Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (astro-ph.IM)

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    Many focal-reducer spectrographs, currently available at state-of-the art telescopes facilities, would benefit from a simple refurbishing that could increase both the resolution and spectral range in order to cope with the progressively challenging scientific requirements but, in order to make this update appealing, it should minimize the changes in the existing structure of the instrument. In the past, many authors proposed solutions based on stacking subsequently layers of dispersive elements and record multiple spectra in one shot (multiplexing). Although this idea is promising, it brings several drawbacks and complexities that prevent the straightforward integration of a such device in a spectrograph. Fortunately nowadays, the situation has changed dramatically thanks to the successful experience achieved through photopolymeric holographic films, used to fabricate common Volume Phase Holographic Gratings (VPHGs). Thanks to the various advantages made available by these materials in this context, we propose an innovative solution to design a stacked multiplexed VPHGs that is able to secure efficiently different spectra in a single shot. This allows to increase resolution and spectral range enabling astronomers to greatly economize their awarded time at the telescope. In this paper, we demonstrate the applicability of our solution, both in terms of expected performance and feasibility, supposing the upgrade of the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC) Optical System for Imaging and low-Intermediate-Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy (OSIRIS).
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    We compare the existent methods including the minimum spanning tree based method and the local stellar density based method in measuring mass segregation of star clusters. We find that the minimum spanning tree method reflects more the compactness, which represents the global spatial distribution of massive stars, while the local stellar density method reflects more the crowdedness, which provides the local gravitational potential information. It is suggested to measure the local and the global mass segregation simultaneously. We also develop a hybrid method which takes both aspects into account. This hybrid method balances the local and the global mass segregation in the sense that if the predominant one is caused either by dynamical evolution or purely accidental, especially when the knowledge is unknown a priori. In addition, we test our prescriptions with numerical models and show the impact of binaries, in estimating the mass segregation value. As an application, we apply these methods on the Orion Nebula Cluster and the Taurus Cluster observations. We find that the Orion Nebula Cluster is significantly mass segregated down to the 20th most massive stars. In contrast, the massive stars of the Taurus cluster are sparsely distributed in many different sub-clusters and show a low degree of compactness. The massive stars of Taurus are also found to be distributed in the high-density regions of sub-clusters, showing significant mass segregation at sub-cluster scale. Finally, we apply these methods to discuss the possible mechanisms of the dynamical evolution of simulated sub-structured star clusters.
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    Supernova cosmology without spectra will be the bread and butter mode for future surveys such as LSST. This lack of supernova spectra results in uncertainty in the redshifts which, if ignored, leads to significantly biased estimates of cosmological parameters. Here we present a hierarchical Bayesian formalism -- zBEAMS -- that fully addresses this problem by marginalising over the unknown or contaminated supernova redshifts to produce unbiased cosmological estimates that are competitive with entirely spectroscopic data. zBEAMS provides a unified treatment of both photometric redshifts and host galaxy misidentification (occurring due to chance galaxy alignments or faint hosts), effectively correcting the inevitable contamination in the Hubble diagram. Like its predecessor BEAMS, our formalism also takes care of non-Ia supernova contamination by marginalising over the unknown supernova type. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique with simulations of supernovae with photometric redshifts and host galaxy misidentification. A novel feature of the photometric redshift case is the important role played by the redshift distribution of the supernovae.