otherwise significant along other directions.
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    Nanostructured metals subject to local optical interrogation can generate open-circuit photovoltages potentially useful for energy conversion and photodetection. We report a study of the photovoltage as a function of illumination position in single metal Au nanowires and nanowires with nanogaps formed by electromigration. We use a laser scanning microscope to locally heat the metal nanostructures via excitation of a local plasmon resonance and direct absorption. In nanowires without nanogaps, where charge transport is diffusive, we observe voltage distributions consistent with thermoelectricity, with the local Seebeck coefficient depending on the width of the nanowire. In the nanowires with nanogaps, where charge transport is by tunneling, we observe large photovoltages up to tens of mV, with magnitude, polarization dependence, and spatial localization that follow the plasmon resonance in the nanogap. This is consistent with a model of photocurrent across the nanogap carried by the nonequilibrium, "hot" carriers generated upon the plasmon excitation.
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    In semiconductors, quantum confinement can greatly enhance the interaction between band carriers (electrons and holes) and dopant atoms. One manifestation of this enhancement is the increased stability of exciton magnetic polarons in magnetically-doped nanostructures. In the limit of very strong 0D confinement that is realized in colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, a single exciton can exert an effective exchange field $B_{\rm{ex}}$ on the embedded magnetic dopants that exceeds several tesla. Here we use the very sensitive method of resonant photoluminescence (PL) to directly measure the presence and properties of exciton magnetic polarons in colloidal Cd$_{1-x}$Mn$_x$Se nanocrystals. Despite small Mn$^{2+}$ concentrations ($x$=0.4-1.6\%), large polaron binding energies up to $\sim$26~meV are observed at low temperatures via the substantial Stokes shift between the pump laser and the resonant PL maximum, indicating nearly complete alignment of all Mn$^{2+}$ spins by $B_{\rm{ex}}$. Temperature and magnetic field-dependent studies reveal that $B_{\rm{ex}} \approx$ 10~T in these nanocrystals, in good agreement with theoretical estimates. Further, the emission linewidths provide direct insight into the statistical fluctuations of the Mn$^{2+}$ spins. These resonant PL studies provide detailed insight into collective magnetic phenomena, especially in lightly-doped nanocrystals where conventional techniques such as nonresonant PL or time-resolved PL provide ambiguous results.
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    Detection and precise localization of nano-scale structures buried beneath spin coated films are highly valuable additions to nano-fabrication technology. In principle, the topography of the final film contains information about the location of the buried features. However, it is generally believed that the relation is masked by flow effects, which lead to an upstream shift of the dry film's topography and render precise localization impossible. Here we demonstrate, theoretically and experimentally, that the flow-shift paradigm does not apply at the sub-micron scale. Specifically, we show that the resist topography is accurately obtained from a convolution operation with a symmetric Gaussian Kernel whose parameters solely depend on the resist characteristics. We exploit this finding for a 3 nm precise overlay fabrication of metal contacts to an InAs nanowire with a diameter of 27 nm using thermal scanning probe lithography.
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    We model quasi-two-dimensional two-electron Quantum Dots in a parabolic confinement potential with rovibrational and purely vibrational effective Hamiltonian operators. These are optimized by non-linear least-square fits to the exact energy levels. We find, that the vibrational Hamiltonian describes the energy levels well and reveals how relative contributions change on varying the confinement strength. The rovibrational model suggests the formation of a rigid two-electron molecule in weak confinement and we further present a modified model, that allows a very accurate transition from weak to strong confinement regimes.

Recent comments

Noon van der Silk Sep 04 2013 23:55 UTC

Part of the standard equipment for playing bosonic baseball? It's a good game, but it's hard to know who's playing.