High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (astro-ph.HE)

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    The discovery of radionuclides like 60Fe with half-lives of million years in deep-sea crusts and sediments offers the unique possibility to date and locate nearby supernovae. We want to quantitatively establish that the 60Fe enhancement is the result of several supernovae which are also responsible for the formation of the Local Bubble, our Galactic habitat. We performed three-dimensional hydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement simulations (with resolutions down to subparsec scale) of the Local Bubble and the neighbouring Loop I superbubble in different homogeneous, self-gravitating environments. For setting up the Local and Loop I superbubble, we took into account the time sequence and locations of the generating core-collapse supernova explosions, which were derived from the mass spectrum of the perished members of certain stellar moving groups. The release of 60Fe and its subsequent turbulent mixing process inside the superbubble cavities was followed via passive scalars, where the yields of the decaying radioisotope were adjusted according to recent stellar evolution calculations. The models are able to reproduce both the timing and the intensity of the 60Fe excess observed with rather high precision, provided that the external density does not exceed 0.3 cm-3 on average. Thus the two best-fit models presented here were obtained with background media mimicking the classical warm ionised and warm neutral medium. We also found that 60Fe (which is condensed onto dust grains) can be delivered to Earth via two physical mechanisms: either through individual fast-paced supernova blast waves, which cross the Earth's orbit sometimes even twice as a result of reflection from the Local Bubble's outer shell, or, alternatively, through the supershell of the Local Bubble itself, injecting the 60Fe content of all previous supernovae at once, but over a longer time range.
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    Theoretical and observational evidences have been recently gained for a two-fold classification of short bursts: 1) short gamma-ray flashes (S-GRFs), with isotropic energy $E_{iso}<10^{52}$~erg and no black hole (BH) formation, and 2) the authentic short gamma-ray bursts (S-GRBs), with isotropic energy $E_{iso}>10^{52}$~erg evidencing a BH formation in the binary neutron star merging process. The signature for the BH formation consists in the on-set of the high energy ($0.1$--$100$~GeV) emission, coeval to the prompt emission, in all S-GRBs. No GeV emission is expected nor observed in the S-GRFs. In this paper we present two additional S-GRBs, GRB 081024B and GRB 140402A, following the already identified S-GRBs, i.e., GRB 090227B, GRB 090510 and GRB 140619B. We also return on the absence of the GeV emission of the S-GRB 090227B, at an angle of $71^{\rm{o}}$ from the \textitFermi-LAT boresight. All the correctly identified S-GRBs correlate to the high energy emission, implying no significant presence of beaming in the GeV emission. The existence of a common power-law behavior in the GeV luminosities, following the BH formation, when measured in the source rest-frame, points to a commonality in the mass and spin of the newly-formed BH in all S-GRBs.
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    We report the discovery and multicolor (VRIW) photometry of a rare explosive star MASTER OT J004207.99+405501.1 - a luminous red nova - in the Andromeda galaxy M31N2015-01a. We use our original light curve acquired with identical MASTER Global Robotic Net telescopes in one photometric system: VRI during first 30 days and W (unfiltered) during 70 days. Also we added publishied multicolor photometry data to estimate the mass and energy of the ejected shell, and discuss the likely formation scenarios of outbursts of this type. We propose the interpretation of the explosion, that is consistent with the evolutionary scenario where star merger is a natural stage of the evolution of close-mass stars and may serve as an extra channel for the formation of nova outbursts.
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    SS~433 is an X-ray binary and the source of sub-relativistic, precessing, baryonic jets. We present high-resolution spectrograms of SS 433 in the infrared H and K bands. The spectrum is dominated by hydrogen and helium emission lines. The precession phase of the emission lines from the jet continues to be described by a constant period, P_jet= 162.375 d. The limit on any secularly changing period is $|\dot P| \lesssim 10^{-5}$. The He I 2.0587 micron line has complex and variable P Cygni absorption features produced by an inhomogeneous wind with a maximum outflow velocity near 900 km/s. The He II emission lines in the spectrum also arise in this wind. The higher members of the hydrogen Brackett lines show a double-peaked profile with symmetric wings extending more than +/-1500 km/s from the line center. The lines display radial velocity variations in phase with the radial velocity variation expected of the compact star, and they show a distortion during disk eclipse that we interpret as a rotational distortion. We fit the line profiles with a model in which the emission comes from the surface of a symmetric, Keplerian accretion disk around the compact object. The outer edge of the disk has velocities that vary from 110 to 190 km/s. These comparatively low velocities place an important constraint on the mass of the compact star: Its mass must be less than 2.2 M_solar and is probably less than 1.6 M_solar.
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    We analyze three scenarios to address the challenge of ultrafast gamma-ray variability reported from active galactic nuclei. We focus on the energy requirements imposed by these scenarios: (i) external cloud in the jet, (ii) relativistic blob propagating through the jet material, and (iii) production of high energy gamma rays in the magnetosphere gaps. We show that while the first two scenarios are not constrained by the flare luminosity, there is a robust upper limit on the luminosity of flares generated in the black hole magnetosphere. This limit depends weakly on the mass of the central black hole and is determined by the accretion disk magnetization, viewing angle, and the pair multiplicity. For the most favorable values of these parameters, the luminosity for 5 min flares is limited by \(2\times10^43\rm\u2009erg\u2009s^-1\), which excludes the black hole magnetosphere origin of the flare detected from \ic. In the scopes of scenarios (i) and (ii), the jet power, which is required to explain the \ic flare, exceeds the jet power estimated based on the radio data. To resolve this discrepancy in the framework of the scenario (ii), it is sufficient to assume that the relativistic blobs are not distributed isotropically in the jet reference frame. A realization of the scenario (i) demands the jet power during the flare exceeding by a factor \(10^2\)the power of the radio jet relevant to a timescale of \(10^8\)years.
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    As shown in an earlier paper, in an axially symmetric Szekeres model infinite blueshift can appear only on those rays that intersect the symmetry axis. It was also shown that with the Szekeres mass-dipole superposed on an L--T background any finite $z$ becomes closer to $-1$ and that null geodesics with $z \approx -1$ exist also in a nonsymmetric Szekeres model. Those Szekeres spacetimes were chosen for their simplicity. In the present paper, an axially symmetric Szekeres dipole is superposed on such an L--T background that was proved, in another paper, to be a promising model of a gamma-ray burst (GRB). The present model does make $z$ closer to $-1$, and has the additional advantage that strong blueshifts appear only along two opposite directions, which is consistent with the hypothetical collimation of the GRBs. The model consists of a quasi-spherical Szekeres region matched into a Friedmann background. The function $t_B(r)$ is constant in the Friedmann region and has a hump in the Szekeres region. Since such a Szekeres island generates stronger blueshifts than an L--T island, the BB hump can be lowered, which moves the observer further away from it. A more distant observer implies a smaller angular radius of the GRB source, so more GRB sources can be fitted into the sky. Null geodesics reaching present GRB observers from different directions relative to the BB hump are numerically calculated, and the patterns of redshift across the image of the GRB source are shown in tables. The Szekeres models of the GRB sources promise to explain the short durations of the GRBs and their afterglows via the effect of non-repeatability of the light paths.
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    Recently, in a study the X-ray flaring activity of Sgr A* with Chandra and XMM-Newton public observations from 1999 to 2014 and 2014 Swift data, it has been argued that the "bright and very bright" flaring rate raised from 2014 Aug. 31. Thanks to 482ks of observations performed in 2015 with Chandra, XMM-Newton and Swift, we test the significance of this rise of flaring rate and determine the threshold of unabsorbed flare flux or fluence leading to any flaring-rate change. The mean unabsorbed fluxes of the 107 flares detected in the 1999-2015 observations are consistently computed from the extracted spectra and calibration files, assuming the same spectral parameters. We construct the observed flare fluxes and durations distribution for the XMM-Newton and Chandra flares and correct it from the detection biases to estimate the intrinsic distribution from which we determine the average flare detection efficiency for each observation. We apply the BB algorithm on the flare arrival times corrected from the corresponding efficiency. We confirm a constant overall flaring rate in 1999-2015 and a rise in the flaring rate for the most luminous/energetic flares from 2014 Aug. 31 (4 months after the passage of the DSO/G2 close to Sgr A*). We also identify a decay of the flaring rate for the less luminous and less energetic flares from 2013 Aug. and Nov., respectively (10 and 7 months before the pericenter of the DSO/G2). The decay of the faint flaring rate is difficult to explain by the tidal disruption of the DSO/G2, whose stellar nature is now well established, since it occurred well before its pericenter. Moreover, a mass transfer from the DSO/G2 to Sgr A* is not required to produce the rise in the bright flaring rate since the energy saved by the decay of the number of faint flares during a long time period may be later released by several bright flares during a shorter time period. (abridged)
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    Fast radio bursts, or FRBs, are transient sources of unknown origin. Recent radio and optical observations have provided strong evidence for an extragalactic origin of the phenomenon and the precise localization of the repeating FRB 121102. Observations using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) have revealed the existence of a continuum non-thermal radio source consistent with the location of the bursts in a dwarf galaxy. All these new data rule out several models that were previously proposed, and impose stringent constraints to new models. We aim to model FRB 121102 in light of the new observational results in the active galactic nucleus (AGN) scenario. We propose a model for repeating FRBs in which a non-steady relativistic $e^\pm$-beam, accelerated by an impulsive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-driven mechanism, interacts with a cloud at the centre of a star-forming dwarf galaxy. The interaction generates regions of high electrostatic field called cavitons in the plasma cloud. Turbulence is also produced in the beam. These processes, plus particle isotropization, the interaction scale, and light retardation effects, provide the necessary ingredients for short-lived, bright coherent radiation bursts. The mechanism studied in this work explains the general properties of FRB 121102, and may also be applied to other repetitive FRBs. Coherent emission from electrons and positrons accelerated in cavitons provides a plausible explanation of FRBs.
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    We compile a sample of spectral energy distribution (SED) of 12 GeV radio galaxies (RGs), including eight FR I RGs and four FR II RGs. These SEDs can be represented with the one-zone leptonic model. No significant unification as expected in the unification model is found for the derived jet parameters between FR I RGs and BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs) and between FR II RGs and flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). However, on average FR I RGs have the larger gamma_b (break Lorentz factor of electrons) and lower B (magnetic field strength) than FR II RGs, analogous to the differences between BL Lacs and FSRQs. The derived Doppler factors (delta) of RGs are on average smaller than that of balzars, which is consistent with the unification model that RGs are the misaligned parent populations of blazars with smaller delta. On the basis of jet parameters from SED fits, we calculate their jet powers and the powers carried by each component, and compare their jet compositions and radiation efficiencies with blazars. Most of the RG jets may be dominated by particles, like BL Lacs, not FSRQs. However, the jets of RGs with higher radiation efficiencies tend to have higher jet magnetization. A strong anticorrelation between synchrotron peak frequency and jet power is observed for the GeV RGs and blazars in both the observer and co-moving frames, indicating that the "sequence" behavior among blazars, together with the GeV RGs, may be dominated by the jet power intrinsically.
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    The low-lying energy levels of proton-rich $^{56}$Cu have been extracted using in-beam $\gamma$-ray spectroscopy with the state-of-the-art $\gamma$-ray tracking array GRETINA in conjunction with the S800 spectrograph at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. Excited states in $^{56}$Cu serve as resonances in the $^{55}$Ni(p,$\gamma$)$^{56}$Cu reaction, which is a part of the rp-process in type I x-ray bursts. To resolve existing ambiguities in the reaction Q-value, a more localized IMME mass fit is used resulting in $Q=639\pm82$~keV. We derive the first experimentally-constrained thermonuclear reaction rate for $^{55}$Ni(p,$\gamma$)$^{56}$Cu. We find that, with this new rate, the rp-process may bypass the $^{56}$Ni waiting point via the $^{55}$Ni(p,$\gamma$) reaction for typical x-ray burst conditions with a branching of up to $\sim$40$\%$. We also identify additional nuclear physics uncertainties that need to be addressed before drawing final conclusions about the rp-process reaction flow in the $^{56}$Ni region.
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    We calculate the electromagnetic signal of a gamma-ray flare coming from the surface of a neutron star shortly before merger with a black hole companion. Using a new version of the Monte Carlo radiation transport code Pandurata that incorporates dynamic spacetimes, we integrate photon geodesics from the neutron star surface until they reach a distant observer or are captured by the black hole. The gamma-ray light curve is modulated by a number of relativistic effects, including Doppler beaming and gravitational lensing. Because the photons originate from the inspiraling neutron star, the light curve closely resembles the corresponding gravitational waveform: a chirp signal characterized by a steadily increasing frequency and amplitude. We propose to search for these electromagnetic chirps using matched filtering algorithms similar to those used in LIGO data analysis.