Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (astro-ph.SR)

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    When we perform probabilistic inferences with the Gaia Mission data, we technically require a likelihood function, or a probability of the (raw-ish) data as a function of stellar (astrometric and photometric) properties. Unfortunately, we aren't (at present) given access to the Gaia data directly; we are only given a Catalog of derived astrometric properties for the stars. How do we perform probabilistic inferences in this context? The answer - implicit in many publications - is that we should look at the Gaia Catalog as containing the parameters of a likelihood function, or a probability of the Gaia data, conditioned on stellar properties, evaluated at the location of the data. Concretely, my recommendation is to assume (for, say, the parallax) that the Catalog-reported value and uncertainty are the mean and root-variance of a Gaussian function that can stand in for the true likelihood function. This is the implicit assumption in most Gaia literature to date; my only goal here is to make the assumption explicit. Certain technical choices by the Mission team slightly invalidate this assumption for DR1 (TGAS), but not seriously. Generalizing beyond Gaia, it is important to downstream users of any Catalog products that they deliver likelihood information about the fundamental data; this is a challenge for the probabilistic catalogs of the future.
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    Gravitational 3-body interaction among binary stars and the supermassive black hole (SMBH) at the center of the Milky Way occasionally ejects a hypervelocity star (HVS) with a velocity of ~1000 km/s. Due to the ejection location, such a HVS initially has negligible azimuthal angular momentum Lz ~ 0 kpc km/s. Even if the halo is mildly triaxial, Lz of a recently ejected nearby HVS remains negligible, since its flight time from the Galactic center is too short to accumulate noticeable torque. However, if we make a wrong assumption about the Solar position and velocity, such a HVS would apparently have noticeable non-zero angular momentum, due to the wrong reflex motion of the Sun. Conversely, with precise astrometric data for a nearby HVS, we can measure the Solar position and velocity by requiring that the HVS has zero angular momentum. Based on this idea, here we propose a method to estimate the Galactocentric distance of the Sun R0 and the Galactocentric Solar azimuthal velocity Vsun by using a HVS. We demonstrate with mock data for nearby HVS candidate (LAMOST-HVS1) that the Gaia astrometric data, along with the currently available constraint on Vsun/R0 from the proper motion measurement of Sgr A*, can constrain R0 and Vsun with uncertainties of ~ 0.27 kpc and ~7.8 km/s (or fractional uncertainties of 3 percent), respectively. Our method will be a promising tool to constrain (R0, Vsun), given that Gaia is expected to discover many nearby HVSs in the near future.
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    This paper reports on time-series analysis of 156 pulsating red giants (21 SRa, 52 SRb, 33 SR, 50 Lb) in the AAVSO (American Association of Variable Star Observers) observing program for which there are no more than 150-250 observations in total. Some results were obtained for 68 of these stars: 17 SRa, 14 SRb, 20 SR, and 17 Lb. These results generally include only an average period and amplitude. Many, if not most of the stars are undoubtedly more complex; pulsating red giants are known to have wandering periods, variable amplitudes, and often multiple periods including "long secondary periods" of unknown origin. These results (or lack thereof) raise the question of how the AAVSO should best manage the observation of these and other sparsely-observed pulsating red giants.
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    The evolution of self-gravitating clouds of isothermal gas forms the basis of many star formation theories. Therefore it is important to know under what conditions such a cloud will undergo homologous collapse into a single, massive object, or will fragment into a spectrum of smaller ones. And if it fragments, do initial conditions (e.g. Jeans mass, sonic mass) influence the mass function of the fragments, as predicted by many theories of star formation? In this paper we show that the relevant parameter separating homologous collapse from fragmentation is not the Mach number of the initial turbulence (as suspected by many), but the infall Mach number $\mathcal{M}_{\rm infall}\sim\sqrt{G M/(R c_s^2)}$, equivalent to the number of Jeans masses in the initial cloud $N_J$. We also show that fragmenting clouds produce a power-law mass function with slopes close to the expected -2 (i.e. equal mass in all logarithmic mass intervals). However, the low-mass cut-off of this mass function is entirely numerical; the initial properties of the cloud have no effect on it. In other words, if $\mathcal{M}_{\rm infall}\gg 1$, fragmentation proceeds without limit to masses much smaller than the initial Jeans mass.
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    Aims. We develop, test and characterise of a new statistical tool (intelligent system) for the sifting and analysis of nearby young open cluster (NYOC) populations. Methods. Using a Bayesian formalism, this statistical tool is able to obtain the posterior distributions of parameters governing the cluster model. It also uses hierarchical bayesian models to establish weakly informative priors, and incorporates the treatment of missing values and non-homogeneous (heteroscedastic) observational uncertainties. Results. From simulations, we estimate that this statistical tool renders kinematic (proper motion) and photometric (luminosity) distributions of the cluster population with a contamination rate of $5.8 \pm 0.2$ %. The luminosity distributions and present day mass function agree with the ones found by Bouy et al. (2015b) on the completeness interval of the survey. At the probability threshold of maximum accuracy, the classifier recovers $\sim$ 90% of Bouy et al. (2015b) candidate members and finds 10% of new ones. Conclusions. A new statistical tool for the analysis of NYOC is introduced, tested and characterised. Its comprehensive modelling of the data properties allows it to get rid of the biases present in previous works. In particular, those resulting from the use of only completely observed (non-missing) data and the assumption of homoskedastic uncertainties. Also, its Bayesian framework allows it to properly propagate observational uncertainties into membership probabilities and cluster velocity and luminosity distributions. Our results are in a general agreement with those from the literature, although we provide the most up-to-date and extended list of candidate members of the Pleiades cluster.
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    The paper considers the influence of the solar global magnetic field structure (GMFS) cycle evolution on the occurrence rate and parameters of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in cycles 23-24. It has been shown that over solar cycles, CMEs are not distributed randomly, but they are regulated by evolutionary changes in the GMFS. It is proposed, that the generation of magnetic Rossby waves in the solar tachocline results in the GMFS cycle changes. Each Rossby wave period favors a particular GMFS. It is proposed that the changes in wave periods result in the GMFS reorganization and consequently in CME location, occurrence rate, and parameter changes. The CME rate and parameters depend on the sharpness of the GMFS changes, the strength of the global magnetic field and the phase of a cycle.
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    A star enshrouded in a Dyson sphere with high covering fraction may manifest itself as an optically subluminous object with a spectrophotometric distance estimate significantly in excess of its parallax distance. Using this criterion, the Gaia mission will in coming years allow for Dyson-sphere searches that are complementary to searches based on waste-heat signatures at infrared wavelengths. A limited search of this type is also possible at the current time, by combining Gaia parallax distances with spectrophotometric distances from ground-based surveys. Here, we discuss the merits and shortcomings of this technique and carry out a limited search for Dyson-sphere candidates in the sample of stars common to Gaia Data Release 1 and RAVE Data Release 5. We find that a small fraction of stars indeed display distance discrepancies of the type expected for nearly complete Dyson spheres. To shed light on the properties of objects in this outlier population, we present follow-up high-resolution spectroscopy for one of these stars, the late F-type dwarf TYC 6111-1162-1. The spectrophotometric distance of this object is about twice that derived from its Gaia parallax, and there is no detectable infrared excess. While our analysis largely confirms the stellar parameters and the spectrophotometric distance inferred by RAVE, a plausible explanation for the discrepant distance estimates of this object is that the astrometric solution has been compromised by an unseen binary companion, possibly a rather massive white dwarf ($\approx 1\ M_\odot$). This scenario can be further tested through upcoming Gaia data releases.
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    We predict the sterile neutrino spectrum of some of the key solar nuclear reactions and discuss the possibility of these being observed by the next generation of solar neutrino experiments. By using an up-to-date standard solar model with good agreement with current helioseismology and solar neutrino flux data sets, we found that from solar neutrino fluxes arriving on Earth only 3\%-4\% correspond to the sterile neutrino. The most intense solar sources of sterile neutrinos are the $pp$ and $^7Be$ nuclear reactions with a total flux of $2.2\times 10^{9}\;{\rm cm^2 s^{-1}}$ and $1.8\times 10^{8}\;{\rm cm^2 s^{-1}}$, followed by the $^{13}N$ and $^{15}O$ nuclear reactions with a total flux of $1.9\times 10^{7}\;{\rm cm^2 s^{-1}}$ and $1.7\times 10^{7}\;{\rm cm^2 s^{-1}}$. Moreover, we compute the sterile neutrino spectra of the nuclear proton-proton nuclear reactions -- $pp$, $hep$ and $^8B$ and the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen -- $^{13}N$, $^{15}O$ and $^{17}F$ and the spectral lines of $^7Be$.
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    A deep understanding of the Milky Way galaxy, its formation and evolution requires observations of large numbers of stars. Stellar photometry provides an economical method to obtain intrinsic stellar parameters. With the addition of distance information -- a prospect made real for more than a billion stars with the second Gaia data release -- deriving reliable ages from photometry is a possibility. We developed a Bayesian method to generate 2D probability maps of a star's age and metallicity from photometry and parallax using isochrones. Our synthetic tests show that colours in the optical or near-infrared cannot by themselves provide unique ages and metallicities due to strong degeneracy between the two parameters. Including a near-UV passband enables us to break this degeneracy for many types of stars. It is possible to find well-constrained ages and metallicities for turn-off and sub-giant stars with colours including a U band and a parallax with an uncertainty less than approximately 20%. Metallicities alone are possible for the main sequence and giant branch. We attempted to recover ages and metallicities from real data, using the Gaia benchmark stars and the old open cluster NGC 188. This revealed significant limitations in the stellar isochrones. The ages of the cluster stars varied with evolutionary stage, such that turn-off ages were discrepant with those on the sub-giant branch and metallicities varied significantly throughout the HR diagram. Most importantly, the parameters varied appreciably depending on which colour combinations were used in the derivation. We conclude that there exists a noticeable mismatch between the photometry from isochrones and those from observations. Our results here are a warning to those applying isochrone ages indiscriminately. Further efforts to improve the models will result in significant advances in our ability to study the Galaxy.
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    In sunspot umbrae, convection is largely suppressed by the strong magnetic field. Previous measurements reported on negligible convective flows in umbral cores. Based on this, numerous studies have taken the umbra as zero reference to calculate Doppler velocities of the ambient active region. To clarify the amount of convective motion in the darkest part of umbrae, we directly measured Doppler velocities with an unprecedented accuracy and precision. We performed spectroscopic observations of sunspot umbrae with the Laser Absolute Reference Spectrograph (LARS) at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope. A laser frequency comb enabled the calibration of the high-resolution spectrograph and absolute wavelength positions. A thorough spectral calibration, including the measurement of the reference wavelength, yielded Doppler shifts of the spectral line Ti i 5713.9 Å with an uncertainty of around 5 m s-1. The measured Doppler shifts are a composition of umbral convection and magneto-acoustic waves. For the analysis of convective shifts, we temporally average each sequence to reduce the superimposed wave signal. Compared to convective blueshifts of up to -350 m s-1 in the quiet Sun, sunspot umbrae yield a strongly reduced convective blueshifts around -30 m s-1. We find that the velocity in a sunspot umbra correlates significantly with the magnetic field strength, but also with the umbral temperature defining the depth of the titanium line. The vertical upward motion decreases with increasing field strength. Extrapolating the linear approximation to zero magnetic field reproduces the measured quiet Sun blueshift. Simply taking the sunspot umbra as a zero velocity reference for the calculation of photospheric Dopplergrams can imply a systematic velocity error.
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    We adapt the friends of friends algorithm to the analysis of light curves, and show that it can be successfully applied to searches for transient phenomena in large photometric databases. As a test case we search OGLE-III light curves for known dwarf novae. A single combination of control parameters allows to narrow the search to 1% of the data while reaching a $\sim$90% detection efficiency. A search involving $\sim$2% of the data and three combinations of control parameters can be significantly more effective - in our case a 100% efficiency is reached. The method can also quite efficiently detect semi-regular or strictly periodic variability. We report 28 new variables found in the field of the globular cluster M22, which was examined earlier with the help of periodicity-searching algorithms
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    We studied the polarised spectrum of the post-AGB binary system 89\u2009Herculis on the basis of data collected with the high resolution \emphCatania Astrophysical Observatory Spectropolarimeter, \emphHArps-North POlarimeter and \emphEchelle SpectroPolarimetric Device for the Observation of Stars. We find the existence of linear polarisation in the strongest metal lines in absorption and with low excitation potentials. Signals are characterized by complex Q and U morphologies varying with the orbital period. As possible origin of this "Second Solar Spectrum"-like behaviour, we rule out magnetic fields, continuum depolarisation due pulsations and hot spots. The linear polarisation we detected also in the Ca\sc ii\u20098662Å\,line is a clear evidence of optical pumping polarisation and it rules out the scattering polarisation from free electrons of the circumbinary environment. In the framework of optical pumping due to the secondary star, the observed periodic properties of the spectral line polarisation can be justied by two jets, flow velocity of few tens of km\u2009s$^{-1}$, at the basis of that hour-glass structure characterising 89\u2009Herculis. We also discovered linear polarisation across the emission profile of metal lines. Numerical simulations show that these polarised profiles could be formed in an undisrupted circumbinary disk rotating at $\le$10 km\u2009s$^{-1}$ and whose orientation in the sky is in agreement with optical and radio interferometric results. We conclude that the study of those aspherical enevlopes, whose origin is not yet completely understood, of PNe and already present in the post-AGB's, can benefit of high resolution spectropolarimetry and that this technique can shape envelopes still too far for interferometry.
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    We calculate accretion mass of interstellar objects (ISOs) like `Oumuamua onto low-mass population III stars (Pop.~III survivors), and surface pollution of Pop.~III survivors. An ISO number density estimated from the discovery of `Oumuamua is so high ($\sim 0.2$~au$^{-3}$) that Pop.~III survivors have chances at colliding with ISOs $\gtrsim 10^5$ times per $1$~Gyr. In contrast, Pop.~III survivors never collide with free floating planets and Pop.~I/II stars in the Hubble time. `Oumuamua itself would be sublimated if it approaches to Pop.~III survivors, since it has small size, $\sim 100$~m. However, ISOs with size $\gtrsim 3$~km would reach the surfaces of Pop.~III survivors. Supposing an ISO cumulative number density with size larger than $D$ is $n \propto D^{-\alpha}$, Pop.~III survivors can accrete ISO mass $\gtrsim 10^{-16}M_\odot$, or ISO iron mass $\gtrsim 10^{-17}M_\odot$, if $\alpha < 4$. This iron mass is larger than the accretion mass of interstellar medium (ISM) by several orders of magnitude, since stellar wind of Pop.~III survivors prevents ISM from falling into Pop.~III survivors. Considering material mixing in a convection zone of Pop.~III survivors, we obtain their surface pollution is typically [Fe/H] $\lesssim -8$ in most cases, however the surface pollution of Pop.~III survivors with $0.8M_\odot$ can be [Fe/H] $\gtrsim -6$ because of the very shallow convective layer. The dependence of the metal pollution is as follows. If $\alpha > 4$, Pop.~III survivors have no chance at colliding with ISOs with $D \gtrsim 3$~km, and keep metal-free. If $3 < \alpha < 4$, Pop.~III survivors would be most polluted by ISOs up to [Fe/H] $\sim -7$. If $\alpha < 3$ up to $D \sim 10$~km, Pop.~III survivors could hide in metal-poor stars so far discovered. Although the metal pollution depends on $\alpha$, we first show the importance of ISOs for the metal pollution of Pop.~III survivors.
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    We extend a known solution generating technique for isotropic fluids in order to construct more general models of anisotropic stars with poloidal magnetic fields. In particular, we discuss the magnetized versions of some well-known exact solutions describing anisotropic stars and dark energy stars and we describe some of their properties.
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    Inaccurate limb-darkening models can be a significant source of error in the analysis of the light curves for transiting exoplanet and eclipsing binary star systems, particularly for high-precision light curves at optical wavelengths. The power-2 limb-darkening law, $I_\lambda(\mu) = 1 - c\left(1-\mu^{\alpha}\right)$, has recently been proposed as a good compromise between complexity and precision in the treatment of limb-darkening. I have used synthetic spectra based on the 3D stellar atmosphere models from the Stagger-grid to compute the limb-darkening for several passbands (UBVRI, CHEOPS, TESS, Kepler, etc.). The parameters of the power-2 limb-darkening laws are optimized using a least-squares fit to a simulated light curve computed directly from the tabulated $I_\lambda(\mu)$ values. I use the transformed parameters $h_1 = 1-c\left(1-2^{-\alpha}\right)$ and $h_2 = c2^{-\alpha}$ to directly compare these optimized limb-darkening parameters to the limb darkening measured from Kepler light curves of 16 transiting exoplanet systems. The posterior probability distributions (PPDs) of the transformed parameters $h_1$ and $h_2$ resulting from the light curve analysis are found to be much less strongly correlated than the PPDs for $c$ and $\alpha$. The agreement between the computed and observed values of ($h_1$, $h_2$) is generally very good but there are significant differences between the observed and computed values for Kepler-17, the only star in the sample that shows significant variability between the eclipses due to magnetic activity (star spots). The tabulation of $h_1$ and $h_2$ provided here can be used to accurately model the light curves of transiting exoplanets. I also provide estimates of the priors that should be applied to transformed parameters $h_1$ and $h_2$ based on my analysis of the Kepler light curves of 16 stars with transiting exoplanets.
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    We analyzed 151 variables previously classified as fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars from Campaigns 01-04 of the Kepler two wheel (K2) archive. By employing a method based on the application of systematics filtering with the aid of co-trending light curves in the presence of the large amplitude signal component, we searched for additional Fourier signals in the close neighborhood of the fundamental period. We found only 13 stars without such components, yielding the highest rate of 91% of modulated (Blazhko) stars detected so far. A detection efficiency test suggests that this occurrence rate likely implies a 100% underlying rate. Furthermore, the same test performed on a subset of the Large Magellanic Cloud RR Lyrae stars from the MACHO archive shows that the conjecture of high true occurrence rate fits well to the low observed rate derived from this database.
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    We report high resolution optical speckle observations of 336 M dwarfs which result in 113 measurements of relative position of 80 systems and 256 other stars with no indications of duplicity. These are the first measurements for two of the systems. We also present the earliest measures of relative position for 17 others. We include orbits for six of the systems, two revised and four reported for the first time. For one of the systems with a new orbit, G 161-7, we determine masses of 0.156 +/- 0.011 and 0.1175 +/-0.0079 \msun for the A and B components, respectively. All six of these new calculated orbits have short periods between five and thirty-eight years and hold the promise of deriving accurate masses in the near future. For many other pairs we can establish their nature as physical or chance alignment depending on their relative motion. Of the 80 systems, 32 have calculated orbits, 25 others are physical pairs, 4 are optical pairs and 19 are currently unknown.
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    We analyze the effect of a sunspot in its quiet surroundings applying a helioseismic technique on almost three years of Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) observations obtained during solar cycle 24 to further study the sunspot structure below the solar surface. The attenuation of acoustic waves with frequencies lower than 4.2 mHz depends more strongly on the wave direction at a distance of $6^o-7^o$ from the sunspot center. The amplification of higher frequency waves is highest 6$^o$ away from the active region and it is largely independent of the wave's direction. We observe a mean clockwise flow around active regions, which angular speed decreases exponentially with distance and has a coefficient close to $-0.7$ degree$^{-1}$. The observed horizontal flow in the direction of the nearby active region agrees with a large-scale circulation around the sunspot in the shape of cylindrical shell. The center of the shell seems to be centered around 7$^o$ from the sunspot center, where we observe an inflow close to the surface down to $\sim$2 Mm, followed by an outflow at deeper layers until at least 7 Mm.
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    This paper presents a table with estimates of the absolute magnitude of the Sun and the conversions from $vegamag$ to the AB and ST systems for several wide-band filters used in ground and space-based observatories. These estimates use the dustless spectral energy distribution (SED) of Vega, calibrated absolutely using the SED of Sirius, to set the $vegamag$ zero-points and a composite spectrum of the Sun that coadds space-based observations from the ultra-violet to the near infrared with models of the Solar atmosphere. The uncertainty of the absolute magnitudes is estimated comparing the synthetic colors with photometric measurements of solar analogs and is found to be $\sim$ 0.02 magnitudes. Combined with the uncertainty of $\sim$ 2% in the calibration of the Vega SED, the errors of these absolute magnitudes are $\sim$ 3--4%. Using these SEDs, for the three of the most utilized filters in extragalactic work the estimated absolute magnitudes of the Sun are $M_B$ = 5.44, $M_V$ = 4.81 and $M_K$ = 3.27 mag in the $vegamag$ system and $M_B$ = 5.31, $M_V$ = 4.80 and $M_K$ = 5.08 mag in AB.
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    The windows of low extinction in the Milky Way (MW) plane are rare but important because they enable us to place structural constraints on the opposite side of the Galaxy, which has hitherto been done rarely. We use the near-infrared (near-IR) images of the VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) Survey to build extinction maps and to identify low extinction windows towards the Southern Galactic plane. Here we report the discovery of VVV WIN 1713$-$3939, a very interesting window with relatively uniform and low extinction conveniently placed very close to the Galactic plane. The new window of roughly 30 arcmin diameter is located at Galactic coordinates (l,b)= (347.4,-0.4) deg. We analyse the VVV near-IR colour-magnitude diagrams in this window. The mean total near-IR extinction and reddening values measured for this window are A_Ks=0.46 and E(J-Ks)=0.95. The red clump giants within the window show a bimodal magnitude distribution in the Ks band, with peaks at Ks=14.1 and 14.8 mag, corresponding to mean distances of D=11.0+/-2.4 and 14.8+/-3.6 kpc, respectively. We discuss the origin of these red clump overdensities within the context of the MW disk structure.
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    Temporal and spectral characteristics of X-ray emission from 60 flares of intensity $\ge$C class observed by Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) during 2003-2011 are presented. We analyse the X-ray emission observed in four and three energy bands by the Si and CZT detectors, respectively. The number of peaks in the intensity profile of the flares varies between 1 and 3. We find moderate correlation (R$\simeq$0.2) between the rise time and the peak flux of the first peak of the flare irrespective to energy band, which is indicative of its energy-independent nature. Moreover, magnetic field complexity of the flaring region is found to be anti-correlated (R=0.61) with the rise time of the flares while positively correlated (R=0.28) with the peak flux of the flare. The time delay between the peak of the X-ray emission in a given energy band and that in the 25-30 keV decreases with increasing energy suggesting conduction cooling to be dominant in the lower energies. Analysis of 340 spectra from 14 flares reveals that the peak of Differential Emission Measure (DEM) evolution delays by 60-360 s relative to that of the temperature, and this time delay is inversely proportional to the peak flux of the flare. We conclude that temporal and intensity characteristics of flares are energy dependent as well as magnetic field configuration of the active region.