Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (astro-ph.SR)

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    We investigate the ionising effect of low energy cosmic rays (CRs) from a young star on its protoplanetary disk (PPD). We consider specifically the effect of $\sim3\,$GeV protons injected at the inner edge of the PPD. An increase in the ionisation fraction as a result of these CRs could allow the magnetorotational instability to operate in otherwise magnetically dead regions of the disk. For the typical values assumed we find an ionisation rate of $\zeta_\mathrm{CR} \sim 10^{-17}\mathrm{s^{-1}}$ at $1\,$au. The transport equation is solved by treating the propagation of the CRs as diffusive. We find for increasing diffusion coefficients the CRs penetrate further in the PPD, while varying the mass density profile of the disk is found to have little effect. We investigate the effect of an energy spectrum of CRs. The influence of a disk wind is examined by including an advective term. For advective wind speeds between $1-100\mathrm{km\,s^{-1}}$ diffusion dominates at all radii considered here (out to 10$\,$au) for reasonable diffusion coefficients. Overall, we find that low energy CRs can significantly ionise the midplane of PPDs out to $\sim\,1\,$au. By increasing the luminosity or energy of the CRs, within plausible limits, their radial influence could increase to $\sim2\,$au at the midplane but it remains challenging to significantly ionise the midplane further out.
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    We present 2271 radial velocity measurements taken on 118 single-line binary stars, taken over eight years with the CORALIE spectrograph. The binaries consist of F/G/K primaries and M-dwarf secondaries. They were initially discovered photometrically by the WASP planet survey, as their shallow eclipses mimic a hot-Jupiter transit. The observations we present permit a precise characterisation of the binary orbital elements and mass function. With modelling of the primary star this mass function is converted to a mass of the secondary star. In the future, this spectroscopic work will be combined with precise photometric eclipses to draw an empirical mass/radius relation for the bottom of the mass sequence. This has applications in both stellar astrophysics and the growing number of exoplanet surveys around M-dwarfs. In particular, we have discovered 34 systems with a secondary mass below $0.2 M_\odot$, and so we will ultimately double the known number of very low-mass stars with well characterised mass and radii. We are able to detect eccentricities as small as 0.001 and orbital periods to sub-second precision. Our sample can revisit some earlier work on the tidal evolution of close binaries, extending it to low mass ratios. We find some binaries that are eccentric at orbital periods < 3 days, while our longest circular orbit has a period of 10.4 days. By collating the EBLM binaries with published WASP planets and brown dwarfs, we derive a mass spectrum with twice the resolution of previous work. We compare the WASP/EBLM sample of tightly-bound orbits with work in the literature on more distant companions up to 10 AU. We note that the brown dwarf desert appears wider, as it carves into the planetary domain for our short-period orbits. This would mean that a significantly reduced abundance of planets begins at $\sim 3M_{\rm Jup}$, well before the Deuterium-burning limit. [abridged]
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    The effect of metallicity on the granulation activity in stars is still poorly understood. Available spectroscopic parameters from the updated APOGEE-\textitKepler catalog, coupled with high-precision photometric observations from NASA's \textitKepler mission spanning more than four years of observation, make oscillating red giant stars in open clusters crucial testbeds. We determine the role of metallicity on the stellar granulation activity by discriminating its effect from that of different stellar properties such as surface gravity, mass, and temperature. We analyze 60 known red giant stars belonging to the open clusters NGC 6791, NGC 6819, and NGC 6811, spanning a metallicity range from [Fe/H] $\simeq -0.09$ to $0.32$. The parameters describing the granulation activity of these stars and their $\nu_\mathrm{max}$, are studied by considering the different masses, metallicities, and stellar evolutionary stages. We derive new scaling relations for the granulation activity, re-calibrate existing ones, and identify the best scaling relations from the available set of observations. We adopted the Bayesian code DIAMONDS for the analysis of the background signal in the Fourier spectra of the stars. We performed a Bayesian parameter estimation and model comparison to test the different model hypotheses proposed in this work and in the literature. Metallicity causes a statistically significant change in the amplitude of the granulation activity, with a dependency stronger than that induced by both stellar mass and surface gravity. We also find that the metallicity has a significant impact on the corresponding time scales of the phenomenon. The effect of metallicity on the time scale is stronger than that of mass. A higher metallicity increases the amplitude of granulation and meso-granulation signals and slows down their characteristic time scales toward longer periods.
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    We present the first images of the 28SiO v=1, J=2-1 maser emission around the closest known massive young stellar object Orion Source I observed at 86 GHz (3mm) with the VLBA. These images have high spatial (~0.3 mas) and spectral (~0.054 km/s) resolutions. We find that the 3mm masers lie in an X-shaped locus consisting of four arms, with blue-shifted emission in the south and east arms and red-shifted emission in the north and west arms. Comparisons with previous images of the 28SiO v=1,2, J=1-0 transitions at 7mm (observed in 2001-2002) show that the bulk of the J=2-1 transition emission follows the streamlines of the J=1-0 emission and exhibits an overall velocity gradient consistent with the gradient at 7mm. While there is spatial overlap between the 3mm and 7mm transitions, the 3mm emission, on average, lies at larger projected distances from Source I (~44 AU compared with ~35 AU for 7mm). The spatial overlap between the v=1, J=1-0 and J=2-1 transitions is suggestive of a range of temperatures and densities where physical conditions are favorable for both transitions of a same vibrational state. However, the observed spatial offset between the bulk of emission at 3mm and 7mm possibly indicates different ranges of temperatures and densities for optimal excitation of the masers. We discuss different maser pumping models that may explain the observed offset. We interpret the 3mm and 7mm masers as being part of a single wide-angle outflow arising from the surface of an edge-on disk rotating about a northeast-southwest axis, with a continuous velocity gradient indicative of differential rotation consistent with a Keplerian profile in a high-mass proto-binary.
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    Stellar evolution computations provide the foundation of several methods applied to study the evolutionary properties of stars and stellar populations, both Galactic and extragalactic. The accuracy of the results obtained with these techniques is linked to the accuracy of the stellar models, and in this context the correct treatment of the transport of chemical elements is crucial. Unfortunately, in many respects calculations of the evolution of the chemical abundance profiles in stars are still affected by sometime sizable uncertainties. Here, we review the various mechanisms of element transport included in the current generation of stellar evolution calculations, how they are implemented, the free parameters and uncertainties involved, the impact on the models, and the observational constraints.
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    This study aims timing the eclipses of the short period low mass binary star AB And. The times of minima are taken from the literature and from our observations in October 2013 (22 times of minima) and in August 2014 (23 times of minima). We find and discuss an inaccuracy in the determination of the types of minima in the previous investigation by \citetli2014. We study the secular evolution of the central binary's orbital period and the possibility of the existence of third and fourth companions in the system.
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    In order to understand the exoplanet, you need to understand its parent star. Astrophysical parameters of extrasolar planets are directly and indirectly dependent on the properties of their respective host stars. These host stars are very frequently the only visible component in the systems. This book describes our work in the field of characterization of exoplanet host stars using interferometry to determine angular diameters, trigonometric parallax to determine physical radii, and SED fitting to determine effective temperatures and luminosities. The interferometry data are based on our decade-long survey using the CHARA Array. We describe our methods and give an update on the status of the field, including a table with the astrophysical properties of all stars with high-precision interferometric diameters out to 150 pc (status Nov 2016). In addition, we elaborate in more detail on a number of particularly significant or important exoplanet systems, particularly with respect to (1) insights gained from transiting exoplanets, (2) the determination of system habitable zones, and (3) the discrepancy between directly determined and model-based stellar radii. Finally, we discuss current and future work including the calibration of semi-empirical methods based on interferometric data.
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    Context: Although type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) play a key role in astrophysics, the companions of the exploding carbon-oxygen white dwarfs (CO WDs) are still not completely identified. It has been suggested recently that a He-rich WD (a He WD or a hybrid HeCO WD) merges with a CO WD may produce an SN Ia. This theory was based on the double-detonation model, in which the shock compression in the CO core caused by the surface explosion of the He-rich shell might lead to the explosion of the whole CO WD. However, so far, very few binary population synthesis (BPS) studies have been made on the merger scenario of a CO WD and a He-rich WD in the context of SNe Ia. Aims: We aim to systematically study the Galactic birthrates and delay-time distributions of SNe Ia based on the merger scenario of a CO WD and a He-rich WD. Methods: We performed a series of Monte Carlo BPS simulations to investigate the properties of SNe Ia from the merging of a CO WD and a He-rich WD based on the Hurley rapid binary evolution code. We also considered the influence of different metallicities on the final results. Results: From our simulations, we found that no more than 15% of all SNe Ia stem from the merger scenario of a CO WD and a He-rich WD, and their delay times range from ~110 Myr to the Hubble time. This scenario mainly contributes to SN Ia explosions with intermediate and long delay times. The present work indicates that the merger scenario of a CO WD and a He-rich WD can roughly reproduce the birthrates of SN 1991bg-like events, and cover the range of their delay times. We also found that SN Ia birthrates from this scenario would be higher for the cases with low metallicities.
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    The K2 mission observed the Upper Scorpius association during its Campaign 2 (C2) and will partially re-visit the region during its Campaign 15 (C15) from 23 August to 20 November 2017. The high-precision photometry from K2 enables detailed studies of young star variability. However, K2 campaigns last only 80 days, while young stars can exhibit variability on timescales of months to years; moreover, K2 data are not available until months after the campaigns are completed. Thus putting K2 observations in the context of overall young star variability, as well as pre-identifying interesting variables for simultaneous ground-based observations during K2 campaigns, requires complementary long-baseline photometric surveys. We therefore present light curves of Upper Sco members taken over the last 5.5 years by the ground-based Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT). We show that KELT data can be used to accurately identify the periodic signals found with high-precision K2/C2 photometry, illustrating the power of ground-based surveys in deriving stellar rotation periods of young stars. We also use KELT data to identify sources exhibiting variability that is likely related to circumstellar material and/or stellar activity cycles; these signatures are often unseen in the short-term K2 data, illustrating the importance and complementary nature of long-term monitoring surveys. We provide the KELT light curves as electronic tables as part of an ongoing effort to establish legacy data sets for studying young star variability, complementing the much higher-precision but shorter-term space-based observations from not only K2, but also future mission such as TESS.
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    Aims. We define a small and large chemical network which can be used for the quantitative simultaneous analysis of molecular emission from the near-IR to the submm. We revise reactions of excited molecular hydrogen, which are not included in UMIST, to provide a homogeneous database for future applications. Methods. We use the thermo-chemical disk modeling code ProDiMo and a standard T Tauri disk model to evaluate the impact of various chemical networks, reaction rate databases and sets of adsorption energies on a large sample of chemical species and emerging line fluxes from the near-IR to the submm wavelength range. Results. We find large differences in the masses and radial distribution of ice reservoirs when considering freeze-out on bare or polar ice coated grains. Most strongly the ammonia ice mass and the location of the snow line (water) change. As a consequence molecules associated to the ice lines such as N2H+ change their emitting region; none of the line fluxes in the sample considered here changes by more than 25% except CO isotopologues, CN and N2H+ lines. The three-body reaction N+H2+M plays a key role in the formation of water in the outer disk. Besides that, differences between the UMIST 2006 and 2012 database change line fluxes in the sample considered here by less than a factor 2 (a subset of low excitation CO and fine structure lines stays even within 25%); exceptions are OH, CN, HCN, HCO+ and N2H+ lines. However, different networks such as OSU and KIDA 2011 lead to pronounced differences in the chemistry inside 100 au and thus affect emission lines from high excitation CO, OH and CN lines. H2 is easily excited at the disk surface and state-to-state reactions enhance the abundance of CH+ and to a lesser extent HCO+. For sub-mm lines of HCN, N2H+ and HCO+, a more complex larger network is recommended. ABBREVIATED
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    We present multi-wavelength radio observations obtained with the VLA of the protoplanetary disk surrounding the young brown dwarf 2MASS J04442713+2512164 (2M0444) in the Taurus star forming region. 2M0444 is the brightest known brown dwarf disk at millimeter wavelengths, making this an ideal target to probe radio emission from a young brown dwarf. Thermal emission from dust in the disk is detected at 6.8 and 9.1 mm, whereas the 1.36 cm measured flux is dominated by ionized gas emission. We combine these data with previous observations at shorter sub-mm and mm wavelengths to test the predictions of dust evolution models in gas-rich disks after adapting their parameters to the case of 2M0444. These models show that the radial drift mechanism affecting solids in a gaseous environment has to be either completely made inefficient, or significantly slowed down by very strong gas pressure bumps in order to explain the presence of mm/cm-sized grains in the outer regions of the 2M0444 disk. We also discuss the possible mechanisms for the origin of the ionized gas emission detected at 1.36 cm. The inferred radio luminosity for this emission is in line with the relation between radio and bolometric luminosity valid for for more massive and luminous young stellar objects, and extrapolated down to the very low luminosity of the 2M0444 brown dwarf.
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    We report the discovery of four short period extrasolar planets transiting moderately bright stars from photometric measurements of the HATSouth network coupled to additional spectroscopic and photometric follow-up observations. While the planet masses range from 0.26 to 0.90 M$_J$, the radii are all approximately a Jupiter radii, resulting in a wide range of bulk densities. The orbital period of the planets range from 2.7d to 4.7d, with HATS-43b having an orbit that appears to be marginally non-circular (e= 0.173$\pm$0.089). HATS-44 is notable for a high metallicity ([Fe/H]= 0.320$\pm$0.071). The host stars spectral types range from late F to early K, and all of them are moderately bright (13.3<V<14.4), allowing the execution of future detailed follow-up observations. HATS-43b and HATS-46b, with expected transmission signals of 2350 ppm and 1500 ppm, respectively, are particularly well suited targets for atmospheric characterisation via transmission spectroscopy.
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    We study UV spectra obtained with the SO82-B slit spectrograph on board SKYLAB to estimate the fine structure splitting of the Cl-like 3p4 3d 4D J=5/2 and 3p4 3d 4D J=7/2 levels of Fe X. The splitting is of interest because the Zeeman effect mixes these levels, producing a "magnetically induced transition" (MIT) from 3p4 3d 4D J=7/2 to 3p5 2Po J=3/2 for modest magnetic field strengths characteristic of the active solar corona. We estimate the splitting using the Ritz combination formula applied to two lines in the UV region of the spectrum close to 1603.2 Angstrom, which decay from the level 3p4(1D)3d 2G J=7/2 to these two lower levels. The MIT and accompanying spin-forbidden transition lie near 257 Angstrom. By careful inspection of a deep exposure obtained with the S082B instrument we derive a splitting of <~ 7 +/- 3 cm-1. The upper limit arises because of a degeneracy between the effects of non-thermal line broadening and fine-structure splitting for small values of the latter parameter. Although the data were recorded on photographic film, we solved for optimal values of line width and splitting of 8.3 +/- 0.9 and 3.6 +/- 2.7 cm-1.
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    We consider the observational basis for the belief that flare ribbons in the chromosphere result from energy transport from the overlying corona. We study ribbons of small flares using magnetic as well as intensity data from the Hinode, SDO and IRIS missions. While most ribbons appear connected to the corona, and they over-lie regions of significant vertical magnetic field, we examine one ribbon with no clear evidence for such connections. Evolving horizontal magnetic fields seen with Hinode suggest that reconnection with pre-existing fields below the corona can explain the data. The identification of just one, albeit small, ribbon, with no apparent connection to the corona, leads us to conclude that at least two mechanisms are responsible for the heating that leads to flare ribbon emission.
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    We study broad red-shifted emission in chromospheric and transition region lines that appears to correspond to a form of post-flare coronal rain. Profiles of Mg II, C II and Si IV lines were obtained using the IRIS instrument before, during and after the X2.1 flare of 11 March 2015 (SOL2015-03- 11T16:22). We analyze the profiles of the five transitions of Mg II (the 3p - 3s h and k transitions, and three lines belonging to the 3d - 3p transitions). We use analytical methods to understand the unusual profiles, together with higher resolution observational data of similar phenomena observed by Jing et al. (2016). The peculiar line ratios indicate anisotropic emission from the strands which have cross-strand line center optical depths (k-line) of between 1 and 10. The lines are broadened by unresolved Alfvenic motions whose energy exceeds the radiation losses in the Mg II lines by an order of magnitude. The decay of the line widths is accompanied by a decay in the brightness, suggesting a causal connection. If the plasma is <~ 99% ionized, ion-neutral collisions can account for the dissipation, otherwise a of dynamical process seems necessary. Our work implies that the motions are initiated during the impulsive phase, to be dissipated as radiation over a period of an hour, predominantly by strong chromospheric lines. The coronal "rain" we observe is far more turbulent that most earlier reports have indicated, with implications for plasma heating mechanisms.
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    Several abundance analyses of Galactic open clusters (OCs) have shown a tendency for Ba but not for other heavy elements (La$-$Sm) to increase sharply with decreasing age such that Ba was claimed to reach [Ba/Fe] $\simeq +0.6$ in the youngest clusters (ages $<$ 100 Myr) rising from [Ba/Fe]$=0.00$ dex in solar-age clusters. Within the formulation of the $s$-process, the difficulty to replicate higher Ba abundance and normal La$-$Sm abundances in young clusters is known as \it the barium puzzle. Here, we investigate the barium puzzle using extremely high-resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra of 24 solar twins and measured the heavy elements Ba, La, Ce, Nd and Sm with a precision of 0.03 dex. We demonstrate that the enhanced Ba \scs II relative to La$-$Sm seen among solar twins, stellar associations and OCs at young ages ($<$100 Myr) is unrelated to aspects of stellar nucleosynthesis but has resulted from overestimation of Ba by standard methods of LTE abundance analysis in which the microturbulence derived from the Fe lines formed deep in the photosphere is insufficient to represent the true line broadening imposed on Ba \scs II lines by the upper photospheric layers from where the Ba \scs II lines emerge. As the young stars have relatively active photospheres, Ba overabundances most likely result from the adoption of too low a value of microturbulence in the spectum synthesis of the strong Ba \scs II lines but the change of microturbulence in the upper photosphere has only a minor affect on La$-$Sm abundances measured from the weak lines.
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    We investigate magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in Keplerian disks with a nonzero net azimuthal magnetic field using shearing box simulations. As distinct from most previous studies, we analyze turbulence dynamics in Fourier (${\bf k}$-) space to understand its sustenance. The linear growth of MRI with azimuthal field has a transient character and is anisotropic in Fourier space, leading to anisotropy of nonlinear processes in Fourier space. As a result, the main nonlinear process appears to be a new type of angular redistribution of modes in Fourier space -- the \emphnonlinear transverse cascade -- rather than usual direct/inverse cascade. We demonstrate that the turbulence is sustained by interplay of the linear transient growth of MRI (which is the only energy supply for the turbulence) and the transverse cascade. These two processes operate at large length scales, comparable to box size and the corresponding small wavenumber area, called \emphvital area in Fourier space is crucial for the sustenance, while outside the vital area direct cascade dominates. The interplay of the linear and nonlinear processes in Fourier space is generally too intertwined for a vivid schematization. Nevertheless, we reveal the \emphbasic subcycle of the sustenance that clearly shows synergy of these processes in the self-organization of the magnetized flow system. This synergy is quite robust and persists for the considered different aspect ratios of the simulation boxes. The spectral characteristics of the dynamical processes in these boxes are qualitatively similar, indicating the universality of the sustenance mechanism of the MRI-turbulence.
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    We study the implementation of mechanical feedback from supernovae (SNe) and stellar mass loss in galaxy simulations, within the Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) project. We present the FIRE-2 algorithm for coupling mechanical feedback, which can be applied to any hydrodynamics method (e.g. fixed-grid, moving-mesh, and mesh-less methods), and black hole as well as stellar feedback. This algorithm ensures manifest conservation of mass, energy, and momentum, and avoids imprinting 'preferred directions' on the ejecta. We show that it is critical to incorporate both momentum and thermal energy of mechanical ejecta in a self-consistent manner, accounting for SNe cooling radii when they are not resolved. Using idealized simulations of single SNe explosions, we show that the FIRE-2 algorithm, independent of resolution, reproduces converged solutions in both energy and momentum. In contrast, common 'fully-thermal' (energy-dump) or 'fully-kinetic' (particle-kicking) schemes in the literature depend strongly on resolution: when applied at mass resolution $\gtrsim 100\,M_{\odot}$, they diverge by orders-of-magnitude from the converged solution. In galaxy-formation simulations, this divergence leads to orders-of-magnitude differences in galaxy properties, unless those models are adjusted in a resolution-dependent way. We show that all models that individually time-resolve SNe converge to the FIRE-2 solution at sufficiently high resolution ($<100\,M_{\odot}$). However, in both idealized single-SNe simulations and cosmological galaxy-formation simulations, the FIRE-2 algorithm converges much faster than other sub-grid models without re-tuning parameters.
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    The recent discovery of habitable exoplanets around Proxima Centauri and TRAPPIST-1 has attracted much attention due to their potential for hosting life. We delineate a simple model that accurately describes the evolution of biological diversity on Earth. Combining this model with constraints on atmospheric erosion and the maximal evolutionary timescale arising from the star's lifetime, we arrive at two striking conclusions: (i) Earth-analogs orbiting low-mass M-dwarfs are unlikely to be inhabited, and (ii) K-dwarfs and some G-type stars are potentially capable of hosting more complex biospheres than the Earth. Hence, future searches for biosignatures should prioritize planets around K-dwarf stars.
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    Several low-mass eclipsing binary stars show larger than expected radii for their measured mass, metallicity and age. One proposed mechanism for this radius inflation involves inhibited internal convection and starspots caused by strong magnetic fields. One particular eclipsing binary, T-Cyg1-12664, has proven confounding to this scenario. \citetCakirli2013a measured a radius for the secondary component that is twice as large as model predictions for stars with the same mass and age, but a primary mass that is consistent with predictions. \citet[][]Iglesias2017 independently measured the radii and masses of the component stars and found that the radius of the secondary is not in fact inflated with respect to models, but that the primary is, consistent with the inhibited convection scenario. However, in their mass determinations, \citet[][]Iglesias2017 lacked independent radial velocity measurements for the secondary component due to the star's faintness at optical wavelengths. The secondary component is especially interesting as its purported mass is near the transition from partially-convective to a fully-convective interior. In this article we independently determined the masses and radii of the component stars of T-Cyg1-12664 using archival \it Kepler data and radial velocity measurements of both component stars obtained with IGRINS on the Discovery Channel Telescope and NIRSPEC and HIRES on the Keck Telescopes. We show that neither of the component stars is inflated with respect to models. Our results are broadly consistent with modern stellar evolutionary models for main-sequence M dwarf stars and do not require inhibited convection by magnetic fields to account for the stellar radii.
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    Stripped-envelope (SE) supernovae (SNe) include H-poor (Type IIb), H-free (Type Ib) and He-free (Type Ic) events thought to be associated with the deaths of massive stars. The exact nature of their progenitors is a matter of debate. Here we present the analysis of the light curves of 34 SE SNe published by the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I), which are unparalleled in terms of photometric accuracy and wavelength range. Light-curve parameters are estimated through the fits of an analytical function and trends are searched for among the resulting fit parameters. We found a tentative correlation between the peak absolute $B$-band magnitude and $\Delta m_{15}(B)$, as well as a correlation between the late-time linear slope and $\Delta m_{15}$. Making use of the full set of optical and near-IR photometry, combined with robust host-galaxy extinction corrections, bolometric light curves are constructed and compared to both analytic and hydrodynamical models. From the hydrodynamical models we obtained ejecta masses of $1.1-6.2$ $M_{\odot}$, $^{56}$Ni masses of $0.03-0.35$ $M_{\odot}$, and explosion energies (excluding two SNe Ic-BL) of $0.25-3.0\times10^{51}$ erg. Our analysis indicates that adopting $\kappa = 0.07$ cm$^{2}$ g$^{-1}$ as the mean opacity serves to be a suitable assumption when comparing Arnett-model results to those obtained from hydrodynamical calculations. We also find that adopting He I and O I line velocities to infer the expansion velocity in He-rich and He-poor SNe, respectively, provides ejecta masses relatively similar to those obtained by using the Fe II line velocities. The inferred ejecta masses are compatible with intermediate mass ($M_{ZAMS} \leq 20$ $M_{\odot}$) progenitor stars in binary systems for the majority of SE SNe. Furthermore, the majority of our SNe is affected by significant mixing of $^{56}$Ni, particularly in the case of SNe Ic.
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    We aim to improve upon contemporary methods to estimate host-galaxy reddening of stripped-envelope (SE) supernovae (SNe). To this end the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I) SE SNe photometry data release, consisting of nearly three dozen objects, is used to identify a minimally reddened sub-sample for each traditionally defined spectroscopic sub-types (i.e, SNe~IIb, SNe~Ib, SNe~Ic). Inspection of the optical and near-infrared (NIR) colors and color evolution of the minimally reddened sub-samples reveals a high degree of homogeneity, particularly between 0d to +20d relative to B-band maximum. This motivated the construction of intrinsic color-curve templates, which when compared to the colors of reddened SE SNe, yields an entire suite of optical and NIR color excess measurements. Comparison of optical/optical vs. optical/NIR color excess measurements indicates the majority of the CSP-I SE SNe suffer relatively low amounts of reddening and we find evidence for different R_(V)^(host) values among different SE SN. Fitting the color excess measurements of the seven most reddened objects with the Fitzpatrick (1999) reddening law model provides robust estimates of the host visual-extinction A_(V)^(host) and R_(V)^(host). In the case of the SE SNe with relatively low amounts of reddening, a preferred value of R_(V)^(host) is adopted for each sub-type, resulting in estimates of A_(V)^(host) through Fitzpatrick (1999) reddening law model fits to the observed color excess measurements. Our analysis suggests SE SNe reside in galaxies characterized by a range of dust properties. We also find evidence SNe Ic are more likely to occur in regions characterized by larger R_(V)^(host) values compared to SNe IIb/Ib and they also tend to suffer more extinction. These findings are consistent with work in the literature suggesting SNe Ic tend to occur in regions of on-going star formation.
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    The first phase of the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I) was a dedicated supernova follow-up program based at the Las Campanas Observatory that collected science data of young, low-redshift supernovae between 2004 and 2009. Presented in this paper is the CSP-I photometric data release of low-redshift stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae. The data consist of optical (uBgVri) photometry of 34 objects, with a subset of 26 having near-infrared (YJH) photometry. Twenty objects have optical pre-maximum coverage with a subset of 12 beginning at least five days prior to the epoch of B-band maximum brightness. In the near-infrared, 17 objects have pre-maximum observations with a subset of 14 beginning at least five days prior to the epoch of J-band maximum brightness. Analysis of this photometric data release is presented in companion papers focusing on techniques to estimate host-galaxy extinction (Stritzinger et al., submitted) and the light-curve and progenitor star properties of the sample (Taddia et al., submitted). The analysis of an accompanying visual-wavelength spectroscopy sample of ~150 spectra will be the subject of a future paper.