Condensed Matter (cond-mat)

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    We study thermal states of strongly interacting quantum spin chains and prove that those can efficiently be represented in terms of convex combinations of matrix product states. Apart from revealing new features of the entanglement structure of Gibbs states, such as an area law for the entanglement of formation, our results provide a theoretical justifications for the use of White's algorithm of minimally entangled typical thermal states. Furthermore, we shed new light on time dependent matrix product state algorithms which yield hydrodynamical descriptions of the underlying dynamics.
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    Purification is a powerful technique in quantum physics whereby a mixed quantum state is extended to a pure state on a larger system. This process is not unique, and in systems composed of many degrees of freedom, one natural purification is the one with minimal entanglement. Here we study the entropy of the minimally entangled purification, called the entanglement of purification, in three model systems: an Ising spin chain, conformal field theories holographically dual to Einstein gravity, and random stabilizer tensor networks. We conjecture values for the entanglement of purification in all these models, and we support our conjectures with a variety of numerical and analytical results. We find that such minimally entangled purifications have a number of applications, from enhancing entanglement-based tensor network methods for describing mixed states to elucidating novel aspects of the emergence of geometry from entanglement in the AdS/CFT correspondence.
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    We apply advanced methods of control theory to open quantum systems and we determine finite-time processes which are optimal with respect to thermodynamic performances. General properties and necessary conditions characterizing optimal drivings are derived, obtaining bang-bang type solutions corresponding to control strategies switching between adiabatic and isothermal transformations. A direct application of these results is the maximization of the work produced by a generic quantum heat engine, where we show that the maximum power is directly linked to a particular conserved quantity naturally emerging from the control problem. Finally we apply our general approach to the specific case of a two level system, which can be put in contact with two different baths at fixed temperatures, identifying the processes which minimize heat dissipation. Moreover, we explicitly solve the optimization problem for a cyclic two-level heat engine driven beyond the linear-response regime, determining the corresponding optimal cycle, the maximum power, and the efficiency at maximum power.
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    Anyons are exotic quasi-particles with fractional charge that can emerge as fundamental excitations of strongly interacting topological quantum phases of matter. Unlike ordinary fermions and bosons, they may obey non-abelian statistics--a property that would help realize fault tolerant quantum computation. Non-abelian anyons have long been predicted to occur in the fractional quantum Hall (FQH) phases that form in two-dimensional electron gases (2DEG) in the presence of a large magnetic field, su ch as the $\nu=\tfrac{5}{2}$ FQH state. However, direct experimental evidence of anyons and tests that can distinguish between abelian and non-abelian quantum ground states with such excitations have remained elusive. Here we propose a new experimental approach to directly visualize the structure of interacting electronic states of FQH states with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Our theoretical calculations show how spectroscopy mapping with the STM near individual impurity defects can be used to image fractional statistics in FQH states, identifying unique signatures in such measurements that can distinguish different proposed ground states. The presence of locally trapped anyons should leave distinct signatures in STM spectroscopic maps, and enables a new approach to directly detect - and perhaps ultimately manipulate - these exotic quasi-particles.
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    In this letter we report a thorough analysis of the exciton dispersion in bulk hexagonal boron nitride. We solve the ab initio GW Bethe-Salpeter equation at finite $\mathbf{q}\parallel \Gamma K$, and we compare our results with recent high-accuracy electron energy loss data. Simulations reproduce the measured dispersion and the variation of the peak intensity. We focus on the evolution of the intensity, and we demonstrate that the excitonic peak is formed by the superposition of two groups of transitions that we call $KM$ and $MK'$ from the k-points involved in the transitions. These two groups contribute to the peak intensity with opposite signs, each damping the contributions of the other. The variations in number and amplitude of these transitions determine the changes in intensity of the peak. Our results contribute to the understanding of electronic excitations in this systems along the $\Gamma K$ direction, which is the relevant direction for spectroscopic measurements. They also unveil the non-trivial relation between valley physics and excitonic dispersion in h--BN, opening the possibility to tune excitonic effects by playing with the interference between transitions. Furthermore, this study introduces analysis tools and a methodology that are completely general. They suggest a way to regroup independent-particle transitions which could permit a deeper understanding of excitonic properties in any system.
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    It is demonstrated that fermionic/bosonic symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases across different dimensions and symmetry classes can be organized using geometric constructions that increase dimensions and symmetry-forgetting maps that change symmetry groups. Specifically, it is shown that the interacting classifications of SPT phases with and without glide symmetry fit into a short exact sequence, so that the classification with glide is constrained to be a direct sum of cyclic groups of order 2 or 4. Applied to fermionic SPT phases in the Wigner-Dyson class AII, this implies that the complete interacting classification in the presence of glide is ${\mathbb Z}_4{\oplus}{\mathbb Z}_2{\oplus}{\mathbb Z}_2$ in 3 dimensions. In particular, the hourglass-fermion phase recently realized in the band insulator KHgSb must be robust to interactions. Generalizations to spatiotemporal glide symmetries are discussed.
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    Boundary conformal field theories have several additional terms in the trace anomaly of the stress tensor associated purely with the boundary. We constrain the corresponding boundary central charges in three- and four-dimensional conformal field theories in terms of two- and three-point correlation functions of the displacement operator. We provide a general derivation by comparing the trace anomaly with scale dependent contact terms in the correlation functions. We conjecture a relation between the a-type boundary charge in three dimensions and the stress tensor two-point function near the boundary. We check our results for several free theories.
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    We consider the Fermi polaron problem at zero temperature, where a single impurity interacts with non-interacting host fermions. We approach the problem starting with a Frohlich-like Hamiltonian where the impurity is described with canonical position and momentum operators. We apply the Lee-Low-Pine (LLP) transformation to change the fermionic Frohlich Hamiltonian into the fermionic LLP Hamiltonian which describes a many-body system containing host fermions only. We adapt the self-consistent Hartree-Fock (HF) approach, first proposed by Edwards, to the fermionic LLP Hamiltonian in which a pair of host fermions with momenta $\mathbf{k}$ and $\mathbf{k}'$ interact with a potential proportional to $\mathbf{k}\cdot\mathbf{k}'$. We apply the HF theory, which has the advantage of not restricting the number of particle-hole pairs, to repulsive Fermi polarons in one dimension. When the impurity and host fermion masses are equal our variational ansatz, where HF orbitals are expanded in terms of free-particle states, produces results in excellent agreement with McGuire's exact analytical results based on the Bethe ansatz. This work raises the prospect of using the HF ansatz and its time-dependent generalization as building blocks for developing all-coupling theories for both equilibrium and nonequilibrium Fermi polarons in higher dimensions
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    We study the phase transition between conducting and insulating states taking place in disordered multi-channel Luttinger liquids with inter-channel interactions. We derive renormalisation group equations which are perturbative in disorder but nonperturbative in interaction. In the vicinity of the simultaneous phase transition in all channels, these equations become a set of coupled Berezinskii--Kosterlitz--Thouless equations, which we analyze within two models: an array of identical wires and a two-channel model with distinct channels. We show that a competition between disorder and interaction results in a variety of phases, expected to be observable at intermediate temperatures where the interaction and disorder are relevant but weak hybridization and the charge-density wave interaction may be ignored.
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    Understanding the wave transport and localisation is a major goal in the study of lattices of different nature. In general, inhibiting the energy transport on a perfectly periodic and disorder-free system is challenging, however, some specific lattice geometries allow localisation due to the presence of dispersionless (flat) bands in the energy spectrum. Here, we report on the experimental realisation of a quasi-one-dimensional photonic graphene ribbon supporting four flat-bands. We study the dynamics of fundamental and dipolar modes, which are analogous to the s and p orbitals, respectively. In the experiment, both modes (orbitals) are effectively decoupled from each other, implying two sets of six bands, where two of them are completely flat. Using an image generator setup, we excite the s and p flat band modes and demonstrate their non-diffracting propagation for the first time. Our results open an exciting route towards photonic emulation of higher orbital dynamics.
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    Dynamic density functionals (DDFs) are popular tools for studying the dynamical evolution of inhomogeneous polymer systems. Here, we present a systematic evaluation of a set of diffusive DDF theories by comparing their predictions with data from particle-based Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations for two selected problems: Interface broadening in compressible A/B homopolymer blends after a sudden change of the incompatibility parameter, and microphase separation in compressible A:B diblock copolymer melts. Specifically, we examine (i) a local dynamics model, where monomers are taken to move independently from each other, (ii) a nonlocal "chain dynamics" model, where monomers move jointly with correlation matrix given by the local chain correlator, and (iii,iv) two popular approximations to (ii), namely (iii) the Debye dynamics model, where the chain correlator is approximated by its value in a homogeneous system, and (iv) the computationally efficient "external potential dynamics" (EPD) model. With the exception of EPD, the value of the compressibility parameter has little influence on the results. In the interface broadening problem, the chain dynamics model reproduces the BD data best. However, the closely related EPD model produces large spurious artefacts. These artefacts disappear when the blend system becomes incompressible. In the microphase separation problem, the predictions of the nonlocal models (ii-iv) agree with each other and significantly overestimate the ordering time, whereas the local model (i) underestimates it. We attribute this to the multiscale character of the ordering process, which involves both local and global chain rearrangements. To account for this, we propose a mixed local/nonlocal DDF scheme which quantitatively reproduces all BD simulation data considered here.
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    We report the fabrication and electrical characterization of depletion-mode quantum dots in a two-dimensional hole gas (2DHG) in intrinsic silicon. We use fixed charge in a SiO$_2$/Al$_2$O$_3$ dielectric stack to induce a 2DHG at the Si/SiO$_2$ interface. Fabrication of the gate structures is accomplished with a single layer metallization process. Transport spectroscopy reveals regular Coulomb oscillations with charging energies of 10-15 meV and 3-5 meV for the few- and many-hole regimes, respectively. This depletion-mode design avoids complex multilayer architectures requiring precision alignment, and allows to adopt directly best practices already developed for depletion dots in other material systems. We also demonstrate a method to deactivate fixed charge in the SiO$_2$/Al$_2$O$_3$ dielectric stack using deep ultraviolet light, which may become an important procedure to avoid unwanted 2DHG build-up in Si MOS quantum bits.
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    We realise bistability in the spinor of polariton condensates under non-resonant optical excitation and in the absence of biasing external fields. Numerical modelling of the system using the Ginzburg-Landau equation with an internal Josephson coupling between the two spin components of the condensate qualitatively describes the experimental observations. We demonstrate that polariton spin bistability persists for sweep times in the range of $[10 \mu sec,1 sec]$ offering a promising route to spin switches and spin memory elements.
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    We formulate a numerical method for predicting the tensorial linear response of a rigid, asymmetrically charged body to an applied electric field. This prediction requires calculating the response of the fluid to the Stokes drag forces on the moving body and on the countercharges near its surface. To determine the fluid's motion, we represent both the body and the countercharges using many point sources of drag known as stokeslets. Finding the correct flow field amounts to finding the set of drag forces on the stokeslets that is consistent with the relative velocities experienced by each stokeslet. The method rigorously satisfies the condition that the object moves with no transfer of momentum to the fluid. We demonstrate that a sphere represented by 1999 well-separated stokeslets on its surface produces flow and drag force like a solid sphere to one-percent accuracy. We show that a uniformly-charged sphere with 3998 body and countercharge stokeslets obeys the Smoluchowski prediction \citeMorrison for electrophoretic mobility when the countercharges lie close to the sphere. Spheres with dipolar and quadrupolar charge distributions rotate and translate as predicted analytically to four percent accuracy or better. We describe how the method can treat general asymmetric shapes and charge distributions. This method offers promise as a way to characterize and manipulate asymmetrically charged colloid-scale objects from biology (e.g. viruses) and technology (e.g. self-assembled clusters).
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    The search for new materials, based on computational screening, relies on methods that accurately predict, in an automatic manner, total energy, atomic-scale geometries, and other fundamental characteristics of materials. Many technologically important material properties directly stem from the electronic structure of a material, but the usual workhorse for total energies, namely density-functional theory, is plagued by fundamental shortcomings and errors from approximate exchange-correlation functionals in its prediction of the electronic structure. At variance, the $GW$ method is currently the state-of-the-art \em ab initio approach for accurate electronic structure. It is mostly used to perturbatively correct density-functional theory results, but is however computationally demanding and also requires expert knowledge to give accurate results. Accordingly, it is not presently used in high-throughput screening: fully automatized algorithms for setting up the calculations and determining convergence are lacking. In this work we develop such a method and, as a first application, use it to validate the accuracy of $G_0W_0$ using the PBE starting point, and the Godby-Needs plasmon pole model ($G_0W_0^\textrm{GN}$@PBE), on a set of about 80 solids. The results of the automatic convergence study utilized provides valuable insights. Indeed, we find correlations between computational parameters that can be used to further improve the automatization of $GW$ calculations. Moreover, we find that $G_0W_0^\textrm{GN}$@PBE shows a correlation between the PBE and the $G_0W_0^\textrm{GN}$@PBE gaps that is much stronger than that between $GW$ and experimental gaps. However, the $G_0W_0^\textrm{GN}$@PBE gaps still describe the experimental gaps more accurately than a linear model based on the PBE gaps.
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    Surfaces of homoepitaxially grown TiO2-terminated SrTiO3(001) were studied in situ with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. By controlling the Ti/Sr ratio, two-dimensional domains of highly ordered linear nanostructures, so-called "nanolines", are found to form on the surface. To further study how the surface structure affects the band structure, spectroscopic studies of these surfaces were performed. Our results reveal significantly more band bending for surfaces with the nanolines, indicative of an acceptor state associated with these features. Additionally, an in-gap state is observed on nanoline surfaces grown under high oxygen deficient conditions. This state appears to be the same as that observed previously, arising from the (++/+) transition level of surface oxygen vacancies.
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    We present experimental and theoretical investigation of exciton recombination dynamics and the related polarization of emission in highly in-plane asymmetric nanostructures. Considering general asymmetry- and size-driven effects, we illustrate them with a detailed analysis of InAs/AlGaInAs/InP elongated quantum dots. These offer a widely varied confinement characteristics tuned by size and geometry that are tailored during the growth process, which leads to emission in the application-relevant spectral range of 1.25-1.65 \mum. By exploring the interplay of the very shallow hole confining potential and widely varying structural asymmetry, we show that a transition from the strong through intermediate to even weak confinement regime is possible in nanostructures of this kind. This has a significant impact on exciton recombination dynamics and the polarization of emission, which are shown to depend not only on details of the calculated excitonic states but also on excitation conditions in the photoluminescence experiments. We estimate the impact of the latter and propose a way to determine the intrinsic polarization-dependent exciton light-matter coupling based on kinetic characteristics.
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    Investigation of the electron-phonon interaction (EPI) in LaCuSb2 and La(Cu0.8Ag0.2)Sb2 compounds by Yanson point-contact spectroscopy (PCS) has been carried out. Point-contact spectra display a pronounced broad maximum in the range of 10\div20 mV caused by EPI. Variation of the position of this maximum is likely connected with anisotropic phonon spectrum in these layered compounds. The absence of phonon features after the main maximum allows the assessment of the Debye energy of about 40 meV. The EPI constant for the LaCuSb2 compound was estimated to be \lambda=0.2+/-0.03. A zero-bias minimum in differential resistance for the latter compound is observed for some point contacts, which vanishes at about 6 K, pointing to the formation of superconducting phase under point contact, while superconducting critical temperature of the bulk sample is only 1K.
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    A synoptic view on the long-established theory of light propagation in crystalline dielectrics is presented, providing a new exact solution for the microscopic local electromagnetic field thus disclosing the role of the divergence-free (transversal) and curl-free (longitudinal) parts of the electromagnetic field inside a material as a function of the density of polarizable atoms. Our results enable fast and efficient calculation of the photonic bandstructure and also the (non-local) dielectric tensor, solely with the crystalline symmetry and atom-individual polarizabilities as input.
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    We report the high-field induced magnetic phase in single crystal of U(Ru0.92Rh0.08)2Si2. Our neutron study combined with high-field magnetization, shows that the magnetic phase above the first metamagnetic transition at Hc1 = 21.6 T has an uncompensated commensurate antiferromagnetic structure with propagation vector Q2 = ( 2/3 0 0) possessing two single-Q domains. U moments of 1.45 (9) muB directed along the c axis are arranged in an up-up-down sequence propagating along the a axis, in agreement with bulk measurements. The U magnetic form factor at high fields is consistent with both the U3+ and U4+ type. The low field short-range order that emerges from the pure URu2Si2 due to Rh-doping is initially strengthened by the field but disappears in the field-induced phase. The tetragonal symmetry is preserved across the transition but the a axis lattice parameter increases already at low fields. Our results are in agreement with itinerant electron model with 5f states forming bands pinned in the vicinity of the Fermi surface that is significantly reconstructed by the applied magnetic field.
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    We investigate the histograms of conductance values obtained during controlled electromigration thinning of Cu thin films. We focus on the question whether the most frequently observed conductance values, apparent as peaks in conductance histograms, can be attributed to the atomic structure of the wire. To this end we calculate the Fourier transform of the conductance histograms. We find all the frequencies matching the highly symmetric crystallographic directions of fcc-Cu. In addition, there are other frequencies explainable by oxidation and possibly formation of hcp-Cu. With these structures we can explain all peaks occurring in the Fourier transform within the relevant range. The results remain the same if only a third of the samples are included. By comparing our results to the ones available in the literature on work-hardened nanowires we find indications that even at low temperatures of the environment, metallic nanocontacts could show enhanced electromigration at low current densities due to defects enhancing electron scattering.
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    We show that the stripe spin-density wave state commonly observed in the phase diagrams of the iron-based superconductors necessarily triggers loop currents characterized by charge transfer between different Fe 3d orbitals. This effect is rooted on the glide-plane symmetry of these materials and on the existence of an atomic spin-orbit coupling that couples states at the $X$ and $Y$ points of the 1-Fe Brillouin zone. In the particular case in which the spins are aligned parallel to the magnetic ordering vector direction which is the spin configuration most commonly found in the iron-based superconductors these loop currents involve the $d_{xy}$ orbital and either the $d_{yz}$ orbital (if the spins point along the $y$ axis) or the $d_{xz}$ orbitals (if the spins point along the $x$ axis). We show that the two main manifestations of the orbital loop currents are the emergence of magnetic moments in the pnictide/chalcogen site and an orbital-selective band splitting in the magnetically ordered state, both of which could be detected experimentally. Our results highlight the unique intertwining between orbital and spin degrees of freedom in the iron-based superconductors, and reveal the emergence of an unusual correlated phase that may impact the normal state and superconducting properties of these materials.
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    The emergence of large-scale connectivity underlies the proper functioning of many networked systems, ranging from social networks and technological infrastructure to global trade networks. Percolation theory characterizes network formation following stochastic local rules, while optimization models of network formation assume a single controlling authority or one global objective function. In socio-economic networks, however, network formation is often driven by individual, locally optimal decisions. How such decisions impact connectivity is only poorly understood to date. We study how large-scale connectivity emerges from decisions made by rational agents that individually minimize costs for satisfying their demand. We establish an exact mapping of the resulting nonlinear optimization problem to a local percolation model and analyze how locally optimal decisions on the micro-level define the structure of networks on the macroscopic scale.
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    Rare-earth nickelates form an intriguing series of correlated perovskite oxides. Apart from LaNiO3, they exhibit on cooling a sharp metal-insulator electronic phase transition, a concurrent structural phase transition and a magnetic phase transition toward an unusual antiferromagnetic spin order. Appealing for various applications, full exploitation of these compounds is still hampered by the lack of global understanding of the interplay between their electronic, structural and magnetic properties. Here, we show from first-principles calculations that the metal-insulator transition of nickelates arises from the softening of an oxygen breathing distortion, structurally triggered by oxygen-octahedra rotation motions. The origin of such a rare triggered mechanism is traced back in their electronic and magnetic properties, providing a united picture. We further develop a Landau model accounting for the evolution of the metal-insulator transition in terms of the $R cations and rationalising how to tune this transition by acting on oxygen rotation motions.
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    We investigate Brownian motion of rod-shaped glass particles in freely-suspended liquid crystalline films, which represent a unique experimental model system for 2D isotropic fluids. We demonstrate that the viscous drag is anisotropic and the anisotropy is increasing with increasing ratio of the particle length to the hydrodynamic scale given by the Saffman-Delbrück length. The experimental data for translational and rotational drags collected over three orders of magnitude of the effective rod length are found to be in excellent agreement with the theoretical model developed by Levine et al. [\em Phys.Rev.Lett. \bf 93, 038102 (2004)].
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    X-ray absorption spectra calculated within an effective one-electron approach have to be broadened to account for the finite lifetime of the core hole. For Green's function based methods this can be achieved either by adding a small imaginary part to the energy or by convoluting the spectra on the real axis with a Lorentzian. We demonstrate on the case of Fe K and L2,3 spectra that these procedures lead to identical results only for energies higher than few core level widths above the absorption edge. For energies close to the edge, spurious spectral features may appear if too much weight is put on broadening via the imaginary energy component. Special care should be taken for dichroic spectra at edges which comprise several exchange-split core levels, such as the L3 edge of 3d transition metals.
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    PT-symmetric quantum mechanics allows finding stationary states in mean-field systems with balanced gain and loss of particles. In this work we apply this method to rotating Bose-Einstein condensates with contact interaction which are known to support ground states with vortices. Due to the particle exchange with the environment transport phenomena through ultracold gases with vortices can be studied. We find that even strongly interacting rotating systems support stable PT-symmetric ground states, sustaining a current parallel and perpendicular to the vortex cores. The vortices move through the non-uniform particle density and leave or enter the condensate through its borders creating the required net current.
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    We report a study on the electrical properties of 19 nm thick Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) films grown by liquid phase epitaxy. The electrical conductivity and Hall coefficient are measured in the high temperature range [300,400]~K using a Van der Pauw four-point probe technique. We find that the electrical resistivity decreases exponentially with increasing temperature following an activated behavior corresponding to a band-gap of $E_g\approx 2$ eV, indicating that epitaxial YIG ultra-thin films behave as large gap semiconductor, and not as electrical insulator. The resistivity drops to about $5\times 10^3$~$\Omega \cdot \text{cm}$ at $T=400$ K. We also infer the Hall mobility, which is found to be positive ($p$-type) at 5 cm$^2$/(V$\cdot$sec) and about independent of temperature. We discuss the consequence for non-local transport experiments performed on YIG at room temperature. These electrical properties are responsible for an offset voltage (independent of the in-plane field direction) whose amplitude, odd in current, grows exponentially with current due to Joule heating. These electrical properties also induce a sensitivity to the perpendicular component of the magnetic field through the Hall effect. In our lateral device, a thermoelectric offset voltage is produced by a temperature gradient along the wire direction proportional to the perpendicular component of the magnetic field (Righi-Leduc effects).
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    Oxygen vacancies, especially their distribution, are directly coupled to the electromagnetic properties of oxides and related emergent functionalities that have implication in device applications. Here using a homoepitaxial strontium titanate thin film, we demonstrate a controlled manipulation of the oxygen vacancy distribution using the mechanical force from a scanning probe microscope tip. By combining Kelvin probe force microscopy imaging and phase-field simulations, we show that oxygen vacancies can move under a stress-gradient-induced depolarisation field. When tailored, this nanoscale flexoelectric effect enables a controlled spatial modulation. In motion, the scanning probe tip thereby deterministically reconfigures the spatial distribution of vacancies. The ability to locally manipulate oxygen vacancies on-demand provides a tool for the exploration of mesoscale quantum phenomena, and engineering multifunctional oxide devices.
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    We present a thorough tight-binding analysis of the band structure of a wide variety of lattices belonging to the class of honeycomb and Kagome systems including several mixed forms combining both lattices. The band structure of these systems are made of a combination of dispersive and flat bands. The dispersive bands possess Dirac cones (linear dispersion) at the six corners (K points) of the Brillouin zone although in peculiar cases Dirac cones at the center of the zone $(\Gamma$ point) appear. The flat bands can be of different nature. Most of them are tangent to the dispersive bands at the center of the zone but some, for symmetry reasons, do not hybridize with other states. The objective of our work is to provide an analysis of a wide class of so-called ligand-decorated honeycomb Kagome lattices that are observed in 2D metal-organic framework (MOF) where the ligand occupy honeycomb sites and the metallic atoms the Kagome sites. We show that the $p_x$-$p_y$ graphene model is relevant in these systems and there exists four types of flat bands: Kagome flat (singly degenerate) bands, two kinds of ligand-centered flat bands (A$_2$ like and E like, respectively doubly and singly degenerate) and metal-centered (three fold degenerate) flat bands.
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    The realization of quantum field theories on an optical lattice is an important subject toward the quantum simulation. We argue that such efforts would lead to the experimental realizations of quantum black holes. The basic idea is to construct non-gravitational systems which are equivalent to the quantum gravitational systems via the holographic principle. Here the `equivalence' means that two theories cannot be distinguished even in principle. Therefore, if the holographic principle is true, one can create actual quantum black holes by engineering the non-gravitational systems on an optical lattice. In this presentation, we consider the simplest example: the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) model. We design an experimental scheme for creating the SYK model with use of ultra-cold fermionic atoms such as Lithium-6.
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    It is a common perception that the transport of a spin current in polycrystalline metal is isotropic and independent of the polarization direction, even though spin current is a tensorlike quantity and its polarization direction is a key variable. We demonstrate surprising anisotropic spin relaxation in mesoscopic polycrystalline Cu channels in nonlocal spin valves. For directions in the substrate plane, the spin-relaxation length is longer for spins parallel to the Cu channel than for spins perpendicular to it, by as much as 9% at 10 K. Spin-orbit effects on the surfaces of Cu channels can account for this anisotropic spin relaxation. The finding suggests novel tunability of spin current, not only by its polarization direction but also by electrostatic gating.
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    Structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of laves phase intermetallic compounds CaRh2 and LaRh2 prototype with MgCu2 are investigated by using the first principle calculations. These calculations stand on density functional theory (DFT) from CASTEP code. The calculated lattice parameters are consistent with the experimental values. The significant elastic properties, like as bulk modulus, shear modulus, Youngs modulus and the Poissons ratio are determined by applying the Voigt Reuss Hill (VRH) approximation. The analysis of Pughs ratio shows the ductile nature of both the phases. Metallic conductivity is observed for both the compounds. Most of the contribution originates from Rh 4d states at Fermi level in DOS. The study of bonding characteristics reveals the existence of ionic and metallic bonds in both intermetallics. The study of optical properties indicates that maximum reflectivity occurs in low energy region implying the characteristics of high conductance of both the phases. Absorption quality of both the phases is good in the visible region.
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    We studied the Ehrenfest urn model in which particles in the same urn interact with each other. Depending on the nature of interaction, the system undergoes a first-order or second-order phase transition. The relaxation time to the equilibrium state, the Poincare cycles of the equilibrium state and the most far-from-equilibrium state, and the duration time of the states during first-order phase transition are calculated. It was shown that the scaling behavior of the Poincare cycles could be served as an indication to the nature of phase transition, and the ratio of duration time of the states could be a strong evidence of the metastability during first-order phase transition.
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    We present results of specific heat, electrical resistance, and magnetoresistivity measurements on single crystals of the heavy-fermion superconducting alloy Ce$_{0.91}$Yb$_{0.09}$CoIn$_5$. Signatures of the non-Fermi liquid to Fermi liquid crossover are clearly observed in the temperature dependence of the Sommerfeld coefficient $\gamma$ and resistivity data. Furthermore, we show that the Yb-doped sample with $x=0.09$ exhibits universality due to an underlying quantum phase transition without an applied magnetic field by utilizing the scaling analysis of $\gamma$. Fitting of the heat capacity and resistivity data based on existing theoretical models indicates that the zero-field quantum critical point is of antiferromagnetic origin.
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    The artifacts in the magnetic structures reconstructed from Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (LTEM) images with TIE method have been analyzed. The processing for the simulated Bloch and Neel spirals indicated that the improper parameters in the TIE may overestimate the higher frequency information and induce some false inverse fluxes in the retrieved images. The specimen tilt will complicate the analysis of the images because the images in LTEM are the integral projection of the magnetization in the specimen.
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    Topological defects in magnetism have attracted great attention due to fundamental research interests and potential novel spintronics applications. Rich examples of topological defects can be found in nanoscale non-uniform spin textures, such as monopoles, domain walls, vortices, and skyrmions. Recently, skyrmions stabilized by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction have been studied extensively. However, the stabilization of antiskyrmions is less straightforward. Here, using numerical simulations we demonstrate that antiskyrmions can be a stable spin configuration in the presence of anisotropic Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. We find current-driven antiskyrmion motion that has a transverse component, namely antiskyrmion Hall effect. The antiskyrmion gyroconstant is opposite to that for skyrmion, which allows the current-driven propagation of coupled skyrmion-antiskyrmion pairs without apparent skyrmion Hall effect. The antiskyrmion Hall angle strongly depends on the current direction, and a zero antiskyrmion Hall angle can be achieved at a critic current direction. These results open up possibilities to tailor the spin topology in nanoscale magnetism, which may be useful in the emerging field of skyrmionics.
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    We study the root of unity limit of the lens elliptic gamma function solution of the star-triangle relation, for an integrable model with continuous and discrete spin variables. This limit involves taking an elliptic nome to a primitive $rN$-th root of unity, where $r$ is an existing integer parameter of the lens elliptic gamma function, and $N$ is an additional integer parameter. This is a singular limit of the star-triangle relation, and at subleading order of an asymptotic expansion, another star-triangle relation is obtained for a model with discrete spin variables in $\mathbb{Z}_{rN}$. Some special choices of solutions of equation of motion are shown to result in well-known discrete spin solutions of the star-triangle relation. The saddle point equations themselves are identified with three-leg forms of "3D-consistent" classical discrete integrable equations, known as $Q4$ and $Q3_{(\delta=0)}$. We also comment on the implications for supersymmetric gauge theories, and in particular comment on a close parallel with the works of Nekrasov and Shatashvili.
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    We obtain exact solutions to the two-dimensional (2D) Dirac equation for the one-dimensional Pöschl-Teller potential which contains an asymmetry term. The eigenfunctions are expressed in terms of Heun confluent functions, while the eigenvalues are determined via the solutions of a simple transcendental equation. For the symmetric case, the eigenfunctions of the supercritical states are expressed as spheroidal wave functions, and approximate analytical expressions are obtained for the corresponding eigenvalues. A universal condition for any square integrable symmetric potential is obtained for the minimum strength of the potential required to hold a bound state of zero energy. Applications for smooth electron waveguides in 2D Dirac-Weyl systems are discussed.
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    Degenerately doped semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) exhibit a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Unlike metals, semiconductor NCs offer tunable LSPR characteristics enabled by doping, or via electrochemical or photochemical charging. Tuning plasmonic properties through carrier density modulation suggests potential applications in smart optoelectronics, catalysis, and sensing. Here, we elucidate fundamental aspects of LSPR modulation through dynamic carrier density tuning in Sn-doped Indium Oxide NCs. Monodisperse Sn-doped Indium Oxide NCs with various doping level and sizes were synthesized and assembled in uniform films. NC films were then charged in an in situ electrochemical cell and the LSPR modulation spectra were monitored. Based on spectral shifts and intensity modulation of the LSPR, combined with optical modeling, it was found that often-neglected semiconductor properties, specifically band structure modification due to doping and surface states, strongly affect LSPR modulation. Fermi level pinning by surface defect states creates a surface depletion layer that alters the LSPR properties; it determines the extent of LSPR frequency modulation, diminishes the expected near field enhancement, and strongly reduces sensitivity of the LSPR to the surroundings.
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Recent comments

Maciej Malinowski Jul 26 2017 15:56 UTC

In what sense is the ground state for large detuning ordered and antiferromagnetic? I understand that there is symmetry breaking, but other than that, what is the fundamental difference between ground states for large negative and large positive detunings? It seems to be they both exhibit some order

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Thomas Klimpel Apr 20 2017 09:16 UTC

This paper [appeared][1] in February 2016 in the peer reviewed interdisciplinary journal Chaos by the American Institute of Physics (AIP).

It has been reviewed publicly by amateurs both [favorably][2] and [unfavorably][3]. The favorable review took the last sentence of the abstract ("These invalid

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Stefano Pirandola Nov 30 2016 06:45 UTC

Dear Mark, thx for your comment. There are indeed missing citations to previous works by Rafal, Janek and Lorenzo that we forgot to add. Regarding your paper, I did not read it in detail but I have two main comments:

1- What you are using is completely equivalent to the tool of "quantum simulatio

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Mark M. Wilde Nov 30 2016 02:18 UTC

An update http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 of this paper has appeared, one day after the arXiv post http://arxiv.org/abs/1611.09165 . The paper http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 now includes (without citation) some results for bosonic Gaussian channels found independently in http://arxiv.org/abs/16

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Mark M. Wilde Oct 06 2016 15:44 UTC

The following paper found a setting in which adaptive operations do not help in quantum channel discrimination:

https://arxiv.org/abs/1408.3373

It is published as

Communications in Mathematical Physics, vol. 344, no. 3, pages 797-829, June 2016

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2

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Māris Ozols Sep 15 2016 21:30 UTC

Here is a link for those who also haven't heard of SciPost before: https://scipost.org/

Zoltán Zimborás Sep 15 2016 18:12 UTC

This is the very first paper of SciPost, waiting for the first paper of "Quantum" (http://quantum-journal.org). There are radical (and good!) changes going on in scientific publishing.

James Wootton Aug 18 2016 16:42 UTC

A video of a talk I gave this morning will be [here][1], if it ever finishes uploading.

[1]: https://youtu.be/I8cMY0AmIY0

Valentin Zauner-Stauber Jul 18 2016 09:54 UTC

Conjugate Gradient IS a Krylov-space method...

Stephen Jordan Apr 15 2016 15:02 UTC

This is a beautiful set of lecture notes.