Condensed Matter (cond-mat)

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    A strained graphene monolayer is shown to operate as a highly efficient quantum heat engine delivering maximum power. The efficiency and power of the proposed device exceeds that of recent proposals. The reason for these excellent characteristics is that strain enables complete valley separation in transmittance through the device, implying that increasing strain leads to very high Seeback coefficient as well as lower conductance. In addition, since time-reversal symmetry is unbroken in our system, the proposed strained graphene quantum heat engine can also act as a high performance refrigerator.
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    Sensors based on single spins can enable magnetic field detection with very high sensitivity and spatial resolution. Previous work has concentrated on sensing of a constant magnetic field or a periodic signal. Here, we instead investigate the problem of estimating a field with non-periodic variation described by a Wiener process. We propose and study, by numerical simulations, an adaptive tracking protocol based on Bayesian estimation. The tracking protocol updates the probability distribution for the magnetic field, based on measurement outcomes, and adapts the choice of sensing time and phase in real time. By taking the statistical properties of the signal into account, our protocol strongly reduces the required measurement time, reducing the error in the estimation of a time-varying signal by up to a factor 4.
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    In recent years, studies of long-range interacting (LRI) systems have taken centre stage in the arena of statistical mechanics and dynamical system studies, due to new theoretical developments involving tools from as diverse a field as kinetic theory, non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, and large deviation theory, but also due to new and exciting experimental realizations of LRI systems. In this invited contribution, we discuss the general features of long-range interactions, emphasizing in particular the main physical phenomenon of non-additivity, which leads to a plethora of distinct effects, both thermodynamic and dynamic, that are not observed with short-range interactions: Ensemble inequivalence, slow relaxation, broken ergodicity. We also discuss several physical systems with long-range interactions: mean-field spin systems, self-gravitating systems, Euler equations in two dimensions, Coulomb systems, one-component electron plasma, dipolar systems, free-electron lasers, atoms trapped in optical cavities.
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    Understanding how topological constraints affect the dynamics of polymers in solution is at the basis of any polymer theory and it is particularly needed for melts of rings. These polymers fold as crumpled and space-filling objects and, yet, they display a large number of topological constraints. To understand their role, here we systematically probe the response of solutions of rings at various densities to "random pinning" perturbations. We show that these perturbations trigger non-Gaussian and heterogeneous dynamics, eventually leading to non-ergodic and glassy behaviours. We then derive universal scaling relations for the values of solution density and polymer length marking the onset of vitrification in unperturbed solutions. Finally, we directly connect the heterogeneous dynamics of the rings with their spatial organisation and mutual interpenetration. Our results suggest that deviations from the typical behaviours observed in systems of linear polymers may originate from architecture-specific (threading) topological constraints.
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    The zero-bias peak (ZBP) is understood as the definite signature of a Majorana bound state (MBS) when attached to a semi-infinite Kitaev nanowire (KNW) nearby zero temperature. However, such characteristics concerning the realization of the KNW constitute a profound experimental challenge. We explore theoretically a QD connected to a topological KNW of finite size at non-zero temperatures and show that overlapped MBSs of the wire edges can become effectively decoupled from each other and the characteristic ZBP can be fully recovered if one tunes the system into the leaked Majorana fermion fixed point. At very low temperatures, the MBSs become strongly coupled similarly to what happens in the Kondo effect. We derive universal features of the conductance as a function of the temperature and the relevant crossover temperatures. Our findings offer additional guides to identify signatures of MBSs in solid state setups.
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    This Letter reports a generalized theory of the smallest diameter of metallic nanorods from physical vapor deposition. The generalization incorporates the effects of nanorod separation and those of van der Waals interactions on geometrical shadowing. In contrast, the previous theory for idealized geometrical shadowing [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 136102 (2013)] does not include any dependence on nanorod separation and it predicts the diameter to be about to of what the generalized theory does. As verification, numerical solutions and the generalized theory in closed-form agree in terms of effective deposition flux. As validation, experiments of physical vapor deposition and the generalized theory agree in terms of the diameter as a function of the separation of nanorods.
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    Density functional theory is used to describe electrolyte solutions in contact with electrodes of planar or spherical shape. For the electrolyte solutions we consider the so-called civilized model, in which all species present are treated on equal footing. This allows us to discuss the features of the electric double layer in terms of the differential capacitance. The model provides insight into the microscopic structure of the electric double layer, which goes beyond the mesoscopic approach studied in the accompanying paper. This enables us to judge the relevance of microscopic details, such as the radii of the particles forming the electrolyte solutions or the dipolar character of the solvent particles, and to compare the predictions of various models. Similar to the preceding paper, a general behavior is observed for small radii of the electrode in that in this limit the results become independent of the surface charge density and of the particle radii. However, for large electrode radii non-trivial behaviors are observed. Especially the particle radii and the surface charge density strongly influence the capacitance. From the comparison with the Poisson-Boltzmann approach it becomes apparent that the shape of the electrode determines whether the microscopic details of the full civilized model have to be taken into account or whether already simpler models yield acceptable predictions.
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    We investigate the many-body properties of graphene on top of a piezoelectric substrate, focusing on the interaction between the graphene electrons and the piezoelectric acoustic phonons. We calculate the electron and phonon self-energies as well as the electron mobility limited by the substrate phonons. We emphasize the importance of the proper screening of the electron-phonon vertex and discuss the various limiting behaviors as a function of electron energy, temperature, and doping level. The effect on the graphene electrons of the piezoelectric acoustic phonons is compared with that of the intrinsic deformation acoustic phonons of graphene. Substrate phonons tend to dominate over intrinsic ones for low doping levels at high and low temperatures.
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    The critical point of the condensation transition for linear molecules adsorbed on square lattices, was studied by using an adaptation of the Histogram Reweighting technique. The results were obtained by means of grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations within the lattice gas model, along with finite size scaling using the fourth order Binder cumulant. The Method was tested in a system of interacting monomers in which the critical point can be determined exactly. The application of this method to the determination of the critical point in dimer systems with attractive interactions, gave better results than the previous reported studies to the best knowledge of the authors. In addition, the adsorption isotherms at different temperatures, as well as the phase diagrams for monomer and dimer systems were obtained, achieving significant improvements in the phase diagram for dimers.
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    We consider flocking of self-propelling agents in two dimensions, each of which communicates with its neighbors within a limited vision cone. Also, the communication occurs with some delay. The communication among the agents are modeled by Vicsek rules. In this study we explore the effect of non-reciprocal interaction among the agents, induced by their vision cone, together with the delayed interactions on the dynamical pattern formation within the flock. We find that under these two influences and without any position based attractive interactions or confining boundaries, the agents can spontaneously condense into drops. Though the agents are in motion within the drop, the drop as whole is virtually pinned in space. We also find that this novel state of the flock has a well defined order stabilized by the noise present in the system.
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    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for characterizing the local properties of graphene. Here, we introduce a method for evaluating unknown strain configurations and simultaneous doping. It relies on separating the effects of hydrostatic strain (peak shift) and shear strain (peak splitting) on the Raman spectrum of graphene. The peak shifts from hydrostatic strain and doping are separated with a correlation analysis of the 2D and G frequencies. This enables us to obtain the local hydrostatic strain, shear strain and doping without any assumption on the strain configuration prior to the analysis. We demonstrate our approach for two model cases: Graphene under uniaxial stress on a PMMA substrate and graphene suspended on nanostructures that induce an unknown strain configuration. We measured $\omega_\mathrm{2D}/\omega_\mathrm{G} = 2.21 \pm 0.05$ for pure hydrostatic strain, which can be used as a reference in future studies. Raman scattering with circular corotating polarization is ideal for analyzing strain and doping, especially for weak strain when the peak splitting by shear strain cannot be resolved.
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    Within the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) approach electrolytes in contact with planar, spherical, and cylindrical electrodes are analyzed systematically. The dependences of their capacitance $C$ on the surface charge density $\sigma$ and the ionic strength $I$ are examined as function of the wall curvature. The surface charge density has a strong effect on the capacitance for small curvatures whereas for large curvatures the behavior becomes independent of $\sigma$. An expansion for small curvatures gives rise to capacitance coefficients which depend only on a single parameter, allowing for a convenient analysis. The universal behavior at large curvatures can be captured by an analytic expression.
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    We investigate the spectral statistics of Hermitian matrices in which the elements are chosen uniformly from U (1), called the uni-modular ensemble (UME), in the limit of large matrix size. Using three complimentary methods; a supersymmetric integration method, a combinatorial graph-theoretical analysis and a Brownian motion approach, we are able to derive expressions for 1/N corrections to the mean spectral moments and also analyse the fluctuations about this mean. By addressing the same ensemble from three different point of view, we can critically compare their relative advantages and derive some new results.
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    Understanding stabilization and aggregation in magnetic nanoparticle systems is crucial to optimizing the functionality of these systems in real physiological applications. Here we address this problem for a specific, yet representative, system. We present an experimental and analytical study on the aggregation of superparamagnetic liposomes in suspension in the presence of a controllable external magnetic field. We study the aggregation kinetics and report an intermediate time power law evolution and a long time stationary value for the average aggregate diffusion coefficient, both depending on the magnetic field intensity. We then show that the long time aggregate structure is fractal with a fractal dimension that decreases upon increasing the magnetic field intensity. By scaling arguments we also establish an analytical relation between the aggregate fractal dimension and the power law exponent controlling the aggregation kinetics. This relation is indeed independent on the magnetic field intensity. Despite the superparamagnetic character of our particles, we further prove the existence of a population of surviving aggregates able to maintain their integrity after switching off the external magnetic field. Finally, we suggest a schematic interaction scenario to rationalize the observed coexistence between reversible and irreversible aggregation.
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    We investigate the coupling between interstitial medium and granular particles by studying the hopper flow of dry and submerged system experimentally and numerically. In accordance with earlier studies, we find, that the dry hopper empties at a constant rate. However, in the submerged system we observe the surging of the flow rate. We model both systems using the discrete element method, which we couple with computational fluid dynamics in the case of a submerged hopper. We are able to match the simulations and the experiments with good accuracy. To do that, we fit the particle-particle contact friction for each system separately, finding that submerging the hopper changes the particle-particle contact friction from $\mu_{vacuum}=0.15$ to $\mu_{sub}=0.13$, while all the other simulation parameters remain the same. Furthermore, our experiments find a particle size dependence to the flow rate, which is comprehended based on arguments on the terminal velocity and drag. These results jointly allow us to conclude that at the large particle limit, the interstitial medium does not matter, in contrast to small particles. The particle size limit, where this occurs depends on the viscosity of the interstitial fluid.
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    Nano-thick metallic transition metal dichalcogenides such as VS$_{2}$ are essential building blocks for constructing next-generation electronic and energy-storage applications, as well as for exploring unique physical issues associated with the dimensionality effect. However, such 2D layered materials have yet to be achieved through either mechanical exfoliation or bottom-up synthesis. Herein, we report a facile chemical vapor deposition route for direct production of crystalline VS$_{2}$ nanosheets with sub-10 nm thicknesses and domain sizes of tens of micrometers. The obtained nanosheets feature spontaneous superlattice periodicities and excellent electrical conductivities (~3$\times$10$^{3}$ S cm$^{-1}$), which has enabled a variety of applications such as contact electrodes for monolayer MoS$_{2}$ with contact resistances of ~1/4 to that of Ni/Au metals, and as supercapacitor electrodes in aqueous electrolytes showing specific capacitances as high as 8.6$\times$10$^{2}$ F g$^{-1}$. This work provides fresh insights into the delicate structure-property relationship and the broad application prospects of such metallic 2D materials.
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    We investigate the photoluminescence of interlayer excitons in heterostructures consisting of monolayer MoSe2 and WSe2 at low temperatures. Surprisingly, we find a doublet structure for such interlayer excitons. Both peaks exhibit long photoluminescence lifetimes of several ten nanoseconds up to 100 ns at low temperatures, which verifies the interlayer nature of both. The peak energy and linewidth of both show unusual temperature and power dependences. In particular, we observe a blue-shift of their emission energy for increasing excitation powers. At a low excitation power and low temperatures, the energetically higher peak shows several spikes. We explain the findings by two sorts of interlayer excitons; one that is indirect in real space but direct in reciprocal space, and the other one being indirect in both spaces. Our results provide fundamental insights into long-lived interlayer states in van der Waals heterostructures with possible bosonic many-body interactions
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    We present density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) of FePt, which is of great interest for magnetic recording applications. Our data, and the majority of previously calculated results for perfectly ordered crystals, predict an MAE of $\sim 3.0$ meV per formula unit, which is significantly larger than experimentally measured values. Analyzing the effects of disorder by introducing stacking faults (SFs) and anti site defects (ASDs) in varying concentrations we are able to reconcile calculations with experimental data and show that even a low concentration of ASDs are able to reduce the MAE of FePt considerably. Investigating the effect of exact exchange and electron correlation within the adiabatic-connection dissipation fluctuation theorem in the random phase approximation (ACDFT-RPA) reveals a significantly smaller influence on the MAE. Thus the effect of disorder, and more specifically ASDs, is the crucial factor in explaining the deviation of common DFT calculations of FePt to experimental measurements.
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    A method is suggested for calculating the critical temperature in multicomponent field theory with weak interactions. The method is based on self-similar approximation theory allowing for the extrapolation of series in powers of asymptotically small coupling to finite and even infinite couplings. The extrapolation for the critical temperature employs self-similar factor approximants. The found results are in perfect agreement with Monte Carlo simulations.
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    The recently discovered topological Dirac semimetal represents a new exotic quantum state of matter. Topological Dirac semimetals can be viewed as three dimensional analogues of graphene, in which the Dirac nodes are protected by crystalline symmetry. It has been found that quantum confinement effect can gap out Dirac nodes and convert Dirac semimetal to a band insulator. The band insulator is either normal insulator or quantum spin Hall insulator depending on the thin film thickness. We present the study of disorder effects in thin film of Dirac semimetals. It is found that moderate Anderson disorder strength can drive a topological phase transition from normal band insulator to topological Anderson insulator in Dirac semimetal thin film. The numerical calculation based on the model parameters of Dirac semimetal Na$_{3}$Bi shows that in the topological Anderson insulator phase a quantized conductance plateau occurs in the bulk gap of band insulator, and the distributions of local currents further confirm that the quantized conductance plateau arises from the helical edge states induced by disorder. Finally, an effective medium theory based on Born approximation fits the numerical data.
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    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the existence of a critical layer thickness in nanolayer coextrusion, under which no continuous layer is observed. Polymer films containing thousands of layers of alternating polymers with individual layer thicknesses below 100 nm have been prepared by coextrusion through a series of layer multiplying elements. Different films composed of alternating layers of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS) were fabricated with the aim to reach individual layer thicknesses as small as possible, varying the number of layers, the mass composition of both components and the final total thickness of the film. Films were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a statistical analysis was used to determine the distribution in layer thicknesses and the continuity of layers. For the PS/PMMA nanolayered systems, results point out the existence of a critical layer thickness around 10 nm, below which the layers break up. This critical layer thickness is reached regardless of the processing route, suggesting it might be dependent only on material characteristics but not on process parameters. We propose this breakup phenomenon is due to small interfacial perturbations that are amplified by (van der Waals) disjoining forces.
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    We revisit the question whether the steady states arising after non-equilibrium time evolution in integrable models (and in particular in the XXZ spin chain) can be described by the so-called Generalized Gibbs Ensemble (GGE). Whereas it is known that the micro-canonical ensemble built on a complete set of charges correctly describes the long-time limit of local observables, it was recently argued by Ilievski et. al. that in the XXZ chain it is not possible to construct an equivalent canonical ensemble. Here we overcome this problem by considering truncated GGE's (tGGE's) that only include a finite number of conserved operators. It is shown that the tGGE's can approximate the steady states with arbitrary precision, i.e. all physical observables are exactly reproduced in the infinite truncation limit. In addition, we show that a complete canonical ensemble can in fact be built in terms of a new (discrete) set of charges built as linear combinations of the standard ones. Our general arguments are applied to concrete quench situations in the XXZ chain, where the initial states are simple two-site or four-site product states. Depending on the quench we find that numerical results for the local correlators can be obtained with remarkable precision using truncated GGE's with only 10-100 charges.
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    In MR elastography it is common to use an elastic model for the tissue's response in order to properly interpret the results. More complex models such as viscoelastic, fractional viscoelastic, poroelastic, or poroviscoelastic ones are also used. These models appear at first sight to be very different, but here it is shown that they all may be expressed in terms of elementary viscoelastic models. For a medium expressed with fractional models, many elementary spring-damper combinations are added, each of them weighted according to a long-tailed distribution, hinting at a fractional distribution of time constants or relaxation frequencies. This may open up for a more physical interpretation of the fractional models. The shear wave component of the poroelastic model is shown to be modeled exactly by a three-component Zener model. The extended poroviscoelastic model is found to be equivalent to what is called a non-standard four-parameter model. Accordingly, the large number of parameters in the porous models can be reduced to the same number as in their viscoelastic equivalents. As long as the individual displacements from the solid and fluid parts cannot be measured individually the main use of the poro(visco)elastic models is therefore as a physics based method for determining parameters in a viscoelastic model.
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    The spin noise in singly charged self-assembled quantum dots is studied theoretically and experimentally under the influence of a perturbation, provided by additional photoexcited charge carriers. The theoretical description takes into account generation and relaxation of charge carriers in the quantum dot system. The spin noise is measured under application of above barrier excitation for which the data are well reproduced by the developed model. Our analysis demonstrates a strong difference of the recharging dynamics for holes and electrons in quantum dots.
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    Organic-inorganic halide perovskites present a number of challenges for first-principles atomistic materials modelling. These `plastic crystals' feature dynamic processes across multiple length-scales and time-scales, which include: (i) transport of slow ions and fast electrons; (ii) highly anharmonic lattice dynamics with short phonon lifetimes; (iii) local symmetry breaking of the average crystallographic space group; (iv) strong relativistic (spin-orbit coupling) effects on the electronic band structure; (v) thermodynamic metastability and rapid chemical breakdown. These issues, which affect the operation of solar cells, are outlined in this perspective. We also discuss general guidelines for performing quantitative and predictive simulations of these materials, which are relevant to metal-organic frameworks and other hybrid semiconducting, dielectric and ferroelectric compounds.
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    These notes describe several loop soup models and their \it universal behaviour in dimensions greater or equal to 3. These loop models represent certain classical or quantum statistical mechanical systems. These systems undergo phase transitions that are characterised by changes in the structures of the loops. Namely, long-range order is equivalent to the occurrence of macroscopic loops. There are many such loops, and the joint distribution of their lengths is always given by a \it Poisson-Dirichlet distribution. This distribution concerns random partitions and it is not widely known in statistical physics. We introduce it explicitly, and we explain that it is the invariant measure of a mean-field split-merge process. It is relevant to spatial models because the macroscopic loops are so intertwined that they behave effectively in mean-field fashion. This heuristics can be made exact and it allows to calculate the parameter of the Poisson-Dirichlet distribution. We discuss consequences about symmetry breaking in certain quantum spin systems.
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    In this paper, we have demonstrated a three-dimensional Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) transition in the random field XY model driven at a uniform velocity. By employing the spin-wave approximation and non-perturbative renormalization group approach, in the weak disorder regime, the three-dimensional driven random field XY model is found to exhibit a quasi-long-range order phase, wherein the correlation function shows power-law decay with a non-universal exponent that depends on the disorder strength and the driving velocity. We further develop a phenomenological theory of the KT transition by taking into account the effect of vortices.
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    We consider continuous-time Markov chains which display a family of wells at the same depth. We show that in an appropriate time-scale the state of the process can be represented as a time-dependent convex combination of mestastable states, each of which is supported on one well. The time dependence of the convex combination is given in terms of the distribution of a reduced Markov chain.
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    Titanium Oxynitride (TiOxNy) thin films are fabricated using reactive magnetron sputtering. The mechanism of their growth formation is explained and their optical properties are presented. The films grown when the level of residual Oxygen in the background vacuum was between 5E-9Torr to 20E-9Torr exhibit double Epsilon-Near-Zero (2-ENZ) behaviour with ENZ1 and ENZ2 wavelengths tunable in the 700-850 nm and in the 1100-1350 nm spectral ranges, respectively. Samples fabricated when the level of residual Oxygen in the background vacuum was above 2E-8Torr exhibit non-metallic behaviour, while the layers deposited when the level of residual Oxygen in the background vacuum was below 5E-9Torr, show metallic behaviour with a single ENZ value. The double ENZ phenomenon is related to the level of residual Oxygen in the background vacuum and is attributed to the mixture of TiN and TiOxNy/TiOx phases in the films. Varying the partial pressure of nitrogen during the deposition can further control the amount of TiN, TiOx and TiOxNy compounds in the films and, therefore, tune the screened plasma wavelength. A good approximation of the ellipsometric behaviour is achieved with Maxwell-Garnett theory for a composite film formed by a mixture of TiO2 and TiN phases suggesting that double ENZ TiOxNy films are formed by inclusions of TiN within a TiO2 matrix. These oxynitride compounds could be considered as new materials exhibiting double ENZ in the visible and near-IR spectral ranges.
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    The two-channel Kondo impurity model realizes a local non-Fermi liquid state with finite residual entropy, and is separated from its single channel counterpart by an impurity quantum phase transition. We show that the out-of-time-ordered (OTO) commutator for the impurity spin reveals markedly distinct behaviour depending on the low energy impurity state, though it is temperature independent in both cases. For the one channel Kondo model with Fermi liquid ground state, the OTO commutator vanishes for late times, indicating the absence of the butterfly effect. For the two channel case, the impurity OTO commutator saturates quickly to its upper bound 1/4, and the butterfly effect is maximally enhanced. These compare favourably to numerics on spin chain representation of the Kondo model.
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    We report two-dimensional superconducting phase fluctuations in a Ca$_2$RuO$_4$ nanofilm single crystal. A thin film of Ca$_2$RuO$_4$ exhibits typical Kosterlitz-Thouless transition behaviour around $T_{\mathrm{KT}}=30$ K. We also found that the bias current applied to the thin film causes a superconducotor-insulator transition at low temperatures. The film is superconductive for small bias currents and insulating for large bias currents. The two phases are well separated by the critical sheet resistance of the thin film 16.5 k$\Omega$. In addition to these findings, our results suggest the presence of superconducting fluctuations at a high temperature $T=96$ K with onset. The fabrication of nanofilms made of layered material enables us to discuss rich superconducting phenomena in ruthenates.
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    High-quality thermoelectric LaxSr1-xTiO3 (LSTO) layers (here with x = 0.2), with thicknesses ranging from 20 nm to 700 nm, have been epitaxially grown on SrTiO3(001) substrates by enhanced solid-source oxide molecular-beam epitaxy. All films are atomically flat (with rms roughness < 0.2 nm), with low mosaicity (<0.1\deg), and present very low electrical resistivity (<5 x 10-4 ohm.cm at room temperature), one order of magnitude lower than commercial Nb-doped SrTiO3 single-crystalline substrate. The conservation of transport properties within this thickness range has been confirmed by thermoelectric measurements where Seebeck coefficients of around -60 microV/K have been found for all films, accordingly. Finally, a correlation is given between the mosaicity and the (thermo)electric properties. These functional LSTO films can be integrated on Si in opto-microelectronic devices as transparent conductor, thermoelectric elements or in non-volatile memory structures.
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    In this work, we study the crystalline nuclei growth in glassy systems focusing primarily on the early stages of the process, at which the size of a growing nucleus is still comparable with the critical size. On the basis of molecular dynamics simulation results for two crystallizing glassy systems, we evaluate the growth laws of the crystalline nuclei and the parameters of the growth kinetics at the temperatures corresponding to deep supercoolings; herein, the statistical treatment of the simulation results is done within the mean-first-passage-time method. It is found for the considered systems at different temperatures that the crystal growth laws rescaled onto the waiting times of the critically-sized nucleus follow the unified dependence, that can simplify significantly theoretical description of the post-nucleation growth of crystalline nuclei. The evaluated size-dependent growth rates are characterized by transition to the steady-state growth regime, which depends on the temperature and occurs in the glassy systems when the size of a growing nucleus becomes two-three times larger than a critical size. It is suggested to consider the temperature dependencies of the crystal growth rate characteristics by using the reduced temperature scale $\widetilde{T}$. Thus, it is revealed that the scaled values of the crystal growth rate characteristics (namely, the steady-state growth rate and the attachment rate for the critically-sized nucleus) as functions of the reduced temperature $\widetilde{T}$ for glassy systems follow the unified power-law dependencies. This finding is supported by available simulation results; the correspondence with the experimental data for the crystal growth rate in glassy systems at the temperatures near the glass transition is also discussed.
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    We investigate the temperature dependent microwave absorption spectrum of an yttrium iron garnet sphere as a function of temperature (5 K to 300 K) and frequency (3 GHz to 43.5 GHz). At temperatures above 100 K, the magnetic resonance linewidth increases linearly with temperature and shows a Gilbert-like linear frequency dependence. At lower temperatures, the temperature dependence of the resonance linewidth at constant external magnetic fields exhibits a characteristic peak which coincides with a non-Gilbert-like frequency dependence. The complete temperature and frequency evolution of the linewidth can be modeled by the phenomenology of slowly relaxing rare-earth impurities and either the Kasuya-LeCraw mechanism or the scattering with optical magnons. Furthermore, we extract the temperature dependence of the saturation magnetization, the magnetic anisotropy and the g-factor.
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    We analyze, through resonant photoluminescence, the spin dynamics of an individual magnetic atom (Mn) coupled to a hole in a semiconductor quantum dot. The hybrid Mn-hole spin and the positively charged exciton in a CdTe/ZnTe quantum dot forms an ensemble of $\Lambda$ systems which can be addressed optically. Auto-correlation of the resonant photoluminescence and resonant optical pumping experiments are used to study the spin relaxation channels in this multilevel spin system. We identified for the hybrid Mn-hole spin an efficient relaxation channel driven by the interplay of the Mn-hole exchange interaction and the coupling to acoustic phonons. We also show that the optical $\Lambda$ systems are connected through inefficient spin-flips than can be enhanced under weak transverse magnetic field. The dynamics of the resonant photoluminescence in a p-doped magnetic quantum dot is well described by a complete rate equation model. Our results suggest that long lived hybrid Mn-hole spin could be obtained in quantum dot systems with large heavy-hole/light-hole splitting.
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    The out-of-time-order correlator (OTOC) is considered as a measure of quantum chaos. We formulate how to calculate the OTOC for quantum mechanics with a general Hamiltonian. We demonstrate explicit calculations of OTOCs for a harmonic oscillator, a particle in a one-dimensional box, a circle billiard and stadium billiards. For the first two cases, OTOCs are periodic in time because of their commensurable energy spectra. For the circle and stadium billiards, they are not recursive but saturate to constant values which are linear in temperature. Although the stadium billiard is a typical example of the classical chaos, an expected exponential growth of the OTOC is not found. We also discuss the classical limit of the OTOC. Analysis of a time evolution of a wavepacket in a box shows that the OTOC can deviate from its classical value at a time much earlier than the Ehrenfest time.
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    The presence of a thermodynamic phase of a three-stranded DNA, namely, a mixed phase of bubbles of two bound strands and a single one, is established for large dimensions ($d\geq 5$) by using exact real space renormalization group (RG) transformations and exact computations of specific heat for finite length chains. Similar exact computations for the fractal Sierpinski gasket of dimension $d<2$ establish the stability of the phase in presence of repulsive three chain interaction. In contrast to the Efimov DNA, where three strands are bound though no two are bound, the mixed phase appears on the bound side of the two chain melting temperature. Both the Efimov-DNA and the mixed phase are formed due to strand exchange mechanism.
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    A cluster composed of a few magnetic atoms assembled on the surface of a nonmagnetic substrate is one suitable realization of a bit for future concepts of spin-based information technology. The prevalent approach to achieve magnetic stability of the bit is decoupling the cluster spin from substrate conduction electrons in order to suppress spin-flips destabilizing the bit. However, this route entails less flexibility in tailoring the coupling between the bits which is ultimately needed for spin-processing. Here, we show using a spin-resolved scanning tunneling microscope, that we can write, read, and store spin information for hours in clusters of only three atoms strongly coupled to a substrate featuring a cloud of non-collinearly polarized host atoms, a so called non-collinear giant moment cluster (GMC). The GMC can be driven into a Kondo screened state by simply moving one of its atoms to a different site. Owing to the exceptional atomic tunability of the non-collinear substrate mediated Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, novel concepts of spin-based information technology get within reach, as we demonstrate by a logical scheme for a four-bit register.
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    We derive the equations for calculating the high-frequency asymptotics of the local two-particle vertex function for a multi-orbital impurity model. These relate the asymptotics for a general local interaction to equal-time two-particle Green's functions, which we sample using continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo simulations with a worm algorithm. As specific examples we study the single-orbital Hubbard model and the three $t_{2g}$ orbitals of SrVO$_3$ within dynamical mean field theory (DMFT). We demonstrate how the knowledge of the high-frequency asymptotics reduces the statistical uncertainties of the vertex and further eliminates finite box size effects. The proposed method benefits the calculation of non-local susceptibilities in DMFT and diagrammatic extensions of DMFT.
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    In this paper, we address the inverse problem, or the statistical machine learning problem, in Markov random fields with a non-parametric pair-wise energy function with continuous variables. The inverse problem is formulated by maximum likelihood estimation. The exact treatment of maximum likelihood estimation is intractable because of two problems: (1) it includes the evaluation of the partition function and (2) it is formulated in the form of functional optimization. We avoid Problem (1) by using Bethe approximation. Bethe approximation is an approximation technique equivalent to the loopy belief propagation. Problem (2) can be solved by using orthonormal function expansion. Orthonormal function expansion can reduce a functional optimization problem to a function optimization problem. Our method can provide an analytic form of the solution of the inverse problem within the framework of Bethe approximation.
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    The magnitude of the pH of the surface of water continues to be a contentious topic in the physical chemistry of aqueous interfaces. Recent theoretical studies have shown little or no preference for the proton to be at the surface compared to the bulk\citebaer2014toward. Using ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations, we revisit the propensity of the excess proton for the air-water interface with a particular focus on the role of instantaneous liquid interfaces. We find a much a stronger propensity of the proton for the surface of water. The enhanced water structuring around the proton results in the presence of proton wires that run parallel to the surface as well as a hydrophobic environment made up of under-coordinated topological defect water molecules, both of which create favorable conditions for proton confinement at the surface. The Grotthuss mechanism within the structured water layer involves a mixture of both concerted and closely spaced stepwise proton hops. The proton makes excursions within the first solvation layer either in proximity to or along the instantaneous interface.
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    Generating and detection coherent high-frequency heat-carrying phonons has been a great topic of interest in recent years. While there have been successful attempts in generating and observing coherent phonons, rigorous techniques to characterize and detect these phonon coherence in a crystalline material have been lagging compared to what has been achieved for photons. One main challenge is a lack of detailed understanding of how detection signals for phonons can be related to coherence. The quantum theory of photoelectric detection has greatly advanced the ability to characterize photon coherence in the last century and a similar theory for phonon detection is necessary. Here, we re-examine the optical sideband fluorescence technique that has been used detect high frequency phonons in materials with optically active defects. We apply the quantum theory of photodetection to the sideband technique and propose signatures in sideband photon-counting statistics and second-order correlation measurement of sideband signals that indicates the degree of phonon coherence. Our theory can be implemented in recently performed experiments to bridge the gap of determining phonon coherence to be on par with that of photons.
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    Recent discoveries have spurred the theoretical prediction and experimental realization of novel materials that have topological properties arising from band inversion. Such topological insulators are insulating in the bulk but have conductive surface or edge states. Topological materials show various unusual physical properties and are surmised to enable the creation of exotic Majorana-fermion quasiparticles. How the signatures of topological behavior evolve when the system size is reduced is interesting from both a fundamental and an application-oriented point of view, as such understanding may form the basis for tailoring systems to be in specific topological phases. This work considers the specific case of quantum-well confinement defining two-dimensional layers. Based on the effective-Hamiltonian description of bulk topological insulators, and using a harmonic-oscillator potential as an example for a softer-than-hard-wall confinement, we have studied the interplay of band inversion and size quantization. Our model system provides a useful platform for systematic study of the transition between the normal and topological phases, including the development of band inversion and the formation of massless-Dirac-fermion surface states. The effects of bare size quantization, two-dimensional-subband mixing, and electron-hole asymmetry are disentangled and their respective physical consequences elucidated.
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Recent comments

Stefano Pirandola Nov 30 2016 06:45 UTC

Dear Mark, thx for your comment. There are indeed missing citations to previous works by Rafal, Janek and Lorenzo that we forgot to add. Regarding your paper, I did not read it in detail but I have two main comments:

1- What you are using is completely equivalent to the tool of "quantum simulatio

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Mark M. Wilde Nov 30 2016 02:18 UTC

An update http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 of this paper has appeared, one day after the arXiv post http://arxiv.org/abs/1611.09165 . The paper http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 now includes (without citation) some results for bosonic Gaussian channels found independently in http://arxiv.org/abs/16

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Mark M. Wilde Oct 06 2016 15:44 UTC

The following paper found a setting in which adaptive operations do not help in quantum channel discrimination:

https://arxiv.org/abs/1408.3373

It is published as

Communications in Mathematical Physics, vol. 344, no. 3, pages 797-829, June 2016

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2

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Māris Ozols Sep 15 2016 21:30 UTC

Here is a link for those who also haven't heard of SciPost before: https://scipost.org/

Zoltán Zimborás Sep 15 2016 18:12 UTC

This is the very first paper of SciPost, waiting for the first paper of "Quantum" (http://quantum-journal.org). There are radical (and good!) changes going on in scientific publishing.

James Wootton Aug 18 2016 16:42 UTC

A video of a talk I gave this morning will be [here][1], if it ever finishes uploading.

[1]: https://youtu.be/I8cMY0AmIY0

Valentin Zauner-Stauber Jul 18 2016 09:54 UTC

Conjugate Gradient IS a Krylov-space method...

Stephen Jordan Apr 15 2016 15:02 UTC

This is a beautiful set of lecture notes.

Zoltán Zimborás Jan 07 2016 06:50 UTC

Interesting, both the 2nd and the 4th author is called Yuanping Chen... :)

Mile Gu Nov 20 2015 05:04 UTC

Good question! There shouldn't be any contradiction with the correspondence principle. The reason here is that the quantum models are built to simulate the output behaviour of macroscopic, classical systems, and are not necessarily macroscopic themselves. When we compare quantum and classical comple

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