Condensed Matter (cond-mat)

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    We introduce a toy holographic correspondence based on the multi-scale entanglement renormalization ansatz (MERA) representation of ground states of local Hamiltonians. Given a MERA representation of the ground state of a local Hamiltonian acting on an one dimensional `boundary' lattice, we lift it to a tensor network representation of a quantum state of a dual two dimensional `bulk' hyperbolic lattice. The dual bulk degrees of freedom are associated with the bonds of the MERA, which describe the renormalization group flow of the ground state, and the bulk tensor network is obtained by inserting tensors with open indices on the bonds of the MERA. We explore properties of `copy bulk states'---particular bulk states that correspond to inserting the copy tensor on the bonds of the MERA. We show that entanglement in copy bulk states is organized according to holographic screens, and that expectation values of certain extended operators in a copy bulk state, dual to a critical ground state, are proportional to $n$-point correlators of the critical ground state. We also present numerical results to illustrate e.g. that copy bulk states, dual to ground states of several critical spin chains, have exponentially decaying correlations, and that the correlation length generally decreases with increase in central charge for these models. Our toy model illustrates a possible approach for deducing an emergent bulk description from the MERA, in light of the on-going dialogue between tensor networks and holography.
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    Kitaev's quantum double models, including the toric code, are canonical examples of quantum topological models on a 2D spin lattice. Their Hamiltonian define the groundspace by imposing an energy penalty to any nontrivial flux or charge, but treats any such violation in the same way. Thus, their energy spectrum is very simple. We introduce a new family of quantum double Hamiltonians with adjustable coupling constants that allow us to tune the energy of anyons while conserving the same groundspace as Kitaev's original construction. Those Hamiltonians are made of commuting four-body projectors that provide an intricate splitting of the Hilbert space.
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    Electric-field noise from the surfaces of ion-trap electrodes couples to the ion's charge causing heating of the ion's motional modes. This heating limits the fidelity of quantum gates implemented in quantum information processing experiments. The exact mechanism that gives rise to electric-field noise from surfaces is not well-understood and remains an active area of research. In this work, we detail experiments intended to measure ion motional heating rates with exchangeable surfaces positioned in close proximity to the ion, as a sensor to electric-field noise. We have prepared samples with various surface conditions, characterized in situ with scanned probe microscopy and electron spectroscopy, ranging in degrees of cleanliness and structural order. The heating-rate data, however, show no significant differences between the disparate surfaces that were probed. These results suggest that the driving mechanism for electric-field noise from surfaces is due to more than just thermal excitations alone.
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    A promising approach of designing mesostructured materials with novel physical behavior is to combine unique optical and electronic properties of solid nanoparticles with long-range ordering and facile response of soft matter to weak external stimuli. Here we design, practically realize, and characterize orientationally ordered nematic liquid crystalline dispersions of rod-like upconversion nanoparticles. Boundary conditions on particle surfaces, defined through surface functionalization, promote spontaneous unidirectional self-alignment of the dispersed rod-like nanoparticles, mechanically coupled to the molecular ordering direction of the thermotropic nematic liquid crystal host. As host is electrically switched at low voltages~ 1V, nanorods rotate, yielding tunable upconversion and polarized luminescence properties of the composite. We characterize spectral and polarization dependencies, explain them through invoking models of electrical switching and upconversion dependence on crystalline matrices of nanorods, and discuss potential practical uses.
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    In systems having an anisotropic electronic structure, such as the layered materials graphite, graphene and cuprates, impulsive light excitation can coherently stimulate specific bosonic modes, with exotic consequences for the emergent electronic properties. Here we show that the population of E$_{2g}$ phonons in the multiband superconductor MgB$_2$ can be selectively enhanced by femtosecond laser pulses, leading to a transient control of the number of carriers in the \sigma-electronic subsystem. The nonequilibrium evolution of the material optical constants is followed in the spectral region sensitive to both the a- and c-axis plasma frequencies and modeled theoretically, revealing the details of the $\sigma$-$\pi$ interband scattering mechanism in MgB$_2$.
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    Extreme nanowires (ENs) represent the ultimate class of crystalline materials: They are the smallest possible periodic materials. With atom-wide motifs repeated in 1D, they offer a unique perspective into the Physics and Chemistry of low-dimensional systems. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) provide ideal environments for the creation of such materials. Here we report the observation of Te ENs grown inside ultra-narrow SWCNTs with diameters between 0.7nm and 1.1nm. Through state-of-the-art imaging techniques and high-precision, high-throughput ab initio calculations, we unambiguously determine the competing structures of encapsulated Te as a function of the encapsulating diameters. From 1-atom-wide Peierls-distorted linear chains -- the ultimate ENs, Te morphs into zigzag chains and then gives rise to helical structures that are the 1D analogues of bulk Te. The pitch of the encapsulated Te coils varies non-monotonically with the diameter of the encapsulating SWCNTs.
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    We study the dynamics of evolution of points of agents placed in the vertices of a graph within the rules of two-agent units of competition where an edge is randomly chosen and the agent with higher points gets a new point with a probability $p$. The model is closely connected to generalized vertex models and anti-ferromagnetic Potts models at zero temperature. After studying the most general properties for generic graphs we confine the study to discrete d-dimensional tori. We mainly focus on the ring and torus graphs.
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    A Chern-Simons theory in 3D is accomplished by the so-called $\theta$-term in the action, $(\theta/2)\int F\wedge F$, which contributes only to observable effects on the boundaries of such a system. When electromagnetic radiation interacts with the system, the wave is reflected and its polarization is rotated at the interface, even when both the $\theta$-system and the environment are pure vacuum. These topics have been studied extensively. Here, we investigate the optical properties of a thin $\theta$-film, where multiple internal reflections could interfere coherently. The cases of pure vacuum and a material with magneto-electric properties are analyzed. It is found that the film reflectance is enhanced compared to ordinary non-$\theta$ systems and the interplay between magneto-electric properties and $\theta$ parameter yield film opacity and polarization properties which could be interesting in the case of topological insulators, among other topological systems.
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    This paper summarizes the final results on the electron counting capacitance standard experiment at PTB achieved since the publication of a preliminary result from 2012. All systematic uncertainty contributions were experimentally quantified and are discussed. Frequency dependent measurements on the 1 pF cryogenic capacitor were performed using a high-precision transformer-based capacitance bridge with a relative uncertainty of 0.03 microF/F. The results revealed a crucial problem related to the capacitor, which hampered realizing the quantum metrology triangle with an accuracy corresponding to a combined total uncertainty of better few part per million and eventually caused the discontinuation of the experiment at PTB. The paper furthermore gives a conclusion on the implications for future quantum metrology triangle experiments from the latest CODATA adjustment of fundamental constants, and summarizes perspectives for future quantum metrology triangle experiments based on topical developments in small current metrology as an outlook.
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    For stationary, homogeneous Markov processes (viz., Lévy processes, including Brownian motion) in dimension $d\geq 3$, we establish an exact formula for the average number of $(d-1)$-dimensional facets that can be defined by $d$ points on the process's path. This formula defines a universality class in that it is independent of the increments' distribution, and it admits a closed form when $d=3$, a case which is of particular interest for applications in biophysics, chemistry and polymer science. We also show that the asymptotical average number of facets behaves as $\langle \mathcal{F}_T^{(d)}\rangle \sim 2\left[\ln \left( T/\Delta t\right)\right]^{d-1}$, where $T$ is the total duration of the motion and $\Delta t$ is the minimum time lapse separating points that define a facet.
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    The study of localization phenomena - pioneered in Anderson's seminal work on the absence of diffusion in certain random lattices [1] - is receiving redoubled attention in the context of the physics of interacting systems showing many-body localization [2-5]. While in these systems the presence of quenched disorder plays a central role, suggestions for interaction-induced localization in disorder-free systems appeared early in the context of solid Helium [6]. However, all of these are limited to settings having inhomogeneous initial states [7-9]. Whether quenched disorder is a general precondition for localization has remained an open question. Here, we provide an explicit example to demonstrate that a disorder-free system can generate its own randomness dynamically, which leads to localization in one of its subsystems. Our model is exactly soluble, thanks to an extensive number of conserved quantities, which we identify, allowing access to the physics of the long-time limit. The model can be extended while preserving its solubility, in particular towards investigations of disorder-free localization in higher dimensions.
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    Fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to investigate how a liquid-like water droplet behaves when into contact with a nanopore formed by carbon nanotube arrays. We have considered different tube arrays, varying the spacing between them, as well as, different chemical functionalizations on the uncapped nanotubes. Our results show that simple functionalizations (for instance, hydrogen ones) allow tuning up the wetting surface properties increasing the permeation of liquid inside the nanopore. For functionalizations that increase the surface hydrophilicity, even when the pore size is significantly increased the droplet remains at the surface without tube permeation.
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    Many complex oxides (including titanates, nickelates and cuprates) show a regime in which resistivity follows a power law in temperature ($\rho\propto T^2$). By analogy to a similar phenomenon observed in some metals at low temperature, this has often been attributed to electron-electron (Baber) scattering. We show that Baber scattering results in a $T^2$ power law only under several crucial assumptions which may not hold for complex oxides. We illustrate this with sodium metal ($\rho_\text{el-el}\propto T^2$) and strontium titanate ($\rho_\text{el-el}\not\propto T^2$). We conclude that an observation of $\rho\propto T^2$ is not sufficient evidence for electron-electron scattering.
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    We review some recent methods of subgrid-scale parameterization used in the context of climate modeling. These methods are developed to take into account (subgrid) processes playing an important role in the correct representation of the atmospheric and climate variability. We illustrate these methods on a simple stochastic triad system relevant for the atmospheric and climate dynamics, and we show in particular that the stability properties of the underlying dynamics of the subgrid processes has a considerable impact on their performances.
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    Zirconium pentatelluride ZrTe$_5$, a fascinating topological material platform, hosts exotic chiral fermions in its highly anisotropic three-dimensional Dirac band and holds great promise advancing the next-generation information technology. However, the origin underlying its anomalous resistivity peak has been under debate for decades. Here we provide transport evidence substantiating the anomaly to be a direct manifestation of a Lifshitz transition in the Dirac band with an ultrahigh carrier mobility exceeding 3$\times$10$^5$ cm$^2$ V$^{-1}$ s$^{-1}$. We demonstrate that the Lifshitz transition is readily controllable by means of carrier doping, which sets the anomaly peak temperature $\textit{T}$$_p$. $\textit{T}$$_p$ is found to scale approximately as $\textit{n}$$_H^{0.27}$, where the Hall carrier concentration $\textit{n}$$_H$ is linked with the Fermi level by $\textit{\epsilon}$$_F$ $\propto$ $\textit{n}$$_H^{1/3}$ in a linearly dispersed Dirac band. This relation indicates $\textit{T}$$_p$ monotonically increases with $\textit{\epsilon}$$_F$, which serves as an effective knob for fine tuning transport properties in pentatelluride-based Dirac semimetals.
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    The Heisenberg model for S=1/2 describes the interacting spins of electrons localized on lattice sites due to strong repulsion. It is the simplest strong-coupling model in condensed matter physics with wide-spread applications. Its relevance has been boosted further by the discovery of curate high-temperature superconductors. In leading order, their undoped parent compounds realize the Heisenberg model on square-lattices. Much is known about the model, but mostly at small wave vectors, i.e., for long-range processes, where the physics is governed by spin waves (magnons), the Goldstone bosons of the long-range ordered antiferromagnetic phase. Much less, however, is known for short-range processes, i.e., at large wave vectors. Yet these processes are decisive for understanding high-temperature superconductivity. Recent reports suggest that one has to resort to qualitatively different fractional excitations, spinons. By contrast, we present a comprehensive picture in terms of dressed magnons with strong mutual attraction on short length scales. The resulting spectral signatures agree strikingly with experimental data
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    We consider a directed variant of the negative-weight percolation model in a two-dimensional, periodic, square lattice. The problem exhibits edge weights which are taken from a distribution that allows for both positive and negative values. Additionally, in this model variant all edges are directed. For a given realization of the disorder, a minimally weighted loop/path configuration is determined by performing a non-trivial transformation of the original lattice into a minimum weight perfect matching problem. For this problem, fast polynomial-time algorithms are available, thus we could study large systems with high accuracy. Depending on the fraction of negatively and positively weighted edges in the lattice, a continuous phase transition can be identified, whose characterizing critical exponents we have estimated by a finite-size scaling analyses of the numerically obtained data. We observe a strong change of the universality class with respect to standard directed percolation, as well as with respect to undirected negative-weight percolation. Furthermore, the relation to directed polymers in random media is illustrated.
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    We present an investigation of the effect of the interaction between a thin polystyrene film and its supporting substrate on its glass transition temperature (Tg). We modulate this interaction by depositing the film on end-tethered polystyrene grafted layers of controlled molecular parameters. By comparing Tg measurements versus film thickness for films deposited on different grafted layers and films deposited directly on a silicon substrate, we can conclude that there is no important effect of the film-subtrate interaction. Our interpretation of these results is that local orientation and dynamic effects substantial enough to influence Tg cannot readily be obtained by grafting prepolymerized chains to a surface, due to intrinsic limitation of the surface grafting density.
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    One of the challenging goals in the studies of many-body physics with ultracold atoms is the creation of a topological $p_{x} + ip_{y}$ superfluid for identical fermions in two dimensions (2D). The expectations of reaching the critical temperature $T_c$ through p-wave Feshbach resonance in spin-polarized fermionic gases have soon faded away because on approaching the resonance, the system becomes unstable due to inelastic-collision processes. Here, we consider an alternative scenario in which a single-component degenerate gas of fermions in 2D is paired via phonon-mediated interactions provided by a 3D BEC background. Within the weak-coupling regime, we calculate the critical temperature $T_c$ for the fermionic pair formation, using Bethe-Salpeter formalism, and show that it is significantly boosted by higher-order diagramatic terms, such as phonon dressing and vertex corrections. We describe in detail an experimental scheme to implement our proposal, and show that the long-sought p-wave superfluid is at reach with state-of-the-art experiments.
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    A new convenient method to diagonalize the non-relativistic many-body Schroedinger equation with two-body central potentials is derived. It combines kinematic rotations (democracy transformations) and exact calculation of overlap integrals between bases with different sets of mass-scaled Jacobi coordinates, thereby allowing for a great simplification of this formidable problem. We validate our method by obtaining a perfect correspondence with the exactly solvable three-body ($N=3$) Calogero model in 1D.
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    Shape memory alloys often show a complex hierarchical morphology in the martensitic state. To understand the formation of this twin-within-twins microstructure, we examine epitaxial Ni-Mn-Ga films as a model system. In-situ scanning electron microscopy experiments show beautiful complex twinning patterns with a number of different mesoscopic twin boundaries and macroscopic twin boundaries between already twinned regions. We explain the appearance and geometry of these patterns by constructing an internally twinned martensitic nucleus, which can take the shape of a diamond or a parallelogram, within the basic phenomenological theory of martensite. These nucleus contains already the seeds of different possible mesoscopic twin boundaries. Nucleation and growth of these nuclei determines the creation of the hierarchical space-filling martensitic microstructure. This is in contrast to previous approaches to explain a hierarchical martensitic microstructure. This new picture of creation and anisotropic, well-oriented growth of twinned martensitic nuclei explains the morphology and exact geometrical features of our experimentally observed twins-within-twins microstructure on the meso- and macroscopic scale.
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    We explore an alternative way to fabricate (In,Ga)N/GaN short-period superlattices on GaN(0001) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. We exploit the existence of an In adsorbate structure manifesting itself by a $(\sqrt{3}\times\!\sqrt{3})\text{R}30^{\circ}$ surface reconstruction observed in-situ by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. This In adlayer accommodates a maximum of 1/3 monolayer of In on the GaN surface and, under suitable conditions, can be embedded into GaN to form an In$_{0.33}$Ga$_{0.67}$N quantum sheet whose width is naturally limited to a single monolayer. Periodically inserting these quantum sheets, we synthesize (In,Ga)N/GaN short-period superlattices with abrupt interfaces and high periodicity as demonstrated by x-ray diffractometry and scanning transmission electron microscopy. The embedded quantum sheets are found to consist of single monolayers with an In content of 0.25-0.29. For a barrier thickness of 6 monolayers, the superlattice gives rise to a photoluminescence band at 3.16 eV, close to the theoretically predicted values for these structures.
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    We introduce a matrix-product state based method to efficiently obtain dynamical response functions for two-dimensional microscopic Hamiltonians, which we apply to different phases of the Kitaev-Heisenberg model. We find significant broad high energy features beyond spin-wave theory even in the ordered phases proximate to spin liquids. This includes the phase with zig-zag order of the type observed in $\alpha$-RuCl$_3$, where we find high energy features like those seen in inelastic neutron scattering experiments. Our results provide an example of a natural path for proximate spin liquid features to arise at high energies above a conventionally ordered state, as the diffuse remnants of spin-wave bands intersect to yield a broad peak at the Brillouin zone center.
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    Future computing devices may rely on all-optical components and coherent transfer of energy and information. Next to quantum dots or NV-centers that act as photon sources, plasmonic nanoparticles hold great promise as photon handling elements and as transport channels between calculating subunits. Energy oscillations between two spatially separated plasmonic entities via a virtual middle state are examples of electron-based population transfer, but their realization requires precise control over nanoscale assembly of heterogeneous particles. Here, we show the assembly and optical analysis of a triple particle system consisting of a chain of two gold nanoparticles with an inter-spaced silver island. We observe strong plasmonic coupling between the spatially separated gold particles mediated by the connecting silver particle with almost no dissipation of energy. As the excitation energy of the silver island exceeds that of the gold particles, only quasi-occupation of the silver transfer channel is possible. We describe this effect both with exact classical electrodynamic modeling and qualitative quantum-mechanical calculations. We identify the formation of strong hot spots between all particles as the main mechanism for the loss-less coupling between the remote partners. The observed spectra are consistent with a description of coherent ultra-fast energy transfer and could thus prove useful for optical computing applications such as quantum gate operations, but also for classical charge and information transfer processes.
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    Majorana bound states (MBS) are well-established in the clean limit in wires of ferromagnetically aligned impurities deposited on conventional superconductors with finite spin-orbit coupling. Here we show that these MBS are very robust against disorder. By performing self-consistent calculations we find that the MBS are protected as long as the surrounding superconductor show no large signs of inhomogeneity. We find that longer wires offer more stability against disorder for the MBS, albeit the minigap decreases, as do increasing strengths of spin-orbit coupling and superconductivity.
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    This article continues our recent publication [I.A. Baburin and D.M. Proserpio and V.A. Saleev and A.V. Shipilova, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys.17, 1332 (2015)] where we have presented a comprehensive computational study of sp3 carbon allotropes based on the topologies proposed for zeolites. Here we predict six new silicon and six new germanium allotropes which have the same space group symmetries and topologies as those predicted earlier for the carbon allotropes, and study their structural, elastic, vibrational, electronic and optical properties.
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    We show that a carbon nanotube can serve as a functional electric weak link performing photo-spintronic transduction. A spin current, facilitated by strong spin-orbit interactions in the nanotube and not accompanied by a charge current, is induced in a device containing the nanotube weak link by circularly polarized microwaves. Nanomechanical tuning of the photo-spintronic transduction can be achieved due to the sensitivity of the spin-orbit interaction to geometrical deformations of the weak link.
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    Molecular wires of the acene-family can be viewed as a physical realization of a two-rung ladder Hamiltonian. For acene-ladders, closed-shell ab-initio calculations and elementary zone-folding arguments predict incommensurate gap oscillations as a function of the number of repetitive ring units, $N_{\text{R}}$, exhibiting a period of about ten rings. %% Results employing open-shell calculations and a mean-field treatment of interactions suggest anti-ferromagnetic correlations that could potentially open a large gap and wash out the gap oscillations. % Within the framework of a Hubbard model with repulsive on-site interaction, $U$, we employ a Hartree-Fock analysis and the density matrix renormalization group to investigate the interplay of gap oscillations and interactions. % We confirm the persistence of incommensurate oscillations in acene-type ladder systems for a significant fraction of parameter space spanned by $U$ and $N_{\text{R}}$.
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    Metal atoms and small clusters introduced into superfluid helium (He II) concentrate there in quantized vortices to form (by further coagulation) the thin nanowires. The nanowires' thickness and structure are well predicted by a double-staged mechanism. On the first stage the coagulation of cold particles in the vortex cores leads to melting of their fusion product, which acquires a spherical shape due to surface tension. Then (second stage) when these particles reach a certain size they do not possess sufficient energy to melt and eventually coalesce into the nanowires. Nevertheless the assumption of melting for such refractory metal as tungsten, especially in He II, which possesses an extremely high thermal conductivity, induces natural skepticism. That is why we decided to register directly the visible thermal emission accompanying metals coagulation in He II. The brightness temperatures of this radiation for the tungsten, molybdenum, and platinum coagulation were found to be noticeably higher than even the metals' melting temperatures. The region of He II that contained suspended metal particles expanded with the velocity of 50 m/s, being close to the Landau velocity, but coagulation took place even more quickly, so that the whole process of nanowire growth is completed at distances about 1.5 mm from the place of metal injection into He II. High rate of coagulation of guest metal particles as well as huge local overheating are associated with them concentrating in quantized vortex cores. The same process should take place not only for metals but for any atoms, molecules and small clusters embedded into He II.
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    Ultrafast plasmonics of novel materials has emerged as a promising field of nanophotonics bringing new concepts for advanced optical applications. Ultrafast electronic photoexcitation of a diamond surface and subsequent surface plasmon-polaritons (SPPs) excitation are studied both theoretically and experimentally - for the first time. After photoexcitation on the rising edge of the pulse, transient surface metallization was found to occur for laser intensity near 18 TW/cm$^2$ due to enhancement of the impact ionization rate; in this regime, the dielectric constant of the photoexcited diamond becomes negative in the trailing edge of the pulse thereby increasing the efficacy with which surface roughness leads to inhomogeneous energy absorption at the SPP wave-vector. These transient SPP waves imprint permanent fine and coarse surface ripples oriented perpendicularly to the laser polarization. The theoretical modeling is supported by the experiments on the generation of laser-induced periodic surface structure on diamond surface with normally incident 515-nm, 200-fs laser pulses. Sub-wavelength ($\Lambda \approx 100$ nm) and near wavelength ($\Lambda \approx 450$ nm) surface ripples oriented perpendicularly to the laser polarization emerged within the ablative craters with the increased number of laser shots; the spatial periods of the surface ripples decrease with the increasing exposure following known cumulative trends. The comparison between experimental data and theoretical predictions makes evident the role of transient changes of the dielectric permittivity of diamond during the initial stage of periodic surface ripple formation upon irradiation with ultrashort laser pulses.
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    It is often claimed that error cancellation plays an essential role in quantum chemistry and first-principle simulation for condensed matter physics and materials science. Indeed, while the energy of a large, or even medium-size, molecular system cannot be estimated numerically within chemical accuracy (typically 1 kcal/mol or 1 mHa), it is considered that the energy difference between two configurations of the same system can be computed in practice within the desired accuracy. The purpose of this paper is to provide a quantitative study of discretization error cancellation. The latter is the error component due to the fact that the model used in the calculation (e.g. Kohn-Sham LDA) must be discretized in a finite basis set to be solved by a computer. We first report comprehensive numerical simulations performed with Abinit on two simple chemical systems, the hydrogen molecule on the one hand, and a system consisting of two oxygen atoms and four hydrogen atoms on the other hand. We observe that errors on energy differences are indeed significantly smaller than errors on energies, but that these two quantities asymptotically converge at the same rate when the energy cut-off goes to infinity. We then analyze a simple one-dimensional periodic Schrödinger equation with Dirac potentials, for which analytic solutions are available. This allows us to explain the discretization error cancellation phenomenon on this test case with quantitative mathematical arguments.
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    Background forces are linear long range interactions of the cantilever body with its surroundings that must be compensated for in order to reveal tip-surface force, the quantity of interest for determining material properties in atomic force microscopy. We provide a mathematical derivation of a method to compensate for background forces, apply it to experimental data, and discuss how to include background forces in simulation. Our method, based on linear response theory in the frequency domain, provides a general way of measuring and compensating for any background force and it can be readily applied to different force reconstruction methods in dynamic AFM.
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    We study a two parameter ($u,p$) extension of the conformally invariant raise and peel model. The model also represents a nonlocal and biased-asymmetric exclusion process with local and nonlocal jumps of excluded volume particles in the lattice. The model exhibits an unusual and interesting critical phase where, in the bulk limit, there are an infinite number of absorbing states. In spite of these absorbing states the system stays, during a time that increases exponentially with the lattice size, in a critical quasi-stationary state. In this critical phase the critical exponents depend only on one of the parameters defining the model ($u$). The endpoint of this critical phase belongs to a distinct universality class, where the system changes from an active to an inactive frozen state. This new behavior we believe to be due to the appearance of Jordan cells in the Hamiltonian describing the time evolution. The dimensions of these cells increases with the lattice size. In a special case ($u=0$) where the model has no adsorptions we are able to calculate analytically the time evolution of some of the observables. A polynomial time dependence is obtained due to the Jordan cells structure of the Hamiltonian.
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    Energy level alignment at solid-solvent interfaces is an important step in determining the properties of electrochemical systems. The positions of conduction and valence band edges of a semiconductor are affected by its environment. In this study, using first-principles DFT calculation, we have determined the level shifts of the semiconductors TiO$_2$ and ZnO at the interfaces with MeCN and DMF solvent molecules. The level shifts of semiconductor is obtained using the potential difference between the clean and exposed surfaces of asymmetric slabs. In this work, neglecting the effects of ions in the electrolyte solution, we have shown that the solvent molecules give an up-shift to the levels, and the amount of this shift varies with coverage. It is also shown that the shapes of density of states do not change sensibly near the gap. Molecular dynamics simulations of the interface have shown that at room temperatures the semiconductor surface is not fully covered by the solvent molecules, and one must use intermediate values in an static calculations.
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    Cellular materials not only show interesting static properties but can also be used to manipulate dynamic mechanical waves. In this contribution, the existence of phononic band gaps in periodic cellular structures is experimentally shown via sonic transmission experiment. Cellular structures with varying numbers of cells are excited by piezoceramic actuators and the transmitted waves are measured by piezoceramic sensors. The minimum number of cells necessary to form a clear band gap is determined. A rotation of the cells does not have an influence on the formation of the gap, indicating a complete phononic band gap. The experimental results are in good agreement with the numerically obtained dispersion relation.
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    We consider the spontaneous formation of striped structures in a holographic model which possesses explicit translational symmetry breaking, dual to an ionic lattice with spatially modulated chemical potential. We focus on the perturbative study of the marginal modes which drive the transition to a phase exhibiting spontaneous stripes. We study the wave-vectors of the instabilities with largest critical temperature in a wide range of backgrounds characterized by the period and the amplitude of the chemical potential modulation. We report the first holographic observation of the commensurate lock-in between the spontaneous stripes and the underlying ionic lattice, which takes place when the amplitude of the lattice is large enough. We also observe an incommensurate regime in which the amplitude of the lattice is finite, but the preferred stripe wave-vector is different from that of the lattice. We find that the new commensurate phase, arising due to the above mentioned instabilities, presents features that make it a promising candidate for a holographic dual of a Mott insulator.
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    We explore the dynamics of a graphene nanomechanical oscillator coupled to a reference oscillator. Circular graphene drums are forced into self-oscillation, at a frequency fosc, by means of photothermal feedback induced by illuminating the drum with a continuous-wave red laser beam. Synchronization to a reference signal, at a frequency fsync, is achieved by shining a power-modulated blue laser onto the structure. We investigate two regimes of synchronization as a function of both detuning and signal strength for direct (fsync = fosc) and parametric locking (fsync = 2fosc). We detect a regime of phase resonance, where the phase of the oscillator behaves as an underdamped second-order system, with the natural frequency of the phase resonance showing a clear power-law dependence on the locking signal strength. The phase resonance is qualitatively reproduced using a forced van der Pol-Duffing-Mathieu equation.
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    In this work we study the effects of gradient flow and open boundary condition in the temporal direction in 1+1 dimensional lattice $\phi^4$ theory. Simulations are performed with periodic (PBC) and open (OPEN) boundary conditions in the temporal direction. The Effects of gradient flow and open boundary on the field $\phi$ and the susceptibility are studied in detail along with the finite size scaling analysis. In both cases, at a given volume, the phase transition point is shifted towards a lower value of lattice coupling $\lambda_0$ for fixed $m_0^2$ in the case of OPEN as compared to PBC with this shift found to be diminishing as volume increases. We compare and contrast the extraction of the boson mass from the two point function (PBC) and the one point function (OPEN) as the coupling, starting from moderate values, approaches the critical value corresponding to the vanishing of the mass gap. In the critical region, boundary artifacts become dominant in the latter. Our studies point towards the need for a detailed finite volume (scaling) analysis of the effects of OPEN in the critical region.
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    Recent experiments on quantum criticality in the Ge-substituted heavy-electron material YbRh2Si2 under magnetic field have revealed a possible non-Fermi liquid (NFL) strange metal (SM) state over a finite range of fields at low temperatures, which still remains a puzzle. In the SM region, the zero-field antiferromagnetism is suppressed. Above a critical field, it gives way to a heavy Fermi liquid with Kondo correlation. The T (temperature)-linear resistivity and the T-logarithmic followed by a power-law singularity in the specific heat coefficient at low T, salient NFL behaviours in the SM region, are un-explained. We offer a mechanism to address these open issues theoretically based on the competition between a quasi-2d fluctuating short-ranged resonant- valence-bonds (RVB) spin-liquid and the Kondo correlation near criticality. Via a field-theoretical renormalization group analysis on an effective field theory beyond a large-N approach to an anti- ferromagnetic Kondo-Heisenberg model, we identify the critical point, and explain remarkably well both the crossovers and the SM behaviour.
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    Static and dynamic properties of vortices in a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate with Rashba spin-orbit coupling are investigated. The mass current around a vortex core in the plane-wave phase is found to be deformed by the spin-orbit coupling, and this makes the dynamics of the vortex pairs quite different from those in a scalar Bose-Einstein condensate. The velocity of a vortex-antivortex pair is much smaller than that without spin-orbit coupling, and there exist stationary states. Two vortices with the same circulation move away from each other or unite to form a stationary state.
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    We study structural and chemical transformations induced by focused laser beam in GaAs nanowires with axial zinc-blende/wurtzite (ZB/WZ) heterostucture. The experiments are performed using a combination of transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Raman scattering, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. For the both components of heterostructure, laser irradiation under atmospheric air is found to produce a double surface layer which is composed of crystalline arsenic and of amorphous GaO$_{x}$. The latter compound is responsible for appearance of a peak at 1.76 eV in photoluminescence spectra of GaAs nanowires. Under increased laser power density, due to sample heating, evaporation of the surface crystalline arsenic and formation of $\beta$-Ga$_{2}$O$_{3}$ nanocrystals proceed on surface of the zinc-blende part of nanowire. The formed nanocrystals reveal a photoluminescence band in visible range of 1.7-2.4 eV. At the same power density for wurtzite part of the nanowire, total amorphization with formation of $\beta$-Ga$_{2}$O$_{3}$ nanocrystals occurs. Observed transformation of WZ-GaAs to $\beta$-Ga$_{2}$O$_{3}$ nanocrystals presents an available way for creation of axial and radial heterostuctures ZB-GaAs/$\beta$-Ga$_{2}$O$_{3}$ for optoelectronic and photonic applications.
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    In this paper, the absorption of a particle undergoing Lévy flight in the presence of a point sink of arbitrary strength and position is studied. The motion of such a particle is given by a modified Fokker-Planck equation whose exact solution in the Laplace domain can be described in terms of the Laplace transform of the unperturbed (absence of the sink) Green's function. This solution for the Green's function is a well-studied, generic result which applies to both fractional and usual Fokker-Planck equations alike. Using this result, the propagator and the absorption time distribution are obtained for free Lévy flight and Lévy flight in linear and harmonic potentials in the presence of a delta function sink, and their dependence on the sink strength is analyzed. Analytical results are presented for the long-time behaviour of the absorption time distribution in all the three above mentioned potentials. Simulation results are found to corroborate closely with the analytical results.
  • PDF
    Wavefunctions restricted to electron-pair states are promising models to describe static/nondynamic electron correlation effects encountered, for instance, in bond-dissociation processes and transition-metal and actinide chemistry. To reach spectroscopic accuracy, however, the missing dynamic electron correlation effects that cannot be described by electron-pair states need to be included \textita posteriori. In this article, we extend the previously presented perturbation theory models with an Antisymmetric Product of 1-reference orbital Geminal (AP1roG) reference function that allow us to describe both static/nondynamic and dynamic electron correlation effects. Specifically, our perturbation theory models combine a diagonal and off-diagonal zero-order Hamiltonian, a single-reference and multi-reference dual state, and different excitation operators used to construct the projection manifold. We benchmark all proposed models as well as an \textita posteriori linearized coupled cluster correction on top of AP1roG against CR-CCSD(T) reference data for reaction energies of several closed-shell molecules that are extrapolated to the basis set limit. Moreover, we test the performance of our new methods for multiple bond breaking processes in the N$_2$, C$_2$, and BN dimers against MRCI-SD and MRCI-SD+Q reference data. Our numerical results indicate that the best performance is obtained from a linearized coupled cluster correction as well as second-order perturbation theory corrections employing a diagonal and off-diagonal zero-order Hamiltonian and a single-determinant dual state. These dynamic corrections on top of AP1roG allow us to reliably model molecular systems dominated by static/nondynamic as well as dynamic electron correlation.
  • PDF
    We suggest a simple approach to populate photonic quantum materials at non-zero chemical potential and near-zero temperature. Taking inspiration from forced evaporation in cold-atom experiments, the essential ingredients for our low-entropy thermal reservoir are (a) inter-particle interactions, and (b) energy-dependent loss. The resulting thermal reservoir may then be coupled to a broad class of Hamiltonian systems to produce low-entropy quantum phases. We present an idealized picture of such a reservoir, deriving the scaling of reservoir entropy with system parameters, and then propose several practical implementations using only standard circuit quantum electrodynamics tools, and extract the fundamental performance limits. Finally, we explore, both analytically and numerically, the coupling of such a thermalizer to the paradigmatic Bose-Hubbard chain, where we employ it to stabilize an $n=1$ Mott phase. In this case, the performance is limited by the interplay of dynamically arrested thermalization of the Mott insulator and finite heat capacity of the thermalizer, characterized by its repumping rate. This work explores a new approach to preparation of quantum phases of strongly interacting photons, and provides a potential route to topologically protected phases that are difficult to reach through adiabatic evolution.
  • PDF
    We consider longitudinal nonlinear atomic vibrations in uniformly strained carbon chains with the cumulene structure ($=C=C=)_{n}$. With the aid of ab initio simulations, based on the density functional theory, we have revealed the phenomenon of the $\pi$-mode softening in a certain range of its amplitude for the strain above the critical value $\eta_{c}\approx 11\,{\%}$. Condensation of this soft mode induces the structural transformation of the carbon chain with doubling of its unit cell. This is the Peierls phase transition in the strained cumulene, which was previously revealed in [Nano Lett. 14, 4224 (2014)]. The Peierls transition leads to appearance of the energy gap in the electron spectrum of the strained carbyne, and this material transforms from the conducting state to semiconducting or insulating states. The authors of the above paper emphasize that such phenomenon can be used for construction of various nanodevices. The $\pi$-mode softening occurs because the old equilibrium positions (EQPs), around which carbon atoms vibrate at small strains, lose their stability and these atoms begin to vibrate in the new potential wells located near old EQPs. We study the stability of the new EQPs, as well as stability of vibrations in their vicinity. In previous paper [Physica D 203, 121(2005)], we proved that only three symmetry-determined Rosenberg nonlinear normal modes can exist in monoatomic chains with arbitrary interparticle interactions. They are the above-discussed $\pi$-mode and two other modes, which we call $\sigma$-mode and $\tau$-mode. These modes correspond to the multiplication of the unit cell of the vibrational state by two, three or four times compared to that of the equilibrium state. We study properties of these modes in the chain model with arbitrary pair potential of interparticle interactions.
  • PDF
    We explore the magnetic phases in a Kondo lattice model on the geometrically frustrated Shastry-Sutherland lattice at metallic electron densities, searching for topologically non-trivial chiral spin textures. Motivated by experimental observations in many rare earth based frustrated metallic magnets, we treat the local moments as classical spins and set the coupling between the itinerant electrons and local moments as the largest energy scale in the problem. Our results show that a canted flux state with non-zero static chirality is stabilized over an extended range of Hamiltonian parameters. The chiral spin state can be quenched efficiently by external fields like temperature and magnetic field as well as by varying the degree of frustration in the electronic itinerancy. Interestingly, unlike insulating electron densities, a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction between the local moments is not essential for the emergence of their non-coplanar ordering.
  • PDF
    The thermal and electrical transport properties of single-crystalline LaBe$_{13}$ have been investigated by specific-heat ($C$) and electrical-resistivity ($\rho$) measurements. The specific-heat measurements in a wide temperature range revealed the presence of a hump anomaly near 40 K in the $C$($T$)/$T$ curve, indicating that LaBe$_{13}$ has a low-energy Einstein-like-phonon mode with a characteristic temperature of $\sim$ 177 K. In addition, a superconducting transition was observed in the $\rho$ measurements at the transition temperature of 0.53 K, which is higher than the value of 0.27 K reported previously by Bonville et al. Furthermore, an unusual $T^3$ dependence was found in $\rho$($T$) below $\sim$ 50 K, in contrast to the behavior expected from the electron--electron scattering or the electron--Debye phonon scattering.
  • PDF
    Prompted by recent reports on $\sqrt{3} \times \sqrt{3}$ graphene superlattices with intrinsic inter-valley interactions, we perform first-principles calculations to investigate the electronic properties of periodically nitrogen-doped graphene and carbon nanotube nanostructures. In these structures, nitrogen atoms substitute one-sixth of the carbon atoms in the pristine hexagonal lattices with exact periodicity to form perfect $\sqrt{3} \times \sqrt{3}$ superlattices of graphene and carbon nanotubes. Multiple nanostructures of $\sqrt{3} \times \sqrt{3}$ graphene ribbons and carbon nanotubes are explored, and all configurations show nonmagnetic and metallic behaviors. The transport properties of $\sqrt{3} \times \sqrt{3}$ graphene and carbon nanotube superlattices are calculated utilizing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. The transmission spectrum through the pristine and $\sqrt{3} \times \sqrt{3}$ armchair carbon nanotube heterostructure shows quantized behavior under certain circumstances.
  • PDF
    It is theoretically demonstrated that the figure of merit ($ZT$) of quantum dot (QD) junctions can be significantly enhanced when the degree of degeneracy of the energy levels involved in electron transport is increased. The theory is based on the the Green-function approach in the Coulomb blockade regime by including all correlation functions resulting from electron-electron interactions associated with the degenerate levels ($L$). We found that electrical conductance ($G_e$) as well as electron thermal conductance ($\kappa_e$) are highly dependent on the level degeneracy ($L$), whereas the Seebeck coefficient ($S$) is not. Therefore, the large enhancement of $ZT$ is mainly attributed to the increase of $G_e$ when the phonon thermal conductance ($\kappa_{ph}$) dominates the heat transport of QD junction system. For thin nanowires filled with coupled QDs, it is found that a $ZT$ value close to 3 can be achieved by increasing the QD level degeneracy in the double-QD junction with a reasonable assessment of the phonon thermal conductance.
  • PDF
    Dynamics of active or self-propulsive Brownian particles in nonequilibrium status, has recently attracted great interest in many fields including biological entities and artificial micro/nanoscopic motors6. Understanding of their dynamics can provide insight into the statistical properties of biological and physical systems far from equilibrium. Generally, active Brownian particles can involve either translational or rotational motion. Here, we report the translational dynamics of photon-activated gold nanoparticles (NPs) in liquid cell imaged by four-dimensional electron microscopy (4D-EM). Under excitation of femtosecond (fs)-laser pulses, we observed that those Brownian NPs exhibit a superfast diffusive behavior with a diffusion constant four to five orders of magnitude greater than that in absence of laser excitation. The measured diffusion constant was found to follow a power-law dependence on the fs-laser fluence. Such superfast diffusion is induced by strong random driving forces arising from rapid nucleation, expansion and collapse of photoinduced nanobubbles (NBs) near the NP surface. In contrast, the motion of the NPs exhibit superfast ballistic translation at a short time scale down to nanoseconds (ns). Combining with physical model simulation, this study reveals a NB-propulsion mechanism for the self-propulsive motion, providing physical insights for better design of light-activated artificial micro/nanomotors.

Recent comments

Stefano Pirandola Nov 30 2016 06:45 UTC

Dear Mark, thx for your comment. There are indeed missing citations to previous works by Rafal, Janek and Lorenzo that we forgot to add. Regarding your paper, I did not read it in detail but I have two main comments:

1- What you are using is completely equivalent to the tool of "quantum simulatio

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Mark M. Wilde Nov 30 2016 02:18 UTC

An update http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 of this paper has appeared, one day after the arXiv post http://arxiv.org/abs/1611.09165 . The paper http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 now includes (without citation) some results for bosonic Gaussian channels found independently in http://arxiv.org/abs/16

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Mark M. Wilde Oct 06 2016 15:44 UTC

The following paper found a setting in which adaptive operations do not help in quantum channel discrimination:

https://arxiv.org/abs/1408.3373

It is published as

Communications in Mathematical Physics, vol. 344, no. 3, pages 797-829, June 2016

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2

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Māris Ozols Sep 15 2016 21:30 UTC

Here is a link for those who also haven't heard of SciPost before: https://scipost.org/

Zoltán Zimborás Sep 15 2016 18:12 UTC

This is the very first paper of SciPost, waiting for the first paper of "Quantum" (http://quantum-journal.org). There are radical (and good!) changes going on in scientific publishing.

JRW Aug 18 2016 16:42 UTC

A video of a talk I gave this morning will be [here][1], if it ever finishes uploading.

[1]: https://youtu.be/I8cMY0AmIY0

Valentin Zauner-Stauber Jul 18 2016 09:54 UTC

Conjugate Gradient IS a Krylov-space method...

Stephen Jordan Apr 15 2016 15:02 UTC

This is a beautiful set of lecture notes.

Zoltán Zimborás Jan 07 2016 06:50 UTC

Interesting, both the 2nd and the 4th author is called Yuanping Chen... :)

Mile Gu Nov 20 2015 05:04 UTC

Good question! There shouldn't be any contradiction with the correspondence principle. The reason here is that the quantum models are built to simulate the output behaviour of macroscopic, classical systems, and are not necessarily macroscopic themselves. When we compare quantum and classical comple

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