Mesoscale and Nanoscale Physics (cond-mat.mes-hall)

  • PDF
    Motivated by the need to understand current-induced magnetization dynamics at the nanoscale, we have developed a formalism, within the framework of Keldysh Green function approach, to study the current-induced dynamics of a ferromagnetic (FM) nanoisland overlayer on a spin-orbit-coupling (SOC) Rashba plane. In contrast to the commonly employed classical micromagnetic LLG simulations the magnetic moments of the FM are treated \it quantum mechanically. We obtain the density matrix of the whole system consisting of conduction electrons entangled with the local magnetic moments and calculate the effective damping rate of the FM. We investigate two opposite limiting regimes of FM dynamics: (1) The precessional regime where the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) and precessional frequency are smaller than the exchange interactions, and (2) The local spin-flip regime where the MAE and precessional frequency are comparable to the exchange interactions. In the former case, we show that due to the finite size of the FM domain, the \textquotedblleft Gilbert damping\textquotedblright does not diverge in the ballistic electron transport regime, in sharp contrast to Kambersky's breathing Fermi surface theory for damping in metallic FMs. In the latter case, we show that above a critical bias the excited conduction electrons can switch the local spin moments resulting in demagnetization and reversal of the magnetization. Furthermore, our calculations show that the bias-induced antidamping efficiency in the local spin-flip regime is much higher than that in the rotational excitation regime.
  • PDF
    An analytical study of low-energy electronic excited states in an uniformly strained graphene is carried out up to second-order in the strain tensor. We report an new effective Dirac Hamiltonian with an anisotropic Fermi velocity tensor, which reveals the graphene trigonal symmetry being absent in low-energy theories to first-order in the strain tensor. In particular, we demonstrate the dependence of the Dirac-cone elliptical deformation on the stretching direction respect to graphene lattice orientation. We further analytically calculate the optical conductivity tensor of strained graphene and its transmittance for a linearly polarized light with normal incidence. Finally, the obtained analytical expression of the Dirac point shift allows a better determination and understanding of pseudomagnetic fields induced by nonuniform strains.
  • PDF
    The transport properties of nanostructured systems are deeply affected by the geometry of the effective connections to metallic leads. In this work we derive a conductance expression for interacting systems whose connectivity geometries do not meet the Meir-Wingreen proportional coupling condition. As an interesting application, we consider a quantum dot connected coherently to tunable electronic cavity modes. The structure is shown to exhibit a well-defined Kondo effect over a wide range of coupling strengths between the two subsystems. In agreement with recent experimental results, the calculated conductance curves exhibit strong modulations and asymmetric behavior as different cavity modes are swept through the Fermi level. These conductance modulations occur, however, while maintaining robust Kondo singlet correlations of the dot with the electronic reservoir, a direct consequence of the lopsided nature of the device.
  • PDF
    We report on experimental investigations of an electrically driven WSe2 based light-emitting van der Waals heterostructure. We observe a threshold voltage for electroluminescence significantly lower than the corresponding single particle band gap of monolayer WSe2. This observation can be interpreted by considering the Coulomb interaction and a tunneling process involving excitons, well beyond the picture of independent charge carriers. An applied magnetic field reveals pronounced magneto-oscillations in the electroluminescence of the free exciton emission intensity with a 1/B-periodicity. This effect is ascribed to a modulation of the tunneling probability resulting from the Landau quantization in the graphene electrodes. A sharp feature in the differential conductance indicates that the Fermi level is pinned and allows for an estimation of the acceptor binding energy.
  • PDF
    Charge density wave (CDW) phases are symmetry-reduced states of matter in which a periodic modulation of the electronic charge frequently leads to drastic changes of the electronic spectrum, including the emergence of energy gaps. We analyze the CDW state in a 1T-TiSe$_2$ monolayer within density functional theory framework and show that, similarly to its bulk counterpart, the monolayer is unstable towards a commensurate $2{\times}2$ periodic lattice distortion (PLD) and CDW at low temperatures. Analysis of the electron and phonon spectrum establishes the PLD as the stable $T=0$\u2009K configuration with a narrow bandgap, whereas the undistorted and semi-metalic state is stable only above a threshold temperature. The lattice distortions and unfolded band structure of the CDW phase agree well with experimental results. We also address the possible mechanism for the CDW formation in 1T-TiSe$_2$ monolayers and the role of electron-electron interactions.
  • PDF
    We show that anisotropic biaxial stress can be used to tune the built-in dipole moment of excitons confined in In(Ga)As quantum dots up to complete erasure of its magnitude and inversion of its sign. We demonstrate that this phenomenon is due to piezoelectricity. We present a model to calculate the applied stress taking advantage of the so-called piezotronic effect, which we observe for the first time in a strained diode-like nanomembrane containing the quantum dots. Finally, self-consistent k.p calculations reveal that the experimental findings can be only accounted for by the nonlinear piezoelectric effect, whose importance in quantum dot physics has been theoretically recognized but it proved to be difficult to single out experimentally.
  • PDF
    Dirac materials are characterized by energy-momentum relations that resemble those of relativistic massless particles. Commonly denominated Dirac cones, these dispersion relations are considered to be their essential feature. These materials comprise quite diverse examples, such as graphene and topological insulators. Band-engineering techniques should aim to a full control of the parameter that characterizes the Dirac cones: the Fermi velocity. We propose a general mechanism that enables the fine-tuning of the Fermi velocity in Dirac materials in a readily accessible way for experiments. By embedding the sample in a uniform electric field, the Fermi velocity is substantially modified. We first prove this result analytically, for the surface states of a topological insulator/semiconductor interface, and postulate its universality to other Dirac materials. Then we check its correctness in carbon-based Dirac materials, namely graphene nanoribbons and nanotubes, thus showing the validity of our hypothesis in both continuum and tight-binding calculations and in different Dirac systems.
  • PDF
    Atomic sized two-level systems (TLSs) in dielectrics are known as a major source of loss in superconducting devices, particularly due to frequency noise. However, the induced frequency shifts on the devices, even by far off-resonance TLSs, is often suppressed by symmetry when standard single-tone spectroscopy is used. We introduce a two-tone spectroscopy on the normal modes of a pair of coupled superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators to uncover this effect by asymmetric saturation. Together with an appropriate generalized saturation model this enables us to extract the average single-photon Rabi frequency of dominant TLSs to be $\Omega_0/2\pi \approx 79 $ kHz. At high photon numbers we observe an enhanced sensitivity to nonlinear kinetic inductance when using the two-tone method and estimate the value of the Kerr coefficient as $K/2\pi \approx -1\times 10^{-4}$ Hz/photon. Furthermore, the life-time of each resonance can be controlled (increased) by pumping of the other mode as demonstrated both experimentally and theoretically.
  • PDF
    In this work, a numerical approach to investigate the room temperature luminescence emission from core/shell nanowire is presented where GaN quantum discs (QDiscs), periodically distributed in AlxGa1-xN nanowire, is considered as core and AlxGa1-xN as shell. Thin disk shaped (Ring shaped) n-doped region has been placed at the GaN/ AlxGa1-xN (AlxGa1-xN /air) interface in AlxGa1-xN region in axial (radial) directions. To obtain energy levels and related wavefunctions, self-consistent procedure has been employed to solve Schrodinger-Poisson equations with considering the spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization. Then luminescence spectrum is studied in details to recognize the parameters influent in luminescence. The results show that the amount of doping, size of QDiscs and theirs numbers have remarkable effects on the band to band luminescence emission. Our numerical calculations gives some insights into the luminescence emission of core/shell nanowire and exhibits a useful tool to analyze findings in experiments.
  • PDF
    Valley polarization (VP), an induced imbalance in the populations of a multi-valley electronic system, allows emission of second harmonic (SH) light even in centrosymmetric crystals such as graphene. Whereas in systems such as MoS$\mathrm{_2}$ or BN this adds to their intrinsic quadratic response, SH generation in a multi-valley inversion-symmetric crystal can provide a direct measure of valley polarization. By computing the nonlinear response and characterizing theoretically the respective SH as a function of polarization, temperature, electron density, and degree of VP, we demonstrate the possibility of disentangling and individually quantifying the intrinsic and valley contributions to the SH. A specific experimental setup is proposed to obtain direct quantitative information about the degree of VP and allow its remote mapping. This approach could prove useful for direct, contactless, real-space monitoring of valley injection and other applications of valley transport and valleytronics.
  • PDF
    Ultrafast electronic dynamics in solids lies at the core of modern condensed matter and materials physics. To build up a practical ab initio method in this field, we develop the momentum-resolved real-time time dependent density functional theory (rt-TDDFT), together with the implementation of length gauge electromagnetic field. When applied to simulate elementary excitation in graphene, different excitation modes, only distinguishable in momentum space, are observed. The momentum-resolved rt-TDDFT is important and efficient for the study of ultrafast dynamics in extended systems.
  • PDF
    Current-induced spin polarization in a two-dimensional electron gas with Rashba spin-orbit interaction is considered theoretically in terms of the Matsubara Green functions. This formalism allows to describe temperature dependence of the induced spin polarization. The electron gas is assumed to be coupled to a magnetic substrate via exchange interaction. Analytical and numerical results on the temperature dependence of spin polarization have been obtained in the linear response regime. The spin polarization has been presented as a sum of two terms - one proportional to the relaxation time and the other related to the Berry phase corresponding to the electronic bands of the magnetized Rashba gas. The spin-orbit torque due to Rashba interaction is also discussed. Such a torque appears as a result of the exchange coupling between the non-equilibrium spin polarization and magnetic moment of the underlayer.
  • PDF
    At the forefront of nanochemistry, there exists a research endeavor centered around intermetallic nanocrystals, which are unique in terms of long-range atomic ordering, well-defined stoichiometry, and controlled crystal structure. In contrast to alloy nanocrystals with no atomic ordering, it has been challenging to synthesize intermetallic nanocrystals with a tight control over their size and shape. This review article highlights recent progress in the synthesis of intermetallic nanocrystals with controllable sizes and well-defined shapes. We begin with a simple analysis and some insights key to the selection of experimental conditions for generating intermetallic nanocrystals. We then present examples to highlight the viable use of intermetallic nanocrystals as electrocatalysts or catalysts for various reactions, with a focus on the enhanced performance relative to their alloy counterparts that lack atomic ordering. We conclude with perspectives on future developments in the context of synthetic control, structure-property relationship, and application.
  • PDF
    Zeeman splitting of 1D hole subbands is investigated in quantum point contacts (QPCs) fabricated on a (311) oriented GaAs-AlGaAs heterostructure. Transport measurements can determine the magnitude of the g-factor, but cannot usually determine the sign. Here we use a combination of tilted fields and a unique off-diagonal element in the hole g-tensor to directly detect the sign of g*. We are able to tune not only the magnitude, but also the sign of the g-factor by electrical means, which is of interest for spintronics applications. Furthermore, we show theoretically that the resulting behavior of g* can be explained by the momentum dependence of the spin-orbit interaction.
  • PDF
    Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides are uniquely-qualified materials for photonics because they combine well defined tunable direct band gaps and selfpassivated surfaces without dangling bonds. However, the atomic thickness of these 2D materials results in low photo absorption limiting the achievable photo luminescence intensity. Such emission can, in principle, be enhanced via nanoscale antennae resulting in; a. an increased absorption cross-section enhancing pump efficiency, b. an acceleration of the internal emission rate via the Purcell factor mainly by reducing the antennas optical mode volume beyond the diffraction limit, and c. improved impedance matching of the emitter dipole to the freespace wavelength. Plasmonic dimer antennae show orders of magnitude hot-spot field enhancements when an emitter is positioned exactly at the midgap. However, a 2D material cannot be grown, or easily transferred, to reside in mid-gap of the metallic dimer cavity. In addition, a spacer layer between the cavity and the emissive material is required to avoid non-radiative recombination channels. Using both computational and experimental methods, in this work we show that the emission enhancement from a 2D emitter- monomer antenna cavity system rivals that of dimers at much reduced lithographic effort. We rationalize this finding by showing that the emission enhancement in dimer antennae does not specifically originate from the gap of the dimer cavity, but is an average effect originating from the effective cavity crosssection taken below each optical cavity where the emitting 2D film is located. In particular, we test an array of different dimer and monomer antenna geometries and observe a representative 3x higher emission for both monomer and dimer cavities as compared to intrinsic emission of Chemical Vapor Deposition synthesized WS2 flakes.
  • PDF
    The dressed states arising from the interaction between electrons and holes, and off-resonant electromagnetic radiation have been investigated for recently fabricated gapped and anisotropic black phosphorus. Our calculations were carried out for the low-energy electronic subbands near the $\Gamma$ point. States for both linear and circular polarizations of the incoming radiation have been computed. However, our principal emphasis is on linearly polarized light with arbitrary polarization since this case has not been given much attention for dressing fields imposed on anisotropic structures. We have considered various cases for one- and few-layer phosphorus, including massless Dirac fermions with tunable in-plane anisotropy. Initial Hamiltonian parameters are renormalized in a largely different way compared to those for previously reported for gapped Dirac structures and, most importantly, existing anisotropy which could be modified in every direction.
  • PDF
    We study Frenkel exciton-polariton Bose-Einstein condensation in a two-dimensional defect-free triangular photonic crystal with an organic semiconductor active medium containing bound excitons with dipole moments oriented perpendicular to the layers. We find photonic Bloch modes of the structure and consider their strong coupling regime with the excitonic component. Using the Gross- Pitaevskii equation for exciton polaritons and the Boltzmann equation for the external exciton reservoir, we demonstrate the formation of condensate at the points in reciprocal space where photon group velocity equals zero. Further, we demonstrate condensation at non-zero momentum states for TM-polarized photons in the case of a system with incoherent pumping, and show that the condensation threshold varies for different points in the reciprocal space, controlled by detuning.
  • PDF
    We demonstrate photon counting at 1550 nm wavelength using microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) made from TiN/Ti/TiN trilayer films with superconducting transition temperature Tc ~ 1.4 K. The detectors have a lumped-element design with a large interdigitated capacitor (IDC) covered by aluminum and inductive photon absorbers whose volume ranges from 0.4 um^3 to 20 um^3. We find that the energy resolution improves as the absorber volume is reduced. We have achieved an energy resolution of 0.22 eV and resolved up to 7 photons per pulse, both greatly improved from previously reported results at 1550 nm wavelength using MKIDs. Further improvements are possible by optimizing the optical coupling to maximize photon absorption into the inductive absorber.
  • PDF
    The understanding of weak measurements and interaction-free measurements has greatly expanded the conceptual and experimental toolbox to explore the quantum world. Here we demonstrate single-shot variable-strength weak measurements of the electron and the nuclear spin states of a single $^{31}$P donor in silicon. We first show how the partial collapse of the nuclear spin due to measurement can be used to coherently rotate the spin to a desired pure state. We explicitly demonstrate that phase coherence is preserved throughout multiple sequential single-shot weak measurements, and that the partial state collapse can be reversed. Second, we use the relation between measurement strength and perturbation of the nuclear state as a physical meter to extract the tunneling rates between the $^{31}$P donor and a nearby electron reservoir from data, conditioned on observing no tunneling events. Our experiments open avenues to measurement-based state preparation, steering and feedback protocols for spin systems in the solid state, and highlight the fundamental connection between information gain and state modification in quantum mechanics.
  • PDF
    We report the enhancement of spin-orbit torques in MnAl/Ta films with improving chemical ordering through annealing. The switching current density is increased due to enhanced saturation magnetization MS and effective anisotropy field HK after annealing. Both damplinglike effective field HD and fieldlike effective field HF have been increased in the temperature range of 50 to 300 K. HD varies inversely with MS in both of the films, while the HF becomes liner dependent on 1/MS in the annealed film. We infer that the improved chemical ordering has enhanced the interfacial spin transparency and the transmitting of the spin current in MnAl layer.
  • PDF
    We study two Weyl semimetal generalizations in five dimensions (5d) which have Yang monopoles and linked Weyl surfaces in the Brillouin zone, respectively, and carry the second Chern number as a topological number. In particular, we show a Yang monopole naturally reduces to a Hopf link of two Weyl surfaces when the $\mathbf{TP}$ (time-reversal combined with space-inversion) symmetry is broken. We then examine the phase transition between insulators with different topological numbers in 5d. In analogy to the 3d case, 5d Weyl semimetals emerge as intermediate phases during the topological phase transition.
  • PDF
    Magnon-photon coupling in antiferromagnets has many attractive features that do not exist in ferro- or ferrimagnets. We show quantum-mechanically that, in the absence of an external field, one of the two degenerated spin wave bands couples with photons while the other does not. The photon mode anticrosses with the coupled spin waves when their frequencies are close to each other. Similar to its ferromagnetic counterpart, the magnon-photon coupling strength is proportional to the square root of number of spins $\sqrt{N}$ in antiferromagnets. An external field removes the spin wave degeneracy and both spin wave bands couple to the photons, resulting in two anticrossings between the magnons and photons. Two transmission peaks were observed near the anticrossing frequency. The maximum damping that allows clear discrimination of the two transmission peaks is proportional to $\sqrt{N}$ and it's well below the damping of antiferromagnetic insulators. Therefore the strong magnon-photon coupling can be realized in antiferromagnets and the coherent information transfer between the photons and magnons is possible.
  • PDF
    The interlayer gallery between two adjacent sheets of van der Waals materials is expected to modify properties of atoms and molecules confined at the atomic interfaces. Here, we directly image individual hydrogen atom intercalated between two graphene sheets and investigate its dynamics by scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). The intercalated hydrogen atom is found to be remarkably different from atomic hydrogen chemisorbed on external surface of graphene. Our STM measurements, complemented by first-principles calculations, show that the hydrogen atom intercalated between two graphene sheets has dramatically reduced potential barriers for elementary migration steps. Especially, the confined atomic hydrogen dissociation energy from graphene is reduced to 0.34 eV, which is only about a third of a hydrogen atom chemisorbed on graphene. This offers a unique platform for direct imaging of the atomic dynamics of confined atoms. Our results suggest that the atomic interfaces of van der Waals materials may provide a confined environment to tune the interfacial chemical reactions.
  • PDF
    We study the breaking of the discrete time-translation symmetry in small periodically driven quantum systems. Such systems are intermediate between large closed systems and small dissipative systems, which both display the symmetry breaking, but have qualitatively different dynamics. As a nontrivial example we consider period tripling in a quantum nonlinear oscillator. We show that, for moderately strong driving, the period tripling is robust on an exponentially long time scale, which is further extended by an even weak decoherence.
  • PDF
    The structural, stability, electronic, and optical properties of metal (Si, Ge, Sn, and Pb) mono- and co-doped anatase TiO$_{2}$ nanotubes are investigated, in order to elucidate their potential for photocatalytic applications. It is found that Si doped TiO$_{2}$ nanotubes are more stable than other doped nanotubes. All dopants lower the band gap, the decrease depending on the concentration and the type of dopant. Correspondingly, there is a redshift in the optical properties for all kinds of dopings. Even though a Pb mono-doped TiO$_{2}$ nanotube has the lowest band gap, this system is not suited for water splitting, in contrast to Si, Ge, and Sn mono-doped TiO$_{2}$ nanotubes. On the other hand, co-doped TiO$_{2}$ does not show an enhancement of the photocatalytic properties through doping.
  • PDF
    By using Fourier-transform scanning tunneling spectroscopy we measure the interference patterns produced by the impurity scattering of confined Dirac quasiparticles in epitaxial graphene nanoflakes. Upon comparison of the experimental results with tight-binding calculations of realistic model flakes, we show that the characteristic features observed in the Fourier-transformed local density of states are related to scattering between different transverse modes (sub-bands) of a graphene nanoflake and allow direct insight into the electronic spectrum of graphene. We also observe a strong reduction of quasiparticle lifetime which is attributed to the interaction with the underlying substrate. In addition, we show that the distribution of the onsite energies at flower defects leads to an effectively broken pseudospin selection rule, where intravalley back-scattering is allowed.
  • PDF
    We investigate lattice-pseudospin currents controlled by strain in a silicene-based junction, where in strained barrier, chemical potential and perpendicular electric field are applied. Strained region may be considered as smoothly small perturbation of nearest hoping energies. Using tight-binding model including spin-orbit interaction, the pseudo Dirac fermions under the influence of pseudo-gauge potential are obtained as carriers of the system. As a result, we show that current can be selected to flow by pure A-(or B-) sublattice currents, lattice-pseudospin up (or down) currents, by varying magnitude of strain in the barrier. Pure lattice-pseudospin current gives rise to a peak at some magnitude of strain, yielding strain filtering effect. Magnitude of filtered strain may be tunable by varying chemical potential. High sensitivity performance that very small strain induces current peak is predicted for large barrier thickness. Interestingly, not only does the junction yield strain filter like that in graphene but it also leads to perfect strain control of lattice-pseudospin currents. Our work reveals potential of silicene as a nano-electro-mechanical device and pseudospintronic application.
  • PDF
    Indium tin oxide (Sn-doped In$_2$O$_{3-\delta}$ or ITO) is an interesting and technologically important transparent conducting oxide. This class of material has been extensively studied for decades, with research efforts focusing on the application aspects. The fundamental issues of the electronic conduction properties of ITO from 300 K down to low temperatures have rarely been addressed. Studies of the electrical-transport properties over a wide range of temperature are essential to unraveling the underlying electronic dynamics and microscopic electronic parameters. We show that one can learn rich physics in ITO material, including the semi-classical Boltzmann transport, the quantum-interference electron transport, and the electron-electron interaction effects in the presence of disorder and granularity. To reveal the opportunities that the ITO material provides for fundamental research, we demonstrate a variety of charge transport properties in different forms of ITO structures, including homogeneous polycrystalline films, homogeneous single-crystalline nanowires, and inhomogeneous ultrathin films. We not only address new physics phenomena that arise in ITO but also illustrate the versatility of the stable ITO material forms for potential applications. We emphasize that, microscopically, the rich electronic conduction properties of ITO originate from the inherited free-electron-like energy bandstructure and low-carrier concentration (as compared with that in typical metals) characteristics of this class of material. Furthermore, a low carrier concentration leads to slow electron-phonon relaxation, which causes ($i$) a small residual resistance ratio, ($ii$) a linear electron diffusion thermoelectric power in a wide temperature range 1-300 K, and ($iii$) a weak electron dephasing rate. We focus our discussion on the metallic-like ITO material.
  • PDF
    Topological quantum matter and spintronics research have been developed to a large extent independently. In this Review we discuss a new role that the antiferromagnetic order has taken in combining topological matter and spintronics. This occurs due to the complex microscopic symmetries present in antiferromagnets that allow, e.g., for topological relativistic quasiparticles and the newly discovered Néel spin-orbit torques to coexist. We first introduce the concepts of topological semimetals and spin-orbitronics. Secondly, we explain the antiferromagnetic symmetries on a minimal Dirac semimetal model and the guiding role of $\textit{ab initio}$ calculations in predictions of examples of Dirac, and Weyl antiferromagnets: SrMnBi$_{\text{2}}$, CuMnAs, and Mn$_{\text{3}}$Ge. Lastly, we illustrate the interplay of Dirac quasiparticles, topology and antiferromagnetism on: (i) the experimentally observed quantum Hall effect in EuMnBi$_{\text{2}}$, (ii) the large anomalous Hall effect in Mn$_{\text{3}}$Ge, and (iii) the theoretically predicted topological metal-insulator transition in CuMnAs.
  • PDF
    We explore the scaling behavior of an unsteady flow that is generated by an oscillating body of finite size in a gas. If the gas is gradually rarefied, the Navier-Stokes equations begin to fail and a kinetic description of the flow becomes more appropriate. The failure of the Navier-Stokes equations can be thought to take place via two different physical mechanisms: either the continuum hypothesis breaks down as a result of a finite size effect; or local equilibrium is violated due to the high rate of strain. By independently tuning the relevant linear dimension and the frequency of the oscillating body, we can experimentally observe these two different physical mechanisms. All the experimental data, however, can be collapsed using a single dimensionless scaling parameter that combines the relevant linear dimension and the frequency of the body. This proposed Knudsen number for an unsteady flow is rooted in a fundamental symmetry principle, namely Galilean invariance.
  • PDF
    Point defects in semiconductors are an increasingly attractive platform for quantum information technology applications. Using first-principles calculations we demonstrate how to engineer dangling bond (DB) defects on hydrogenated silicon surfaces, which give rise to isolated impurity states that can be used in single-electron devices. In particular we show that sample thickness and biaxial strain can serve as control parameters to design the electronic properties of DB defects. While in thick Si samples the neutral DB state is resonant with bulk valence bands, ultrathin samples (1-2 nm) lead to an isolated impurity state in the gap. Strain further isolates the DB from the valence band, with the response to strain heavily dependent on sample thickness. These findings suggest new methods for tuning the properties of defects on surfaces for quantum information applications. Finally, we present a consistent and unifying interpretation of many results presented in the literature for DB defects on hydrogenated silicon surfaces, rationalizing apparent discrepancies between different experiments and simulations.
  • PDF
    The realistic modeling of STT-MRAM for the simulations of hybrid CMOS/Spintronics devices in comprehensive simulation environments require a full description of stochastic switching processes in state of the art STT-MRAM. Here, we derive an analytical formulation that takes into account the spin-torque asymmetry of the spin polarization function of magnetic tunnel junctions studying. We studied its validity range by comparing the analytical formulas with results achieved numerically within a full micromagnetic framework. We also find that a reasonable fit of the probability density function (PDF) of the switching time is given by a Pearson Type IV PDF. The main results of this work underlines the need of data-driven design of STT-MRAM that uses a full micromagnetic simulation framework for the statistical proprieties PDF of switching processes.

Recent comments

Noon van der Silk Sep 04 2013 23:55 UTC

Part of the standard equipment for playing bosonic baseball? It's a good game, but it's hard to know who's playing.