Condensed Matter (cond-mat)

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    In this paper, we explore quantum interference in molecular conductance from the point of view of graph theory and walks on lattices. By virtue of the Cayley-Hamilton theorem for characteristic polynomials and the Coulson-Rushbrooke pairing theorem for alternant hydrocarbons, it is possible to derive a finite series expansion of the Green's function for electron transmission in terms of the odd powers of the vertex adjacency matrix or Hückel matrix. This means that only odd-length walks on a molecular graph contribute to the conductivity through a molecule. Thus, if there are only even-length walks between two atoms, quantum interference is expected to occur in the electron transport between them. However, even if there are only odd-length walks between two atoms, a situation may come about where the contributions to the QI of some odd-length walks are canceled by others, leading to another class of quantum interference. For non-alternant hydrocarbons, the finite Green's function expansion may include both even and odd powers. Nevertheless, QI can in some circumstances come about for non-alternants, from the cancellation of odd and even-length walk terms. We report some progress, but not a complete resolution of the problem of understanding the coefficients in the expansion of the Green's function in a power series of the adjacency matrix, these coefficients being behind the cancellations that we have mentioned. And we introduce a perturbation theory for transmission as well as some potentially useful infinite power series expansions of the Green's function.
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    We study properties of heavy-light-heavy three-point functions in two-dimensional CFTs by using the modular invariance of two-point functions on a torus. We show that our result is non-trivially consistent with the condition of ETH (Eigenstate Thermalization Hypothesis). We also study the open-closed duality of cylinder amplitudes and derive behaviors of disk one-point functions.
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    Nonreciprocal devices such as isolators and circulators are necessary to protect sensitive apparatus from unwanted noise. Recently, a variety of alternatives were proposed to replace ferrite-based commercial technologies, with the motivation to be integrated with microwave superconducting quantum circuits. Here, we review isolators realized with microwave optomechanical circuits and present a gyrator-based picture to develop an intuition on the origin of nonreciprocity in these systems. Such nonreciprocal optomechanical schemes show promise as they can be extended to circulators and directional amplifiers, with perspectives to reach the quantum limit in terms of added noise.
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    The sensitivity of graphene to the surrounding environment is given by its \pi electrons, which are directly exposed to molecules in the ambient. The high sensitivity of graphene to the local environment has shown to be both advantageous but also problematic for graphene-based devices, such as transistors and sensors, where the graphene carrier concentration and mobility change due to ambient humidity variations. In this review, recent progress in understanding the effects of water on different types of graphene, grown epitaxially and quasi-free standing on SiC, by chemical vapour deposition on SiO2, as well as exfoliated flakes, are presented. It is demonstrated that water withdraws electrons from graphene, but the graphene-water interaction highly depends on the thickness, layer stacking, underlying substrate and substrate-induced doping. Moreover, we highlight the importance of clear and unambiguous description of the environmental conditions (i.e. relative humidity) whenever a routine characterisation for carrier concentration and mobility is reported (often presented as a simple figure-of-merit), as these electrical characteristics are highly dependent on the adsorbed molecules and the surrounding environment.
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    Concentrated fabric softeners are water-based formulations containing around 10 - 15 wt. % of double tailed esterquat surfactants primarily synthesized from palm oil. In recent patents, it was shown that a significant part of the surfactant contained in today formulations can be reduced by circa 50 % and replaced by natural guar polymers without detrimental effects on the deposition and softening performances. We presently study the structure and rheology of these softener formulations and identify the mechanisms at the origin of these effects. The polymer additives used are guar gum polysaccharides, one cationic and one modified through addition of hydroxypropyl groups. Formulations with and without guar polymers are investigated using optical and cryo-transmission electron microscopy, small-angle light and Xray scattering and finally rheology. Similar techniques are applied to study the phase behavior of softener and cellulose nanocrystals considered here as a model for cotton. The esterquat surfactants are shown to assemble into micron-sized vesicles in the dilute and concentrated regimes. In the former, guar addition in small amounts does not impair the vesicular structure and stability. In the concentrated regime, cationic guars induce a local crowding associated to depletion interactions and leads to the formation of a local lamellar order. In rheology, adjusting the polymer concentration at one tenth that of the surfactant is sufficient to offset the decrease of the elastic property associated with the surfactant reduction. In conclusion, we have shown that through an appropriate choice of natural additives it is possible to lower the concentration of surfactants in fabric conditioners by about half, a result that could represent a significant breakthrough in current home care formulations.
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    We study a two-level impurity coupled locally to a quantum gas on an optical lattice. For state-dependent interactions between the impurity and the gas, we show that its evolution encodes information on the local excitation spectrum of gas at the coupling site. Based on this, we design a nondestructive method to probe the system's excitations in a broad range of energies by measuring the state of the probe using standard atom optics methods. We illustrate our findings with numerical simulations for quantum lattice systems, including realistic dephasing noise on the quantum probe, and discuss how a controllable dephasing rate on the quantum probe may enable distinguishing regular and chaotic spectra.
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    Asymmetric segregation of key proteins at cell division -- be it a beneficial or deleterious protein -- is ubiquitous in unicellular organisms and often considered as an evolved trait to increase fitness in a stressed environment. Here, we provide a general framework to describe the evolutionary origin of this asymmetric segregation. We compute the population fitness as a function of the protein segregation asymmetry $a$, and show that the value of $a$ which optimizes the population growth manifests a phase transition between symmetric and asymmetric partitioning phases. Surprisingly, the nature of phase transition is different for the case of beneficial proteins as opposed to proteins which decrease the single-cell growth rate. Our study elucidates the optimization problem faced by evolution in the context of protein segregation, and motivates further investigation of asymmetric protein segregation in biological systems.
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    We introduce an efficient dynamical tree method that enables us, for the first time, to explicitly demonstrate thermo-remanent magnetization memory effect in a hierarchical energy landscape. Our simulation nicely reproduces the nontrivial waiting-time and waiting-temperature dependences in this non-equilibrium phenomenon. We further investigate the condensation effect, in which a small set of micro-states dominates the thermodynamic behavior, in the multi-layer trap model. Importantly, a structural phase transition of the tree is shown to coincide with the onset of condensation phenomenon. Our results underscore the importance of hierarchical structure and demonstrate the intimate relation between glassy behavior and structure of barrier trees.
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    Several IV-VI semiconductor compounds made of heavy atoms, such as Pb$_{1-x}$Sn$_{x}$Te, may undergo band-inversion at the $L$ point of the Brillouin zone upon variation of their chemical composition. This inversion gives rise to topologically distinct phases, characterized by a change in a topological invariant. In the framework of the $\mathbf{k}\cdot\mathbf{p}$ theory, band-inversion can be viewed as a change of sign of the fundamental gap. A two-band model within the envelope-function approximation predicts the appearance of midgap interface states with Dirac cone dispersions in band-inverted junctions, namely, when the gap changes sign along the growth direction. We present a thorough study of these interface electron states in the presence of crossed electric and magnetic fields, the electric field being applied along the growth direction of a band-inverted junction. We show that the Dirac cone is robust and persists even if the fields are strong. In addition, we point out that Landau levels of electron states lying in the semiconductor bands can be tailored by the electric field. Tunable devices are thus likely to be realizable exploiting the properties studied herein.
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    We present measurements of one-dimensional superconductor-semiconductor Coulomb islands, fabricated by gate confinement of a two-dimensional InAs heterostructure with an epitaxial Al layer. When tuned via electrostatic side gates to regimes without sub-gap states, Coulomb blockade reveals Cooper-pair mediated transport. When sub-gap states are present, Coulomb peak positions and heights oscillate in a correlated way with magnetic field and gate voltage, as predicted theoretically, with (anti) crossings in (parallel) transverse magnetic field indicating Rashba-type spin-orbit coupling. Overall results are consistent with a picture of overlapping Majorana zero modes in finite wires.
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    We study stability of multiple conducting edge states in a topological insulator against all multi-particle perturbations allowed by the time-reversal symmetry. We model a system as a multi-channel Luttinger liquid, where the number of channels equals the number of Kramers doublets at the edge. We show that in the clean system with N Kramers doublets there always exist relevant perturbations (either of superconducting or charge density wave character) which always open (N-1) gaps. In the charge density wave regime, (N-1) edge states get localised. The single remaining gapless mode describes sliding of 'Wigner crystal' like structure. Disorder introduces multi-particle backscattering processes. While the single-particle backscattering turns out to be irrelevant, the two-particle process may localise this gapless, in translation invariant system, mode. Our main result is that an interacting system with N Kramers doublets at the edge may be either a trivial insulator or a topological insulator for N=1 or 2, depending on density-density repulsion parameters whereas any higher number N>2 of doublets gets fully localised by the disorder pinning irrespective of the parity issue.
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    Unconventional superconductivity often arises from Cooper pairing between neighboring atomic sites, stipulating a characteristic pairing symmetry in the reciprocal space. The twisted bilayer graphene (TBG) presents a new setting where superconductivity emerges on the flat bands whose Wannier wavefunctions spread over many graphene unit cells, forming the so-called Moiré pattern. To unravel how Wannier states form Cooper pairs, we study the interplay between electronic, structural, and pairing instabilities in TBG, and compare the results with those of single-layer graphene (SLG) and graphene on boron-nitride (GBN). For all cases, we compute the pairing eigenvalues and eigenfunctions by solving a linearized Eliashberg gap equation, where the pairing potential is evaluated from materials specific tight-binding band structures. We find an extended s-wave as the leading pairing symmetry in TBG, in which the nearest-neighbor Wannier sites form Cooper pairs with alternating phases. In contrast, GBN assumes a p + ip-wave pairing between next-nearest-neighbor Wannier states in a different Moiré lattice, SLG has the d + id-wave symmetry for inter sublattice pairing. Moreover, while p+ip, and d+id pairings are chiral, and nodeless, but the extended s-wave channel possesses accidental nodes. The nodal pairing symmetry makes it easily distinguishable via power-law dependencies in thermodynamical entities, in addition to their direct visualization via spectroscopies.
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    Nanosize pores can turn semimetallic graphene into a semiconductor and from being impermeable into the most efficient molecular sieve membrane. However, scaling the pores down to the nanometer, while fulfilling the tight structural constraints imposed by applications, represents an enormous challenge for present top-down strategies. Here we report a bottom-up method to synthesize nanoporous graphene comprising an ordered array of pores separated by ribbons, which can be tuned down to the one nanometer range. The size, density, morphology and chemical composition of the pores are defined with atomic precision by the design of the molecular precursors. Our measurements further reveal a highly anisotropic electronic structure, where orthogonal one-dimensional electronic bands with an energy gap of ~1 eV coexist with confined pore states, making the nanoporous graphene a highly versatile semiconductor for simultaneous sieving and electrical sensing of molecular species.
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    Confined two-dimensional assemblies of floating particles, known as granular rafts, are prone to develop a highly nonlinear response under compression. Here we investigate the transition to the friction-dominated jammed state and map the gradual development of the internal stress profile with flexible pressure sensors distributed along the raft surface. Surprisingly, we observe that the surface stress screening builds up much more slowly than previously thought and that the typical screening distance later dramatically decreases. We explain this behavior in terms of progressive friction mobilization, where the full amplitude of the frictional forces is only reached after a macroscopic local displacement. At further stages of compression, rafts of large length-to-width aspect ratio experience much stronger screenings than the full mobilization limit described by the Janssen's model. We solve this paradox using a simple mathematical analysis and show that such enhanced screening can be attributed to a localized compaction front, essentially shielding the far field from compressive stresses.
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    We present an approach to studying optical band gaps in real solids in which Monte Carlo methods allow for the application of a rigorous variational principle to both ground and excited state wave functions. In tests that include small, medium, and large band gap materials, optical gaps are predicted with a mean-absolute-deviation of 3.5% against experiment, less than half the equivalent errors for typical many-body perturbation theories. The approach is designed to be insensitive to the choice of density functional, a property we confirm in ZnO, a challenging case in which $G_0W_0$ predictions are strongly dependent on the functional. By exploiting this insensitivity, our method can analyze which density functionals best satisfy the assumptions of many-body perturbation theory in a particular solid and can thus guide the application and improvement of these widely used techniques.
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    In crystal growth, surfactants are additive molecules used in dilute amount or as dense, permeable layers to control surface morphologies. Here, we investigate the properties of a strikingly different surfactant: a two-dimensional and covalent layer with close atomic packing, graphene. Using in situ, real time electron microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, and continuum mechanics calculations, we reveal why metallic atomic layers can grow in a two-dimensional manner below an impermeable graphene membrane. Upon metal growth, graphene dynamically opens nanochannels called wrinkles, facilitating mass transport, while at the same time storing and releasing elastic energy via lattice distortions. Graphene thus behaves as a mechanically active, deformable surfactant. The wrinkle-driven mass transport of the metallic layer intercalated between graphene and the substrate is observed for two graphene-based systems, characterized by different physico-chemical interactions, between graphene and the substrate, and between the intercalated material and graphene. The deformable surfactant character of graphene that we unveil should then apply to a broad variety of species, opening new avenues for using graphene as a two-dimensional surfactant forcing the growth of flat films, nanostructures and unconventional crystalline phases.
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    We present the results from dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations of phase separation dynamics in ternary (ABC) fluids mixture in $d=3$ where components A and B represent the simple fluids and component C represents a polymeric fluid. Here, we study the role of polymeric fluid (C) on domain morphology by varying composition ratio, polymer chain length, and polymer stiffness. We observe that the system under consideration lies in the same dynamical universality class as a simple ternary fluids mixture. However, the scaling functions depend upon the parameters mentioned above as they change the time scale of the evolution morphologies. In all cases, the characteristic domain size follows: $l(t) \sim t^{\phi} $ with dynamic growth exponent $\phi$, showing a crossover from the viscous hydrodynamic regime $(\phi=1)$ to the inertial hydrodynamic regime $(\phi=2/3)$ in the system at late times.
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    A multidisciplinary approach is presented to analyse the precipitation process in a model Al-Cu alloy. Although this topic has been extensively studied in the past, most of the investigations are focussed either on transmission electron microscopy or on thermal analysis of the processes. The information obtained from these techniques cannot, however, provide a coherent picture of all the complex transformations that take place during decomposition of supersaturated solid solution. Thermal analysis, high resolution dilatometry, (high resolution) transmission electron microscopy and density functional calculations are combined to study precipitation kinetics, interfacial energies, and the effect of second phase precipitates on the mechanical strength of the alloy. Data on both the coherent and semi-coherent orientations of the \theta"/Al interface are reported for the first time. The combination of the different characterization and modelling techniques provides a detailed picture of the precipitation phenomena that take place during aging and of the different contributions to the strength of the alloy. This strategy can be used to analyse and design more complex alloys.
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    Analytical approaches to model the structure of complex networks can be distinguished into two groups according to whether they consider an intensive (e.g., fixed degree sequence and random otherwise) or an extensive (e.g., adjacency matrix) description of the network structure. While extensive approaches---such as the state-of-the-art Message Passing Approach---typically yield more accurate predictions, intensive approaches provide crucial insights on the role played by any given structural property in the outcome of dynamical processes. Here we introduce an intensive description that yields almost identical predictions to the ones obtained with MPA for bond percolation. Our approach distinguishes nodes according to two simple statistics: their degree and their position in the core-periphery organization of the network. Our near-exact predictions highlight how accurately capturing the long-range correlations in network structures allows to easily and effectively compress real complex network data.
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    Using local scanning electrical techniques we study edge effects in side-gated Hall nanodevices made of epitaxial graphene. We demonstrate that lithographically defined edges of the graphene channel exhibit hole conduction within the narrow band of ~60-125 nm width, whereas the bulk of the material is electron doped. The effect is the most pronounced when the influence of atmospheric contamination is minimal. We also show that the electronic properties at the edges can be precisely tuned from hole to electron conduction by using moderate strength electrical fields created by side-gates. However, the central part of the channel remains relatively unaffected by the side-gates and retains the bulk properties of graphene.
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    We address the effects of quenched disorder averaging in the time-evolution of systems of ultracold atoms in optical lattices in the presence of noise, imposed by the presence of an environment. For bosonic systems governed by the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian, we numerically quantify the result of the presence of disorder in the Hamiltonian parameters in terms of physical observables, including bipartite entanglement in the ground state and report the existence of disorder-induced enhancement in weakly interacting cases. For systems of two-species fermions described by the Fermi-Hubbard Hamiltonian, we find similar results. In both cases, our dynamical calculations show no appreciable change in the effects of disorder from that of the initial state of the evolution. We explain our findings in terms the statistics of the disorder in the parameters and the behaviour of the observables with the parameters.
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    We study the competing charge-density-wave and superconducting order in the attractive Hubbard model under a voltage bias, using steady-state non-equilibrium dynamical mean-field theory. We show that the charge-density-wave is suppressed in a current-carrying non-equilibrium steady state. This effect is beyond a simple Joule-heating mechanism and a "supercooled" metallic state is stabilized at a non-equilibrium temperature lower than the equilibrium superconducting $T_c$. On the other hand, a current-carrying superconducting state is always in equilibrium. It is not subject to the same non-thermal suppression, and can therefore nucleate out of the supercooled metal, e.g. in a resistive switching experiment. The fact that an electric current can change the relative stability of different phases compared to thermal equilibrium, even when a system appears locally thermal due to electron-eletron scattering, provides a general perspective to control intertwined orders out of equilibrium.
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    The presence of bifurcation of the Kirkendall marker plane, a very special phenomenon discovered recently, is found in a technologically important Cu Sn system. It was predicted based on estimated diffusion coefficients; however, could not be detected following the conventional inert marker experiments. As reported in this study, we could detect the locations of these planes based on the microstructural features examined in SEM and TEM. This strengthens the concept of the physicochemical approach that relates microstructural evolution with the diffusion rates of components and imparts finer understanding of the growth mechanism of phases. The estimated diffusion coefficients at the Kirkendall marker planes indicates that the reason for the growth of the Kirkendall voids is the nonconsumption of excess vacancies which are generated due to unequal diffusion rate of components. Systematic experiments using different purity of Cu in this study indicates the importance of the presence of impurities on the growth of voids, which increases drastically for greather than 0.1 wt percent impurity. The growth of voids increases drastically for electroplated Cu, commercially pure Cu and Cu(0.5 at percent Ni) indicating the adverse role of both inorganic and organic impurities. Void size and number distribution analysis indicates the nucleation of new voids along with the growth of existing voids with the increase in annealing time. The newly found location of the Kirkendall marker plane in the Cu3Sn phase indicates that voids grow on both the sides of this plane which was not considered earlier for developing theoretical models.
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    PhD Thesis entitled "Diffusion-controlled growth of phases in metal-tin systems related to microelectronics packaging" by Varun A. Baheti from Professor Aloke Paul group at the Department of Materials Engineering of the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore - 560012, INDIA
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    We directly correlate the local (20-nm scale) and global electronic properties of a device containing mono-, bi- and tri-layer epitaxial graphene (EG) domains on 6H-SiC(0001) by simultaneously performing local surface potential measurements using Kelvin probe force microscopy and global transport measurements. Using well-controlled environmental conditions, where the starting state of the surface can be reproducibly defined, we investigate the doping effects of N2, O2, water vapour and NO2 at concentrations representative of the ambient air. We show that presence of O2, water vapour and NO2 leads to p-doping of all EG domains. However, the thicker layers of EG are significantly less affected by the atmospheric dopants. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the general consensus of O2 and water vapour present in ambient air providing majority of the p-doping to graphene is a common misconception. We experimentally show that even the combined effect of O2, water vapour, and NO2 at concentrations higher than typically present in the atmosphere does not fully replicate the state of the EG surface in ambient air. All doping effects can be reproducibly reversed by vacuum annealing. Thus, for EG gas sensors it is essential to consider naturally occurring environmental effects and properly separate them from those coming from targeted species.
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    In this work we explore mechanical properties of graphene samples of variable thickness. For this purpose, we coupled a high pressure sapphire anvil cell to a micro-Raman spectrometer. From the evolution of the G band frequency with stress we document the importance the substrate has on the mechanical response of graphene. On the other hand, the appearance of disorder as a conse-quence of the stress treatment has a negligible effect on the high stress behaviour of graphene.
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    Scattering of a wave of frequency $\omega$ by a complex structure coupled to the external through $N$ channels, such as the electronic wave in a chaotic quantum dot, can be encoded in the on-shell scattering $N\times N$ matrix $\mathcal{S}(\omega)$. Temporal aspects of the scattering process can be analysed through the concept of time delays. Within a random matrix approach, we study the statistical properties of the symmetrised Wigner-Smith time-delay matrix $\mathcal{Q}_s(\omega)=-\mathrm{i}\mathcal{S}^{-1/2}\big(\partial_\omega\mathcal{S}\big)\,\mathcal{S}^{-1/2}$. We obtain the joint distribution for $\mathcal{S}$ and $\mathcal{Q}_s$, for quantum dots with non-ideal contacts, characterised by a finite transmission probability (per channel) $0<T\leq1$. We derive two representations of the distribution of $\mathcal{Q}_s$ in terms of matrix integrals (the general case of unequally coupled channels is also discussed). We consider the Wigner time delay $\tau_\mathrm{W}=(1/N)\mathrm{tr}\big\{\mathcal{Q}_s\big\}$, which is an important quantity serving as a measure of the density of states of the open system. Using the distribution of the symmetrised Wigner-Smith matrix $\mathcal{Q}_s$, we determine the distribution $\mathscr{P}_{N,\beta}(\tau)$ of the Wigner time delay for uniform couplings in the weak coupling limit $NT\ll1$ ($\beta$ is the Dyson index).
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    The nonequilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) approach is a versatile theoretical tool, which allows to describe the electronic structure, spectroscopy and dynamics of strongly correlated systems. The applicability of this method is, however, limited by its considerable computational cost. Due to the treatment of the full two-time dependence of the NEGF the underlying equations of motion involve a long-lasting non-Markovian memory kernel that results in at least a $N^3_t$ scaling in the number of time points $N_t$. The system's memory time is, however, reduced in the presence of a thermalizing bath. In particular, dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) -- one of the most successful approaches to strongly correlated lattice systems - maps extended systems to an effective impurity coupled to a bath. In this work, we systematically investigate how the memory time can be truncated in nonequilibrium DMFT simulations of the Hubbard and Hubbard-Holstein model. We show that suitable truncation schemes, which substantially reduce the computational cost, result in excellent approximations to the full time evolution. This approach enables the propagation to longer times, making fundamental processes like prethermalization and the final stages of thermalization accessible to nonequilibrium DMFT.
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    We theoretically show that IV-VI semiconducting compounds with low-temperature rhombohedral crystal structure represent a new potential platform for topological semimetals. By means of minimal $\mathbf{k}\cdot\mathbf{p}$ models we find that the two-step structural symmetry reduction of the high-temperature rocksalt crystal structure, comprising a rhombohedral distortion along the [111] direction followed by a relative shift of the cation and anion sublattices, gives rise to topologically protected Weyl semimetal and nodal line semimetal phases. We derive general expressions for the nodal features and apply our results to SnTe showing explicitly how Weyl points and nodal lines emerge in this system. Experimentally, the topological semimetals could potentially be realized in the low-temperature ferroelectric phase of SnTe, GeTe and related alloys.
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    We report a detailed study of the ultra slow domain wall motion controlling the magnetization reversal process in ferromagnetic thin films under weak applied fields, in the stationary creep regime, where the domain wall jumps between deep metastable states through thermally nucleated localized displacements. By determining the areas irreversibly reversed in consecutive time windows of different durations, we are able to resolve the non-gaussian statistics of the intermittent domain growth, for domain wall mean velocities as small as $v \approx 1 ~\si{\nano\meter\per\second}$. Our observations are quantitatively consistent with the existence of \textitcreep avalanches: roughly independent clusters with broad size and ignition-time distributions, each one composed by a large number of spatio-temporally correlated thermally activated elementary events.
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    Exceptional points (EPs) associated with a square-root singularity have been found in many non-Hermitian systems. In most of the studies, the EPs found are isotropic meaning that the same singular behavior is obtained independent of the direction from which they are approached in the parameter space. In this work, we demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally the existence of an anisotropic EP in an acoustic system that shows different singular behaviors when the anisotropic EP is approached from different directions in the parameter space. Such an anisotropic EP arises from the coalescence of two square-root EPs having the same chirality.
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    We determine the spin-lifetime anisotropy of spin-polarized carriers in graphene. In contrast to prior approaches, our method does not require large out-of-plane magnetic fields and thus it is reliable for both low- and high-carrier densities. We first determine the in-plane spin lifetime by conventional spin precession measurements with magnetic fields perpendicular to the graphene plane. Then, to evaluate the out-of-plane spin lifetime, we implement spin precession measurements under oblique magnetic fields that generate an out-of-plane spin population. We find that the spin-lifetime anisotropy of graphene on silicon oxide is independent of carrier density and temperature down to 150 K, and much weaker than previously reported. Indeed, within the experimental uncertainty, the spin relaxation is isotropic. Altogether with the gate dependence of the spin lifetime, this indicates that the spin relaxation is driven by magnetic impurities or random spin-orbit or gauge fields.
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    We study the effects of Rashba spin-orbit coupling on two-dimensional Rydberg exciton systems. Using analytical and numerical arguments we demonstrate that this coupling considerably modifies the wave functions and leads to a level repulsion that results in a deviation from the Poissonian statistics of the adjacent level distance distribution. This signifies the crossover to non-integrability of the system and hints on the possibility of quantum chaos emerging. Such a behavior strongly differs from the classical realization, where spin-orbit coupling produces highly entangled, chaotic electron trajectories in an exciton. We also calculate the oscillator strengths and show that randomization appears in the transitions between states with different total momenta.
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    We present a perturbative correction within initiator full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo (i-FCIQMC). In the existing i-FCIQMC algorithm, a significant number of spawned walkers are discarded due to the initiator criteria. Here we show that these discarded walkers have a form that allows calculation of a second-order Epstein-Nesbet correction, that may be accumulated in a trivial and inexpensive manner, yet substantially improves i-FCIQMC results. The correction is applied to the Hubbard model, the uniform electron gas and molecular systems.
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    The competition between the singlet superconducting states with $s$- and d-wave symmetry of the order parameter is studied within a single-band model with nearest-neighbor attractive interaction. The zero- and finite-temperature ground state phase diagrams are constructed for different ratios between the nearest- and next-nearest-neighbor electron transfer integrals. The mixed $s+id$ pairing state is shown to form in the intermediate region between $s$- and d-waves. The temperature phase transitions between the pure and the mixed pairing state are found.
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    In the paper, packings built of identical cuboids with a square base created by random sequential adsorption are studied. The result of the study show that the packing of the highest density are obtained for oblate and prolate cuboids of the edge-edge length ratios of $0.7$ and $1.4$. For both cases, the packing fraction is $0.400 \pm 0.002$, which is approximately 8% higher than the value reported for cubes. Additionally, because the crucial part of the packing generation algorithm is the cuboid-cuboid intersection detection, several methods were tested. It appears that the fastest one is based on the separating axis theorem.
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    We investigate a new experimental possibility of measuring the Newtonian gravitational constant $G$ by using the weak measurement. Amplification via weak measurement is one of the interesting phenomena of quantum mechanics. In this letter, we consider it in a system consisting of many cold atoms which are gravitationally interacting with an external macroscopic source and show that it is possible to obtain ${\mathcal{O}}(10^{3})$ amplification of their relative motion compared with the classical motion when the number of atoms are ${\mathcal{O}}(10^{15})$ and the observing time is $\sim 0.5$s. This result suggests that it might be possible to use this system as a new experimental set up for determining $G$. Besides, our study indicates that the gravitational force can behave as a repulsive force because of the weak measurement.
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    This concise book offers an essential introduction and reference guide for the many newcomers to the field of physics of elemental 2D materials. Silicene and related materials are currently among the most actively studied materials, especially following the first experimental synthesis on substrates in 2012. Accordingly, this primer introduces and reviews the most crucial developments regarding silicene from both theoretical and experimental perspectives. At the same time the reader is guided through the extensive body of relevant foundational literature. The text starts with a brief history of silicene, followed by a comparison of the bonding nature in silicon versus carbon atoms. Here, a simple but robust framework is established to help the reader follow the concepts presented throughout the book. The book then presents the atomic and electronic structure of free-standing silicene, followed by an account of the experimental realization of silicene on substrates. This topic is subsequently developed further to discuss various reconstructions that silicene acquires due to interactions with the substrate and how such effects are mirrored in the electronic properties. Next the book examines the dumbbell structure that is the key to understanding the growth mechanism and atomic structure of multilayer silicene. Last but not least, it addresses similar effects in other elemental 2D materials from group IV (germanene, stanane), group V (phosphorene) and group III (borophene), as well as transition metal dichalcogenides and other compositions, so as to provide a general comparative overview of their electronic properties.
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    The effects of humidity on the electronic properties of quasi-free standing one layer graphene (QFS 1LG) are investigated via simultaneous magneto-transport in the van der Pauw geometry and local work function measurements in a controlled environment. QFS 1LG on 4H-SiC(0001) is obtained by hydrogen intercalation of the interfacial layer. In this system, the carrier concentration experiences a two-fold increase in sensitivity to changes in relative humidity as compared to the as-grown epitaxial graphene. This enhanced sensitivity to water is attributed to the lowering of the hydrophobicity of QFS 1LG, which results from spontaneous polarization of 4H-SiC(0001) strongly influencing the graphene. Moreover, the superior carrier mobility of the QFS 1LG system is retained even at the highest humidity. The work function maps constructed from Kelvin probe force microscopy also revealed higher sensitivity to water for 1LG compared to 2LG in both QFS 1LG and as-grown systems. These results point to a new field of applications for QFS 1LG, i.e., as humidity sensors, and the corresponding need for metrology in calibration of graphene-based sensors and devices.
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    We perform local nanoscale studies of the surface and interface structure of hydrogen intercalated graphene on 4H-SiC(1000). In particular, we show that intercalation of the interfacial layer results in the formation of quasi-free standing one layer graphene (QFS 1LG) with change in the carrier type from n- to p-type, accompanied by a more than four times increase in carrier mobility. We demonstrate that surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) reveals the enhanced Raman signal of Si-H stretching mode, which is the direct proof of successful intercalation. Furthermore, the appearance of D, D+D' as well as C-H peaks for the quasi-free standing two layer graphene (QFS 2LG) suggests that hydrogen also penetrates in between the graphene layers to locally form C-H sp3 defects that decrease the mobility. Thus, SERS provides a quick and reliable technique to investigate the interface structure of graphene which is in general not accessible by other conventional methods. Our findings are further confirmed by Kelvin probe force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.
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    We report the fabrication of one-dimensional (1D) ferromagnetic edge contacts to two-dimensional (2D) graphene/h-BN heterostructures. While aiming to study spin injection/detection with 1D edge contacts, a spurious magnetoresistance signal was observed, which is found to originate from the local Hall effect in graphene due to fringe fields from ferromagnetic edge contacts and in the presence of charge current spreading in the nonlocal measurement configuration. Such behavior has been confirmed by the absence of a Hanle signal and gate-dependent magnetoresistance measurements that reveal a change in sign of the signal for the electron- and hole-doped regimes, which is in contrast to the expected behavior of the spin signal. Calculations show that the contact-induced fringe fields are typically on the order of hundreds of mT, but can be reduced below 100 mT with careful optimization of the contact geometry. There may be additional contribution from magnetoresistance effects due to tunneling anisotropy in the contacts, which need to be further investigated. These studies are useful for optimization of spin injection and detection in 2D material heterostructures through 1D edge contacts.
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    We studied numerically electromagnetic response of the finite periodic structure consisting of the ${\cal{PT}}$ dipoles represented by two infinitely long, parallel cylinders with the opposite sign of the imaginary part of a refractive index which are centered at the positions of two-dimensional honeycomb lattice. We observed that the total scattered energy reveals series of sharp resonances at which the energy increases by two orders of magnitude and an incident wave is scattered only in a few directions given by spatial symmetry of periodic structure. We explain this behavior by analysis of the complex frequency spectra associated with an infinite honeycomb array of the ${\cal{PT}}$ dipoles and identify the lowest resonance with the broken ${\cal{PT}}$-symmetry mode formed by a doubly degenerate pair with complex conjugate eigenfrequencies corresponding to the $K$-point of the reciprocal lattice.
  • PDF
    We study a magnetic phase diagram of CsCuCl3 by a spin wave theory. We clarify an existence of new magnetic phases, i.e. up-up-down (uud) phase and Y coplanar phase under a high pressure. We also discuss a magnetic field(H)-temperature(T) phase diagram under ambient and high pressures.
  • PDF
    Graphene superlattices were shown to exhibit high-temperature quantum oscillations due to periodic emergence of delocalized Bloch states in high magnetic fields such that unit fractions of the flux quantum pierce a superlattice unit cell. Under these conditions, semiclassical electron trajectories become straight again, similar to the case of zero magnetic field. Here we report magnetotransport measurements that reveal second, third and fourth order magnetic Bloch states at high electron densities and temperatures above 100 K. The recurrence of these states creates a fractal pattern intimately related to the origin of Hofstadter butterflies. The hierarchy of the fractal states is determined by the width of magnetic minibands, in qualitative agreement with our band structure calculations.
  • PDF
    The effect of randomness on critical behavior is a crucial subject in condensed matter physics due to the the presence of impurity in any real material. We presently probe the critical behaviour of the antiferromagnetic (AF) Ising model on rewired square lattices with random connectivity. An extra link is randomly added to each site of the square lattice to connect the site to one of its next-nearest neighbours, thus having different number of connections (links). Average number of links (ANOL) $\kappa$ is fractional, varied from 2 to 3, where $\kappa = 2$ associated with the native square lattice. The rewired lattices possess abundance of triangular units in which spins are frustrated due to AF interaction. The system is studied by using Monte Carlo method with Replica Exchange algorithm. Some physical quantities of interests were calculated, such as the specific heat, the staggered magnetization and the spin glass order parameter (Edward-Anderson parameter). We investigate the role played by the randomness in affecting the existing phase transition and its interplay with frustration to possibly bring any spin glass (SG) properties. We observed the low temperature magnetic ordered phase (Néel phase) preserved up to certain value of $\kappa$ and no indication of SG phase for any value of $\kappa$.
  • PDF
    Hybrid 2D-2D materials composed by perpendicularly oriented covalent organic framework (COFs) and graphene were prepared and tested for energy storage applications. Diboronic acid molecules covalently attached to graphene oxide (GO) were used as nucleation sites for directing vertical growth of COF-1 nanosheets (v-COF-GO). The hybrid material shows forest of COF-1 nanosheets with thickness of ~3 to 15 nm in edge-on orientation relative to GO. The same reaction performed in absence of molecular pillars resulted in uncontrollable growth of thick COF-1 platelets parallel to the surface of GO. The v-COF-GO was converted into conductive carbon material preserving the nanostructure of precursor with ultrathin porous carbon nanosheets grafted to graphene in edge-on orientation. It was demonstrated as high-performance electrode material for supercapacitors. The molecular pillar approach can be used for preparation of many other 2D-2D materials with control of their relative orientation.
  • PDF
    In this paper we use an ab-initio quantum transport approach to study the electron current flowing through lithiated SnO anodes for potential applications in Li-ion batteries. By investigating a set of lithiated structures with varying lithium concentrations, it is revealed that LixSnO can be a good conductor, with values comparable to bulk $\beta$-Sn and Li. A deeper insight into the current distribution indicates that electrons preferably follow specific trajectories, which offer superior conducting properties than others. These channels have been identified and it is shown here how they can enhance or deteriorate the current flow in lithiated anode materials.
  • PDF
    We generalize the diffusive model for spin injection and detection in nonlocal spin structures to account for spin precession under an applied magnetic field in an anisotropic medium, for which the spin lifetime is not unique and depends on the spin orientation.We demonstrate that the spin precession (Hanle) line shape is strongly dependent on the degree of anisotropy and on the orientation of the magnetic field. In particular, we show that the anisotropy of the spin lifetime can be extracted from the measured spin signal, after dephasing in an oblique magnetic field, by using an analytical formula with a single fitting parameter. Alternatively, after identifying the fingerprints associated with the anisotropy, we propose a simple scaling of the Hanle line shapes at specific magnetic field orientations that results in a universal curve only in the isotropic case. The deviation from the universal curve can be used as a complementary means of quantifying the anisotropy by direct comparison with the solution of our generalized model. Finally, we applied our model to graphene devices and find that the spin relaxation for graphene on silicon oxide is isotropic within our experimental resolution.
  • PDF
    In recent years, new spin-dependent thermal effects have been discovered in ferromagnets, stimulating a growing interest in spin caloritronics, a field that exploits the interaction between spin and heat currents. Amongst the most intriguing phenomena is the spin Seebeck effect, in which a thermal gradient gives rise to spin currents that are detected through the inverse spin Hall effect. Non-magnetic materials such as graphene are also relevant for spin caloritronics, thanks to efficient spin transport, energy-dependent carrier mobility and unique density of states. Here, we propose and demonstrate that a carrier thermal gradient in a graphene lateral spin valve can lead to a large increase of the spin voltage near to the graphene charge neutrality point. Such an increase results from a thermoelectric spin voltage, which is analogous to the voltage in a thermocouple and that can be enhanced by the presence of hot carriers generated by an applied current. These results could prove crucial to drive graphene spintronic devices and, in particular, to sustain pure spin signals with thermal gradients and to tune the remote spin accumulation by varying the spin-injection bias.
  • PDF
    Layers obtained by drying a colloidal dispersion of silica spheres are found to be a good benchmark to test the elastic behaviour of porous media, in the challenging case of high porosities and nano-sized microstructures. Classically used for these systems, Kendall's approach explicitely considers the effect of surface adhesive forces onto the contact area between the particles. This approach provides the Young's modulus using a single adjustable parameter (the adhesion energy) but provides no further information on the tensorial nature and possible anisotropy of elasticity. On the other hand, homogenization approaches (e.g. rule of mixtures, Eshelby, Mori-Tanaka and self-consistent schemes), based on continuum mechanics and asymptotic analysis, provide the stiffness tensor from the knowledge of the porosity and the elastic constants of the beads. Herein, the self-consistent scheme accurately predicts both bulk and shear moduli, with no adjustable parameter, provided the porosity is less than 35%, for layers composed of particles as small as 15 nm in diameter. Conversely, Kendall's approach is found to predict the Young's modulus over the full porosity range. Moreover, the adhesion energy in Kendall's model has to be adjusted to a value of the order of the fracture energy of the particle material. This suggests that sintering during drying leads to the formation of covalent siloxane bonds between the particles.

Recent comments

Stefano Pirandola Apr 23 2018 12:23 UTC

The most important reading here is Sam Braunstein's foundational paper: https://authors.library.caltech.edu/3827/1/BRAprl98.pdf published in January 98, already containing the key results for the strong convergence of the CV protocol. This is a must-read for those interested in CV quantum informatio

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Mark M. Wilde Apr 23 2018 12:09 UTC

One should also consult my paper "Strong and uniform convergence in the teleportation simulation of bosonic Gaussian channels" https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.00145v4 posted in January 2018, in this context.

Stefano Pirandola Apr 23 2018 11:46 UTC

Some quick clarifications on the Braunstein-Kimble (BK) protocol for CV teleportation
and the associated teleportation simulation of bosonic channels.
(Disclaimer: the following is rather technical and CVs might not be so popular on this blog...so I guess this post will get a lot of dislikes :)

1)

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Dan Elton Mar 16 2018 04:36 UTC

Comments are appreciated. Message me here or on twitter @moreisdifferent

Code is open source and available at :
[https://github.com/delton137/PIMD-F90][1]

[1]: https://github.com/delton137/PIMD-F90

Johnnie Gray Feb 01 2018 12:59 UTC

Thought I'd just comment here that we've rather significantly updated this paper.

Maciej Malinowski Jul 26 2017 15:56 UTC

In what sense is the ground state for large detuning ordered and antiferromagnetic? I understand that there is symmetry breaking, but other than that, what is the fundamental difference between ground states for large negative and large positive detunings? It seems to be they both exhibit some order

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Thomas Klimpel Apr 20 2017 09:16 UTC

This paper [appeared][1] in February 2016 in the peer reviewed interdisciplinary journal Chaos by the American Institute of Physics (AIP).

It has been reviewed publicly by amateurs both [favorably][2] and [unfavorably][3]. The favorable review took the last sentence of the abstract ("These invalid

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Stefano Pirandola Nov 30 2016 06:45 UTC

Dear Mark, thx for your comment. There are indeed missing citations to previous works by Rafal, Janek and Lorenzo that we forgot to add. Regarding your paper, I did not read it in detail but I have two main comments:

1- What you are using is completely equivalent to the tool of "quantum simulatio

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