Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (astro-ph.SR)

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    Interstellar gas clouds are often both highly magnetized and supersonically turbulent, with velocity dispersions set by a competition between driving and dissipation. This balance has been studied extensively in the context of gases with constant mean density. However, many astrophysical systems are contracting under the influence of external pressure or gravity, and the balance between driving and dissipation in a contracting, magnetized medium has yet to be studied. In this paper we present three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of compression in a turbulent, magnetized medium that resembles the physical conditions inside molecular clouds. We find that in some circumstances the combination of compression and magnetic fields leads to a rate of turbulent dissipation far less than that observed in non-magnetized gas, or in non-compressing magnetized gas. As a result, a compressing, magnetized gas reaches an equilibrium velocity dispersion much greater than would be expected for either the hydrodynamic or the non-compressing case. We use the simulation results to construct an analytic model that gives an effective equation of state for a coarse-grained parcel of the gas, in the form of an ideal equation of state with a polytropic index that depends on the dissipation and energy transfer rates between the magnetic and turbulent components. We argue that the reduced dissipation rate and larger equilibrium velocity dispersion produced by compressing, magnetized turbulence has important implications for the driving and maintenance of turbulence in molecular clouds, and for the rates of chemical and radiative processes that are sensitive to shocks and dissipation.
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    Although observational data unequivocally point out to the presence of chromospheres in red giant stars, no attempts have been made so far to model them using 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres. We therefore compute an exploratory 3D hydrodynamical model atmosphere for a cool red giant in order to study the dynamical and thermodynamic properties of its chromosphere, as well as the influence of the chromosphere on its observable properties. 3D radiation hydrodynamics simulations are carried out with the CO5BOLD model atmosphere code for a star with the atmospheric parameters (Teff=4010 K, log g=1.5, [M/H]=0.0), which are similar to those of the K-type giant star Aldebaran (alpha Tau). ... we compute the emergent continuum intensity maps at different wavelengths, spectral line profiles of Ca II K, the Ca II infrared triplet line at 854.2nm, and H alpha, as well as the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the emergent radiative flux. The initial model quickly develops a dynamical chromosphere characterised by propagating and interacting shock waves. The peak temperatures in the chromospheric shock fronts reach values on the order of up to 5000 K although the shock fronts remain quite narrow. Like for the Sun, the gas temperature distribution in the upper layers is composed of a cool component due to adiabatic cooling in the expanding post-shock regions and a hot component due to shock waves. For this red giant model, the hot component is a rather flat high-temperature tail, which nevertheless affects the resulting average temperatures significantly. The simulations show that the atmospheres of red giant stars are dynamic and intermittent. Consequently, many observable properties cannot be reproduced with one-dimensional static models but demand for advanced 3D HD modelling. Furthermore, including a chromosphere in the models might produce significant contributions to the emergent UV flux.
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    Observational studies reveal that complex organic molecules (COMs) can be found in various objects associated with different star formation stages. The identification of COMs in prestellar cores, i.e., cold environments in which thermally induced chemistry can be excluded and radiolysis is limited by cosmic rays and cosmic ray induced UV-photons, is particularly important as this stage sets up the initial chemical composition from which ultimately stars and planets evolve. Recent laboratory results demonstrate that molecules as complex as glycolaldehyde and ethylene glycol are efficiently formed on icy dust grains via non-energetic atom addition reactions between accreting H atoms and CO molecules, a process that dominates surface chemistry during the 'CO-freeze out stage' in dense cores. In the present study we demonstrate that a similar mechanism results in the formation of the biologically relevant molecule glycerol - HOCH2CH(OH)CH2OH - a three-carbon bearing sugar alcohol necessary for the formation of membranes of modern living cells and organelles. Our experimental results are fully consistent with a suggested reaction scheme in which glycerol is formed along a chain of radical-radical and radical-molecule interactions between various reactive intermediates produced upon hydrogenation of CO ice or its hydrogenation products. The tentative identification of the chemically related simple sugar glyceraldehyde - HOCH2CH(OH)CHO - is discussed as well. These new laboratory findings indicate that the proposed reaction mechanism holds much potential to form even more complex sugar alcohols and simple sugars.
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    As part of the Accretion Discs in H$\alpha$ with OmegaCAM (ADHOC) survey, we imaged in r, i and H-alpha a region of 12x8 square degrees around the Orion Nebula Cluster. Thanks to the high-quality photometry obtained, we discovered three well-separated pre-main sequences in the color-magnitude diagram. The populations are all concentrated towards the cluster's center. Although several explanations can be invoked to explain these sequences we are left with two competitive, but intriguing, scenarios: a population of unresolved binaries with an exotic mass ratio distribution or three populations with different ages. Independent high-resolution spectroscopy supports the presence of discrete episodes of star formation, each separated by about a million years. The stars from the two putative youngest populations rotate faster than the older ones, in agreement with the evolution of stellar rotation observed in pre-main sequence stars younger than 4 Myr in several star forming regions. Whatever the final explanation, our results prompt for a revised look at the formation mode and early evolution of stars in clusters.
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    Understanding the governing mechanism of solar magnetism remains an outstanding challenge in astrophysics. Seismology is the most compelling technique with which to infer the internal properties of the Sun and stars. Waves in the Sun, nominally acoustic, are sensitive to the emergence and cyclical strengthening of magnetic field, evidenced by measured changes in resonant oscillation frequencies that are correlated with the solar cycle. The inference of internal Lorentz stresses from these measurements has the potential to significantly advance our appreciation of the dynamo. Indeed, seismological inverse theory for the Sun is well understood for perturbations in composition, thermal structure and flows but, is not fully developed for magnetism, owing to the complexity of the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equation. Invoking first-Born perturbation theory to characterize departures from spherically symmetric hydrostatic models of the Sun and applying the notation of generalized spherical harmonics, we calculate sensitivity functions of seismic measurements to the general time-varying Lorentz stress tensor. We find that eigenstates of isotropic (i.e. acoustic only) background models are dominantly sensitive to isotropic deviations in the stress tensor and much more weakly so to anisotropic stresses (and therefore challenging to infer). The apple cannot fall far from the tree.
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    We have expanded upon earlier work that investigates the relative importance of coronal loops with isothermal $versus$ multithermal cross-field temperature distributions. These results are important for determining if loops have substructure in the form of unresolved magnetic strands. We have increased the number of loops targeted for temperature analysis from 19 to 207 with the addition of 188 new loops from multiple regions. We selected all loop segments visible in the 171-Å images of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) that had a clean background. 86 of the new loops were rejected because they could not be reliably separated from the background in other AIA filters. 61 loops required multithermal models to reproduce the observations. 28 loops were effectively isothermal, that is, the plasma emission to which AIA is sensitive could not be distinguished from isothermal emission, within uncertainties. 10 loops were isothermal. Also part of our inventory were one small flaring loop, one very cool loop whose temperature distribution could not be constrained by the AIA data, and one loop with inconclusive results. Our survey can confirm an unexpected result from the pilot study: we found no isothermal loop segments where we could properly use the 171-to-193 ratio method, which would be similar to the analysis done for many loops observed with TRACE and EIT. We recommend caution to observers who assume the loop plasma is isothermal, and hope that these results will influence the direction of coronal heating models and the efforts modelers spend on various heating scenarios.
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    SW Sextantis stars are a class of cataclysmic variables originally defined via certain peculiar properties that they all have in common. In this article, I review our knowledge of these stars and show the way from a phenomenological classification to a physical understanding of these systems. The fact that SW Sex stars accumulate at the upper edge of the period gap is discussed with respect to the secular evolution of cataclysmic variables.
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    Supermassive primordial stars forming in atomically-cooled halos at $z \sim15-20$ are currently thought to be the progenitors of the earliest quasars in the Universe. In this picture, the star evolves under accretion rates of $0.1 - 1$ $M_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ until the general relativistic instability triggers its collapse to a black hole at masses of $\sim10^5$ $M_\odot$. However, the ability of the accretion flow to sustain such high rates depends crucially on the photospheric properties of the accreting star, because its ionising radiation could reduce or even halt accretion. Here we present new models of supermassive Population III protostars accreting at rates $0.001 - 10$ $M_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$, computed with the GENEVA stellar evolution code including general relativistic corrections to the internal structure. We use the polytropic stability criterion to estimate the mass at which the collapse occurs, which has been shown to give a lower limit of the actual mass at collapse in recent hydrodynamic simulations. We find that at accretion rates higher than $0.001$ $M_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ the stars evolve as red, cool supergiants with surface temperatures below $10^4$ K towards masses $>10^5$ $M_\odot$, and become blue and hot, with surface temperatures above $10^5$ K, only for rates $\lesssim0.001$ $M_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. Compared to previous studies, our results extend the range of masses and accretion rates at which the ionising feedback remains weak, reinforcing the case for direct collapse as the origin of the first quasars.
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    We present coronagraphic long slit spectra of AU Mic's debris disk taken with the STIS instrument aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Our spectra are the first spatially resolved, scattered light spectra of the system's disk, which we detect at projected distances between approximately 10 and 45 AU. Our spectra cover a wavelength range between 5200 and 10200 Å. We find that the color of AU Mic's debris disk is bluest at small (10-30 AU) projected separations. These results both confirm and quantify the speculative findings qualitatively noted by Krist et al. (2005) and collaborators, and are different than IR observations that suggested a uniform blue or gray color as a function of projected separation between 10-30 AU. Unlike previous literature that reported the color of AU Mic's disk became increasingly more blue as a function of projected separation beyond approximately 30 AU, we find the disk's optical color between 30-45 AU to be uniformly blue. We note that this apparent change in disk color at larger projected separations coincide with several fast, outward moving "features" that are passing through this region of the disk. We speculate that these phenomenon might be related, and that the fast moving features could be changing the localized distribution of sub-micron sized grains as they pass by, thereby reducing the blue color of the disk in the process. We encourage follow-up optical spectroscopic observations of the AU Mic to both confirm this result, and search for further modifications of the disk color caused by additional fast moving features propagating through the disk.