High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (astro-ph.HE)

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    Recent measurements of the Geminga and B0656+14 pulsars by the gamma-ray telescope HAWC (along with earlier measurements by Milagro) indicate that these objects generate significant fluxes of very high-energy electrons. In this paper, we use the very high-energy gamma-ray intensity and spectrum of these pulsars to calculate and constrain their expected contributions to the local cosmic-ray positron spectrum. Among models that are capable of reproducing the observed characteristics of the gamma-ray emission, we find that pulsars invariably produce a flux of high-energy positrons that is similar in spectrum and magnitude to the positron fraction measured by PAMELA and AMS-02. In light of this result, we conclude that it is very likely that pulsars provide the dominant contribution to the long perplexing cosmic-ray positron excess.
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    In this paper we propose a 'knee-like' approximation of the lateral distribution of the Cherenkov light from extensive air showers in the energy range 30-3000 TeV and study a possibility of its practical application in high energy ground-based gamma-ray astronomy experiments (in particular, in TAIGA-HiSCORE). The approximation has a very good accuracy for individual showers and can be easily simplified for practical application in the HiSCORE wide angle timing array in the condition of a limited number of triggered stations.
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    We present results from a detailed analysis of our 2016 \xmm observation of the narrow-line Seyfert~1 galaxy PG~1404+226 which showed a large-amplitude, rapid X-ray variability by a factor of $\sim8$ in $\sim11$\ks. We use this variability event to investigate the origin of the soft X-ray excess emission and the connection between the disk, hot corona and the soft excess emitting region through UV/X-ray cross-correlation, time-resolved spectroscopy and root mean square (rms) spectral modelling. The weakly variable UV emission ($F_{\rm var,UV}$=3.9$\pm0.2\%$) appears to lead the strongly variable X-ray emission ($F_{\rm var, X}$=89.0$\pm0.7\%$) by $\sim33$\ks. Such a UV lead is consistent with the crossing time ($\sim23$\ks) of the seed photons from the disk to a compact ($\sim 10r_s$) hot corona and the time required for their thermal Comptonization ($\sim9$\ks) giving rise to the X-ray power-law emission. The strong soft X-ray excess below 1\keV seen in the mean X-ray spectrum as well as in the time-resolved spectra is well described by both the intrinsic disk Comptonization and the blurred reflection models. The soft excess emission is found to vary together with the power-law component as $F_{{\rm primary}}\propto F_{{\rm excess}}^{2.01}$. The X-ray fractional rms spectrum shows an increase in variability with energy which can be described only in the framework of blurred reflection model in which both the intrinsic continuum and the reflected emission are highly variable in normalization only and are perfectly coupled with each other. Our results suggest that accretion disk provides the seed photons for thermal Comptonization giving rise to the X-ray power-law component which in turn illuminates the innermost accretion disk and gives rise to the soft X-ray excess emission.
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    The observational properties of Soft Gamma Repeaters and Ano\-malous X-ray Pulsars (SGR/AXP) indicate to necessity of the energy source different from a rotational energy of a neutron star. The model, where the source of the energy is connected with a magnetic field dissipation in a highly magnetized neutron star (magnetar) is analyzed. Some observational inconsistencies are indicated for this interpretation. The alternative energy source, connected with the nuclear energy of superheavy nuclei stored in the nonequilibrium layer of low mass neutron star is discussed.
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    We present spectral and timing analyses of simultaneous X-ray and UV observations of the VY Scl system MV Lyr taken by XMM-Newton, containing the longest continuous X-ray+UV light curve and highest signal-to-noise X-ray (EPIC) spectrum to date. The RGS spectrum displays emission lines plus continuum, confirming model approaches to be based on thermal plasma models. We test the sandwiched model based on fast variability that predicts a geometrically thick corona that surrounds an inner geometrically thin disc. The EPIC spectra are consistent with either a cooling flow model or a 2-T collisional plasma plus Fe emission lines in which the hotter component may be partially absorbed which would then originate in a central corona or a partially obscured boundary layer, respectively. The cooling flow model yields a lower mass accretion rate than expected during the bright state, suggesting an evaporated plasma with a low density, thus consistent with a corona. Timing analysis confirms the presence of a dominant break frequency around log(f/Hz) = -3 in the X-ray Power Density Spectrum (PDS) as in the optical PDS. The complex soft/hard X-ray light curve behaviour is consistent with a region close to the white dwarf where the hot component is generated. The soft component can be connected to an extended region. We find another break frequency around log(f/Hz) = -3.4 that is also detected by Kepler. We compared flares at different wavelengths and found that the peaks are simultaneous but the rise to maximum is delayed in X-rays with respect to UV.
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    This work is a methodical study of another option of the hybrid method originally aimed at gamma/hadron separation in the TAIGA experiment. In the present paper this technique was performed to distinguish between different mass groups of cosmic rays in the energy range 200 TeV - 500 TeV. The study was based on simulation data of TAIGA prototype and included analysis of geometrical form of images produced by different nuclei in the IACT simulation as well as shower core parameters reconstructed using timing array simulation. We show that the hybrid method can be sufficiently effective to precisely distinguish between mass groups of cosmic rays.
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    The nine-year H.E.S.S. Galactic Plane Survey (HGPS) yielded the most uniform observation scan of the inner Milky Way in the TeV gamma-ray band to date. The sky maps and source catalogue of the HGPS allow for a systematic study of the population of TeV pulsar wind nebulae found throughout the last decade. To investigate the nature and evolution of pulsar wind nebulae, for the first time we also present several upper limits for regions around pulsars without a detected TeV wind nebula. Our data exhibit a correlation of TeV surface brightness with pulsar spin-down power $\dot{E}$. This seems to be caused both by an increase of extension with decreasing $\dot{E}$, and hence with time, compatible with a power law $R_\mathrm{PWN}(\dot{E}) \sim \dot{E}^{-0.65 \pm 0.20}$, and by a mild decrease of TeV gamma-ray luminosity with decreasing $\dot{E}$, compatible with $L_{1-10\,\mathrm{TeV}} \sim \dot{E}^{0.59 \pm 0.21}$. We also find that the offsets of pulsars with respect to the wind nebula centres with ages around 10 kyr are frequently larger than can be plausibly explained by pulsar proper motion and could be due to an asymmetric environment. In the present data, it seems that a large pulsar offset is correlated with a high apparent TeV efficiency $L_{1-10\,\mathrm{TeV}}/\dot{E}$. In addition to 14 HGPS sources considered as firmly identified pulsar wind nebulae and 5 additional pulsar wind nebulae taken from literature, we find 10 HGPS sources that form likely TeV pulsar wind nebula candidates. Using a model that subsumes the present common understanding of the very high-energy radiative evolution of pulsar wind nebulae, we find that the trends and variations of the TeV observables and limits can be reproduced to a good level, drawing a consistent picture of present-day TeV data and theory.
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    The cosmological evolution of primordial black holes (PBHs) is considered. A comprehensive view of the accretion and evaporation histories of PBHs across the entire cosmic history is presented, with focus on the critical mass holes. The critical mass of a PBH for current era evaporation is $M_{cr}\sim 5.1\times10^{14}$ g. Across cosmic time such a black hole will not accrete radiation or matter in sufficient quantity to hasten the inevitable evaporation, if the black hole remains within an average volume of the universe. The accretion rate onto PBHs is most sensitive to the mass of the hole, the sound speed in the cosmological fluid, and the energy density of the accreted components. It is easy for a PBH to accrete to $30M_\odot$ by $z\sim0.1$ even outside any overdense region of the universe, so two merging PBHs are a plausible source for the gravitational wave events GW150914 and GW151226. However it is difficult for isolated PBHs to grow to supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at high redshift with masses large enough to fit observational constraints.
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    Possible formation mechanisms of massive close binary black holes that can merge in the Hubble time to produce powerful gravitational wave bursts detected during advanced LIGO O1 science run are briefly discussed. The pathways include the evolution from field low-metallicity massive binaries, the dynamical formation in globular clusters and primordial black holes. Low effective black hole spins inferred for LIGO GW150914 and LTV151012 events are discussed. Population synthesis calculations of the expected spin and chirp mass distributions from the standard field massive binary formation channel are presented for different metallicities (from zero-metal Population III stars up to solar metal abundance). We conclude that that merging binary black holes can contain systems from different formation channels, discrimination between which can be made with increasing statistics of mass and spin measurements from ongoing and future gravitational wave observations.
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    We present results from a new incoherent-beam Fast Radio Burst (FRB) search on the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) Pathfinder. Its large instantaneous field of view (FoV) and relative thermal insensitivity allow us to probe the ultra-bright tail of the FRB distribution, and to test a recent claim that this distribution's slope, $\alpha\equiv-\frac{\partial \log N}{\partial \log S}$, is quite small. A 256-input incoherent beamformer was deployed on the CHIME Pathfinder for this purpose. If the FRB distribution were described by a single power-law with $\alpha=0.7$, we would expect an FRB detection every few days, making this the fastest survey on sky at present. We collected 1268 hours of data, amounting to one of the largest exposures of any FRB survey, with over 2.4\,$\times$\u200910$^5$\u2009deg$^2$\u2009hrs. Having seen no bursts, we have constrained the rate of extremely bright events to $<\!13$\u2009sky$^{-1}$\u2009day$^{-1}$ above $\sim$\u2009220$\sqrt{(\tau/\rm ms)}$ Jy\u2009ms for $\tau$ between 1.3 and 100\u2009ms, at 400--800\u2009MHz. The non-detection also allows us to rule out $\alpha\lesssim0.9$ with 95$\%$ confidence, after marginalizing over uncertainties in the GBT rate at 700--900\u2009MHz, though we show that for a cosmological population and a large dynamic range in flux density, $\alpha$ is brightness-dependent. Since FRBs now extend to large enough distances that non-Euclidean effects are significant, there is still expected to be a dearth of faint events and relative excess of bright events. Nevertheless we have constrained the allowed number of ultra-intense FRBs. While this does not have significant implications for deeper, large-FoV surveys like full CHIME and APERTIF, it does have important consequences for other wide-field, small dish experiments.
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    Results of the search for $\sim (10^{16} - 10^{17.5})$ eV primary cosmic-ray photons with the data of the Moscow State University (MSU) Extensive Air Shower (EAS) array are reported. The full-scale reanalysis of the data with modern simulations of the installation does not confirm previous indications of the excess of gamma-ray candidate events. Upper limits on the corresponding gamma-ray flux are presented. The limits are the most stringent published ones at energies $\sim 10^{17}$ eV.
  • Feb 28 2017 astro-ph.HE arXiv:1702.07997v1
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    We discuss cold dense QCD by examining constraints from neutron stars, nuclear experiments, and QCD calculations at low and high baryon density. The two solar mass constraint and suggestive small radii (10~13 km) of neutron stars constrain the strength of hadron-quark matter phase transitions. Assuming the adiabatic continuity from hadronic to quark matter, we use a schematic quark model for hadron physics and examine the size of medium coupling constants. We find that to baryon density nB ~ 10n0 (n0: nuclear saturation density), the model coupling constants should be as large as in the vacuum, indicating that gluons remain non- perturbative even after the quark matter formation.
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    The true ground state of hadronic matter may be strange quark matter (SQM). According to this hypothesis, the observed pulsars, which are generally deemed as neutron stars, may actually be strange quark stars. However, proving or disproving the SQM hypothesis still remains to be a difficult problem, due to the similarity between the macroscopical characteristics of strange quark stars and neutron stars. Here we propose a hopeful method to probe the existence of strange quark matter. In the frame work of the SQM hypothesis, strange quark dwarfs and even strange quark planets can also stably exist. Noting that SQM planets will not be tidally disrupted even when they get very close to their host stars due to their extreme compactness, we argue that we could identify SQM planets by searching for very close-in planets among extrasolar planetary systems. Although a search in the $\sim 2950$ exoplanets detected so far has failed to identify any close-in samples that meet the SQM criteria, i.e. lying in the tidal disruption region for normal matter planets, we suggest that such an effort deserves to be continued in the future since it provides a unique test for the SQM hypothesis. Especially, we should keep our eyes on possible pulsar planets with orbital radius less than $\sim 3.8 \times 10^{10}$~cm and period less than $\sim 3400$~s.
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    V1387 Aql (the donor in the microquasar GRS 1915+105) is a low-mass giant. Such a star consists of a degenerate helium core and a hydrogen-rich envelope. Both components are separated by an hydrogen burning shell. The structure of such an object is relatively simple and easy to model. Making use of the observational constraints on the luminosity and the radius of V1387 Aql, we constrain the mass of this star with evolutionary models. We find a very good agreement between the constraints from those models and from the observed rotational broadening and the NIR magnitude. Combining the constraints, we find solutions with stripped giants of the mass of $\geq\!0.28{\rm M}_{\odot}$ and of the spectral class K5 III, independent of the distance to the system, and a distance-dependent upper limit, $\lesssim\!1{\rm M}_{\odot}$. We also calculate the average mass transfer rate and the duty cycle of the system as a function of the donor mass.
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    A possibility of time-delayed radio brightenings of Sgr A* triggered by the pericenter passage of the G2 cloud is studied by carrying out global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations taking into account the radiative cooling of the tidal debris of the G2 cloud. Magnetic fields in the accretion flow are strongly perturbed and re-organized after the passage of G2. We have found that the magnetic energy in the accretion flow increases by a factor 3-4 in 5-10 years after the pericenter passage of G2 by a dynamo mechanism driven by the magneto-rotational instability. Since this B-field amplification enhances the synchrotron emission from the disk and the outflow, the radio and the infrared luminosity of Sgr A* is expected to increase around A.D. 2020. The time-delay of the radio brightening enables us to determine the rotation axis of the preexisting disk.
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    Discovery of huge magnetic field in magnetars has stimulated a renewed interest about the magnetic field and physics of compact stars, where microphysics such as QED or QCD may play active parts. Here we discuss the equation of state (EOS) of quark matter in the core of compact stars by taking into account the strong magnetic field. We show that quark EOS becomes very stiff in the presence of the strong magnetic field, and becomes stiffest under the causality condition beyond the threshold strength of $B_c\sim O(10^{19})$ G. This is because quarks make the Landau levels in the presence of the magnetic field and thereby only the lowest Landau level is occupied in the extreme case beyond $B_c$. Thus quarks can freely move along the magnetic field with localization in the perpendicular plane, which resembles the quasi-one dimensional systems and gives rise to a stiff EOS. Consequently, we may easily produce high-mass stars beyond two solar mass. As another interesting possibility, we discuss the appearance of the third family of compact stars, succeeding white dwarfs and neutron stars, before collapsing into black holes. We demonstrate an example, which is specified by a discontinuous increase of the adiabatic index at the hadron-quark phase transition. Such new family may affect the supernova explosions or the gravitational wave emitted from the neutron star mergers.
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    We study the properties of compact stars in the Randall-Sundrum II type braneworld model. To this end, we solve the braneworld generalization of the stellar structure equations for a static fluid distribution with spherical symmetry considering that the spacetime outside the star is described by a Schwarzschild metric. First, the stellar structure equations are integrated employing the so called causal limit equation of state (EOS), which is constructed using a well established EOS at densities below a fiducial density, and the causal EOS $P= \rho$ above it. It is a standard procedure in general relativistic stellar structure calculations to use such EOS for obtaining a limit in the mass radius diagram, known as causal limit, above which no stellar configurations are possible if the EOS fulfills that the sound velocity is smaller than the speed of light. We find that the equilibrium solutions in the braneworld model can violate the general relativistic causal limit and, for sufficiently large mass they approach asymptotically to the Schwarzschild limit $M = 2 R$. Then, we investigate the properties of hadronic and strange quark stars using two typical EOSs. For masses below $\sim 1.5 - 2 M_{\odot}$, the mass versus radius curves show the typical behavior found within the frame of General Relativity. However, we also find a new branch of stellar configurations that can violate the general relativistic causal limit and that in principle may have an arbitrarily large mass. The stars belonging to this new branch are supported against collapse by the nonlocal effects of the bulk on the brane. We also show that these stars are always stable under small radial perturbations. These results support the idea that traces of extra-dimensions might be found in astrophysics, specifically through the analysis of masses and radii of compact objects.
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    The first direct detection of gravitational waves resulted from the merger of two stellar mass black holes (sBH) that were 'overweight' compared to sBH observed in our own Galaxy. The upper end of the inferred sBH-sBH merger rate from LIGO observations presents a challenge for existing models. Several groups have now argued that 'overweight' sBH naturally occur in AGN disks and are likely to merge. Here we parameterize sources of sBH in AGN disks and uncertainties in their estimated merger rate. We find the plausible sBH-sBH merger rate in AGN disks detectable with LIGO spans $\sim 0.1-200$ $\rm{Gpc}^{-3} \rm{yr}^{-1}$. Our rate estimate is dominated by the accelerated, gas-driven merger in the AGN disk of pre-existing sBH from a nuclear star cluster whose orbits are ground down into the AGN disk. We predict a wide range of mass ratios for such binary mergers, spanning $\sim [10^{-2},1]$. We suggest a mechanism for producing sBH mergers consistent with present LIGO constraints on precursor spin. If our model is efficient, it also predicts a large population of IMBH in disks around SMBH in the nearby Universe. LISA will be able to severely constrain the rate from this channel through observations of IMBH-SMBH binaries.
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    A simple 'knee-like' approximation of the Lateral Distribution Function (LDF) of Cherenkov light emitted by EAS (extensive air showers) in the atmosphere is proposed for solving various tasks of data analysis in HiSCORE and other wide angle ground-based experiments designed to detect gamma rays and cosmic rays with the energy above tens of TeV. Simulation-based parametric analysis of individual LDF curves revealed that on the radial distance 20-500 m the 5-parameter 'knee-like' approximation fits individual LDFs as well as the mean LDF with a very good accuracy. In this paper we demonstrate the efficiency and flexibility of the 'knee-like' LDF approximation for various primary particles and shower parameters and the advantages of its application to suppressing proton background and selecting primary gamma rays.
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    This work is a methodical study on hybrid reconstruction techniques for hybrid imaging/timing Cherenkov observations. This type of hybrid array is to be realized at the gamma-observatory TAIGA intended for very high energy gamma-ray astronomy (>30 TeV). It aims at combining the cost-effective timing-array technique with imaging telescopes. Hybrid operation of both of these techniques can lead to a relatively cheap way of development of a large area array. The joint approach of gamma event selection was investigated on both types of simulated data: the image parameters from the telescopes, and the shower parameters reconstructed from the timing array. The optimal set of imaging parameters and shower parameters to be combined is revealed. The cosmic ray background suppression factor depending on distance and energy is calculated. The optimal selection technique leads to cosmic ray background suppression of about 2 orders of magnitude on distances up to 450 m for energies greater than 50 TeV.
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    A 'knee-like' approximation of Cherenkov light Lateral Distribution Functions, which we developed earlier, now is used for the actual tasks of background rejection methods for high energy (tens and hundreds of TeV) gamma-ray astronomy. In this work we implement this technique to the HiSCORE wide angle timing array consisting of Cherenkov light detectors with spacing of 100 m covering 0.2 km$^2$ presently and up to 5 km$^2$ in future. However, it can be applied to other similar arrays. We also show that the application of a multivariable approach (where 3 parameters of the knee-like approximation are used) allows us to reach a high level of background rejection, but it strongly depends on the number of hit detectors.
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    Flares from tidal disruption events are unique tracers of quiescent black holes at the centre of galaxies. The appearance of these flares is very sensitive to whether the star is totally or partially disrupted, and in this paper we seek to identify the critical distance of the star from the black hole (r_d) that enables us to distinguish between these two outcomes. We perform here Mesh-free Finite Mass, traditional, and modern Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamical simulations of star-black hole close encounters, with the aim of checking if the value of r_d depends on the simulation technique. We find that the critical distance (or the so-called critical disruption parameter beta_d) depends only weakly on the adopted simulation method, being beta_d=0.92\pm 0.02 for a gamma=5/3 polytrope and beta_d=2.01\pm 0.01 for a gamma=4/3 polytrope.