Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (astro-ph.IM)

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    We describe the release of a new High Level Science Product (HLSP) available at the MAST archive. The HLSP, called K2Superstamp, consists of a series of FITS images for four open star clusters observed by the K2 Mission using so-called "superstamp" pixel masks: M35, the $\sim$150 Myr old open cluster observed during K2 Campaign 0, M67, the solar-age, solar-metallicity benchmark cluster observed during Campaign 5, Ruprecht 147, the $\sim$3 Gyr-old open cluster observed during Campaign 7, and the Lagoon Nebula (M8/NGC 6530), the high-mass star-forming region observed during Campaign 9. While the data for these regions have long been served on MAST, until now they were only available as a disconnected set of smaller Target Pixel Files (TPFs) because the spacecraft stored these observations in small chunks. As a result, these regions have hitherto been ignored by many lightcurve and planet search pipelines. With this new release, we have stitched these TPFs together into spatially contiguous FITS images (one per cadence) to make their scientific analysis easier. In addition, each image has been fit with an accurate WCS solution so that you may locate any object of interest via its right ascension and declination. We describe here the process of stitching and astrometric calibration.
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    Astronomical observations of extended sources, such as cubes of integral field spectroscopy (IFS), encode auto-correlated spatial structures that cannot be optimally exploited by standard methodologies. Here we introduce a novel technique to model IFS datasets, which treats the observed galaxy properties as manifestations of an unobserved Gaussian Markov random field. The method is computationally efficient, resilient to the presence of low-signal-to-noise regions, and uses an alternative to Markov Chain Monte Carlo for fast Bayesian inference, the Integrated Nested Laplace Approximation (INLA). As a case study, we analyse 721 IFS data cubes of nearby galaxies from the CALIFA and PISCO surveys, for which we retrieved the following physical properties: age, metallicity, mass, and extinction. The proposed Bayesian approach, built on a generative representation of the galaxy properties, enables the creation of synthetic images, recovery of areas with bad pixels, and an increased power to detect structures in datasets subject to substantial noise and/or sparsity of sampling. A snippet code to reproduce the analysis of this paper is available in the COIN toolbox, together with the field reconstructions for the CALIFA and PISCO samples.
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    Combining the resolving power of long-baseline interferometry with the high-dynamic range capability of nulling still remains the only technique that can directly sense the presence of structures in the innermost regions of extrasolar planetary systems. Ultimately, the performance of any nuller architecture is constrained by the partial resolution of the on-axis star whose light it attempts to cancel out, and the design of nullers focuses on increasing the order of the extinction to reduce the sensitivity to this effect. However from the ground, the effective performance of nulling is dominated by residual time-varying instrumental phase errors that keep the instrument off the null. This is similar to what happens with high-contrast imaging, and is what we aim to ameliorate. We introduce a modified nuller architecture that enables the extraction of information that is robust against piston excursions. Our method generalizes the concept of kernel, now applied to the outputs of the modified nuller so as to make them robust to second order pupil phase error. We present the general method to determine these kernel-outputs and highlight the benefits of this novel approach. We present the properties of VIKiNG: the VLTI Infrared Kernel NullinG, an instrument concept within the Hi-5 framework for the 4-UT VLTI infrastructure that takes advantage of the proposed architecture, to produce three self-calibrating nulled outputs. Stabilized by a fringe-tracker that would bring piston-excursions down to 50 nm, this instrument would be able to directly detect more than a dozen extrasolar planets so-far detected by radial velocity only, as well as many hot transiting planets and a significant number of very young exoplanets.
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    We discuss the technical challenges we faced and the techniques we used to overcome them when reducing the PHAT photometric data set on the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2). We first describe the architecture of our photometry pipeline, which we found particularly efficient for reducing the data in multiple ways for different purposes. We then describe the features of EC2 that make this architecture both efficient to use and challenging to implement. We describe the techniques we adopted to process our data, and suggest ways these techniques may be improved for those interested in trying such reductions in the future. Finally, we summarize the output photometry data products, which are now hosted publicly in two places in two formats. They are in simple fits tables in the high-level science products on MAST, and on a queryable database available through the NOAO Data Lab.
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    In exoplanet interferometry a null of 40~dB is a large step in achieving the ability to directly image an Earth-like planet that is in the habitable zone around a star like our own. Based on the standard procedure at the Australian National University we have created a nulling interferometer that has achieved a 25~dB null in the astronomical L~band under laboratory conditions. The device has been constructed on a 2-dimensional platform of chalcogenide glass: a three layered structure of $Ge_{11.5}As_{24}S_{64.5}$ undercladding, 2~\si\um of $Ge_{11.5}As_{24}Se_{64.5}$ core and an angled deposition of $Ge_{11.5}As_{24}S_{64.5}$ as a complete overcladding. Matching simulation from Rsoft and individual results of the MMIs the expected null should produce a null of 40~dB over a bandwidth of 400~nm but due to limitations in mask design and light contamination only a 25~dB extinction can be reliably achieved.