High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (astro-ph.HE)

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    We report on the analysis of 13 gamma-ray pulsars discovered in the Einstein@Home blind search survey using Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) Pass 8 data. The 13 new gamma-ray pulsars were discovered by searching 118 unassociated LAT sources from the third LAT source catalog (3FGL), selected using the Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) machine learning algorithm on the basis of their gamma-ray emission properties being suggestive of pulsar magnetospheric emission. The new gamma-ray pulsars have pulse profiles and spectral properties similar to those of previously-detected young gamma-ray pulsars. Follow-up radio observations have revealed faint radio pulsations from two of the newly-discovered pulsars, and enabled us to derive upper limits on the radio emission from the others, demonstrating that they are likely radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars. We also present results from modeling the gamma-ray pulse profiles and radio profiles, if available, using different geometric emission models of pulsars. The high discovery rate of this survey, despite the increasing difficulty of blind pulsar searches in gamma rays, suggests that new systematic surveys such as presented in this article should be continued when new LAT source catalogs become available.
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    We derive a Bayesian criterion for assessing whether signals observed in two separate data sets originate from a common source. The Bayes factor for a common vs. unrelated origin of signals includes an overlap integral of the posterior distributions over the common source parameters. Focusing on multimessenger gravitational-wave astronomy, we apply the method to the spatial and temporal association of independent gravitational-wave and electromagnetic (or neutrino) observations. As an example, we consider the coincidence between the recently discovered gravitational-wave signal GW170817 from a binary neutron star merger and the gamma-ray burst GRB 170817A: we find that the common source model is enormously favored over a model describing them as unrelated signals.
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    Left-Right symmetric model (LRSM) has been an attractive extension of the Standard Model (SM) which can address the parity violation in the SM electroweak (EW) interaction, generate tiny neutrino masses, accommodate dark matter (DM) candidates and generate baryogenesis through leptogenesis. In this work we utilize the minimal LRSM to study the recently reported DAMPE results of cosmic $e^+e^-$ measurement which exhibits a tentative peak around 1.4 TeV, while satisfying the current neutrino data. The minimal LRSM predicts 10 physical Higgs bosons: four CP-even $H_{1,2,3,4}$, two CP-odd $A_{1,2}$, two singly charged $H^\pm_{1,2}$ and two doubly charged $H^{\pm\pm}_{1,2}$, all with increasing masses in the ascending order. We propose to explain the DAMPE peak with scalar DM $m_\chi\sim$ 3 TeV in two scenarios: 1) $\chi\chi \to H_1^{++}H_1^{--} \to \ell_i^+\ell_i^+\ell_j^-\ell_j^-$; 2) $\chi\chi \to H_{\{k,l\}}^{++}H_{\{k,l\}}^{--} \to \ell_i^+\ell_i^+\ell_j^-\ell_j^-$ accompanied by $\chi\chi \to H_1^+ H_1^- \to \ell_i^+ \nu_{\ell_i} \ell_j^- \nu_{\ell_j}$ with $\ell_{i,j}=e,\mu,\tau,\, H_{\{k,l\}}^{\pm\pm}=H_{\{1,2\}}^{\pm\pm}$. We impose various experimental constraints such as accommodation of a SM-like Higgs, the observed DM relic abundance, DM direct detection bounds, lepton flavor violation measurements and EW precision observables. We found that there are ample parameter space which can interpret the DAMPE data while passing the above constraints. We also discuss the collider signals for benchmark model points.
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    Supernova remnants (SNRs) arise from the interaction between the ejecta of a supernova (SN) explosion and the surrounding circumstellar and interstellar medium. Some SNRs, mostly nearby SNRs, can be studied in great detail. However, to understand SNRs as a whole, large samples of SNRs must be assembled and studied. Here, we describe the radio, optical, and X-ray techniques which have been used to identify and characterize almost 300 Galactic SNRs and more than 1200 extragalactic SNRs. We then discuss which types of SNRs are being found and which are not. We examine the degree to which the luminosity functions, surface-brightness distributions and multi-wavelength comparisons of the samples can be interpreted to determine the class properties of SNRs and describe efforts to establish the type of SN explosion associated with a SNR. We conclude that in order to better understand the class properties of SNRs, it is more important to study (and obtain additional data on) the SNRs in galaxies with extant samples at multiple wavelength bands than it is to obtain samples of SNRs in other galaxies
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    We present results of the analysis of super-Eddington flares registered from the X-ray pulsar LMC X-4 by the NuSTAR observatory in the broad energy range 3-79 keV. The pulsar spectrum is well described by the thermal comptonization model both in a quiescent state and during flares, when the peak luminosity reaches values $L_{\rm x} \sim (2-4)\times10^{39}$ erg s$^{-1}$. An important feature, found for the first time, is that the order of magnitude increase in the luminosity during flares is observed primarily at energies below 25-30 keV, whereas at higher energies (30-70 keV) the shape of the spectrum and the source flux remain practically unchanged. The luminosity increase is accompanied by changes in the source pulse profile -- in the energy range of 3-40 keV it becomes approximately triangular, and the pulsed fraction increases with increasing energy, reaching 60-70% in the energy range of 25-40 keV. The paper discusses possible changes in the geometry of the accretion column, which can explain variations in spectra and pulse profiles.
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    We analysed the four-decades-long X-ray light curve of the low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN) NGC 7213 and discovered a fast-rise-exponential-decay (FRED) pattern, i.e. the X-ray luminosity increased by a factor of $\approx 4$ within 200 days, and then decreased exponentially with an $e$-folding time $\approx 8116$ days ($\approx 22.2$ years). For the theoretical understanding of the observations, we examined three variability models proposed in the literature: the thermal-viscous disk instability model, the radiation pressure instability model and the tidal disruption event (TDE) model. We find that a delayed tidal disruption of a main sequence star is most favorable; either the thermal-viscous disk instability model or radiation pressure instability model fails to explain some key properties observed, thus we argue them unlikely.
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    We have used LOFAR to perform targeted millisecond pulsar surveys of Fermi gamma-ray sources. Operating at a center frequency of 135 MHz, the surveys use a novel semi-coherent dedispersion approach where coherently dedispersed trials at coarsely separated dispersion measures are incoherently dedispersed at finer steps. Three millisecond pulsars have been discovered as part of these surveys. We describe the LOFAR surveys and the properties of the newly discovered pulsars.
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    We consider a stationary metric immersed in a uniform magnetic field and determine general expressions for the epicyclic frequencies of charged particles. Applications to the Kerr--Newman black hole is reach of physical consequences and reveals some new effects among which the existence of radially and vertically stable circular orbits in the region enclosed by the outer horizon and the so-called "innermost" stable circular orbit in the plane of symmetry.
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    Quasars are among the most luminous sources characterized by their broad band spectra ranging from radio through optical to X-ray band, with numerous emission and absorption features. Using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Boroson & Green (1992) were able to show significant correlations between the measured parameters. Among the significant correlations projected, the leading component, related to Eigenvector 1 (EV1) was dominated by the anti-correlation between the Fe${\mathrm{II}}$ optical emission and [OIII] line where the EV1 alone contained 30% of the total variance. This introduced a way to define a quasar main sequence, in close analogy to the stellar main sequence in the Hertzsprung-Russel (HR) diagram (Sulentic et. al 2001). Which of the basic theoretically motivated parameters of an active nucleus (Eddington ratio, black hole mass, accretion rate, spin, and viewing angle) is the main driver behind the EV1 yet remains to be answered. We currently limit ourselves to the optical waveband, and concentrate on theoretical modelling the Fe${\mathrm{II}}$ to H$\mathrm{\beta}$ ratio, and test the hypothesis that the physical driver of EV1 is the maximum of the accretion disk temperature, reflected in the shape of the spectral energy distribution (SED). We performed computations of the H$\mathrm{\beta}$ and optical Fe${\mathrm{II}}$ for a broad range of SED peak position using CLOUDY photoionisation code. We assumed that both H$\mathrm{\beta}$ and Fe${\mathrm{II}}$ emission come from the Broad Line Region represented as a constant density cloud in a plane-parallel geometry. We compare the results for two different approaches: (1) considering a fixed bolometric luminosity for the SED; (2) considering $\mathrm{L_{bol}/L_{Edd}}$ = 1.
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    We here identify GRB 151027A as a binary-driven hypernova (BdHN): a long GRB with progenitor a carbon-oxygen core (CO$_{\rm core}$), on the verge of supernova (SN) explosion, and a binary companion neutron star (NS). The hypercritical accretion of the SN ejecta on the companion NS leads to the gravitational collapse of the NS into a black hole and, in sequence, the emission of the GRB and a copious $e^+e^-$ plasma. Here we follow the impact of the $e^+e^-$ plasma on the SN ejecta with the consequent emission of the two peaks of the prompt radiation, the double emission composed by the Gamma-ray flare and the X-ray flare. We proceed first to the description of these two double component generalizing our recent works, performing the time integrated and time resolved analysis for the prompt emission phase, confirming its ultra relativistic nature and confirming as well the mildly relativistic nature of the Gamma-ray flares and X-ray flares. We also confirm the presence of announced X-ray thermal emission and confirm our recent proposal that this emission occurs in the transition from a SN to an HN: we here give the needed details. We then enter into the theoretical justification of these observations by integrating the hydrodynamical equations corresponding to the propagation $e^+ e^-$into the SN ejecta simulated by 3D smoothed particle like hydrodynamics. We compare and contrast our results with analysis based on the collapsar-fireball-single jetted ultra-relativistic emission.
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    We describe the afterglows of long gamma-ray-burst (GRB) within the context of a binary-driven hypernova (BdHN). In this paradigm afterglows originate from the interaction between a newly born neutron star ($\nu$NS), created by an Ic supernova (SN), and a mildly relativistic ejecta of a hypernova (HN). Such a HN in turn result from the impact of the GRB on the original SN Ic. The observed power-law afterglow in the optical and X-ray bands is shown to arise from the synchrotron emission of relativistic electrons in the expanding magnetized HN ejecta. Two components contribute to the injected energy: the kinetic energy of the mildly relativistic expanding HN and the rotational energy of the fast rotating highly magnetized $\nu$NS. As an example we reproduce the observed afterglow of GRB 130427A in all wavelengths from the optical ($10^{14}$~Hz) to the X-ray band ($10^{19}$~Hz) over times from $604$~s to $5.18\times 10^6$~s relative to the Fermi-GBM trigger. Initially, the emission is dominated by the loss of kinetic energy of the HN component. After $10^5$~s the emission is dominated by the loss of rotational energy of the $\nu$NS, for which we adopt an initial rotation period of 2~ms and a dipole/quadrupole magnetic field of $\lesssim \! 7\times 10^{12}$~G/$\sim \! 10^{14}$~G. This approach opens new views on the roles of the GRB interaction with the SN ejecta, on the mildly relativistic kinetic energy of the HN and on the pulsar-like phenomena of the $\nu$NS. This scenario differs from the current ultra-relativistic treatments of the afterglow in the collapsar-fireball model and it is, instead, consistent with the current observations of the mildly relativistic regimes of X-ray flares, $\gamma$-ray flares and plateau emission in the BdHN.
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    Recent detection of suborbital gamma-ray variability of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasar (FSRQ) 3C 279 by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) is in severe conflict with established models of blazar emission. This paper presents the results of suborbital analysis of the Fermi/LAT data for the brightest gamma-ray flare of another FSRQ blazar 3C 454.3 in November 2010 (MJD 55516-22). Gamma-ray light curves are calculated for characteristic time bin lengths as short as 3 min. The measured variations of the 0.1-10 GeV photon flux are tested against the hypothesis of steady intraorbit flux. In addition, the structure function is calculated for absolute photon flux differences and for their significances. Significant gamma-ray flux variations are measured only over time scales longer than ~5h, which is consistent with the standard blazar models.
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    We present a flavor and energy inference analysis for each high-energy neutrino event observed by the IceCube observatory during six years of data taking. Our goal is to obtain, for the first time, an estimate of the posterior probability distribution for the most relevant properties, such as the neutrino energy and flavor, of the neutrino-nucleon interactions producing shower and track events in the IceCube detector. For each event the main observables in the IceCube detector are the deposited energy and the event topology (showers or tracks) produced by the Cherenkov light by the transit through a medium of charged particles created in neutrino interactions. It is crucial to reconstruct from these observables the properties of the neutrino which generated such event. Here we describe how to achieve this goal using Bayesian inference and Markov chain Monte Carlo methods.
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    We investigate the effects of AGN feedback on the cosmological evolution of an isolated elliptical galaxy by performing two-dimensional high-resolution hydrodynamical numerical simulations. The inner boundary of the simulation is chosen so that the Bondi radius is resolved, which is crucial for the determination of the mass accretion rate of the AGN. According to the theory of black hole accretion, there are two accretion modes, hot and cold, which correspond to different accretion rates and have different radiation and wind outputs. In our simulations, the two modes are discriminated and the feedback effects by radiation and wind in each mode are taken into account. The main improvement of the present work compared to previous ones is that we adopt the most updated AGN physics, including the descriptions of radiation and wind from the hot accretion flows and wind from cold accretion disks. Physical processes like star formation, Type Ia and Type II supernovae are taken into account. We study the AGN light curve, typical AGN lifetime, growth of the black hole mass, AGN duty-cycle, star formation, and the X-ray surface brightness of the galaxy. We have compared our simulation results with observations and found general consistency. Comparisons with previous simulation works find significant differences, indicating the importance of AGN physics. The respective roles of radiation and wind feedbacks are examined and it is found that they are different for different problems of interest such as AGN luminosity and star formation. We find that it is hard to neglect any of them, so we suggest to simply use the names of "cold feedback mode" and "hot feedback mode" to replace the currently used names.
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    Bow shocks and related density enhancements produced by the winds of massive stars moving through the interstellar medium provide important information regarding the motions of the stars, the properties of their stellar winds, and the characteristics of the local medium. Since bow shocks are aspherical structures, light scattering within them produces a net polarization signal even if the region is spatially unresolved. Scattering opacity arising from free electrons and dust leads to a distribution of polarized intensity across the bow shock structure. That polarization encodes information about the shape, composition, opacity, density, and ionisation state of the material within the structure. In this paper we use the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code SLIP to investigate the polarization created when photons scatter in a bow shock-shaped region of enhanced density surrounding a stellar source. We present results assuming electron scattering, and investigate the polarization behaviour as a function of optical depth, temperature, and source of photons for two different cases: pure scattering and scattering with absorption. In both regimes we consider resolved and unresolved cases. We discuss the implication of these results as well as their possible use along with observational data to constrain the properties of observed bow shock systems. In different situations and under certain assumptions, our simulations can constrain viewing angle, optical depth and temperature of the scattering region, and the relative luminosities of the star and shock.
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    White dwarfs are often found in binary systems with orbital periods ranging from tens of minutes to hours in which they can accrete gas from their companion stars. In about 15% of these binaries, the magnetic field of the white dwarf is strong enough ($\geq 10^6$ Gauss) to channel the accreted matter along field lines onto the magnetic poles. The remaining systems are referred to as "non-magnetic", since to date there has been no evidence that they have a dynamically significant magnetic field. Here we report an analysis of archival optical observations of the "non-magnetic" accreting white dwarf in the binary system MV Lyrae (hereafter MV Lyr), whose lightcurve displayed quasi-periodic bursts of $\approx 30$ minutes duration every $\approx 2$ hours. The observations indicate the presence of an unstable magnetically-regulated accretion mode, revealing the existence of magnetically gated accretion, where disk material builds up around the magnetospheric boundary (at the co-rotation radius) and then accretes onto the white dwarf, producing bursts powered by the release of gravitational potential energy. We infer a surface magnetic field strength for the white dwarf in MV Lyr between $2 \times 10^4 \leq B \leq 10^5$ Gauss, too low to be detectable by other current methods. Our discovery provides a new way of studying the strength and evolution of magnetic fields in accreting white dwarfs and extends the connections between accretion onto white dwarfs, young stellar objects and neutron stars, for which similar magnetically gated accretion cysles have been identified.
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    We present results from a systematic selection of tidal disruption events (TDEs) in a wide area (4800 deg$^2$) $g+R$ band experiment by the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) with a rolling cadence of 1 and 3 days. We use photometric selection criteria to down select from a total of 493 nuclear transients detected during the experiment to a sample of 26 blue ($g-r < 0$ mag) nuclear transients in red host galaxies. Using Swift follow-up UV and X-ray imaging, and ground-based optical spectroscopy, we classify 14 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), 9 highly variable active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 2 confirmed TDEs, and 1 potential core-collapse supernova. From our study, we measure a TDE per galaxy rate of 1.7 $^{+2.85}_{-1.27}$ $\times$10$^{-4}$ gal$^{-1}$ yr$^{-1}$ (90% CL in Poisson statistics) using a galaxy number density estimated from the SDSS luminosity function. We find that it is possible to filter out AGNs by employing a more stringent transient color cut ($g-r <$ $-$0.2 mag). The UV is an important discriminator for filtering out SN contamination, since in the optical, SNe Ia can appear as blue as TDEs in their early phases. However, the contamination from SN Ia drops significantly with a more stringent spatial offset cut, suggesting higher precision in astrometry is essential for separating TDEs from SNe Ia in the optical. Our most stringent optical photometric selection criteria yields a contamination rate of 4.5:1, allowing for a manageable number of TDE candidates for complete spectroscopic follow-up and real-time classification in the ZTF era.
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    We present models of realistic globular clusters with post-Newtonian dynamics for black holes. By modeling the relativistic accelerations and gravitational-wave emission in isolated binaries and during three- and four-body encounters, we find that nearly half of all binary black hole mergers occur inside the cluster, with about 10% of those mergers entering the LIGO/Virgo band with eccentricities greater than 0.1. In-cluster mergers lead to the birth of a second generation of black holes with larger masses and high spins, which, depending on the black hole natal spins, can sometimes be retained in the cluster and merge again. As a result, globular clusters can produce merging binaries with detectable spins regardless of the birth spins of black holes formed from massive stars. These second-generation black holes would also populate any upper mass gap created by pair-instability supernovae.
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    We study dynamics of drift waves in the pair plasma of pulsar magnetosphere. It is shown that nonlinear of the drift waves with plasma particles leads to the formation of small scale structures. We show that cyclotron instability developed within these nonlinear structures can be responsible for the formation of nanoshots discovered in the radio emission of the Crab pulsar.