Mesoscale and Nanoscale Physics (cond-mat.mes-hall)

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    The recent observation [R. V. Gorbachev et al., Science 346, 448 (2014)] of nonlocal resistance $R_\mathrm{NL}$ near the Dirac point (DP) of multiterminal graphene on aligned hexagonal boron nitride (G/hBN) has been interpreted as the consequence of topological valley Hall currents carried by the Fermi sea states just beneath the bulk gap $E_g$ induced by the inversion symmetry breaking. However, the valley Hall conductivity $\sigma^v_{xy}$, quantized inside $E_g$, is not directly measurable. Conversely, the Landauer-Büttiker formula, as numerically exact approach to observable nonlocal transport quantities, yields $R_\mathrm{NL} \equiv 0$ for the same simplistic Hamiltonian of gapped graphene that generates $\sigma^v_{xy} \neq 0$. We combine ab initio with quantum transport calculations to demonstrate that G/hBN wires with zigzag edges host dispersive edge states near the DP that are absent in theories based on the simplistic Hamiltonian. Although such edge states exist also in isolated zigzag graphene wires, hBN modifies their energy-momentum dispersion to generate nonzero $R_\mathrm{NL}$ with sharp peak near the DP persisting in the presence of edge disorder. Concurrently, the edge states resolve the long-standing puzzle of why the highly insulating state of G/hBN is rarely observed. We conclude that the observed $R_\mathrm{NL}$ is unrelated to Fermi sea topological valley currents conjectured for gapped Dirac spectra.
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    We study the optical properties of Weyl semimetal (WSM) in a model which features, in addition to the usual term describing isolated Dirac cones proportional to the Fermi velocity $v_{F}$, a gap term $m$ and a Zeeman spin-splitting term $b$ with broken time reversal symmetry. Transport is treated within Kubo formalism and particular attention is payed to the modifications that result from a finite $m$ and $b$. We consider how these modifications change when a finite residual scattering rate $\Gamma$ is included. For $\Gamma<m$ the A.C. conductivity as a function of photon energy $\Omega$ continues to display the two quasilinear energy regions of the clean limit for $\Omega$ below the onset of the second electronic band which is gapped at ($ m+b $). For $\Gamma$ of the order $m$ little trace of two distinct linear energy scales remain and the optical response has evolved towards that for $m=b=0$. Although some quantitative differences remain there are no qualitative differences. The magnitude of the D.C. conductivity $\sigma^{DC}(T=0)$ at zero temperature ($T=0$) and chemical potential ($\mu=0$) is altered. While it remains proportional to $\Gamma$ it becomes inversely dependent on an effective Fermi velocity out of the Weyl nodes equal to $v_{F}^\ast=v_{F}\sqrt{b^2-m^2}/b$ which decreases strongly as the phase boundary between Weyl semimetal and gapped Dirac phase (GDSM) is approached at $b=m$. The leading term in the approach to $\sigma^{DC}(T=0)$ for finite $T/\Gamma$, $\mu/\Gamma$ and $\Omega/\Gamma$ is found to be quadratic. The coefficient of these corrections tracks closely the $b/m$ dependence of the $\mu=T=\Omega=0$ limit with differences largest near to the WSM-GDSM boundary.
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    We report measurements of photon-assisted transport and noise in a tunnel junction in the regime of dynamical Coulomb blockade. We have measured both dc non-linear transport and low frequency noise in the presence of an ac excitation at frequencies up to 33 GHz. In both experiments we observe replicas at finite voltage of the zero bias features, a phenomenon characteristic of photon emission/absorption. However, the ac voltage necessary to explain our data is notably different for transport and noise, indicating that usual theory of photon-assisted phenomena fails to account for our observations.
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    Controlling quasiparticle dynamics can improve the performance of superconducting devices. For example, it has been demonstrated effective in increasing lifetime and stability of superconducting qubits. Here we study how to optimize the placement of normal-metal traps in transmon-type qubits. When the trap size increases beyond a certain characteristic length, the details of the geometry and trap position, and even the number of traps, become important. We discuss for some experimentally relevant examples how to shorten the decay time of the excess quasiparticle density. Moreover, we show that a trap in the vicinity of a Josephson junction can reduce the steady-state quasiparticle density near that junction, thus suppressing the quasiparticle-induced relaxation rate of the qubit. Such a trap also reduces the impact of fluctuations in the generation rate of quasiparticles, rendering the qubit more stable.
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    A microscopic theory of the spin Peltier effect in a bilayer structure comprising a paramagnetic metal (PM) and a ferromagnetic insulator (FI) based on the nonequilibrium Green's function method is presented. Spin current and heat current driven by temperature gradient and spin accumulation are formulated as functions of spin susceptibilities in the PM and the FI, and are summarized by Onsager's reciprocal relations. By using the current formulae, we estimate heat generation and absorption at the interface driven by the heat-current injection mediated by spins from PM into FI.
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    The surface a thin-film is attached to and the surrounding monolayer causes geometrical confinement of a interrogated molecule; we look at the base case of a SC$_{18}H_{37}$ in a SC$_{18}H_{37}$ monolayer on Au[111]. Normal mode analysis was used to get vibrations, and these are analysed using mode character indicators which can quantify: how active an element is in a mode; the overall direction of the mode; and which chemical coordinates are relevant. We examined the 4 possible packing structures. We find that the more thermodynamically stable structures were less perturbed by the surface and more supported by the surrounding monolayer. The surface-perturbed modes were below 100cm$^{-1}$, had a higher global, carbon, sulfur, longitudinal and torsional characters, indicating unit cell backbone motions, often with increased S motion parallel to the surface, and an increased terminal methyl group motion. Modes identified by this technique showed a difference between experimental vibrations (with and without the surface) that was twice as large as those not identified. The surrounding monolayer had a larger effect on a single molecule dynamics than the surface, including stabilising the molecules enough for 12 high energy modes to move $\approx$425cm$^{-1}$ down in energy to below $k_B T$, allowing them to be populated at room temperature. These modes had higher local and higher H characters, and were highly modulated by the SAM structure. This work shows novels ways to analyse vibrations, and demonstrates the crucial need to include geometric confinement effects in SAM studies.
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    Phonon-assisted tunneling plays a crucial role for electronic device performance and even more so with future size down-scaling. We show how one can include this effect in large-scale first-principles calculations using a single "special thermal displacement" (STD) of the atomic coordinates at almost the same cost as elastic transport calculations. We apply the method to ultra-scaled silicon devices and demonstrate the importance of phonon-assisted band-to-band and source-to-drain tunneling. In a diode the phonons lead to a rectification ratio suppression in good agreement with experiments, while in an ultra-thin body transistor the phonons increase off-currents by four orders of magnitude, and the subthreshold swing by a factor of four, in agreement with perturbation theory.
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    Last few years have witnessed significant enhancement of thermoelectric figure of merit of lead telluride (PbTe) via nanostructuring. Despite the experimental progress, current understanding of the electron transport in PbTe is based on either band structure simulated using first-principles in combination with constant relaxation time approximation or empirical models, both requiring adjustable parameters obtained by fitting experimental data. Here, we report parameter-free first-principles calculation of electron and phonon transport in PbTe, including mode-by-mode electron-phonon scattering, leading to detailed information on electron mean free paths and the cumulative contributions by electrons and phonons with different mean free paths to thermoelectric transport properties in PbTe. Such information will help to rationalize the use and optimization of nanosctructures to achieve high thermoelectric figure of merit.
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    We present a comprehensive optical study of thin films of tungsten disulfide (WS$_2$) with layer thicknesses ranging from mono- to octalayer and in the bulk limit. It is shown that the optical band-gap absorption of monolayer WS$_2$ is governed by competing resonances arising from one neutral and two distinct negatively charged excitons whose contributions to the overall absorption of light vary as a function of temperature and carrier concentration. The photoluminescence response of monolayer WS$_2$ is found to be largely dominated by disorder/impurity- and/or phonon-assisted recombination processes. The indirect band-gap luminescence in multilayer WS$_2$ turns out to be a phonon-mediated process whose energy evolution with the number of layers surprisingly follows a simple model of a two-dimensional confinement. The energy position of the direct band-gap response (A and B resonances) is only weakly dependent on the layer thickness, which underlines an approximate compensation of the effect of the reduction of the exciton binding energy by the shrinkage of the apparent band gap. The A-exciton absorption-type spectra in multilayer WS$_2$ display a non-trivial fine structure which results from the specific hybridization of the electronic states in the vicinity of the K-point of the Brillouin zone. The effects of temperature on the absorption-like and photoluminescence spectra of various WS$_2$ layers are also quantified.
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    Exchange coupling is a key ingredient for spin-based quantum technologies since it can be used to entangle spin qubits and create logical spin qubits. However, the influence of the electronic valley degree of freedom in silicon on exchange coupling is presently the subject of important open questions. To experimentally address this question we map the interaction of a single donor coupled to a single-electron quantum dot whose position can be defined with sub-nm precision using a scanning tunneling microscope tip. From the measured map we find that lattice-aperiodic spatial oscillations comprise less than 2~\% of exchange, indicating that the donor's $\pm x$ and $\pm y$ valleys are filtered out of these interactions because the quantum dot contains only $\pm z$ valleys. Hence, exchange coupling of a donor and quantum dot is immune to valley-induced variations from in-plane donor positioning errors. Given the electrical tunability of quantum dot wavefunctions, this result is promising to realise uniform quantum dot-mediated interactions of donor qubits.
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    There are several important solid-state systems, such as defects in solids, superconducting circuits and molecular qubits, for attractive candidates of quantum computations. Molecular qubits, which benefit from the power of chemistry for the tailored and inexpensive synthesis of new systems, face the challenge from decoherence effect. The decoherence effect is due to the molecular qubits' inevitable interactions to their environment. Strategies to overcome decoherence effect have been developed, such as designing a nuclear spin free environment and working at atomic clock transitions. These chemical approaches, however, have some fundamental limitations. For example, chemical approach restricts the ligand selection and design to ligands with zero nuclear magnetic dipole moment, such as carbon, oxygen, and sulfur. Herein, a physical approach, named Dynamical decoupling (DD), is utilized to combat decoherence, while the limitations of the chemical approaches can be avoided. The phase memory time $T_2$ for a transition metal complex has been prolonged to exceed one millisecond ($1.4~$ms) by employing DD. The single qubit figure of merit $Q_M $ reaches $ 1.4\times 10^5$, which is $40$ times better than that previously reported value for such system. Our results show that molecular qubits, with milliseconds $T_2$, are promising candidates for quantum information processing.
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    Investigating the interaction of electron beams with materials and light has been a field of research since more than a century. The field was advanced theoretically by the raise of quantum mechanics and technically by the introduction of electron microscopes and accelerators. It is possible nowadays to uncover a multitude of information from electron-induced excitations in matter by means of advanced techniques like holography, tomography, and most recently photon-induced near-field electron microscopy. The question is whether the interaction can be controlled in an even more efficient way in order to unravel important questions like modal decomposition of the electron-induced polarization, by performing experiments with better spatial, temporal, and energy resolutions. This review discusses recent advances in controlling the electron and light interactions at the nanoscale. Theoretical and numerical aspects of the interaction of electrons with nanostructures and metamaterials will be discussed, with the aim to understand mechanisms of radiation in interaction of electrons with even more sophisticated structures.
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    We study properties of magnetic nanoparticles adsorbed on the halloysite surface. For that a classical magnetic Hamiltonian with a random distribution of spins on a cylindrical surface was solved by using a nonequilibrium Monte Carlo method. The parameters for our simulations: anisotropy constant and saturated magnetization were extracted from recent experiments. We calculate the hysteresis loops and temperature dependence of the zero field cooling (ZFC) susceptibility, which maximum determines the blocking temperature. It is shown that the dipole-dipole interaction between nanoparticles moderately increases the blocking temperature and weakly increases the coercive force. The obtained hysteresis loops (e.g., the value of the coercive force) for Ni nanoparticles are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data. We also discuss the sensitivity of the hysteresis loops and ZFC susceptibilities to the change of the 3d-shell occupation of the metallic nanoparticles, in particular predict larger coercive force for Fe, than for Ni nanoparticles.
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    We study the linear response of doped three dimensional Dirac and Weyl semimetals to vector potentials, by calculating the wave-vector and frequency dependent current-current response function analytically. The longitudinal part of the dynamic current-current response function is then used to study the plasmon dispersion, and the optical conductivity. The transverse response in the static limit yields the orbital magnetic susceptibility. In a Weyl semimetal, along with the current-current response function, all these quantities are significantly impacted by the presence of parallel electric and magnetic fields (a finite ${\bf E}\cdot{\bf B}$ term), and can be used to experimentally explore the chiral anomaly.
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    We present a quantitative characterization of an electrically tunable Josephson junction defined in an InAs nanowire proximitized by an epitax-ially-grown superconducting Al shell. The gate-dependence of the number of conduction channels and of the set of transmission coefficients are extracted from the highly nonlinear current-voltage characteristics. Although the transmissions evolve non-monotonically, the number of independent channels can be tuned, and configurations with a single quasi-ballistic channel achieved. Superconductor-semiconductor-superconductor weak links are interesting hybrid structures in which the Josephson coupling energy, and therefore the su-percurrent, can be modulated by an electric field [1, 2]. It is even possible to lower enough the carrier density in the weak link to achieve the conceptually simple situation of a quantum point contact (QPC), in which only a small number of conduction channels contribute to transport. Although these kind of hybrid microstructures have been explored for many years [3], inducing strong superconducting correlations into the semiconductor in a reliable way has been achieved only recently. A well-defined ("hard") superconducting gap has been clearly demonstrated both in InAs nanowires [4] and in In-GaAs/InAs two-dimensional electron gases [5] by using in-situ epitaxially grown Al contacts. Many experiments [6, 7, 8, 9, 10] are presently using these hybrid structures because they are promising candidates to implement topological superconduc-tivity and Majorana bound states [11, 12]. A good understanding of their basic microscopic transport features is therefore necessary. Here we track the evo-1
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    Monolayer two-dimensional transitional metal dichalcogenides, such as MoS2, WS2 and WSe2, are direct band gap semiconductors with large exciton binding energy. They attract growing attentions for opto-electronic applications including solar cells, photo-detectors, light-emitting diodes and photo-transistors, capacitive energy storage, photodynamic cancer therapy and sensing on flexible platforms. While light-induced luminescence has been widely studied, luminescence induced by injection of free electrons could promise another important applications of these new materials. However, cathodoluminescence is inefficient due to the low cross-section of the electron-hole creating process in the monolayers. Here for the first time we show that cathodoluminescence of monolayer chalcogenide semiconductors can be evidently observed in a van der Waals heterostructure when the monolayer semiconductor is sandwiched between layers of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) with higher energy gap. The emission intensity shows a strong dependence on the thicknesses of surrounding layers and the enhancement factor is more than 1000 folds. Strain-induced exciton peak shift in the suspended heterostructure is also investigated by the cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate that MoS2, WS2 and WSe2 could be promising cathodoluminescent materials for applications in single-photon emitters, high-energy particle detectors, transmission electron microscope displays, surface-conduction electron-emitter and field emission display technologies.
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    The condensate density profile of trapped two-dimensional gas of photons in an optical microcavity, filled by a dye solution, is analyzed taking into account a coordinate-dependent effective mass of cavity photons and photon-photon coupling parameter. The profiles for the densities of the superfluid and normal phases of trapped photons in the different regions of the system at the fixed temperature are analyzed. The radial dependencies of local mean-field phase transition temperature $T_c^0 (r)$ and local Kosterlitz-Thouless transition temperature $T_c (r)$ for trapped microcavity photons are obtained. The coordinate dependence of cavity photon effective mass and photon-photon coupling parameter is important for the mirrors of smaller radius with the high trapping frequency, which provides BEC and superfluidity for smaller critical number of photons at the same temperature. We discuss a possibility of an experimental study of the density profiles for the normal and superfluid components in the system under consideration.
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    Graphene-Silicon Schottky diode photodetectors possess beneficial properties such as high responsivities and detectivities, broad spectral wavelength operation and high operating speeds. Various routes and architectures have been employed in the past to fabricate devices. Devices are commonly based on the removal of the silicon-oxide layer on the surface of silicon by wet-etching before deposition of graphene on top of silicon to form the graphene-silicon Schottky junction. In this work, we systematically investigate the influence of the interfacial oxide layer, the fabrication technique employed and the silicon substrate on the light detection capabilities of graphene-silicon Schottky diode photodetectors. The properties of devices are investigated over a broad wavelength range from near-UV to short-/mid-infrared radiation, radiation intensities covering over five orders of magnitude as well as the suitability of devices for high speed operation. Results show that the interfacial layer, depending on the required application, is in fact beneficial to enhance the photodetection properties of such devices. Further, we demonstrate the influence of the silicon substrate on the spectral response and operating speed. Fabricated devices operate over a broad spectral wavelength range from the near-UV to the short-/mid-infrared (thermal) wavelength regime, exhibit high photovoltage responses approaching 10$^6$ V/W and short rise- and fall-times of tens of nanoseconds.
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    We theoretically study the spin current and its noise generated between two spin-1/2 spin chains (QSCs) coupled at a single site in the presence of an over-population of spin excitations and a temperature elevation in one subsystem relative to the other, and compare the corresponding transport quantities across two coupled magnetic insulators hosting magnons. In the QSC system, we find that applying temperature bias exclusively leads to a vanishing spin current and a concomitant divergence in the spin Fano factor, defined as the spin current noise-to-signal ratio. By drawing an analogy to the physics of quasiparticle scattering between quantum Hall edge states at a quantum point contact, we attribute the vanishing current to Pauli blockade arising from the fermion statistics of the tunneling spin quasiparticles, and show that such physics does not arise in the magnon scenario. We find that Pauli blockade also leads to noise suppression in the QSC case, and discuss how the Fano factor may be extracted experimentally via the inverse spin Hall effect used extensively in spintronics.
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    A full description of a magnetic sample includes a correct treatment of the boundary conditions (BCs). This is in particular important in thin film systems, where even bulk properties might be modified by the properties of the boundary of the sample. We study generic ferromagnets with broken spatial inversion symmetry and derive the general micromagnetic BCs of a system with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). We demonstrate that the BCs require the full tensorial structure of the third-rank DMI tensor and not just the antisymmetric part, which is usually taken into account. Specifically, we study systems with $C_{\infty v}$ symmetry and explore the consequences of the DMI. Interestingly, we find that the DMI already in the simplest case of a ferromagnetic thin-film leads to a purely boundary-driven magnetic twist state at the edges of the sample. The twist state represents a new type of DMI-induced spin structure, which is completely independent of the internal DMI field. We estimate the size of the texture-induced magnetoresistance effect being in the range of that of domain walls.
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    In noncentrosymmetric crystals with broken inversion symmetry $\mathcal{I}$, the $I-V$ ($I$: current, $V$: voltage) characteristic is generally expected to depend on the direction of $I$, which is known as nonreciprocal response and, for example, found in p-n junction. However, it is a highly nontrivial issue in translationally invariant systems since the time-reversal symmetry ($\mathcal{T}$) plays an essential role, where the two states at crystal momenta $k$ and $-k$ are connected in the band structure. Therefore, it has been considered that the external magnetic field ($B$) or the magnetic order which breaks the $\mathcal{T}$-symmetry is necessary to realize the nonreciprocal $I-V$ characteristics, i.e., magnetochiral anisotropy. Here we theoretically show that the electron correlation in $\mathcal{I}$-broken multi-band systems can induce nonreciprocal $I-V$ characteristics without $\mathcal{T}$-breaking. By using the gauge invariant formulation of Keldysh Green's function, we obtain general formula of the nonreciprocal response for two band systems with onsite interaction $U$, and show that $U$ is essential for nonreciprocal $I-V$ characteristics. The formula is applied to Rice-Mele model, a representative 1D model with inversion breaking, and some candidate materials are discussed. This finding offers a coherent understanding of the origin of nonreciprocal $I-V$ characteristics, and will pave a way to design it.
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    When graphene is paired with a semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayer its band structure develops rich spin textures due to proximity spin-orbital effects with interfacial breaking of inversion symmetry. In this work, we show that the characteristic spin winding of low-energy states in graphene on TMD enables current-driven spin polarization, a phenomenon known as the inverse spin galvanic effect (ISGE). By introducing a proper figure of merit, we quantify the efficiency of charge-to-spin conversion and show it is close to unit when the Fermi level approaches the spin minority band. Remarkably, at high electronic density, even though sub-bands with opposite spin helicities are occupied, the efficiency decays only algebraically. The giant ISGE predicted for graphene on TMD monolayers is robust against disorder and remains large at room temperature.
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    A new section of databases and programs devoted to double crystallographic groups (point and space groups) has been implemented in the Bilbao Crystallographic Server (http://www.cryst.ehu.es). The double crystallographic groups are required in the study of physical systems whose Hamiltonian includes spin-dependent terms. In the symmetry analysis of such systems, instead of the irreducible representations of the space groups, it is necessary to consider the single- and double-valued irreducible representations of the double space groups. The new section includes databases of symmetry operations (DGENPOS) and of irreducible representations of the double (point and space) groups (REPRESENTATIONS DPG and REPRESENTATIONS DSG). The tool DCOMPATIBILITY RELATIONS provides compatibility relations between the irreducible representations of double space groups at different k-vectors of the Brillouin zone when there is a group-subgroup relation between the corresponding little groups. The program DSITESYM implements the so-called site-symmetry approach, which establishes symmetry relations between localized and extended crystal states, using representations of the double groups. As an application of this approach, the program BANDREP calculates the band representations and the elementary band representations induced from any Wyckoff position of any of the 230 double space groups, giving information about the properties of these bands. Recently, the results of BANDREP have been extensively applied in the description and the search of topological insulators.

Recent comments

Noon van der Silk Sep 04 2013 23:55 UTC

Part of the standard equipment for playing bosonic baseball? It's a good game, but it's hard to know who's playing.