Condensed Matter (cond-mat)

  • PDF
    Many-body-localized (MBL) systems do not thermalize under their intrinsic dynamics. The athermality of MBL, we propose, can be harnessed for thermodynamic tasks. We illustrate by formulating an Otto engine cycle for a quantum many-body system. The system is ramped between a strongly localized MBL regime and a thermal (or weakly localized) regime. MBL systems' energy-level correlations differ from thermal systems'. This discrepancy enhances the engine's reliability, suppresses worst-case trials, and enables mesoscale engines to run in parallel in the thermodynamic limit. We estimate analytically and calculate numerically the engine's efficiency and per-cycle power. The efficiency mirrors the efficiency of the conventional thermodynamic Otto engine. The per-cycle power scales linearly with the system size and inverse-exponentially with a localization length. This work introduces a thermodynamic lens onto MBL, which, having been studied much recently, can now be applied in thermodynamic tasks.
  • PDF
    We present a quantum algorithm to compute the entanglement spectrum of arbitrary quantum states. The interesting universal part of the entanglement spectrum is typically contained in the largest eigenvalues of the density matrix which can be obtained from the lower Renyi entropies through the Newton-Girard method. Obtaining the $p$ largest eigenvalues ($\lambda_1>\lambda_2\ldots>\lambda_p$) requires a parallel circuit depth of $\mathcal{O}(p(\lambda_1/\lambda_p)^p)$ and $\mathcal{O}(p\log(N))$ qubits where up to $p$ copies of the quantum state defined on a Hilbert space of size $N$ are needed as the input. We validate this procedure for the entanglement spectrum of the topologically-ordered Laughlin wave function corresponding to the quantum Hall state at filling factor $\nu=1/3$. Our scaling analysis exposes the tradeoffs between time and number of qubits for obtaining the entanglement spectrum in the thermodynamic limit using finite-size digital quantum computers. We also illustrate the utility of the second Renyi entropy in predicting a topological phase transition and in extracting the localization length in a many-body localized system.
  • PDF
    Using computational and theoretical approaches, we investigate the snap-through transition of buckled graphene membranes. Our main interest is related to the possibility of using the buckled membrane as a plate of capacitor with memory (memcapacitor). For this purpose, we performed molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations and elasticity theory calculations of the up-to-down and down-to-up snap-through transitions for the membranes of several sizes. We have obtained expressions for the threshold switching forces needed for both up-to-down and down-to-up transitions. Moreover, the up-to-down transition switching force was calculated using the density functional theory (DFT). Our DFT results are in general agreement with MD and analytical theory findings. Our systematic approach can be used for the description of other structures experiencing the snap-through transition, including nanomechanical and biological ones.
  • PDF
    Formation of local molecular structures in liquid water is believed to have marked effect on the bulk properties of water, however, resolving such structural motives in an experiment is challenging. This challenge might be handled if the relevant low-frequency structural motion of the liquid is directly driven with an intense electromagnetic pulse. Here, we resonantly excite diffusive reorientational motions in water with intense terahertz pulses and measure the resulting transient optical birefringence. The observed response is shown to arise from a particular configuration, namely the restricted trans-lational motion of water molecules whose motions are predominantly orthogonal to the dipole moment of the excited neighboring water molecules. Accordingly, we estimate the strength of the anharmonic coupling between the rotational and the restricted translational degrees of freedom of water.
  • PDF
    We propose to use 2D monolayers possessing optical gaps and high exciton oscillator strength as an element of one-dimensional resonant photonic crystals. We demonstrate that such systems are promising for the creation of effective and compact delay units. In the transition-metal-dichalcogenide-based structures where the frequencies of Bragg and exciton resonances are close, a propagating short pulse can be slowed down by few picoseconds while the pulse intensity decreases only 2 - 5 times. This is realized at the frequency of the "slow" mode situated within the stopband. The pulse retardation and attenuation can be controlled by detuning the Bragg frequency from the exciton resonance frequency.
  • PDF
    We present a method allowing us to measure the spectral functions of non-interacting ultra-cold atoms in a three-dimensional disordered potential resulting from an optical speckle field. Varying the disorder strength by two orders of magnitude, we observe the crossover from the "quantum" perturbative regime of low disorder to the "classical" regime at higher disorder strength, and find an excellent agreement with numerical simulations. The experiment relies on the use of state-dependent disorder and the controlled transfer of atoms to create well-defined energy states. This opens new avenues for improved experimental investigations of three-dimensional Anderson localization.
  • PDF
    This viewpoint relates to an article by Jorge Kurchan (1998 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 31, 3719) as part of a series of commentaries celebrating the most influential papers published in the J. Phys. series, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary.
  • PDF
    Among the most interesting predictions in two-dimensional materials with a Dirac cone is the existence of the zeroth Landau level (LL), equally filled by electrons and holes with opposite chirality. The gapless edge states with helical spin structure emerge from Zeeman splitting at the LL filling factor $\nu=0$ gapped quantum Hall state. We present observations of a giant nonlocal four-terminal transport in zero-gap HgTe quantum wells at the $\nu=0$ quantum Hall state. Our experiment clearly demonstrates the existence of the robust helical edge state in a system with single valley Dirac cone materials.
  • PDF
    We investigate the contact of a rigid cylindrical punch with an adhesive beam mounted on flexible end supports. Adhesion is modeled through an adhesive zone model. The resulting Fredholm integral equation of the first kind is solved by a Galerkin projection method in terms of Chebyshev polynomials. Results are reported for several combinations of adhesive strengths, beam thickness, and support flexibilities characterized through torsional and vertical translational spring stiffnesses. Special attention is paid to the important extreme cases of clamped and simply supported beams. The popular Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model for adhesion is obtained as a limit of the adhesive zone model. Finally, we compare our predictions with preliminary experiments and also demonstrate the utility of our approach in modeling complex structural adhesives.
  • PDF
    We investigate the effect of a global degeneracy in the distribution of entanglement spectrum in conformal field theories in one spatial dimension. We relate the recently found universal expression for the entanglement hamiltonian to the distribution of the entanglement spectrum. The main tool to establish this connection is the Cardy formula. It turns out that the Affleck-Ludwig non-integer degeneracy, appearing because of the boundary conditions induced at the entangling surface, can be directly read from the entanglement spectrum distribution. We also clarify the effect of the non-integer degeneracy on the spectrum of the partial transpose, which is the central object for quantifying the entanglement in mixed states. We show that the exact knowledge of the entanglement spectrum in some integrable spin-chains provides strong analytical evidences corroborating our results.
  • PDF
    The rise of atomically thin materials has the potential to enable a paradigm shift in modern technologies by introducing multi-functional materials in the semiconductor industry. To date the growth of high quality atomically thin semiconductors (e.g. WS2) is one of the most pressing challenges to unleash the potential of these materials and the growth of mono- or bi-layers with high crystal quality is yet to see its full realization. Here, we show that the novel use of molecular precursors in the controlled synthesis of mono- and bi-layer WS2 leads to superior material quality compared to the widely used topotactic transformation of WO3-based precursors. Record high room temperature charge carrier mobility up to 52 cm2/Vs and ultra-sharp photoluminescence linewidth of just 36 meV over submillimeter areas demonstrate that the quality of this material supersedes also that of naturally occurring materials. By exploiting surface diffusion kinetics of W and S species adsorbed onto a substrate, a deterministic layer thickness control has also been achieved promoting the design of scalable synthesis routes.
  • PDF
    The electronic and structural properties of excitons and trions in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides are investigated using both a multiband and a single-band model. In the multiband model we construct the excitonic Hamiltonian in the product base of the single-particle states at the conduction and valence band edges. We decouple the corresponding energy eigenvalue equation and solve the resulting differential equation self-consistently, using the finite element method (FEM), to determine the energy eigenvalues and the wave functions. As a comparison, we also consider the simple single-band model which is often used in numerical studies. We solve the energy eigenvalue equation using the FEM as well as with the stochastic variational method (SVM) in which a variational wave function is expanded in a basis of a large number of correlated Gaussians. We find good agreement between the results of both methods, as well as with other theoretical works for excitons, and we also compare with available experimental data. For trions the agreement between both methods is not as good due to our neglect of angular correlations when using the FEM. Finally, when comparing the two models, we see that the presence of the valence bands in the mutiband model leads to differences with the single-band model when (interband) interactions are strong.
  • PDF
    Differential Dynamic Microscopy (DDM) analyzes traditional real-space microscope images to extract information on sample dynamics in a way akin to light scattering, by decomposing each image in a sequence into Fourier modes, and evaluating their time correlation properties. DDM has been applied in a number of soft-matter and colloidal systems. However, objects observed to move out of the microscope's captured field of view, intersecting the edges of the acquired images, can introduce spurious but significant errors in the subsequent analysis. Here we show that application of a spatial windowing filter to images in a sequence before they enter the standard DDM analysis can reduce these artifacts substantially. Moreover, windowing can increase significantly the accessible range of wave vectors probed by DDM, and may further yield unexpected information, such as the size polydispersity of a colloidal suspension.
  • PDF
    The mechanical, thermal and vibrational properties of defective crystals are important in many different contexts, from metallurgy and solid-state physics to, more recently, soft matter and colloidal physics. Here we study two different models of disordered fcc crystal lattices, with randomly-removed bonds and with vacancies, respectively, within the framework of non-affine lattice dynamics. We find that both systems feature the same scaling of the shear modulus with the newly defined inversion-symmetry breaking (ISB) parameter, which shows that local inversion-symmetry breaking around defects is the universal root source of the non-affine softening of the shear modulus. This finding allows us to derive analytical relations for the non-affine (zero-frequency) shear modulus as a function of vacancy concentration in excellent agreement with numerical simulations. Nevertheless, due to the different microstructural disorder, the spatial fluctuations of the local ISB parameter are different in the vacancy and bond-depleted case. The vacancy fcc exhibits comparatively a more heterogenous microstructural disorder (due to the broader distribution of coordination number $Z$), which is reflected in a different scaling relation between boson peak frequency in the DOS and the average $\bar{Z}$. These differences are less important at low vacancy concentrations, where the numerical DOS of the vacancy fcc can be well described theoretically by coherent-potential approximation, presented here for the bond-depleted fcc lattice in 3d.
  • PDF
    The bulk magnetic properties of the lanthanide metaborates, $Ln$(BO$_2$)$_3$, $Ln$ = Pr, Nd, Gd, Tb are studied using magnetic susceptibility, heat capacity and isothermal magnetisation measurements. They crystallise in a monoclinic structure containing chains of magnetic $Ln^{3+}$ and could therefore exhibit features of low-dimensional magnetism and frustration. Pr(BO$_2$)$_3$ is found to have a non-magnetic singlet ground state. No magnetic ordering is observed down to 0.4 K for Nd(BO$_2$)$_3$. Gd(BO$_2$)$_3$ exhibits a sharp magnetic transition at 1.1 K, corresponding to three-dimensional magnetic ordering. Tb(BO$_2$)$_3$ shows two magnetic ordering features at 1.05 K and 1.95 K. A magnetisation plateau at a third of the saturation magnetisation is seen at 2 K for both Nd(BO$_2$)$_3$ and Tb(BO$_2$)$_3$ which persists in an applied field of 14 T. This is proposed to be a signature of quasi one-dimensional behaviour in Nd(BO$_2$)$_3$ and Tb(BO$_2$)$_3$.
  • PDF
    Transport across quantum networks underlies many problems, from state transfer on a spin network to energy transport in photosynthetic complexes. However, networks can contain dark subspaces that block the transportation, and various methods used to enhance transfer on quantum networks can be viewed as equivalently avoiding, modifying, or destroying the dark subspace. Here, we exploit graph theoretical tools to identify the dark subspaces and show that asymptotically almost surely they do not exist for large networks, while for small ones they can be suppressed by properly perturbing the coupling rates between the network nodes. More specifically, we apply these results to describe the recently experimentally observed and robust transport behaviour of the electronic excitation travelling on a genetically-engineered light-harvesting cylinder (M13 virus) structure. We believe that these mainly topological tools may allow us to better infer which network structures and dynamics are more favourable to enhance transfer of energy and information towards novel quantum technologies.
  • PDF
    We computationally study the effect of uniaxial strain in modulating the spontaneous emission of photons in silicon nanowires. Our main finding is that a one to two orders of magnitude change in spontaneous emission time occurs due to two distinct mechanisms: (A) Change in wave function symmetry, where within the direct bandgap regime, strain changes the symmetry of wave functions, which in turn leads to a large change of optical dipole matrix element. (B) Direct to indirect bandgap transition which makes the spontaneous photon emission to be of a slow second order process mediated by phonons. This feature uniquely occurs in silicon nanowires while in bulk silicon there is no change of optical properties under any reasonable amount of strain. These results promise new applications of silicon nanowires as optoelectronic devices including a mechanism for lasing. Our results are verifiable using existing experimental techniques of applying strain to nanowires.
  • PDF
    We study the behavior of quantum dipolar self-bound droplets at zero temperature in the presence of weak disorder potential. We solve the underlying nonlocal Gross-Pitaevskii equation with the Lee-Huang-Yang extra term using a perturbative theory. The influence of disorder on the condensed fraction, the equation of state, the compressibility and the superfluid density is deeply analyzed. Surprisingly, we find that the Lee-Huang-Yang quantum corrections not only arrest the dipolar implosion but also lead to reduce the condensate fluctuations due to the disorder effects prohibiting the fomation of a Bose glass state.
  • PDF
    We consider a condensate of exciton-polaritons in a diluted magnetic semiconductor microcavity. Such system may exhibit magnetic self-trapping in the case of sufficiently strong coupling between polaritons and magnetic ions embedded in the semiconductor. We investigate the effect of the nonequilibrium nature of exciton-polaritons on the physics of the resulting self-trapped magnetic polarons. We find that multiple polarons can exist at the same time, and derive a critical condition for self-trapping which is different to the one predicted previously in the equilibrium case. Using the Bogoliubov-de Gennes approximation, we calculate the excitation spectrum and provide a physical explanation in terms of the effective magnetic attraction between polaritons, mediated by the ion subsystem.
  • PDF
    We theoretically show that terahertz pulses with controlled amplitude and frequency can be used to switch between stable transport modes in layered superconductors, modelled as stacks of Josephson junctions. We find pulse shapes that deterministically switch the transport mode between superconducting, resistive and solitonic states. We develop a simple model that explains the switching mechanism as a destablization of the centre of mass excitation of the Josephson phase, made possible by the highly non-linear nature of the light-matter coupling.
  • PDF
    E. M. Purcell showed that a body has to perform non-reciprocal motion in order to propel itself in a highly viscous environment. The swimmer with one degree of freedom is bound to do reciprocal motion, whereby the center of mass of the swimmer will not be able to propel itself due to the Scallop theorem. In the present study, we are proposing a new artificial swimmer called the one hinge swimmer. Here we will show that flexibility plays a crucial role in the breakdown of Scallop theorem in the case of one-hinge swimmer or two-dimensional scallop at low Reynolds number. To model a one-hinge artificial swimmer, we use bead spring model for two arms joined by a hinge with bending potential for the arms in order to make them semi-flexible. The fluid is simulated using a particle based mesoscopic simulation method called the multi-particle collision dynamics with Anderson thermostat. Here we show that when our swimmer has rigid arms, the center of mass of the swimmer is not able to propel itself as expected from the Scallop theorem. When we introduce flexibility in the arms, the time reversal symmetry breaks in the case of the one-hinged swimmer without the presence of a head contrary to the one-armed super paramagnetic swimmer which required a passive head in order to swim. The reduced velocity of the swimmer is studied using a range of parameters like flexibility, beating frequency and the amplitude of the beat, where we obtain similar scaling as that of the one-armed super paramagnetic swimmer. We also calculate the dimensionless Sperm number for the swimmer and we get the maximum velocity when the Sperm number is around 1.7.
  • PDF
    We study liquid-gas transitions of heat conduction systems in contact with two heat baths under constant pressure in the linear response regime. On the basis of local equilibrium thermodynamics, we derive an equality with a global temperature, which determines the volume near the liquid-gas transition in equilibrium. We find that the formulation of the liquid-gas interface is accompanied by discontinuous change in the volume when increasing the mean temperature of the baths. A super-cooled gas near the interface is observed as a stable steady state.
  • PDF
    In this paper, we investigate transient quantum transport in a nanoscale Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interferometer consisting of a laterally coupled double quantum dot (DQD) coupled to the source and drain electrodes. The transient linear conductance is derived at finite temperature of the leads, and is divided into three terms contributed from different transport channels. By observing the transient linear conductance and time evolution of the elements of the reduced density matrix of the DQD system, we show the nature of how Fano resonance is built up in the time domain.
  • PDF
    Systems with interacting degrees of freedom play a prominent role in stochastic thermodynamics. Our aim is to use the concept of detached path probabilities and detached entropy production for bipartite Markov processes and elaborate on a series of special cases including measurement-feedback systems, sensors and hidden Markov models. For these special cases we show that fluctuation theorems involving the detached entropy production recover known results which have been obtained separately before. Additionally, we show that the fluctuation relation for the detached entropy production can be used to do model verification for hidden Markov models. We discuss the relation to previous approaches including those which use information flow or learning rate to quantify the influence of one subsystem on the other. In conclusion, we present a complete framework with which to find fluctuation relations for coupled systems.
  • PDF
    The 3$d$-electronic spin dynamics and the magnetic order in Fe$_3$PO$_4$O$_3$ were investigated by muon spin rotation and relaxation ($\mu$SR) and $^{57}$Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Zero-field (ZF)-$\mu$SR and $^{57}$Fe Mössbauer studies confirm static long range magnetic ordering below $T_{\mathrm{N}}$ $\approx$ 164\u2009K. Both transverse-field (TF) and ZF-$\mu$SR results evidence 100\% magnetic volume fraction in the ordered state. The ZF-$\mu$SR time spectra can be best described by a Bessel function, which is consistent with the helical magnetic structure proposed by neutron scattering experiments. The Mössbauer spectra are described in detail by considering the specific angular distribution of the local hyperfine field $B_{\mathrm{hyp}}$ with respect to the local electric field gradient. The $\mu$SR spin-lattice relaxation rate exhibits two peaks: One at the magnetic ordering temperature related to critical magnetic fluctuations and another peak at 35\u2009K signaling the presence of a secondary low energy scale in Fe$_3$PO$_4$O$_3$.
  • PDF
    Extending the notion of symmetry protected topological phases to insulating antiferromagnets (AFs) described in terms of opposite magnetic dipole moments associated with the magnetic N$\acute{{\rm{e}}} $el order, we establish a bosonic counterpart of topological insulators in semiconductors. Making use of the Aharonov-Casher effect, induced by electric field gradients, we propose a magnonic analog of the quantum spin Hall effect (magnonic QSHE) for edge states that carry helical magnons. We show that such up and down magnons form the same Landau levels and perform cyclotron motion with the same frequency but propagate in opposite direction. The insulating AF becomes characterized by a topological ${\mathbb{Z}}_{2}$ number consisting of the Chern integer associated with each helical magnon edge state. Focusing on the topological Hall phase for magnons, we study bulk magnon effects such as magnonic spin, thermal, Nernst, and Ettinghausen effects, as well as the thermomagnetic properties of helical magnon transport both in topologically trivial and nontrivial bulk AFs and establish the magnonic Wiedemann-Franz law. We show that our predictions are within experimental reach with current device and measurement techniques.
  • PDF
    Magnetic properties of quasi one-dimensional vanadium-benzene nanowires (VBNW) are investigated theoretically with the absorption of gas molecules-NO and NO2. With the increase adsorption of NO on VBNW, the phase transition from half metal to ferromagnetic metal and last to paramagnetic semiconductor can be observed. With the increase of NO2 on VBNW, half metallic property can be enhanced at first and decreased later. Thus, the electronic and magnetic properties of VBNW can be sensitive and selective to NO and NO2, revealing the potential applications in spintronic sensors of these two kinds of molecules.
  • PDF
    In this paper, we develop an effective approach to simplify two-time-scale Markov chains with infinite state spaces by removal of states with fast leaving rates, which improves the simplification method of finite Markov chains. We introduce the concept of fast transition paths and show that the effective transitions of the reduced chain are the superposition of the direct transitions and the indirect transitions via all the fast transition paths. Furthermore, we apply our simplification approach to the standard Markov model of single-cell stochastic gene expression and provide a mathematical theory of random gene expression bursts. We also give the precise mathematical conditions for mRNAs and proteins to yield random bursts. It turns out the the random bursts exactly correspond to the fast transition paths of the Markov model. This helps us gain a better understanding of the physics behind random bursts as an emergent behavior from the complex biochemical reaction kinetics.
  • PDF
    We study the localization aspects of a kicked non-interacting one-dimensional (1D) quantum system subject to either time-periodic or non-periodic pulses. These are reflected as sudden changes of the onsite energies in the lattice with different modulations in real space. When the modulation of the kick is incommensurate with the lattice spacing, and the kicks are periodic, a well known dynamical localization in real space is recovered for large kick amplitudes and frequencies. We explore the universality class of this transition and also test the robustness of localization under deviations from the perfect periodic case. We show that delocalization ultimately sets in and a diffusive spreading of an initial wave packet is obtained when the aperiodicity of the driving is introduced.
  • PDF
    We discuss the universal spin physics in quasi one-dimensional systems including the real spin in narrow-gap semiconductors like InAs and InSb, the valley pseudo-spin in staggered single-layer graphene, and the combination of real spin and valley pseudospin characterizing single-layer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS$_2$, WS$_2$, MoS$_2$, and WSe$_2$. All these systems can be described by the same Dirac-like Hamiltonian. Spin-dependent observable effects in one of these systems thus have counterparts in each of the other systems. Effects discussed in more detail include equilibrium spin currents, current-induced spin polarization (Edelstein effect), and spin currents generated via adiabatic spin pumping. Our work also suggests that a long-debated spin-dependent correction to the position operator in single-band models should be absent.
  • PDF
    We numerically study the electric and thermoelectric transport properties in phosphorene in the presence of both a magnetic field and disorder. The quantized Hall conductivity is similar to that of a conventional two-dimensional electron gas, but the positions of all the Hall plateaus shift to the left due to the spectral asymmetry, in agreement with the experimental observations. It is found that the thermoelectric coefficients of phosphorene exhibit unique characteristics different from those of graphene. Around zero energy, the transverse thermoelectric conductivity $\alpha_{xy}$ displays a pronounced valley with $\alpha_{xy}=0$, in striking contrast to that of graphene, where a peak appears at the particle-hole symmetric point $E_F=0$. This is consistent with the presence of $\nu=0$ Hall plateau due to the lack of valley degeneracy in phosphorene. When a bias voltage is applied between top and bottom layers, the peaks of both thermopower and Nernst signal are greatly enhanced at high temperatures due to the increase of bulk energy gap. Such an enhanced thermopower is very beneficial for thermoelectric applications of phosphorene-based materials.
  • PDF
    Transport critical current, Ic, is usually defined in terms of a threshold electric field criterion, Ec, with the convention Ec = 1 microVolt/cm, chosen somewhat arbitrarily to provide "reasonably small" electric power dissipation in practical devices. Thus Ic is not fundamentally determined. However, recently it was shown, that the self-field critical current of thin-film superconductors is indeed a fundamental property governed only by the London penetration depth. Here we reconsider the definition of critical current and resolve the apparent contradiction. We measure the field distribution across the width of 2G high-Tc superconducting tapes as the transport current is increased to Ic. We identify a threshold current, Ic_surfB, at which two physical events occur simultaneously: (i) an abrupt crossover from non-linear to linear dependence of the local surface magnetic flux density, Bsurf, as a function of transport current measured at any point on the superconductor surface. This effect was not reported previously. (ii) the appearance of a non-zero electric field, just above of the sensitivity of measuring system. In the present examples Ic_surfB is 10-15% lower than Ic_E determined by the Ec criterion. We propose the transition of Bsurf(I) from non-linear to linear as the most reliable and more fundamental technique for measuring transport critical currents.
  • PDF
    The well-known Jarzynski equality, often written in the form $e^{-\beta\Delta F}=\langle e^{-\beta W}\rangle$, provides a non-equilibrium means to measure the free energy difference $\Delta F$ of a system at the same inverse temperature $\beta$ based on an ensemble average of non-equilibrium work $W$. The accuracy of Jarzynski's measurement scheme was known to be determined by the variance of exponential work, denoted as ${\rm var}\left(e^{-\beta W}\right)$. However, it was recently found that ${\rm var}\left(e^{-\beta W}\right)$ can systematically diverge in both classical and quantum cases. Such divergence will necessarily pose a challenge in the applications of Jarzynski equality because it may dramatically reduce the efficiency in determining $\Delta F$. In this work, we present a deformed Jarzynski equality for both classical and quantum non-equilibrium statistics, in efforts to reuse experimental data that already suffers from a diverging ${\rm var}\left(e^{-\beta W}\right)$. The main feature of our deformed Jarzynski equality is that it connects free energies at different temperatures and it may still work efficiently subject to a diverging ${\rm var}\left(e^{-\beta W}\right)$. The conditions for applying our deformed Jarzynski equality may be met in experimental and computational situations. As a matter of fact, there is no need to redesign experimental or simulation methods. Furthermore, using the deformed Jarzynski equality, we report the distinct behaviors of classical and quantum work fluctuations and provide insights into the essential performance differences between classical and quantum Jarzynski equalities.
  • PDF
    It is shown theoretically that the renormalization of the electron energy spectrum of bilayer graphene with a strong high-frequency electromagnetic field (dressing field) results in the Lifshitz transition - the abrupt change in the topology of the Fermi surface near the band edge. This effect substantially depends on the polarization of the field: The linearly polarized dressing field induces the Lifshitz transition from the quadruply-connected Fermi surface to the doubly-connected one, whereas the circularly polarized field induces the multicritical point, where the four different Fermi topologies may coexist. As a consequence, the discussed phenomenon creates physical basis to control the electronic properties of bilayer graphene with light.
  • PDF
    We present a mode-coupling theory (MCT) for the high-density dynamics of two-dimensional spherical active Brownian particles (ABP). The theory is based on the integration-through-transients (ITT) formalism and hence provides a starting point for the calculation of non-equilibrium averages in active-Brownian particle systems. The ABP are characterized by a self-propulsion velocity $v_0$, and by their translational and rotational diffusion coefficients, $D_t$ and $D_r$. The theory treats both the translational and the orientational degrees of freedom of ABP explicitly. This allows to study the effect of self-propulsion of both weak and strong persistence of the swimming direction, also at high densities where the persistence length $\ell_p=v_0/D_r$ is large compared to the typical interaction length scale. While the low-density dynamics of ABP is characterized by a single Péclet number, $Pe=v_0^2/D_rD_t$, close to the glass transition the dynamics is found to depend on $Pe$ and $\ell_p$ separately. At fixed density, increasing the self-propulsion velocity causes structural relaxatino to speed up, while decreasing the persistence length slows down the relaxation. The theory predicts a non-trivial idealized-glass-transition diagram in the three-dimensional parameter space of density, self-propulsion velocity and rotational diffusivity. The active-MCT glass is a nonergodic state where correlations of initial density fluctuations never fully decay, but also an infinite memory of initial orientational fluctuations is retained in the positions.
  • PDF
    We investigate the robustness of the Araki-Lieb inequality in a two-dimensional (2D) conformal field theory (CFT) on torus. The inequality requires that $\Delta S=S(L)-|S(L-\ell)-S(\ell)|$ is nonnegative, where $S(L)$ is the thermal entropy and $S(L-\ell)$, $S(\ell)$ are the entanglement entropies. Holographically there is an entanglement plateau in the BTZ black hole background, which means that there exists a critical length such that when $\ell \leq \ell_c$ the inequality saturates $\Delta S=0$. In thermal AdS background, the holographic entanglement entropy leads to $\Delta S=0$ for arbitrary $\ell$. We compute the next-to-leading order contributions to $\Delta S$ in the large central charge CFT at both high and low temperatures. In both cases we show that $\Delta S$ is strictly positive except for $\ell = 0$ or $\ell = L$. This turns out to be true for any 2D CFT. In calculating the single interval entanglement entropy in a thermal state, we develop new techniques to simplify the computation. At a high temperature, we ignore the finite size correction such that the problem is related to the entanglement entropy of double intervals on a complex plane. As a result, we show that the leading contribution from a primary module takes a universal form. At a low temperature, we show that the leading thermal correction to the entanglement entropy from a primary module does not take a universal form, depending on the details of the theory.
  • PDF
    The optical conductivity of a metal near a quantum critical point (QCP) is expected to depend on frequency not only via the scattering time but also via the effective mass, which acquires a singular frequency dependence near a QCP. We check this assertion by computing diagrammatically the optical conductivity, $\sigma' (\Omega)$, near both nematic and spin-density wave (SDW) quantum critical points (QCPs) in 2D. If renormalization of current vertices is not taken into account, $\sigma' (\Omega)$ is expressed via the quasiparticle residue $Z$ (equal to the ratio of bare and renormalized masses in our approximation) and transport scattering rate $\gamma_{\text{tr}}$ as $\sigma' (\Omega)\propto Z^2 \gamma_{\text{tr}}/\Omega^2$. For a nematic QCP ($\gamma_{\text{tr}}\propto\Omega^{4/3}$ and $Z\propto\Omega^{1/3}$), this formula suggests that $\sigma'(\Omega)$ would tend to a constant at $\Omega \to 0$. We explicitly demonstrate that the actual behavior of $\sigma' (\Omega)$ is different due to strong renormalization of the current vertices, which cancels out a factor of $Z^2$. As a result, $\sigma' (\Omega)$ diverges as $1/\Omega^{2/3}$, as earlier works conjectured. In the SDW case, we consider two contributions to the conductivity: from hot spots and from"lukewarm" regions of the Fermi surface. The hot-spot contribution is not affected by vertex renormalization, but it is subleading to the lukewarm one. For the latter, we argue that a factor of $Z^2$ is again cancelled by vertex corrections. As a result, $\sigma' (\Omega)$ at a SDW QCP scales as $1/\Omega$ down to the lowest frequencies.
  • PDF
    Two common approaches of studying theoretically the property of a superconductor are shown to have significant differences, when they are applied to the Larkin-Ovchinnikov state of Weyl metals. In the first approach the pairing term is restricted by a cutoff energy to the neighborhood of the Fermi surface, whereas in the second approach the pairing term is extended to the whole Brillouin zone. We explore their difference by considering two minimal models for the Weyl metal. For a model giving a single pair of Weyl pockets, both two approaches give a partly-gapped (fully-gapped) bulk spectrum for small (large) pairing amplitude. However, for very small cutoff energy, a portion of the Fermi surface can be completely unaffected by the pairing term in the first approach. For the other model giving two pairs of Weyl pockets, while the bulk spectrum for the first approach can be fully gapped, the one from the second approach has a robust line node, and the surface states are also changed qualitatively by the pairing. We elucidate the above differences by topological arguments and analytical analyses. A factor common to both of the two models is the tilting of the Weyl cones which leads to asymmetric normal state band structure with respect to the Weyl nodes. For the Weyl metal with two pairs of Weyl pockets, the band folding leads to a double degeneracy in the effective model, which distinguishes the pairing of the second approach from all others.
  • PDF
    The hidden metric space behind complex network topologies is a fervid topic in current network science and the hyperbolic space is one of the most studied, because it seems associated to the structural organization of many real complex systems. The Popularity-Similarity-Optimization (PSO) model simulates how random geometric graphs grow in the hyperbolic space, reproducing strong clustering and scale-free degree distribution, however it misses to reproduce an important feature of real complex networks, which is the community organization. The Geometrical-Preferential-Attachment (GPA) model was recently developed to confer to the PSO also a community structure, which is obtained by forcing different angular regions of the hyperbolic disk to have variable level of attractiveness. However, the number and size of the communities cannot be explicitly controlled in the GPA, which is a clear limitation for real applications. Here, we introduce the nonuniform PSO (nPSO) model that, differently from GPA, forces heterogeneous angular node attractiveness by sampling the angular coordinates from a tailored nonuniform probability distribution, for instance a mixture of Gaussians. The nPSO differs from GPA in other three aspects: it allows to explicitly fix the number and size of communities; it allows to tune their mixing property through the network temperature; it is efficient to generate networks with high clustering. After several tests we propose the nPSO as a valid and efficient model to generate networks with communities in the hyperbolic space, which can be adopted as a realistic benchmark for different tasks such as community detection and link prediction.
  • PDF
    Diffusion couple technique is an efficient tool for the estimating the chemical diffusion coefficients. Typical experimental uncertainties of the composition profile measurements complicate a correct determination of the interdiffusion coefficients via the standard Boltzmann-Matano, Sauer-Freise or the den Broeder methods, especially for systems with a strong compositional dependence of the interdiffusion coefficient. A new approach for reliable fitting of the experimental profiles with an improved behavior at both ends of the diffusion couple is proposed and tested against the experimental data on chemical diffusion in the system Fe-Ga
  • PDF
    Spin liquids are exotic quantum states characterized by the existence of fractional and deconfined quasiparticle excitations, referred to as spinons and visons. Their fractional nature establishes topological properties such as a protected ground-state degeneracy. This work investigates spin-orbit coupled spin liquids where, additionally, topology enters via non-trivial band structures of the spinons. We revisit the $Z_2$ spin-liquid phases that have recently been identified in a projective symmetry-group analysis on the square lattice when spin-rotation symmetry is maximally lifted [Phys. Rev. B 90, 174417 (2014)]. We find that in the case of nearest neighbor couplings only, $Z_2$ spin liquids on the square lattice always exhibit trivial spinon bands. Adding second neighbor terms, the simplest projective symmetry-group solution closely resembles the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model for topological insulators. Assuming that the emergent gauge fields are static we investigate vison excitations, which we confirm to be deconfined in all investigated spin phases. Particularly, if the spinon bands are topological, the spinons and visons form bound states consisting of several spinon-Majorana zero modes coupling to one vison. The existence of such zero modes follows from an exact mapping between these spin phases and topological $p+ip$ superconductors with vortices. We propose experimental probes to detect such states in real materials.
  • PDF
    Propelled partly by the Materials Genome Initiative, and partly by the algorithmic developments and the resounding successes of data-driven efforts in other domains, informatics strategies are beginning to take shape within materials science. These approaches lead to surrogate machine learning models that enable rapid predictions based purely on past data rather than by direct experimentation or by computations/simulations in which fundamental equations are explicitly solved. Data-centric informatics methods are becoming useful to determine material properties that are hard to measure or compute using traditional methods--due to the cost, time or effort involved--but for which reliable data either already exists or can be generated for at least a subset of the critical cases. Predictions are typically interpolative, involving fingerprinting a material numerically first, and then following a mapping (established via a learning algorithm) between the fingerprint and the property of interest. Fingerprints may be of many types and scales, as dictated by the application domain and needs. Predictions may also be extrapolative--extending into new materials spaces--provided prediction uncertainties are properly taken into account. This article attempts to provide an overview of some of the recent successful data-driven "materials informatics" strategies undertaken in the last decade, and identifies some challenges the community is facing and those that should be overcome in the near future.
  • PDF
    It is shown that the adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer expansion does not satisfy the necessary condition for the applicability of perturbation theory. A simple example of an exact solution of a problem that can not be obtained from the Born-Oppenheimer expansion is given. A new version of perturbation theory for molecular systems is proposed.
  • PDF
    We report calculations of the superfluid pairing gap in neutron matter for the $^1S_0$ components of the Reid soft-core $V_6$ and the Argonne $V_{4}'$ two-nucleon interactions. Ground-state calculations have been carried out using the central part of the operator-basis representation of these interactions to determine optimal Jastrow-Feenberg correlations and corresponding effective pairing interactions within the correlated-basis formalism (CBF), the required matrix elements in the correlated basis being evaluated by Fermi hypernetted-chain techniques. Different implementations of the Fermi-Hypernetted Chain Euler-Lagrange method (FHNC-EL) agree at the percent level up to nuclear matter saturation density. For the assumed interactions, which are realistic within the low density range involved in $^1S_0$ neutron pairing, we did not find a dimerization instability arising from divergence of the in-medium scattering length, as was reported recently for simple square-well and Lennard-Jones potential models (Phys. Rev. A \bf 92, 023640 (2015)).
  • PDF
    Multi-component electronic systems can appear in solid state systems with active orbital band structures. They exhibit richer structures of topological superconductivity beyond the conventional scenarios of spin singlet and triplet pairings in spin-$\frac{1}{2}$ systems. Examples include the half-Heusler compounds RPtBi series (R for a rare earth element), whose electronic structures are described by the effective Luttinger-Kohn model with spin-$\frac{3}{2}$ fermions exhibiting strong spin-orbit coupling and band conversion. Recent experiments provide evidence to unconventional superconductivity in the YPtBi material with nodal spin-septet pairing. We systematically study topological pairing structures in spin-$\frac{3}{2}$ systems with cubic group symmetries and calculate surface Majorana spectra, which exhibit both the zero energy flat band and the cubic dispersion. The signatures of these surface states in the quasi-particle interference patterns are studied, which can be tested in future tunneling experiments.
  • PDF
    Even- and odd-frequency superconductivity coexist due to broken time-reversal symmetry under magnetic field. In order to describe this mixing, we extend the linearized Eliashberg equation for the spin and charge fluctuation mechanism in strongly correlated electron systems. We apply this extended Eliashberg equation to the odd-frequency superconductivity on a quasi-one-dimensional isosceles triangular lattice under in-plane magnetic field and examine the effect of the even-frequency component.
  • PDF
    Defects such as vacancies and impurities could have profound effects on the transport properties of thermoelectric materials. However, it is usually quite difficult to directly calculate the thermoelectric properties of defect-containing systems via first-principles method since very large supercell is required. In this work, based on the linear response theory and the kernel polynomial method, we present an efficient approach that can help to calculate the thermoelectric transport coefficients of a large system containing millions of atoms at arbitrary chemical potential and temperature. As a prototype example, we consider dilute vacancies and hydrogen impurities in a large scale \gamma-graphyne sheet and discuss their effects on the thermoelectric transport properties.
  • PDF
    In this article, common experimental techniques and preparation conditions adopted for the synthesis of M-type hexaferrites and their influence on the magnetic properties are briefly reviewed. The effects of various strategies of cationic substitutions on the properties of the hexaferrites are addressed. Further, our synthesis and findings on Co-Ti substituted hexaferrites are presented. It was found that Co-Ti substitution results in improving the saturation magnetization, and reducing the coercivity down to values favorable for high density magnetic recording. Also, evidence of inter-particle interactions in the particulate samples was observed.
  • PDF
    The particle size (D) dependence of the effective magnetic anisotropy Keff of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) usually shows Keff increasing with decreasing D. This dependence is often interpreted using the Eq.: Keff = Kb + (6Ks/D) where Kb and Ks are the anisotropy constants of the spins in the bulk-like core and surface layer, respectively. Here, we show that this model is inadequate to explain the observed size-dependency of Keff for smaller nanoparticles with D < 5 nm. Instead the results in NPs of maghemite (\gamma-Fe2O3), NiO and Ni are best described by an extension of the above model leading to the variation given by Keff = Kb + (6Ks/D) +Ksh[1-(2d/D)]^(-3) -1, where the last term is due to the spins in a shell of thickness d with anisotropy Ksh. The validation of this core-shell-surface layer (CSSL) model for three different magnetic NPs systems viz. ferrimagnetic \gamma-Fe2O3, ferromagnetic Ni and antiferromagnetic NiO suggests its possible applicability for all magnetic nanoparticles.
  • PDF
    We examine energy relaxation of non-equilibrium quasiparticles in "dirty" superconductors with the electron mean free path much shorter than the superconducting coherence length. Relaxation of low-energy non-equilibrium quasiparticles is dominated by phonon emission. We derive the corresponding collision integral and find the quasiparticle relaxation rate. The latter is sensitive to the breaking of time reversal symmetry (TRS) by a magnetic field (or magnetic impurities). As a concrete application of the developed theory, we address quasiparticle trapping by a vortex and a current-biased constriction. We show that trapping of hot quasiparticles may predominantly occur at distances from the vortex core, or the constriction, significantly exceeding the superconducting coherence length.

Recent comments

Thomas Klimpel Apr 20 2017 09:16 UTC

This paper [appeared][1] in February 2016 in the peer reviewed interdisciplinary journal Chaos by the American Institute of Physics (AIP).

It has been reviewed publicly by amateurs both [favorably][2] and [unfavorably][3]. The favorable review took the last sentence of the abstract ("These invalid

...(continued)
Stefano Pirandola Nov 30 2016 06:45 UTC

Dear Mark, thx for your comment. There are indeed missing citations to previous works by Rafal, Janek and Lorenzo that we forgot to add. Regarding your paper, I did not read it in detail but I have two main comments:

1- What you are using is completely equivalent to the tool of "quantum simulatio

...(continued)
Mark M. Wilde Nov 30 2016 02:18 UTC

An update http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 of this paper has appeared, one day after the arXiv post http://arxiv.org/abs/1611.09165 . The paper http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 now includes (without citation) some results for bosonic Gaussian channels found independently in http://arxiv.org/abs/16

...(continued)
Mark M. Wilde Oct 06 2016 15:44 UTC

The following paper found a setting in which adaptive operations do not help in quantum channel discrimination:

https://arxiv.org/abs/1408.3373

It is published as

Communications in Mathematical Physics, vol. 344, no. 3, pages 797-829, June 2016

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2

...(continued)
Māris Ozols Sep 15 2016 21:30 UTC

Here is a link for those who also haven't heard of SciPost before: https://scipost.org/

Zoltán Zimborás Sep 15 2016 18:12 UTC

This is the very first paper of SciPost, waiting for the first paper of "Quantum" (http://quantum-journal.org). There are radical (and good!) changes going on in scientific publishing.

James Wootton Aug 18 2016 16:42 UTC

A video of a talk I gave this morning will be [here][1], if it ever finishes uploading.

[1]: https://youtu.be/I8cMY0AmIY0

Valentin Zauner-Stauber Jul 18 2016 09:54 UTC

Conjugate Gradient IS a Krylov-space method...

Stephen Jordan Apr 15 2016 15:02 UTC

This is a beautiful set of lecture notes.

Zoltán Zimborás Jan 07 2016 06:50 UTC

Interesting, both the 2nd and the 4th author is called Yuanping Chen... :)