Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (astro-ph.IM)

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    Cherenkov light induced by radioactive decay products is one of the major sources of background light for deep-sea neutrino telescopes such as ANTARES. These decays are at the same time a powerful calibration source. Using data collected by the ANTARES neutrino telescope from mid 2008 to 2017, the time evolution of the photon detection efficiency of optical modules is studied. A modest loss of only 20% in 9 years is observed. The relative time calibration between adjacent modules is derived as well.
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    The almost universal availability of electronic connectivity, web software, and portable devices is bringing about a major revolution: information of all kinds is rapidly becoming accessible to everyone, transforming social, economic and cultural life practically everywhere in the world. Internet technologies represent an unprecedented and extraordinary two-way channel of communication between producers and users of data. For this reason the web is widely recognized as an asset capable of achieving the fundamental goal of transparency of information and of data products, in line with the growing demand for transparency of all goods that are produced with public money. This paper describes "Open Universe" an initiative proposed to the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS) with the objective of stimulating a dramatic increase in the availability and usability of space science data, extending the potential of scientific discovery to new participants in all parts of the world.
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    The Hard X-ray Imager (HXI) onboard Hitomi (ASTRO-H) is an imaging spectrometer covering hard X-ray energies of 5-80 keV. Combined with the hard X-ray telescope, it enables imaging spectroscopy with an angular resolution of $1^\prime.7$ half-power diameter, in a field of view of $9^\prime\times9^\prime$. The main imager is composed of 4 layers of Si detectors and 1 layer of CdTe detector, stacked to cover wide energy band up to 80 keV, surrounded by an active shield made of BGO scintillator to reduce the background. The HXI started observations 12 days before the Hitomi loss, and successfully obtained data from G21.5$-$0.9, Crab and blank sky. Utilizing these data, we calibrate the detector response and study properties of in-orbit background. The observed Crab spectra agree well with a powerlaw model convolved with the detector response, within 5% accuracy. We find that albedo electrons in specified orbit strongly affect the background of Si top layer, and establish a screening method to reduce it. The background level over the full field of view after all the processing and screening is as low as the pre-flight requirement of $1$-$3\times10^{-4}$ counts s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ keV$^{-1}$.
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    Radio astronomical observation below 30 MHz is hampered by the refraction and absorption of the ionosphere, and the radio frequency interference (RFI), so far high angular resolution sky intensity map is not available. An interferometer array on lunar orbit provides a perfect observatory in this frequency band: it is out of the ionosphere and the Moon helps to block the RFIs from the Earth. The satellites can make observations on the far side of the Moon and then send back the data on the near side part of the orbit. However, for such array the traditional imaging algorithm is not applicable: the field of view is very wide (almost whole sky), and for baselines distributed on a plane, there is a mirror symmetry between the two sides of the plane. A further complication is that for each baseline, the Moon blocks part of the sky, but as the satellites orbit the Moon, both the direction of the baseline and the blocked sky change, so even imaging algorithms which can deal with non-coplanar baseline may not work in this case. Here we present an imaging algorithm based on solving the linear mapping equations relating the sky intensity to the visibilities. We show that the mirror symmetry can be broken by the three dimensional baseline distribution generated naturally by the precession of the orbital plane of the satellites. The algorithm is applicable and good maps could be reconstructed, even though for each baseline the sky blocking by the Moon is different. We also investigate how the map-making is affected by inhomogeneous baseline distributions.
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    The Pierre Auger Observatory has recently reported the detection of a dipole anisotropy in the arrival directions of cosmic rays above 8 EeV with a post-trial significance of more than 5.2$\sigma$. This observation has profound consequences for the distribution and composition of candidate sources of cosmic rays above the ankle (3-5 EeV). In this paper we search for the presence of anisotropies on all angular scales in public Auger data. The analysis follows a likelihood-based reconstruction method, that automatically accounts for variations in the observatory's angular acceptance and background rate. Our best-fit dipole anisotropy in the equatorial plane has an amplitude of 5.3 $\pm$ 1.3 percent and right ascension angle of 103 $\pm$ 15 degrees, consistent with the results of the Pierre Auger Collaboration. We do not find evidence for the presence of medium- or small-scale anisotropies. The method outlined in this paper is well-suited for the future analyses of cosmic ray anisotropies below the ankle, where cosmic ray detection in surface arrays is not fully efficient and dominated by systematic uncertainties.
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    We want to study whether the astrometric and photometric accuracies obtained for the Carte du Ciel plates digitized with a commercial digital camera are high enough for scientific exploitation of the plates. We use a digital camera Canon EOS~5Ds, with a 100mm macrolens for digitizing. We analyze six single-exposure plates and four triple-exposure plates from the Helsinki zone of Carte du Ciel (+39 degr < delta < 47 degr). Each plate is digitized using four images, with a significant central area being covered twice for quality control purposes. The astrometric calibration of the digitized images is done with the data from the Gaia TGAS (Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution) of the first Gaia data release (Gaia DR1), Tycho-2, HSOY (Hot Stuff for One Year), UCAC5 (USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog), and PMA catalogs. The best astrometric accuracy is obtained with the UCAC5 reference stars. The astrometric accuracy for single-exposure plates is sigma(R.A.)=0.16" and sigma(Dec.)=0.15" expressed as a Gaussian deviation of the astrometric residuals. For triple-exposure plates the astrometric accuracy is sigma(R.A.)=0.12" and sigma(Dec.)=0.13". The 1-sigma uncertainty of photometric calibration is about 0.28 mag and 0.24 mag for single- and triple-exposure plates, respectively. We detect the photographic adjacency (Kostinsky) effect in the triple-exposure plates. We show that accuracies at least of the level of scanning machines can be achieved with a digital camera, without any corrections for possible distortions caused by our instrumental setup. This method can be used to rapidly and inexpensively digitize and calibrate old photographic plates enabling their scientific exploitation.
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    We discuss some of the unique details of the operation and behavior of Leonardo SAPHIRA detectors, particularly in relation to their usage for adaptive optics wavefront sensing. SAPHIRA detectors are 320$\times$256@24 $\mu$m pixel HgCdTe linear avalanche photodiode arrays and are sensitive to 0.8-2.5 $\mu m$ light. SAPHIRA arrays permit global or line-by-line resets, of the entire detector or just subarrays of it, and the order in which pixels are reset and read enable several readout schemes. We discuss three readout modes, the benefits, drawbacks, and noise sources of each, and the observational modes for which each is optimal. We describe the ability of the detector to read subarrays for increased frame rates, and finally clarify the differences between the avalanche gain (which is user-adjustable) and the charge gain (which is not).
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    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project is an international effort to build the world's most sensitive radio telescope operating in the 50 MHz to 14 GHz frequency range. Construction of the SKA is divided into phases, with the first phase (SKA1) accounting for the first 10% of the telescope's receiving capacity. During SKA1, a Low-Frequency Aperture Array (LFAA) comprising over a hundred thousand individual dipole antenna elements will be constructed in Western Australia (SKA1-LOW), while an array of 197 parabolic-receptor antennas, incorporating the 64 receptors of MeerKAT, will be constructed in South Africa (SKA1-MID). Radio telescope arrays, such as the SKA, require phase-coherent reference signals to be transmitted to each antenna site in the array. In the case of the SKA, these reference signals are generated at a central site and transmitted to the antenna sites via fibre-optic cables up to 175 km in length. Environmental perturbations affect the optical path length of the fibre and act to degrade the phase stability of the reference signals received at the antennas, which has the ultimate effect of reducing the fidelity and dynamic range of the data . Given the combination of long fibre distances and relatively high frequencies of the transmitted reference signals, the SKA needs to employ actively-stabilised frequency transfer technologies to suppress the fibre-optic link noise in order to maintain phase-coherence across the array.
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    Radio interferometric data are used to estimate the sky brightness distributions in radio frequencies. Here we focus on estimators of the large-scale structure and the power spectrum of the sky brightness distribution inferred from radio interferometric observations and assess their efficacy using simulated observations of the model sky. We find that while the large-scale distribution can be unbiasedly estimated from the reconstructed image from the interferometric data, estimates of the power spectrum of the intensity fluctuations calculated from the image are generally biased. The bias is more pronounced for diffuse emission. The visibility based power spectrum estimator, however, gives an unbiased estimate of the true power spectrum. We conclude that for an observation with diffuse emission the reconstructed image can be used to estimate the large-scale distribution of the intensity, while to estimate the power spectrum, visibility based methods should be preferred.
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    Large arrays of cryogenic sensors for various imaging applications ranging across x-ray, gamma-ray, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), mm/sub-mm, as well as particle detection increasingly rely on superconducting microresonators for high multiplexing factors. These microresonators take the form of microwave SQUIDs that couple to Transition-Edge Sensors (TES) or Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs). In principle, such arrays can be read out with vastly scalable software-defined radio using suitable FPGAs, ADCs and DACs. In this work, we share plans and show initial results for SLAC Microresonator Radio Frequency (SMuRF) electronics, a next-generation control and readout system for superconducting microresonators. SMuRF electronics are unique in their implementation of specialized algorithms for closed-loop tone tracking, which consists of fast feedback and feedforward to each resonator's excitation parameters based on transmission measurements. Closed-loop tone tracking enables improved system linearity, a significant increase in sensor count per readout line, and the possibility of overcoupled resonator designs for enhanced dynamic range. Low-bandwidth prototype electronics were used to demonstrate closed-loop tone tracking on twelve 300-kHz-wide microwave SQUID resonators, spaced at $\sim$6 MHz with center frequencies $\sim$5-6 GHz. We achieve multi-kHz tracking bandwidth and demonstrate that the noise floor of the electronics is subdominant to the noise intrinsic in the multiplexer.