Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (astro-ph.IM)

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    The astronomical community continues to be interested in suitable programmable slit masks for use in multi-object spectrometers (MOSs) on space missions. There have been ground-based MOS utilizing digital micromirror devices (DMDs) and they have proven to be highly accurate and reliable instruments. This paper summarizes the results of a continuing study to investigate the performance of DMDs under conditions associated with space deployment. This includes the response of DMDs to radiation, to the vibration and mechanical shock loads associated with launch, and the operability of DMD under cryogenic temperatures. The optical contrast ratio and a study of the long-term reflectance of a bare device have also been investigated. The results of the radiation testing demonstrate that DMDs in orbit would experience negligible heavy-ion induced single event upset (SEU) rate burden, we predict SEU rate of 5.6 micromirrors per 24 hours. Vibration and mechanical shock testing was performed according to the NASA General Environmental Verification Standard (GEVS), no mirrors failed in the devices tested. The results of low temperature testing suggest that DMDs are not affected by the thermal load and operate smoothly at temperatures at least as low as 78 K. The reflectivity of a bare DMD did not measurably change even after being exposed to ambient conditions over a period of 13 months. The measured contrast ratio (on state vs off state of the DMD micromirrors) was greater than 6000/:1 when illuminated with an f/4 optical beam. Overall, DMDs are extremely robust and promise to provide a reliable alternative to micro shutter arrays (MSA) to be used in space as remotely programmable slit masks for MOS design.
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    We present a search for optical bursts from the repeating fast radio burst FRB 121102 using simultaneous observations with the high-speed optical camera ULTRASPEC on the 2.4-m Thai National Telescope and radio observations with the 100-m Effelsberg Radio Telescope. A total of 13 radio bursts were detected, but we found no evidence for corresponding optical bursts in our 70.7-ms frames. The 5-sigma upper limit to the optical flux density during our observations is 0.33 mJy at 767nm. This gives an upper limit for the optical burst fluence of 0.046 Jy ms, which constrains the broadband spectral index of the burst emission to alpha < -0.2. Two of the radio pulses are separated by just 34 ms, which may represent an upper limit on a possible underlying periodicity (a rotation period typical of pulsars), or these pulses may have come from a single emission window that is a small fraction of a possible period.
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    We describe an OctTree algorithm for the MPI-parallel, adaptive mesh-refinement code \sc FLASH, which can be used to calculate the gas self-gravity, and also the angle-averaged local optical depth, for treating ambient diffuse radiation. The algorithm communicates to the different processors only those parts of the tree that are needed to perform the tree walk locally. The advantage of this approach is a relatively low memory requirement, important in particular for the optical depth calculation, which needs to process information from many different directions. This feature also enables a general tree-based radiation transport algorithm that will be described in a subsequent paper, and delivers excellent scaling up to at least 1500 cores. Boundary conditions for gravity can be either isolated or periodic, and they can be specified in each direction independently, using a newly developed generalisation of the Ewald method. The gravity calculation can be accelerated with the \em adaptive block update technique by partially re-using the solution from the previous time-step. Comparison with the \sc Flash internal multi-grid gravity solver shows that tree based methods provide a competitive alternative, particularly for problems with isolated or mixed boundary conditions. We evaluate several multipole acceptance criteria (MACs) and identify a relatively simple APE MAC which provides high accuracy at low computational cost. The optical depth estimates are found to agree very well with those of the \sc RADMC-3D radiation transport code, with the tree solver being much faster. Our algorithm is available in the standard release of the \sc FLASH code in version 4.0 and later.
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    We report the first intensity correlation measured with star light since Hanbury Brown and Twiss' historical experiments. The photon bunching $g^{(2)}(\tau, r=0)$, obtained in the photon counting regime, was measured for 3 bright stars, $\alpha$ Boo, $\alpha$ CMi, and $\beta$ Gem. The light was collected at the focal plane of a 1~m optical telescope, was transported by a multi-mode optical fiber, split into two avalanche photodiodes and digitally correlated in real-time. For total exposure times of a few hours, we obtained contrast values around $2\times10^{-3}$, in agreement with the expectation for chaotic sources, given the optical and electronic bandwidths of our setup. Comparing our results with the measurement of Hanbury Brown et al. on $\alpha$ CMi, we argue for the timely opportunity to extend our experiments to measuring the spatial correlation function over existing and/or foreseen arrays of optical telescopes diluted over several kilometers. This would enable $\mu$as long-baseline interferometry in the optical, especially in the visible wavelengths with a limiting magnitude of 10.
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    We report constraints on the global $21$ cm signal due to neutral hydrogen at redshifts $14.8 \geq z \geq 6.5$. We derive our constraints from low foreground observations of the average sky brightness spectrum conducted with the EDGES High-Band instrument between September $7$ and October $26$, $2015$. Observations were calibrated by accounting for the effects of antenna beam chromaticity, antenna and ground losses, signal reflections, and receiver parameters. We evaluate the consistency between the spectrum and phenomenological models for the global $21$ cm signal. For tanh-based representations of the ionization history during the epoch of reionization, we rule out, at $\geq2\sigma$ significance, models with duration of up to $\Delta z = 1$ at $z\approx8.5$ and higher than $\Delta z = 0.4$ across most of the observed redshift range under the usual assumption that the $21$ cm spin temperature is much larger than the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) during reionization. We also investigate a `cold' IGM scenario that assumes perfect Ly$\alpha$ coupling of the $21$ cm spin temperature to the temperature of the intergalactic medium (IGM), but that the IGM is not heated by early stars or stellar remants. Under this assumption, we reject tanh-based reionization models of duration $\Delta z \lesssim 2$ over most of the observed redshift range. Finally, we explore and reject a broad range of Gaussian models for the $21$ cm absorption feature expected in the First Light era. As an example, we reject $100$ mK Gaussians with duration (full width at half maximum) $\Delta z \leq 4$ over the range $14.2\geq z\geq 6.5$ at $\geq2\sigma$ significance.
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    We present techniques developed to calibrate and correct Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) low frequency (72-300 MHz) radio observations for polarimetry. The extremely wide field-of-view, excellent instantaneous (u, v)-coverage and sensitivity to degree-scale structure that the MWA provides enable instrumental calibration, removal of instrumental artefacts, and correction for ionospheric Faraday rotation through imaging techniques. With the demonstrated polarimetric capabilities of the MWA, we discuss future directions for polarimetric science at low frequencies to answer outstanding questions relating to polarised source counts, source depolarisation, pulsar science, low-mass stars, exoplanets, the nature of the interstellar and intergalactic media, and the solar environment.
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    The detection of molecular species in the atmospheres of earth-like exoplanets orbiting nearby stars requires an optical system that suppresses starlight and maximizes the sensitivity to the weak planet signals at small angular separations. Achieving sufficient contrast performance on a segmented aperture space telescope is particularly challenging due to unwanted diffraction within the telescope from amplitude and phase discontinuities in the pupil. Apodized vortex coronagraphs are a promising solution that theoretically meet the performance needs for high contrast imaging with future segmented space telescopes. We investigate the sensitivity of apodized vortex coronagraphs to the expected aberrations, including segment co-phasing errors in piston and tip/tilt as well as other low-order and mid-spatial frequency aberrations. Coronagraph designs and their associated telescope requirements are identified for conceptual HabEx and LUVOIR telescope designs.