Condensed Matter (cond-mat)

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    I critically examine Goodenough's explanation for the experimentally observed phase transition in LiVO$_2$ using microscopic calculations based on density functional and dynamical mean field theories. The high-temperature rhombohedral phase exhibits both magnetic and dynamical instabilities. Allowing a magnetic solution for the rhombohedral structure does not open an insulating gap, and an explicit treatment of the on-site Coulomb $U$ interaction is needed to stabilize an insulating rhombohedral phase. The non-spin-polarized phonon dispersions of the rhombohedral phase show two unstable phonon modes at the wave vector $(\frac{1}{3},-\frac{1}{3},0)$ that corresponds to the experimentally observed trimer forming instability. A full relaxation of the supercell corresponding to this instability yields a nonmagnetic state containing V$_3$ trimers. These results are consistent with Goodenough's suggestion that the high-temperature phase is in the localized-electron regime and the transition to the low-temperature phase in the itinerant-electron regime is driven by V-V covalency.
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    We use the poor man's scaling approach to study the phase boundaries of a pair of quantum impurity models featuring a power-law density of states $\rho(\omega)\propto|\omega|^r$ that gives rise to quantum phase transitions between local-moment and Kondo-screened phases. For the Anderson model with a pseudogap (i.e., $r>0$), we find the phase boundary for (a) $0<r<1/2$, a range over which the model exhibits interacting quantum critical points both at and away from particle-hole symmetry, and (b) $r>1$, where the phases are separated by first-order quantum phase transitions. For the particle-hole-symmetric Kondo model with easy-axis or easy-plane anisotropy of the spin exchange, the phase boundary and scaling trajectories are obtained for both $r>0$ and $r<0$ (the later case describing a density of states that diverges at the Fermi energy). Comparison with nonperturbative results from the numerical renormalization group shows that poor man's scaling correctly describes the shape of phase boundaries expressed as functional relations between model parameters.
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    We study the evolution of helical magnetism in MnGe chiral magnet upon partial substitution of Mn for non magnetic 3d-Co and 4d-Rh ions. At high doping levels, we observe spin helices with very long periods -more than ten times larger than in the pure compound- and sizable ordered moments. This behavior calls for a change in the energy balance of interactions leading to the stabilization of the observed magnetic structures. Strikingly, neutron scattering unambiguously shows a double periodicity in the observed spectra at $x \gtrsim 0.45$ and $\gtrsim 0.25$ for Co- and Rh-doping, respectively. In analogy with observations made in cholesteric liquid crystals, we suggest that it reveals the presence of magnetic twist-grain-boundary phases, involving a dense short-range correlated network of screw dislocations. The dislocation cores are described as smooth textures made of non-radial double-core skyrmions.
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    Al2O3 is a potential dielectric material for metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices. Al2O3 films deposited on semiconductors usually exhibit amorphous due to lattice mismatch. Compared to two-dimensional graphene, MoS2 is a typical semiconductor, therefore, it has more extensive application. The amorphous-Al2O3/MoS2 (a-Al2O3/MoS2) interface has attracted people's attention because of its unique properties. In this paper, the interface behaviors of a-Al2O3/MoS2 under non-strain and biaxial strain are investigated by first principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). First of all, the generation process of a-Al2O3 sample is described, which is calculated by molecular dynamics and geometric optimization. Then, we introduce the band alignment method, and calculate band offset of a-Al2O3/MoS2 interface. It is found that the valence band offset (VBO) and conduction band offset (CBO) change with the number of MoS2 layers. The dependence of leakage current on the band offset is also illustrated. At last, the band structure of monolayer MoS2 under biaxial strain is discussed. The biaxial strain is set in the range from -6% to 6% with the interval of 2%. Impact of the biaxial strain on the band alignment is investigated.
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    We demonstrate from a fundamental perspective the physical and mathematical origins of band warping and band non-parabolicity in electronic and vibrational structures. Remarkably, we find a robust presence and connection with pairs of topologically induced Dirac points in a primitive-rectangular lattice using a $p$-type tight-binding approximation. We provide a transparent analysis of two-dimensional primitive-rectangular and square Bravais lattices whose basic implications generalize to more complex structures. Band warping typically arises at the onset of a singular transition to a crystal lattice with a larger symmetry group, suddenly allowing the possibility of irreducible representations of higher dimensions at special symmetry points in reciprocal space. Band non-parabolicities are altogether different higher-order features, although they may merge into band warping at the onset of a larger symmetry group. Quite separately, although still maintaining a clear connection with that merging, band non-parabolicities may produce pairs of conical intersections at relatively low-symmetry points. Apparently, such conical intersections are robustly maintained by global topology requirements, rather than any local symmetry protection. For two $p$-type tight-binding bands, we find such pairs of conical intersections drifting along the edges of restricted Brillouin zones of primitive-rectangular Bravais lattices as lattice constants vary relatively, until they merge into degenerate warped bands at high-symmetry points at the onset of a square lattice. The conical intersections that we found appear to have similar topological characteristics as Dirac points extensively studied in graphene and other topological insulators, although our conical intersections have none of the symmetry complexity and protection afforded by the latter more complex structures.
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    We study the interface physics of bipartite magnetic materials deposited on a topological insulator. This comprises antiferromagnets as well as ferrimagnets and ferromagnets with multiple magnetic moments per unit cell. If an energy gap is induced in the Dirac states on the topological surface, a topological magnetoelectric effect has been predicted. Here, we show that this effect can act in opposite directions on the two components of the magnet in certain parameter regions. Consequently, an electric field will mainly generate a staggered field rather than a net magnetization in the plane. This is relevant for the current attempts to detect the magnetoelectric effect experimentally, as well as for possible applications. We take a field-theoretic approach that includes the quantum fluctuations of both the Dirac fermions on the topological surface as well as the fermions in the surface layer of the magnet in an analytically solvable model. The effective Lagrangian and the Landau-Lifshitz equation describing the interfacial magnetization dynamics are derived.
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    We investigate the mechanical response of thin sheets perforated with a square array of mutually orthogonal cuts, which leaves a network of squares connected by small ligaments. Our combined analytical, experimental and numerical results indicate that under uniaxial tension the ligaments buckle out-of-plane, inducing the formation of 3D patterns whose morphology is controlled by the load direction. We also find that by largely stretching the buckled perforated sheets, plastic strains develop in the ligaments. This gives rise to the formation of kirigami sheets comprising periodic distribution of cuts and permanent folds. As such, the proposed buckling-induced pop-up strategy points to a simple route for manufacturing complex morphable structures out of flat perforated sheets.
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    The universal behavior of a three-boson system close to the unitary limit is encoded in a simple dependence of many observables in terms of few parameters. For example the product of the three-body parameter $\kappa_*$ and the two-body scattering length $a$, $\kappa_* a$ depends on the angle $\xi$ defined by $E_3/E_2=\tan^2\xi$. A similar dependence is observed in the ratio $a_{AD}/a$ with $a_{AD}$ the boson-dimer scattering length. We use a two-parameter potential to determine this simple behavior and, as an application, to compute $a_{AD}$ for the case of three $^4$He atoms.
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    We discuss, in the context of energy flow in high-dimensional systems and Kolmogorov-Arnol'd-Moser (KAM) theory, the behavior of a chain of rotators (rotors) which is purely Hamiltonian, apart from dissipation at just one end. We derive bounds on the dissipation rate which become arbitrarily small in certain physical regimes, and we present numerical evidence that these bounds are sharp. We relate this to the decoupling of non-resonant terms as is known in KAM problems.
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    We have presented a compact MOSFET model, which allows us to describe the I-V characteristics of irradiated long-channel and short-channel transistors in all operation modes at different measurement temperatures and interface trap densities. The model allows simulating of the off-state and the on-state drain currents of irradiated MOSFETs based on an equal footing. Particularly, a novel compact model of the rebound effect in n-MOSFETs was employed for simulation of the total dose dependencies of drain currents in the highly scaled 60 nm node circuits irradiated up to 1Grad. Compatibility of the model parameter set with BSIM and a single closed form of the model equation imply the possibility of its easy implementation into the standard CAD tools.
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    We present a novel phase-field model development capability in the open source MOOSE finite element framework. This facility is based on the 'modular free energy' approach in which the phase-field equations are implemented in a general form that is logically separated from model-specific data such as the thermodynamic free energy density and mobility functions. Free energy terms contributing to a phase-field model are abstracted into self-contained objects that can be dynamically combined at simulation run time. Combining multiple chemical and mechanical free energy contributions expedites the construction of coupled phase-field, mechanics, and multiphase models. This approach allows computational material scientists to focus on implementing new material models, and to reuse existing solution algorithms and data processing routines. A key new aspect of the rapid phase-field development approach that we discuss in detail is the automatic symbolic differentiation capability. Automatic symbolic differentiation is used to compute derivatives of the free energy density functionals, and removes potential sources of human error while guaranteeing that the nonlinear system Jacobians are accurately approximated. Through just-in-time compilation, we greatly reduce the computational expense of evaluating the differentiated expressions. The new capability is demonstrated for a variety of representative applications.
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    We present a parallel network of 16 demagnetization refrigerators mounted on a cryofree dilution refrigerator aimed to cool nanoelectronic devices to sub-millikelvin temperatures. To measure the refrigerator temperature, the thermal motion of electrons in a Ag wire -- thermalized by a spot-weld to one of the Cu nuclear refrigerators -- is inductively picked-up by a superconducting gradiometer and amplified by a SQUID mounted at 4 K. The noise thermometer as well as other thermometers are used to characterize the performance of the system, finding magnetic field independent heat-leaks of a few nW/mol, cold times of several days below 1 mK, and a lowest temperature of 150 microK of one of the nuclear stages in a final field of 80 mT, close to the intrinsic SQUID noise of about 100 microK. A simple thermal model of the system capturing the nuclear refrigerator, heat leaks, as well as thermal and Korringa links describes the main features very well, including rather high refrigerator efficiencies typically above 80%.
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    We address the electronic structure of the surface states of topological insulator thin films with embedded local non-magnetic and magnetic impurities. Using the $T$-matrix expansion of the real space Green's function, we derive the local density of electrons states and corresponding spin resolved densities. We show that the effects of the impurities can be tuned by applying an electric field between the surface layers. The emerging magnetic states are expected to play an important role both in ferromagnetic mechanism of magnetic topological insulators as well as in its transport properties. In the case of magnetic impurities, we have categorized the possible cases for different spin-directions of the impurities as well as the spin-direction in which the spin resolved density of electron states is calculated and related this to the spin susceptibility of the system.
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    We study quantum spin Hall insulators with local Coulomb interactions in the presence of boundaries using dynamical mean field theory. We investigate the different influence of the Coulomb interaction on the bulk and the edge states. Interestingly, we discover an edge reconstruction driven by electronic correlations. The reason is that the helical edge states experience Mott localization for an interaction strength smaller than the bulk one. We argue that the significance of this edge reconstruction can be understood by topological properties of the system characterized by a local Chern marker.
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    We devise an approach to the calculation of scaling dimensions of generic operators describing scattering within multi-channel Luttinger liquid. The local impurity scattering in an arbitrary configuration of conducting and insulating channels is investigated and the problem is reduced to a single algebraic matrix equation. In particular, the solution to this equation is found for a finite array of chains described by Luttinger liquid models. It is found that for a weak inter-chain hybridisation and intra-channel electron-electron attraction the edge wires are robust against disorder whereas bulk wires, on contrary, become insulating. Thus, the edge state may exist in a finite sliding Luttinger liquid without time-reversal symmetry breaking (quantum Hall systems) or spin-orbit interaction (topological insulators).
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    We introduce a comprehensive numerical framework to generically infer the emergent macroscopic properties of uniaxial nematic and cholesteric phases from that of their microscopic constituent mesogens. This approach, based on the full numerical resolution of the Poniewierski-Stecki equations in the weak chirality limit, may expediently handle a wide range of particle models through the use of Monte-Carlo sampling for all virial-type integrals. Its predictions in terms of equilibrium cholesteric structures are found to be in excellent agreement with previous full-functional descriptions, thereby demonstrating the quantitative validity of the perturbative treatment of chirality for pitch lengths as short as a few dozen particle diameters. Furthermore, the use of the full angle-dependent virial coefficients in the Onsager-Parsons-Lee formalism increases its numerical efficiency by several orders of magnitude over that of these previous methods. The extensive comparison of our results with numerical simulations however reveals some shortcomings of the Parsons-Lee approximation for systems of strongly non-convex particles, notwithstanding the accurate inclusion of their full effective molecular volume. Further potential limitations of our theory in terms of phase symmetry assumptions are also examined, and prospective directions for future improvements discussed.
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    Interfacial charge separation and recombination at heterojunctions of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are of interest to two dimensional optoelectronic technologies. These processes can involve large changes in parallel momentum vector due to the confinement of electrons and holes to the K-valleys in each layer. Since these high-momentum valleys are usually not aligned across the interface of two TMDC monolayers, how parallel momentum is conserved in the charge separation or recombination process becomes a key question. Here we probe this question using the model system of a type-II heterojunction formed by MoS2 and WSe2 monolayers and the experimental technical of femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Upon photo-excitation specifically of WSe2 at the heterojunction, we observe ultrafast (<40 fs) electron transfer from WSe2 to MoS2, independent of the angular alignment and, thus, momentum mismatch between the two TMDCs. The resulting interlayer charge transfer exciton decays via nonradiatively recombination, with rates varying by up to three-orders of magnitude from sample to sample, but with no correlation with inter-layer angular alignment. We suggest that the initial interfacial charge separation and the subsequent interfacial charge recombination processes circumvent momentum mismatch via excess electronic energy and via defect-mediated recombination, respectively.
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    Flexible fully transparent diodes with high rectification ratio of 5 e 8 are fabricated with all oxide materials at low temperature. The devices are optically transparent in visible spectra range and electrically robust while mechanically bending. Distinguished from other diodes, these diodes utilize diode-connected thin-film transistor architecture and follow field-effect principles.
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    Based on a solution of the Floquet Hamiltonian we have studied the time-evolution of electronic states in graphene nanoribbons driven out of equilibrium by time-dependent electromagnetic fields in different regimes of intensity, polarization and frequency. We show that the time-dependent band structure contains many unconventional features that are not captured by considering the Floquet eigenvalues alone. By analyzing the evolution in time of the state population we have identified regimes for the emergence of time-dependent edge states responsible of charge oscillations across the ribbon.
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    We use a combination of neutron and X-ray total scattering measurements together with pair distribution function (PDF) analysis to characterise the variation in local structure across the orbital order--disorder transition in LaMnO$_3$. Our experimental data are inconsistent with a conventional order--disorder description of the transition, and reflect instead the existence of a discontinuous change in local structure between ordered and disordered states. Within the orbital-ordered regime, the neutron and X-ray PDFs are best described by a local structure model with the same local orbital arrangements as those observed in the average (long-range) crystal structure. We show that a variety of meaningfully-different local orbital arrangement models can give fits of comparable quality to the experimental PDFs collected within the disordered regime; nevertheless, our data show a subtle but consistent preference for the anisotropic Potts model proposed in \emphPhys Rev.\ B \bf 79, 174106 (2009). The key implications of this model are electronic and magnetic isotropy together with the loss of local inversion symmetry at the Mn site. We conclude with a critical assessment of the interpretation of PDF measurements when characterising local symmetry breaking in functional materials.
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    Employing a 10-orbital tight binding model, we present a new set of hopping parameters fitted directly to our latest high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data for the high temperature tetragonal phase of FeSe. Using these parameters we predict a large 10 meV shift of the chemical potential as a function of temperature. In order to confirm this large temperature dependence, we performed ARPES experiments on FeSe and observed a $\sim$25 meV rigid shift to the chemical potential between 100 K and 300 K. This unexpectedly strong shift has important implications for theoretical models of superconductivity and of nematic order in FeSe materials.
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    The shear viscosity $\eta$ for a dilute classical gas of hard-sphere particles is calculated by solving the Boltzmann kinetic equation in terms of the weakly absorbed plane waves. For the rare collision regime, the viscosity $\eta$ as function of the equilibrium gas parameters -- temperature $T$, particle number density $n$, particle mass $m$, and hard-core particle diameter $d$ -- is quite different from that of the frequent collision regime, e.g.\ , from the well known result of Chapman and Enskog. An important property of the rare collision regime is the dependence of $\eta$ on the external ("non-equilibrium") parameter $\omega$, frequency of the sound plane wave, that is absent in the frequent collision regime at leading order of the corresponding perturbation expansion. A transition from the frequent to the rare collision regime takes place when the dimensionless parameter $nd^2 (T/m)^{1/2} \omega^{-1}$ goes to zero. The scaled absorption coefficient for sound waves calculated in the rare and frequent collision regimes is found to be in a qualitative agreement with the experimental data.
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    The Bose polaron is a quasi-particle of a mobile impurity dressed by surrounding bosons. Since it is known from the few-body physics that an impurity can form a sequence of Efimov bound states with two bosons on the vicinity of a Feshbach resonance, one would expect that this Efimov correlation can manifest itself in the Bose polaron problem. Nevertheless, no signature of Efimov physics has been reported in the spectroscopy measurements of Bose polarons up to date. In this work, we propose that a large mass imbalance between a light impurity and heavy bosons can help produce visible signatures of Efmov physics in such a spectroscopy measurement. Using the diagrammatic approach in the framework of the Virial expansion to include all three-body effects, we determine the impurity self-energy and its spectral function. Taking $^{6}$Li-$^{133}$Cs\ system as a concrete example, we find two visible Efimov branches in the polaron spectrum, as well as their hybridizations with the attractive polaron branch. We also discuss the general scenarios for the observation of Efimov physics in polaron systems. This work paves the way for the experimental exploration of intriguing few-body correlation in a many-body system in the near future.
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    Obtaining strong magnetoelectric couplings in bulk materials and heterostructures is an ongoing challenge. We demonstrate that manganite heterostructures of the form ${\rm (Insulator)/(LaMnO_3)_n/(CaMnO_3)_n/(Insulator)}$ show strong multiferroicity in magnetic manganites where ferroelectric polarization is realized by charges leaking from ${\rm LaMnO_3}$ to ${\rm CaMnO_3}$ due to repulsion. Here, an effective nearest-neighbor electron-electron (electron-hole) repulsion (attraction) is generated by cooperative electron-phonon interaction. Double exchange, when a particle virtually hops to its unoccupied neighboring site and back, produces magnetic polarons that polarize antiferromagnetic regions. Thus a striking giant magnetoelectric effect ensues when an external electrical field enhances the electron leakage across the interface.
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    We propose a Hamiltonian dynamics formalism for the current and magnetic field driven dynamics of ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic domain walls in one dimensional systems. To demonstrate the power of this formalism, we derive Hamilton equations of motion via Poisson brackets based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert phenomenology, and add dissipative dynamics via the evolution of the energy. We use this approach to study current induced domain wall motion and compute the drift velocity. For the antiferromagnetic case, we show that a nonzero magnetic moment is induced in the domain wall, which indicates that an additional application of a magnetic field would influence the antiferromagnetic domain-wall dynamics. We consider both cases of the magnetic field being parallel and transverse to the Néel field. Based on this formalism, we predict an orientation switch mechanism for antiferromagnetic domain walls which can be tested with the recently discovered Néel spin orbit torques.
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    We analyze diffusion at low temperatures by bringing the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to bear on a response-function which, given current technology, can be realized in a laboratory with ultra cold atoms. As with our earlier analysis, the new response-function also leads to a logarithmic diffusion law in the quantum domain, indicating that this behavior is robust. The new response function has the additional advantage of yielding a positive mean square displacement even in the regime of ultrashort times, and more generally of complying with both "Wightman positivity" and "passivity", whose interrelationship we also discuss.
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    The development of advanced spintronics devices hinges on the efficient generation and utilization of pure spin current. In materials with large spin-orbit coupling, the spin Hall effect may convert charge current to pure spin current and a large conversion efficiency, which is quantified by spin Hall angle (SHA), is desirable for the realization of miniaturized and energy efficient spintronic devices. Here, we report a giant SHA in beta-tungsten (e̱ta-W) thin films in Sub/W(t)/Co20Fe60B20(3 nm)/SiO2(2 nm) heterostructures with variable W thickness. We employed an all-optical time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope for an unambiguous determination of SHA using the principle of modulation of Gilbert damping of the adjacent ferromagnetic layer by the spin-orbit torque from the W layer. A non-monotonic variation of SHA with W layer thickness (t) is observed with a maximum of about 0.4 at about t = 3 nm, followed by a sudden reduction to a very low value at t = 6 nm. This variation of SHA with W-thickness correlates well with the thickness dependent structural phase transition and resistivity variation of W above the spin diffusion length of W, while below this length the interfacial electronic effect at W/CoFeB influences the estimation of SHA.
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    Zika virus (ZIKV) exhibits unique transmission dynamics in that it is concurrently spread by a mosquito vector and through sexual contact. We show that this sexual component of ZIKV transmission induces novel processes on networks through the highly asymmetric durations of infectiousness between males and females -- it is estimated that males are infectious for periods up to ten times longer than females -- leading to an asymmetric percolation process on the network of sexual contacts. We exactly solve the properties of this asymmetric percolation on random sexual contact networks and show that this process exhibits two epidemic transitions corresponding to a core-periphery structure. This structure is not present in the underlying contact networks, which are not distinguishable from random networks, and emerges \textitbecause of the asymmetric percolation. We provide an exact analytical description of this double transition and discuss the implications of our results in the context of ZIKV epidemics. Most importantly, our study suggests a bias in our current ZIKV surveillance as the community most at risk is also one of the least likely to get tested.
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    The ground state magnetic response of fullerene molecules with up to 36 vertices is calculated, when spins classical or with magnitude $s=\frac{1}{2}$ are located on their vertices and interact according to the nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model. The frustrated topology, which originates in the pentagons of the fullerenes and is enchanced by their close proximity, leads to a significant number of classical magnetization and susceptibility discontinuities, something not expected for a model lacking magnetic anisotropy. This establishes the classical discontinuities as a generic feature of fullerene molecules irrespective of their symmetry. The most discontinuities have the molecule with 26 sites, four of the magnetization and two of the susceptibility, and an isomer with 34 sites, which has three each. In addition, for several of the fullerenes the classical zero-field lowest energy configuration has finite magnetization, which is unexpected for antiferromagnetic interactions between an even number of spins. The molecules come in different symmetries and topologies and there are only a few patterns of magnetic behavior that can be detected from such a small sample of relatively small fullerenes. Contrary to the classical case, in the full quantum limit $s=\frac{1}{2}$ there are no discontinuities for a subset of the molecules that was considered. This leaves the icosahedral symmetry fullerenes as the only ones known supporting ground state magnetization discontinuities for $s=\frac{1}{2}$. It is also found that a molecule with 34 sites has a doubly-degenerate $s=\frac{1}{2}$ ground state.
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    Spin qubits hosted in silicon (Si) quantum dots (QD) are attractive due to their exceptionally long coherence times and compatibility with the silicon transistor platform. To achieve electrical control of spins for qubit scalability, recent experiments have utilized gradient magnetic fields from integrated micro-magnets to produce an extrinsic coupling between spin and charge, thereby electrically driving electron spin resonance (ESR). However, spins in silicon QDs experience a complex interplay between spin, charge, and valley degrees of freedom, influenced by the atomic scale details of the confining interface. Here, we report experimental observation of a valley dependent anisotropic spin splitting in a Si QD with an integrated micro-magnet and an external magnetic field. We show by atomistic calculations that the spin-orbit interaction (SOI), which is often ignored in bulk silicon, plays a major role in the measured anisotropy. Moreover, inhomogeneities such as interface steps strongly affect the spin splittings and their valley dependence. This atomic-scale understanding of the intrinsic and extrinsic factors controlling the valley dependent spin properties is a key requirement for successful manipulation of quantum information in Si QDs.
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    Subjecting a many-body localized system to a time-periodic drive generically leads to delocalization and a transition to ergodic behavior if the drive is sufficiently strong or of sufficiently low frequency. Here we show that a specific drive can have an opposite effect, taking a static delocalized system into the MBL phase. We demonstrate this effect using a one dimensional system of interacting hardcore bosons subject to an oscillating linear potential. The system is weakly disordered, and is ergodic absent the driving. The time-periodic linear potential leads to a suppression of the effective static hopping amplitude, increasing the relative strengths of disorder and interactions. Using numerical simulations, we find a transition into the MBL phase above a critical driving frequency and in a range of driving amplitudes. Our findings highlight the potential of driving schemes exploiting the coherent suppression of tunneling for engineering long-lived Floquet phases.
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    Domain walls (DWs) in ferroic materials, across which the order parameter abruptly changes its orientation, can host emergent properties that are absent in the bulk domains. Using a broadband ($10^6-10^{10}$ Hz) scanning impedance microscope, we show that the electrical response of the interlocked antiphase boundaries and ferroelectric domain walls in hexagonal rare-earth manganites ($h-RMnO_3$) is dominated by the bound-charge oscillation rather than free-carrier conduction at the DWs. As a measure of the rate of energy dissipation, the effective conductivity of DWs on the (001) surfaces of $h-RMnO_3$ at GHz frequencies is drastically higher than that at dc, while the effect is absent on surfaces with in-plane polarized domains. First-principles and model calculations indicate that the frequency range and selection rules are consistent with the periodic sliding of the DW around its equilibrium position. This acoustic-wave-like mode, which is associated with the synchronized oscillation of local polarization and apical oxygen atoms, is localized perpendicular to the DW but free to propagate along the DW plane. Our results break the ground to understand structural DW dynamics and exploit new interfacial phenomena for novel devices.
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    Density-wave fronts in a vibrofluidized wet granular layer undergoing a gas-liquid-like transition are investigated experimentally. The threshold of the instability is governed by the amplitude of the vertical vibrations. Fronts, which are curved into a spiral shape, propagate coherently along the circular rim of the container with leading edges. They are stable beyond a critical distance from the container center. Based on an analysis of the emerging time and length scales, we propose a model for the pattern formation by considering the competition between the time scale for the collapse of cohesive particles and that of the energy injection resisting this process.
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    The Feynman amplitudes with the two-dimensional Wess-Zumino action functional have a geometric interpretation as bundle gerbe holonomy. We present details of the construction of a distinguished square root of such holonomy and of a related 3d-index and briefly recall the application of those to the building of topological invariants for time-reversal-symmetric two- and three-dimensional crystals, both static and periodically forced.
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    In the present work, a theoretical study of electron-phonon (electron-ion) coupling rates in semiconductors driven out of equilibrium is performed. Transient change of optical coefficients reflects the band gap shrinkage in covalently bonded materials, and thus, the heating of atomic lattice. Utilizing this dependence, we test various models of electron-ion coupling. The simulation technique is based on tight-binding molecular dynamics. Our simulations with the dedicated hybrid approach (XTANT) indicate that the widely used Fermi's golden rule can break down describing material excitation on femtosecond time scales. In contrast, dynamical coupling proposed in this work yields a reasonably good agreement of simulation results with available experimental data.
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    Water radiolysis by low-energy carbon projectiles is studied by first-principles molecular dynamics. Carbon projectiles of kinetic energies between 175 eV and 2.8 keV are shot across liquid water. Apart from translational, rotational and vibrational excitation, they produce water dissociation. The most abundant products are H and OH fragments. We find that the maximum spatial production of radiolysis products, not only occurs at low velocities, but also well below the maximum of energy deposition, reaching one H every 5 Ang at the lowest speed studied (1 Bohr/fs), dissociative collisions being more significant at low velocity while the amount of energy required to dissociate water is constant and much smaller than the projectile's energy. A substantial fraction of the energy transferred to fragments, especially for high velocity projectiles, is in the form of kinetic energy, such fragments becoming secondary projectiles themselves. High velocity projectiles give rise to well-defined binary collisions, which should be amenable to binary approximations. This is not the case for lower velocities, where multiple collision events are observed. H secondary projectiles tend to move as radicals at high velocity, as cations when slower. We observe the generation of new species such as hydrogen peroxide and formic acid. The former occurs when an O radical created in the collision process attacks a water molecule at the O site. The latter when the C projectile is completely stopped and reacts with two water molecules.
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    Quantum integrable systems, such as the interacting Bose gas in one dimension and the XXZ quantum spin chain, have an extensive number of local conserved quantities that endow them with exotic thermalization and transport properties. We review recently introduced hydrodynamic approaches for such integrable systems in detail and extend them to finite times and arbitrary initial conditions. We then discuss how such methods can be applied to describe non-equilibrium steady states involving ballistic heat and spin currents. In particular, we show that the spin Drude weight in the XXZ chain, previously accessible only by heuristic Bethe ansatz techniques, may be evaluated from hydrodynamics in very good agreement with density-matrix renormalization group calculations. This agreement is a strong check on the equivalence between the generalized hydrodynamics resulting from the infinite set of conservation laws in this model on the one hand, and the Bethe-Boltzmann equation in terms of the pseudo-momentum distribution on the other.
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    It was recently shown that nonsymmorphic space group symmetries can protect novel \textitsurface states with hourglass-like dispersions. In this paper, we show that such hourglass-like dispersions can also appear in the \textitbulk dispersions of systems which respect nonsymmorphic symmetries. Specifically, we construct 2D and 3D lattice models featuring hourglass-like dispersions in the bulk, which are protected by nonsymmorphic and time-reversal symmetries. We call such systems as hourglass semimetals, since they all have point or line nodes associated with the hourglass-like dispersions. In 3D, hourglass nodal lines may appear in glide-invariant planes, while hourglass Weyl points can occur on screw-invariant axes. The Weyl points and surface Fermi arcs in hourglass Weyl semimetals are stable against weak perturbations breaking those nonsymmorphic symmetries. Our results shall shed light to searching for new type of nodal-line and Weyl semimetals in nonsymmorphic materials.
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    We study Andreev reflection and the Josephson effect in a ballistic monolayer of black phosphorous, known as phosphorene. Due to the anisotropic band structure of this system, the supercurrent changes with an order of magnitude when comparing tunneling along two perpendicular directions in the monolayer. We show that the main reason for this effect is a large difference in the number of transverse modes in Andreev bound states. The oscillatory behavior of the supercurrent as a function of the length and chemical potential of the junction also differs substantially depending on the orientation of the superconducting electrodes deposited on the phosphorene sheet. For Andreev reflection, we show that a gate voltage controls the probability of this process and that the anisotropic behavior found in the supercurrent case is also present for conductance spectra.
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    Here we propose a linear microbolometric array based on VOx thin films. The linear microbolometric array is fabricated by using micromachining technology, and its thermo-sensitive VOx thin film has excellent infrared response spectrum and TCR characteristics. Nano-scale VOx thin films deposited on SiO2/Si substrates were obtained by e-beam vapor deposition. The VOx films were then annealed at temperatures between 300 to 500 C with various deposition duration time. The crystal structures and microstructures were examined by XRD, SEM and ESCA. These films showed a predominant phase of rhombohedral VO2 and the crystallinity of the VO2 increased as the annealing temperature increased. Integrated with CMOS circuit, an experimentally prototypical monolithic linear microbolometric array is designed and fabricated. The testing results of the experimental linear array show that the responsivity of linear array can approach 18KV/W and is potential for infrared image systems.
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    A programmable micromechanical resonator based on a VO2 thin film is reported. Multiple mechanical eigenfrequency states are programmed using Joule heating as local power source, gradually driving the phase transition of VO2 around its Metal-Insulator transition temperature. Phase coexistence of domains is used to tune the stiffness of the device via local control of internal stresses and mechanical properties. This study opens perspectives for developing mechanically configurable nanostructure arrays.

Recent comments

Stefano Pirandola Nov 30 2016 06:45 UTC

Dear Mark, thx for your comment. There are indeed missing citations to previous works by Rafal, Janek and Lorenzo that we forgot to add. Regarding your paper, I did not read it in detail but I have two main comments:

1- What you are using is completely equivalent to the tool of "quantum simulatio

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Mark M. Wilde Nov 30 2016 02:18 UTC

An update http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 of this paper has appeared, one day after the arXiv post http://arxiv.org/abs/1611.09165 . The paper http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 now includes (without citation) some results for bosonic Gaussian channels found independently in http://arxiv.org/abs/16

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Mark M. Wilde Oct 06 2016 15:44 UTC

The following paper found a setting in which adaptive operations do not help in quantum channel discrimination:

https://arxiv.org/abs/1408.3373

It is published as

Communications in Mathematical Physics, vol. 344, no. 3, pages 797-829, June 2016

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2

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Māris Ozols Sep 15 2016 21:30 UTC

Here is a link for those who also haven't heard of SciPost before: https://scipost.org/

Zoltán Zimborás Sep 15 2016 18:12 UTC

This is the very first paper of SciPost, waiting for the first paper of "Quantum" (http://quantum-journal.org). There are radical (and good!) changes going on in scientific publishing.

JRW Aug 18 2016 16:42 UTC

A video of a talk I gave this morning will be [here][1], if it ever finishes uploading.

[1]: https://youtu.be/I8cMY0AmIY0

Valentin Zauner-Stauber Jul 18 2016 09:54 UTC

Conjugate Gradient IS a Krylov-space method...

Stephen Jordan Apr 15 2016 15:02 UTC

This is a beautiful set of lecture notes.

Zoltán Zimborás Jan 07 2016 06:50 UTC

Interesting, both the 2nd and the 4th author is called Yuanping Chen... :)

Mile Gu Nov 20 2015 05:04 UTC

Good question! There shouldn't be any contradiction with the correspondence principle. The reason here is that the quantum models are built to simulate the output behaviour of macroscopic, classical systems, and are not necessarily macroscopic themselves. When we compare quantum and classical comple

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