Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (astro-ph.IM)

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    Source detection in counting type experiments such as Cherenkov telescopes often involves the application of the classical Eq. 17 from the paper of Li & Ma (1983) to discrete on- and off-source regions. The on- source region is typically a circular area with radius \theta in which the signal is expected to appear with the shape of the instrument point spread function (PSF). This paper addresses the question of what is the \theta that maximises the probability of detection for a given PSF width and background event density. In the high count number limit and assuming a Gaussian PSF profile, the optimum is found to be at $\zeta_\infty^2 \approx 2.51$ times the squared PSF width $\sigma_\mathrm{PSF39}^2$. While this number is shown to be a good choice in many cases, a dynamic formula for cases of lower count numbers, which favour larger on-source regions, is given. The recipe to get to this parametrisation can also be applied to cases with a non-Gaussian PSF. This result can standardise and simplify analysis procedures, reduce trials and eliminate the need for experience-based ad hoc cut definitions or expensive case-by-case Monte Carlo simulations.
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    Cosmic ray muons with the average energy of 280 GeV and neutrons produced by muons are detected with the Large Volume Detector at LNGS. We present an analysis of the seasonal variation of the neutron flux on the basis of the data obtained during 15 years. The measurement of the seasonal variation of the specific number of neutrons generated by muons allows to obtaine the variation magnitude of of the average energy of the muon flux at the depth of the LVD location. The source of the seasonal variation of the total neutron flux is a change of the intensity and the average energy of the muon flux.
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    We present the catalog of the KVN Calibrator Survey (KVNCS). This first part of the KVNCS is a single dish radio survey conducted at 22 (K band) and 43 GHz (Q band) simultaneously using the Korean VLBI Network (KVN) from 2009 to 2011. A total 2045 sources selected from the VLBA Calibrator Survey (VCS) with an extrapolated flux density limit of 100 mJy at K band. The KVNCS contains 1533 sources in the K band with a flux density limit of 70 mJy and 553 sources in the Q band with a flux density limit of 120 mJy; it covers the whole sky down to $-32.^\circ5$ in declination. Five hundred thirteen sources were detected in the K and Q bands, simultaneously; $\sim76\%$ of them are flat-spectrum sources ($-0.5 \leq \alpha \leq 0.5$). From the flux--flux relationship, we anticipated that the most of the radiation of many of the sources comes from the compact components. Therefore, the sources listed in the KVNCS are strong candidates for high frequency VLBI calibrators.
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    Radio astronomy has traditionally depended on observatories allocating time to observers for exclusive use of their telescopes. The disadvantage of this scheme is that the data thus collected is rarely used for other astronomy applications, and in many cases, is unsuitable. For example, properly calibrated pulsar search data can, with some reduction, be used for spectral line surveys. A backend that supports plugging in multiple applications to a telescope to perform commensal data analysis will vastly increase the science throughput of the facility. In this paper, we present 'SETIBURST', a robotic, commensal, realtime multi-science backend for the 305-m Arecibo Telescope. The system uses the 1.4 GHz, seven-beam Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) receiver whenever it is operated. SETIBURST currently supports two applications: SERENDIP VI, a SETI spectrometer that is conducting a search for signs of technological life, and ALFABURST, a fast transient search system that is conducting a survey of fast radio bursts (FRBs). Based on the FRB event rate and the expected usage of ALFA, we expect 0-5 FRB detections over the coming year. SETIBURST also provides the option of plugging in more applications. We outline the motivation for our instrumentation scheme and the scientific motivation of the two surveys, along with their descriptions and related discussions.
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    X-ray polarimetry has seen a growing interest in recent years. Improvements in detector technology and focusing X-ray optics now enable sensitive astrophysical X-ray polarization measurements. These measurements will provide new insights into the processes at work in accreting black holes, the emission of X-rays from neutron stars and magnetars, and the structure of AGN jets. X-Calibur is a balloon-borne hard X-ray scattering polarimeter. An X-ray mirror with a focal length of 8 m focuses X-rays onto the detector, which consists of a plastic scattering element surrounded by Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride detectors, which absorb and record the scattered X-rays. Since X-rays preferentially scatter perpendicular to their polarization direction, the polarization properties of an X-ray beam can be inferred from the azimuthal distribution of scattered X-rays. A close alignment of the X-ray focal spot with the center of the detector is required in order to reduce systematic uncertainties and to maintain a high photon detection efficiency. This places stringent requirements on the mechanical and thermal stability of the telescope structure. During the flight on a stratospheric balloon, X-Calibur makes use of the Wallops Arc-Second Pointer (WASP) to point the telescope at astrophysical sources. In this paper, we describe the design, construction, and test of the telescope structure, as well as its performance during a 25-hour flight from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico. The carbon fiber-aluminum composite structure met the requirements set by X-Calibur and its design can easily be adapted for other types of experiments, such as X-ray imaging or spectroscopic telescopes.
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    We report the performance of an active veto system using a liquid scintillator with NaI(Tl) crystals for use in a dark matter search experiment. When a NaI(Tl) crystal is immersed in the prototype detector, the detector tags 48% of the internal K-40 background in the 0-10 keV energy region. We also determined the tagging efficiency for events at 6-20 keV as 26.5 +/- 1.7% of the total events, which corresponds to 0.76 +/- 0.04 events/keV/kg/day. According to a simulation, approximately 60% of the background events from U, Th, and K radioisotopes in photomultiplier tubes are tagged at energies of 0-10 keV. Full shielding with a 40-cm-thick liquid scintillator can increase the tagging efficiency for both the internal K-40 and external background to approximately 80%.
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    The Doppler effect is a shift in the frequency of waves emitted from an object moving relative to the observer. By observing and analysing the Doppler shift in electromagnetic waves from astronomical objects, astronomers gain greater insight into the structure and operation of our universe. In this paper, a simple technique is described for teaching the basics of the Doppler effect to undergraduate astrophysics students using acoustic waves. An advantage of the technique is that it produces a visual representation of the acoustic Doppler shift. The equipment comprises a 40 kHz acoustic transmitter and a microphone. The sound is bounced off a computer fan and the signal collected by a DrDAQ ADC and processed by a spectrum analyser. Widening of the spectrum is observed as the fan power supply potential is increased from 4 to 12 V.
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    This is a manual for the MOSiC package. MOSiC is a collection of IDL programs for profile analysis and Gaussian fitting of the Mg II h/k lines along with Gaussian fitting of the C II 133.5 nm line pair, the O I 135.6, the Cl I 135.2, the Si IV 139.7 and 140.3 and the O IV 140.0 nm lines observed with the IRIS near UV and far UV spectrograph. It was tested by analyzing over a hundred different IRIS data sets (quiet Sun, sunspot, ...). It works for off limb data, although it is still experimental. MOSiC analyzes different spectral lines separately and returns line intensity, width, and velocity for each line. A few sample profiles and maps are included in this manual.
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    Many aspects of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) instrument are still unknown due to its young age. One such aspect is the true nature of the primary beam of each baseline, and how changes to the individual primary beams affect astronomical observations when said changes are ignored during imaging. This paper aims to create a more thorough understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of ALMA through realistic modeling of the primary beams and simulated observations, which in turn can inform the user of the necessity of implementing more computationally costly algorithms, such as A-Projection, and when simpler, quicker algorithms will suffice. We quantify our results by examining the dynamic range of each observation, along with the ability to reconstruct the Stokes I amplitude of the test sources. These tests conclude that for dynamic ranges of less than 1000, for point sources and sources much smaller than the main lobe of the primary beam, the accuracy of the primary beam model beyond the physical size of the aperture simply doesn't matter. In observations of large extended sources, deconvolution errors dominate the reconstructed images and the individual primary beam errors were indistinguishable from each other.
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    Merger trees track the evolution of halos across multiple snapshots. They assign for halos of a particular snapshot, the set of halos from previous snapshots they possibly originated from. In this work, Association rule analysis a well known technique from data mining has been used to build halo merger trees. Association rule analysis tries to find associations between different halos(in same as well as in snapshots) using the particle IDs of the particles which the halos are made of. Associations are expressed in the form of association rules. Merger trees are one of the several useful results one can obtain from the output of association rule analysis. Other results including halo substructure and halo splitting can also be extracted. Each type of output to be extracted from the association rule analysis output correspond to a pattern in association rules. Merger trees were formed and tested using the above technique. Dark matter simulations were run using Gadget-2 for 128^3 particles. Halos were extracted from the simulation snapshots using Amiga Halo Finder. Halo accretion history was plotted and compared against those formed using AHF merger tree builder.