Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (astro-ph.SR)

  • PDF
    A Type IIn supernova (SN) is dominated by the interaction of SN ejecta with the circumstellar medium (CSM). Some SNe IIn (e.g., SN 2006jd) have episodes of re-brightening ("bumps") in their light curves. We present iPTF13z, a SN IIn discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) and characterised by several bumps in its light curve. We analyse this peculiar behaviour trying to infer the properties of the CSM and of the SN explosion, as well as the nature of its progenitor star. We obtained multi-band optical photometry for over 1000 days after discovery with the P48 and P60 telescopes at Palomar Observatory. We obtained low-resolution optical spectra in the same period. We did an archival search for progenitor outbursts. We analyse our photometry and spectra, and compare iPTF13z to other SNe IIn. A simple analytical model is used to estimate properties of the CSM. iPTF13z was a SN IIn showing a light curve with five bumps during its decline phase. The bumps had amplitudes between 0.4 and 0.9 mag and durations between 20 and 120 days. The most prominent bumps appeared in all our different optical bands. The spectra showed typical SN IIn characteristics, with emission lines of H$\alpha$ (with broad component FWHM ~$10^{3}-10^{4} ~{\rm ~km ~s^{-1}}$ and narrow component FWHM ~$10^2 \rm ~km ~s^{-1}$) and He I, but also with Fe II, Ca II, Na I D and H$\beta$ P-Cygni profiles (with velocities of ~$10^{3}$ ${\rm ~km ~s^{-1}}$). A pre-explosion outburst was identified lasting $\gtrsim 50$ days, with $M_r \approx -15$ mag around 210 days before discovery. Large, variable progenitor mass-loss rates (~> 0.01 $M_{\odot} \rm ~yr^{-1}$) and CSM densities (~> 10$^{-16}$ g cm$^{-3}$) are derived. We suggest that the light curve bumps of iPTF13z arose from SN ejecta interacting with denser regions in the CSM, possibly produced by the eruptions of a luminous blue variable star.
  • PDF
    Multiwavelength followup of unidentified Fermi sources has vastly expanded the number of known galactic-field "black widow" and "redback" millisecond pulsar binaries. Focusing on their rotation-powered state, we interpret the radio to X-ray phenomenology in a consistent framework. We advocate the existence of two distinct modes differing in their intrabinary shock orientation, distinguished by the phase-centering of the double-peaked X-ray orbital modulation originating from mildly-relativistic Doppler boosting. By constructing a geometric model for radio eclipses, we constrain the shock geometry as functions of binary inclination and shock stand-off $R_0$. We develop synthetic X-ray synchrotron orbital light curves and explore the model parameter space allowed by radio eclipse constraints applied on archetypal systems B1957+20 and J1023+0038. For B1957+20, from radio eclipses the stand-off is $R_0 \sim 0.15$ -- $0.3$ fraction of binary separation from the companion center, depending on the orbit inclination. Constructed X-ray light curves for B1957+20 using these values are qualitatively consistent with those observed, and we find occultation of the shock by the companion as a minor influence, demanding significant Doppler factors to yield double peaks. For J1023+0038, radio eclipses imply $R_0 \lesssim 0.4$ while X-ray light curves suggest $0.1\lesssim R_0 \lesssim 0.3$ (from the pulsar). Degeneracies in the model parameter space encourage further development to include transport considerations. Generically, the spatial variation along the shock of the underlying electron power-law index should yield energy-dependence in the shape of light curves motivating future X-ray phase-resolved spectroscopic studies to probe the unknown physics of pulsar winds and relativistic shock acceleration therein.
  • PDF
    The Carina nebula hosts a large number of globulettes. The majority are of planetary mass, but there are also those with masses of several tens up to a few hundred Jupiter masses. We carried out radio observations of molecular line emission in 12CO and 13CO (2-1) and (3-2) of 12 larger objects in addition of positions in adjacent shell structures using APEX. All selected objects were detected with radial velocities shifted relative to the emission from related shell structures and background molecular clouds. Globulettes along the western part of an extended dust shell show a small spread in velocity with small velocity shifts relative to the shell. This system of globulettes and shell structures in the foreground of the bright nebulosity surrounding the cluster Trumpler 14 is expanding with a few km/s relative to the cluster. The Carina globulettes are compact and denser than objects of similar mass studied previously in the Rosette nebula. Some globulettes in Tr 14 are located far from any shell structures. These objects move at a similar speed as the globulettes along the shell. The distribution and velocities of the globulettes studied suggest that they have originated from eroding shells and elephant trunks.
  • PDF
    We identify and investigate known ultracool stars and brown dwarfs that are being observed or indirectly constrained by the Gaia mission. These objects will be the core of the Gaia ultracool dwarf sample composed of all dwarfs later than M7 that Gaia will provide direct or indirect information on. We match known L and T dwarfs to the Gaia first data release, the Two Micron All Sky Survey and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer AllWISE survey and examine the Gaia and infrared colours, along with proper motions, to improve spectral typing, identify outliers and find mismatches. There are 321 L and T dwarfs observed directly in the Gaia first data release, of which 10 are later than L7. This represents 45 % of all the known LT dwarfs with estimated Gaia G magnitudes brighter than 20.3 mag. We determine proper motions for the 321 objects from Gaia and the Two Micron All Sky Survey positions. Combining the Gaia and infrared magnitudes provides useful diagnostic diagrams for the determination of L and T dwarf physical parameters. We then search the Tycho-Gaia astrometric solution Gaia first data release subset to find any objects with common proper motions to known L and T dwarfs and a high probability of being related. We find 15 new candidate common proper motion systems.
  • PDF
    The presence of dusty debris around main sequence stars denotes the existence of planetary systems. Such debris disks are often identified by the presence of excess continuum emission at infrared and (sub-)millimetre wavelengths, with measurements at longer wavelengths tracing larger and cooler dust grains. The exponent of the slope of the disk emission at sub-millimetre wavelengths, `q', defines the size distribution of dust grains in the disk. This size distribution is a function of the rigid strength of the dust producing parent planetesimals. As part of the survey `PLAnetesimals around TYpical Pre-main seqUence Stars' (PLATYPUS) we observed six debris disks at 9-mm using the Australian Telescope Compact Array. We obtain marginal (~3-\sigma) detections of three targets: HD 105, HD 61005, and HD 131835. Upper limits for the three remaining disks, HD20807, HD109573, and HD109085, provide further constraint of the (sub-)millimetre slope of their spectral energy distributions. The values of q (or their limits) derived from our observations are all smaller than the oft-assumed steady state collisional cascade model (q = 3.5), but lie well within the theoretically expected range for debris disks q ~ 3 to 4. The measured q values for our targets are all < 3.3, consistent with both collisional modelling results and theoretical predictions for parent planetesimal bodies being `rubble piles' held together loosely by their self-gravity.
  • PDF
    The cold-dense plasma is occasionally detected in the solar wind with in situ data, but the source of the cold-dense plasma remains illusive. Interchange reconnections (IRs) between closed fields and nearby open fields are well known to contribute to the formation of solar winds. We present a confined filament eruption associated with a puff-like coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2014 December 24. The filament underwent successive activations and finally erupted, due to continuous magnetic flux cancellations and emergences. The confined erupting filament showed a clear untwist motion, and most of the filament material fell back. During the eruption, some tiny blobs escaped from the confined filament body, along newly-formed open field lines rooted around the south end of the filament, and some bright plasma flowed from the north end of the filament to remote sites at nearby open fields. The newly-formed open field lines shifted southward with multiple branches. The puff-like CME also showed multiple bright fronts and a clear southward shift. All the results indicate an intermittent IR existed between closed fields of the confined erupting filament and nearby open fields, which released a portion of filament material (blobs) to form the puff-like CME. We suggest that the IR provides a possible source of cold-dense plasma in the solar wind.
  • PDF
    Debris discs are the dusty aftermath of planet formation processes around main-sequence stars. Analysis of these discs is often hampered by the absence of any meaningful constraint on the location and spatial extent of the disc around its host star. Multi-wavelength, resolved imaging ameliorates the degeneracies inherent in the modelling process, making such data indispensable in the interpretation of these systems. The Herschel Space Observatory observed HD 105211 (Eta Cru, HIP 59072) with its PACS instrument in three far-infrared wavebands (70, 100 and 160 um). Here we combine these data with ancillary photometry spanning optical to far-infrared wavelengths in order to determine the extent of the circumstellar disc. The spectral energy distribution and multi-wavelength resolved emission of the disc are simultaneously modelled using a radiative transfer and imaging codes. Analysis of the Herschel/PACS images reveals the presence of extended structure in all three PACS images. From a radiative transfer model we derive a disc extent of 87.0 +/- 2.5 au, with an inclination of 70.7 +/- 2.2 degrees to the line of sight and a position angle of 30.1 +/- 0.5 degrees. Deconvolution of the Herschel images reveal a potential asymmetry but this remains uncertain as a combined radiative transfer and image analysis replicate both the structure and the emission of the disc using a single axisymmetric annulus.
  • PDF
    We present an outline of basic assumptions and governing structural equations describing atmospheres of substellar mass objects, in particular the extrasolar giant planets and brown dwarfs. Although most of the presentation of the physical and numerical background is generic, details of the implementation pertain mostly to the code CoolTlusty. We also present a review of numerical approaches and computer codes devised to solve the structural equations, and make a critical evaluation of their efficiency and accuracy.
  • PDF
    Type Ia supernovae are associated with thermonuclear explosions of white dwarf stars. Combustion processes convert material in nuclear reactions and release the energy required to explode the stars. At the same time, they produce the radioactive species that power radiation and give rise to the formation of the observables. Therefore, the physical mechanism of the combustion processes, as reviewed here, is the key to understand these astrophysical events. Theory establishes two distinct modes of propagation for combustion fronts: subsonic deflagrations and supersonic detonations. Both are assumed to play an important role in thermonuclear supernovae. The physical nature and theoretical models of deflagrations and detonations are discussed together with numerical implementations. A particular challenge arises due to the wide range of spatial scales involved in these phenomena. Neither the combustion waves nor their interaction with fluid flow and instabilities can be directly resolved in simulations. Substantial modeling effort is required to consistently capture such effects and the corresponding techniques are discussed in detail. They form the basis of modern multidimensional hydrodynamical simulations of thermonuclear supernova explosions. The problem of deflagration-to-detonation transitions in thermonuclear supernova explosions is briefly mentioned.
  • PDF
    Many protostellar gapped and binary discs show misalignments between their inner and outer discs; in some cases, $\sim70$ degree misalignments have been observed. Here we show that these misalignments can be generated through a "secular precession resonance" between the nodal precession of the inner disc and the precession of the gap-opening (stellar or massive planetary) companion. An evolving protostellar system may naturally cross this resonance during its lifetime due to disc dissipation and/or companion migration. If resonance crossing occurs on the right timescale, of order a few Myrs, characteristic for young protostellar systems, the inner and outer discs can become highly misaligned ($\gtrsim 60$ degrees). When the primary star has a mass of order a solar mass, generating a significant misalignment typically requires the companion to have a mass of $\sim 0.01-0.1$ M$_\odot$ and an orbital separation of tens of AU. The recently observed companion in the cavity of the gapped, highly misaligned system HD 142527 satisfies these requirements, indicating that a previous resonance crossing event misaligned the inner and outer discs. Our scenario for HD 142527's misaligned discs predicts that the companion's orbital plane is aligned with the outer disc's; this prediction should be testable with future observations as the companion's orbit is mapped out. Misalignments observed in several other gapped disc systems could be generated by the same secular resonance mechanism.
  • PDF
    Stars form in cold molecular clouds. However, molecular gas is difficult to observe because the most abundant molecule (H2) lacks a permanent dipole moment. Rotational transitions of CO are often used as a tracer of H2, but CO is much less abundant and the conversion from CO intensity to H2 mass is often highly uncertain. Here we present a new method for estimating the column density of cold molecular gas (Sigma_gas) using optical spectroscopy. We utilise the spatially resolved H-alpha maps of flux and velocity dispersion from the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral-field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. We derive maps of Sigma_gas by inverting the multi-freefall star formation relation, which connects the star formation rate surface density (Sigma_SFR) with Sigma_gas and the turbulent Mach number (Mach). Based on the measured range of Sigma_SFR = 0.005-1.5 M_sol/yr/kpc^2 and Mach = 18-130, we predict Sigma_gas = 7-200 M_sol/pc^2 in the star-forming regions of our sample of 260 SAMI galaxies. These values are close to previously measured Sigma_gas obtained directly with unresolved CO observations of similar galaxies at low redshift. We classify each galaxy in our sample as 'Star-forming' (219) or 'Composite/AGN/Shock' (41), and find that in Composite/AGN/Shock galaxies the average Sigma_SFR, Mach, and Sigma_gas are enhanced by factors of 2.0, 1.6, and 1.3, respectively, compared to Star-forming galaxies. We compare our predictions of Sigma_gas with those obtained by inverting the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation and find that our new method is a factor of two more accurate in predicting Sigma_gas, with an average deviation of 32% from the actual Sigma_gas.
  • PDF
    We present new Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) 1.3 mm continuum observations of the SR 24S transition disk with an angular resolution $\lesssim0.18"$ (12 au radius). We perform a multi-wavelength investigation by combining new data with previous ALMA data at 0.45 mm. The visibilities and images of the continuum emission at the two wavelengths are well characterized by a ring-like emission. Visibility modeling finds that the ring-like emission is narrower at longer wavelengths, in good agreement with models of dust trapping in pressure bumps, although there are complex residuals that suggest potentially asymmetric structures. The 0.45 mm emission has a shallower profile inside the central cavity than the 1.3 mm emission. In addition, we find that the $^{13}$CO and C$^{18}$O (J=2-1) emission peaks at the center of the continuum cavity. We do not detect either continuum or gas emission from the northern companion to this system (SR 24N), which is itself a binary system. The upper limit for the dust disk mass of SR 24N is $\lesssim 0.12\,M_{\bigoplus}$, which gives a disk mass ratio in dust between the two components of $M_{\mathrm{dust, SR\,24S}}/M_{\mathrm{dust, SR\,24N}}\gtrsim840$. The current ALMA observations may imply that either planets have already formed in the SR 24N disk or that dust growth to mm-sizes is inhibited there and that only warm gas, as seen by ro-vibrational CO emission inside the truncation radii of the binary, is present.