Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (astro-ph.IM)

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    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE), one of the four scientific space science missions within the framework of the Strategic Pioneer Program on Space Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is a general purpose high energy cosmic-ray and gamma-ray observatory, which was successfully launched on December 17th, 2015 from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center. The DAMPE scientific objectives include the study of galactic cosmic rays up to $\sim 10$ TeV and hundreds of TeV for electrons/gammas and nuclei respectively, and the search for dark matter signatures in their spectra. In this paper we illustrate the layout of the DAMPE instrument, and discuss the results of beam tests and calibrations performed on ground. Finally we present the expected performance in space and give an overview of the mission key scientific goals.
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    We describe in detail the analysis procedure used to derive the first limits from the Haloscope at Yale Sensitive to Axion CDM (HAYSTAC), a microwave cavity search for cold dark matter (CDM) axions with masses above $20\ \mu\text{eV}$. We have introduced several significant innovations to the axion search analysis pioneered by the Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX), including optimal filtering of the individual power spectra that constitute the axion search dataset and a consistent maximum likelihood procedure for combining and rebinning these spectra. These innovations enable us to obtain the axion-photon coupling $|g_\gamma|$ excluded at any desired confidence level directly from the statistics of the combined data.
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    All estimates of cluster mass have some intrinsic scatter and perhaps some bias with true mass even in absence of measurement errors which are caused by, e.g., cluster triaxiality and large scale structure. Knowledge of the bias and scatter values is fundamental for both cluster cosmology and astrophysics. In this paper we show that the intrinsic scatter of a mass proxy can be constrained by measurements of the gas fraction because masses with larger values of intrinsic scatter with true mass produce more scattered gas fractions. Moreover, the relative bias of two mass estimates can be constrained by comparing the mean gas fraction at the same (nominal) cluster mass. Our observational study addresses the scatter between caustic (i.e. dynamically estimated) and true masses, and the relative bias of caustic and hydrostatic masses. For these purposes, we use the X-ray Unbiased Cluster Sample, a cluster sample selected independently of the intracluster medium content with reliable masses: 34 galaxy clusters in the nearby ($0.050<z<0.135$) Universe, mostly with $14<\log M_{500}/M_\odot \lesssim 14.5$, and with caustic masses. We found a 35\% scatter between caustic and true masses. Furthermore, we found that the relative bias between caustic and hydrostatic masses is small, $0.06\pm0.05$ dex, improving upon past measurements. The small scatter found confirms our previous measurements of a quite variable amount of feedback from cluster to cluster which is the cause of the observed large variety of core-excised X-ray luminosities and gas masses.
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    The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) has been the world's most successful single dish telescope at submillimetre wavelengths since it began operations in 1987. From the pioneering days of single-element photometers and mixers, through the first modest imaging arrays, leading to the state-of-the-art widefield camera SCUBA-2 and the spectrometer array HARP, the JCMT has been associated with a number of major scientific discoveries. Famous for the discovery of "SCUBA" galaxies, which are responsible for a large fraction of the far-infrared background, to the first images of huge discs of cool debris around nearby stars, possibly giving us clues to the evolution of planetary systems, the JCMT has pushed the sensitivity limits more than any other facility in this most difficult of wavebands in which to observe. Now approaching the 30th anniversary of the first observations the telescope continues to carry out unique and innovative science. In this review article we look back on just some of the scientific highlights from the past 30 years.
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    Acoustic neutrino detection is a promising approach to extend the energy range of neutrino telescopes to energies beyond $10^{18}$\u2009eV. Currently operational and planned water-Cherenkov neutrino telescopes, most notably KM3NeT, include acoustic sensors in addition to the optical ones. These acoustic sensors could be used as instruments for acoustic detection, while their main purpose is the position calibration of the detection units. In this article, a Monte Carlo simulation chain for acoustic detectors will be presented, covering the initial interaction of the neutrino up to the signal classification of recorded events. The ambient and transient background in the simulation was implemented according to data recorded by the acoustic set-up AMADEUS inside the ANTARES detector. The effects of refraction on the neutrino signature in the detector are studied, and a classification of the recorded events is implemented. As bipolar waveforms similar to those of the expected neutrino signals are also emitted from other sound sources, additional features like the geometrical shape of the propagation have to be considered for the signal classification. This leads to a large improvement of the background suppression by almost two orders of magnitude, since a flat cylindrical "pancake" propagation pattern is a distinctive feature of neutrino signals. An overview of the simulation chain and the signal classification will be presented and preliminary studies of the performance of the classification will be discussed.
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    A selection of astrometric catalogues are presented in three tables for respectively positions, proper motions and trigonometric parallaxes. The tables contain characteristics of each catalogue showing the evolution in optical astrometry, in fact the evolution during the past 2000 years for positions. The number of stars and the accuracy are summarized by the weight of a catalogue, proportional with the number of stars and the statistical weight. The present report originally from 2008 was revised in 2017 with much new information about the accuracy of catalogues before 1800 AD.
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    Accurate astronomical distance determination is crucial for all fields in astrophysics, from Galactic to cosmological scales. Despite, or perhaps because of, significant efforts to determine accurate distances, using a wide range of methods, tracers, and techniques, an internally consistent astronomical distance framework has not yet been established. We review current efforts to homogenize the Local Group's distance framework, with particular emphasis on the potential of RR Lyrae stars as distance indicators, and attempt to extend this in an internally consistent manner to cosmological distances. Calibration based on Type Ia supernovae and distance determinations based on gravitational lensing represent particularly promising approaches. We provide a positive outlook to improvements to the status quo expected from future surveys, missions, and facilities. Astronomical distance determination has clearly reached maturity and near-consistency.
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    The observation and research of the solar radio emission have unique scientific values in solar and space physics and related space weather forecasting applications, since the observed spectral structures may carry important information about energetic electrons and underlying physical mechanisms. In this study, we present the design of a novel dynamic spectrograph that is installed at the Chashan solar radio station operated by Laboratory for Radio Technologies, Institute of Space Sciences at Shandong University. The spectrograph is characterized by the real-time storage of digitized radio intensity data in the time domain and its capability to perform off-line spectral analysis of the radio spectra. The analog signals received via antennas and amplified with a low-noise amplifier are converted into digital data at a speed reaching up to 32 k data points per millisecond. The digital data are then saved into a high-speed electronic disk for further off-line spectral analysis. Using different word length (1 k - 32 k) and time cadence (5 ms - 10 s) for the off-line fast Fourier transform analysis, we can obtain the dynamic spectrum of a radio burst with different (user-defined) temporal (5 ms - 10 s) and spectral (3 kHz ~ 320 kHz) resolution. This brings a great flexibility and convenience to data analysis of solar radio bursts, especially when some specific fine spectral structures are under study.
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    Rotating radio transients (RRATs), loosely defined as objects that are discovered through only their single pulses, are sporadic pulsars that have a wide range of emission properties. For many of them, we must measure their periods and determine timing solutions relying on the timing of their individual pulses, while some of the less sporadic RRATs can be timed by using folding techniques as we do for other pulsars. Here, based on Parkes and Green Bank Telescope (GBT) observations, we introduce our results on eight RRATs including their timing-derived rotation parameters, positions, and dispersion measures (DMs), along with a comparison of the spin-down properties of RRATs and normal pulsars. Using data for 24 RRATs, we find that their period derivatives are generally larger than those of normal pulsars, independent of any intrinsic correlation with period, indicating that RRATs' highly sporadic emission may be associated with intrinsically larger magnetic fields. We carry out Lomb$-$Scargle tests to search for periodicities in RRATs' pulse detection times with long timescales. Periodicities are detected for all targets, with significant candidates of roughly 3.4 hr for PSR J1623$-$0841 and 0.7 hr for PSR J1839$-$0141. We also analyze their single-pulse amplitude distributions, finding that log-normal distributions provide the best fits, as is the case for most pulsars. However, several RRATs exhibit power-law tails, as seen for pulsars emitting giant pulses. This, along with consideration of the selection effects against the detection of weak pulses, imply that RRAT pulses generally represent the tail of a normal intensity distribution.