High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (astro-ph.HE)

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    The collapsar model has proved highly successful in explaining the properties of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), with the most direct confirmation being the detection of a supernova (SN) coincident with the majority of nearby long GRBs. Within this model, a long GRB is produced by the core-collapse of a metal-poor, rapidly rotating, massive star. The detection of some long GRBs in metal-rich environments, and more fundamentally the three examples of long GRBs (GRB 060505, GRB 060614 and GRB 11005A) with no coincident SN detection down to very deep limits is in strong contention with theoretical expectations. In this paper we present MUSE observations of the host galaxy of GRB 111005A, which is the most recent and compelling example yet of a SN-less, long GRB. At z = 0.01326, GRB 111005A is the second closest GRB ever detected, enabling the nearby environment to be studied at an unprecedented resolution of 100 pc^2. From the analysis of the MUSE data cube, we find GRB 111005A to have occurred within a metal-rich environment with little signs of ongoing star formation. Spectral analysis at the position of the GRB indicates the presence of an old stellar population (age>=10 Myr), which limits the mass of the GRB progenitor to M_(ZAMS) < 15 Msun, in direct conflict with the collapsar model. Our deep limits on the presence of any SN emission combined with the environmental conditions at the position of GRB 111005A necessitate the exploration of a novel long GRB formation mechanism that is unrelated to massive stars.
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    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) revealed that blazars, representing the most extreme radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) population, dominate the census of the gamma-ray sky, and a significant correlation was found between radio and gamma-ray emission in the 0.1-100 GeV energy range. However, the possible connection between radio and very high energy (VHE, E>0.1 TeV) emission still remains elusive and unexplored, owing to the lack of a homogeneous coverage of the VHE sky. The main goal of this work is to quantify and assess the significance of a possible connection between the radio emission on parsec scale measured by the very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and GeV-TeV gamma-ray emission in blazars, which is a central issue for understanding the blazar physics and the emission processes. We investigate the radio VLBI and high energy gamma-ray emission by using two large and unbiased AGN samples extracted from the first and second Fermi-LAT catalogs of hard gamma-ray sources detected above 10 GeV (1FHL) and 50 GeV (2FHL). For comparison, we perform the same correlation analysis by using the 0.1-300 GeV gamma-ray energy flux provided by the third Fermi-LAT source catalog. We find that the correlation strength and significance depend on the gamma-ray energy range with a different behavior among the blazar sub-classes. Overall, the radio and gamma-ray emission above 10 GeV turns out to be uncorrelated for the full samples and for all of the blazar sub-classes with the exception of high synchrotron peaked (HSP) objects, which show a strong and significant correlation. On the contrary, when 0.1-300 GeV gamma-ray energies are considered, a strong and significant correlation is found for the full blazar sample as well as for all of the blazar sub-classes. We interpret and explain this correlation behavior within the framework of the blazar spectral energy distribution properties.
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    Fast variations of gamma-ray flux from Active Galactic Nuclei and Gamma-Ray Bursts can constrain Lorentz Invariance Violation (LIV) because of the delayed (or advanced) arrival of photons with higher energies: this approach has lead to the current world-best limits on the energy scale of Quantum Gravity. Here we report on constraints on LIV studying the gamma-ray emission up to TeV energies from the Galactic Crab pulsar, recently discovered by the MAGIC collaboration. A likelihood analysis of the pulsar events reconstructed for energies above 400 GeV finds no significant variation of energy-dependent arrival time, and 95% CL limits are then obtained on the effective LIV energy scale after taking into account systematic uncertainties. Only a factor of about two less constraining than the current world-best limit on a quadratic LIV scenario, pulsars are now well established as a third and independent class of astrophysical objects suitable to constrain the characteristic energy scale of LIV.
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    Our study exploits the Constant Intensity Cut principles applied simultaneously to muonic and electromagnetic detectors of cosmic rays. We use the fact that the ordering of events according to their signal sizes induced in different types of surface detectors provides information about the mass composition of primary cosmic-ray beam, with low sensitivity to details of hadronic interactions. Composition analysis at knee energies is performed using Monte Carlo simulations for extensive air showers having maxima located far away from a hypothetical observatory. Another type of a hypothetical observatory is adopted to examine composition of ultra-high energy primaries which initiate vertical air showers with maxima observed near surface detectors.
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    In this work, we explore the long-term variability properties of the blazar PKS 0219-164 in the radio and the $\gamma$-ray regime, utilizing the OVRO 15 GHz and the \fermi/LAT observations from the period 2008--2017. We found that $\gamma$-ray emission is more variable than the radio emission implying that $\gamma$ ray emission possibly originated in more compact regions while the radio emission represented continuum emission from the large scale jets. Also, in $\gamma$-ray the source exhibited spectral variability characterized by the \emph softer-when-brighter trend, a less frequently observed feature in the high energy emission by BL Lacs. In radio, using Lomb-Scargle periodogram and weighted wavelet z-transform, we detected a strong signal of quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) with a periodicity of 270 $\pm$ 26 days with possible harmonics of 550 $\pm$ 42 and 1150 $\pm$ 157 days periods. At a time when the issue of the detection of QPOs in blazars is still under debate, the observed QPO with high statistical significance ( $\sim$ 97\% -- 99\% global significance over underlying red-noise processes) and persistent over nearly 10 oscillations could make one of the strongest cases for the detection of QPOs in blazar light curves. We discuss various blazar models that might lead to the $\gamma$-ray and radio variability, QPO, and the achromatic behavior seen in the high energy emission from the source.
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    We present a search for optical bursts from the repeating fast radio burst FRB 121102 using simultaneous observations with the high-speed optical camera ULTRASPEC on the 2.4-m Thai National Telescope and radio observations with the 100-m Effelsberg Radio Telescope. A total of 13 radio bursts were detected, but we found no evidence for corresponding optical bursts in our 70.7-ms frames. The 5-sigma upper limit to the optical flux density during our observations is 0.33 mJy at 767nm. This gives an upper limit for the optical burst fluence of 0.046 Jy ms, which constrains the broadband spectral index of the burst emission to alpha < -0.2. Two of the radio pulses are separated by just 34 ms, which may represent an upper limit on a possible underlying periodicity (a rotation period typical of pulsars), or these pulses may have come from a single emission window that is a small fraction of a possible period.
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    NGC6217 is a nearby spiral galaxy with a starburst region near its center. Evidence for a low luminosity Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) in its core has also been found in optical spectra. Intriguingly, X-ray observations by ROSAT revealed three knots aligned with the galaxy center, resembling a jet structure. This paper presents a study of XMM-Newton observations made to assess the hypothesis of a jet emitted from the center of NGC6217. The XMM data confirm the knots found with ROSAT and our spectral analysis shows that they have similar spectral properties with a hard photon index Gamma~1.7. The core of NGC6217 is well fitted by a model with an AGN and a starburst component, where the AGN contributes at most 46% of the total flux. The candidate jet has an apparent length ~15 kpc and a luminosity of ~5 X 10^38 erg/s. It stands out by being hosted by a spiral galaxy, since jets are more widely associated with ellipticals. To explain the jet launching mechanism we consider the hypothesis of an advection dominated accretion flow with a low accretion rate. The candidate jet emitted from NGC6217 is intriguing since it represents a challenge to the current knowledge of the connection between AGN, jets and host galaxies.
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    The MAGIC telescopes, located at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (2200 a.s.l.) in the Canary Island of La Palma, are placed on the top of a mountain, from where a window of visibility of about 5 deg in zenith and 80 deg in azimuth is open in the direction of the surrounding ocean. This permits to search for a signature of particle showers induced by earth-skimming cosmic tau neutrinos in the PeV to EeV energy range arising from the ocean. We have studied the response of MAGIC to such events, employing Monte Carlo simulations of upward-going tau neutrino showers. The analysis of the shower images shows that air showers induced by tau neutrinos can be discriminated from the hadronic background coming from a similar direction. We have calculated the point source acceptance and the expected event rates, assuming an incoming tau neutrino flux consistent with IceCube measurements, and for a sample of generic neutrino fluxes from photo-hadronic interactions in AGNs. The analysis of about 30 hours of data taken toward the sea leads to a point source sensitivity for tau neutrinos at the level of the down-going point source analysis of the Pierre Auger Observatory.
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    Recent studies suggest that globular clusters (GCs) may retain a substantial population of stellar-mass black holes (BHs), in contrast to the long-held belief of a few to zero BHs. We model the population of BH low-mass X-ray binaries (BH-LMXBs), an ideal observable proxy for elusive single BHs, produced from a representative group of Milky Way GCs with variable BH populations. We simulate the formation of BH-binaries in GCs through exchange interactions between binary and single stars in the company of tens to hundreds of BHs. Additionally, we consider the impact of the BH population on the rate of compact binaries undergoing gravitational wave driven mergers. The characteristics of the BH-LMXB population and binary properties are sensitive to the GCs structural parameters as well as its unobservable BH population. We find that GCs retaining $\sim 1000$ BHs produce a galactic population of $\sim 150$ ejected BH-LMXBs whereas GCs retaining only $\sim20$ BHs produce zero ejected BH-LMXBs. Moreover, we explore the possibility that some of the presently known BH-LMXBs might have originated in GCs and identify five candidate systems.
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    We study the X-ray phases of the Crab pulsar utilizing the 11-year observations from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, 6-year radio observations from the Nanshan Telescope, and the ephemeris from Jodrell Bank Observatory. It is found that the X-ray phases in different energy bands and the radio phases from Nanshan Telescope show similar behaviors, including long-time evolution and short-time variations. Such strong correlations between the X-ray and radio phases imply that the radio and X-ray timing noises are both generated from the pulsar spin that cannot be well described by the the monthly ephemeris from the Jodrell Bank observatory. When using the Nanshan phases as references to study the X-ray timing noise, it has a significantly smaller variation amplitude and shows no long-time evolution, with a change rate of $(-1.1\pm1.1)\times10^{-7}$ periods per day. These results show that the distance of the X-ray and radio emission regions on the Crab pulsar has no detectable secular change, and it is unlikely that timing-noises resulted from any unique physical processes in the radio or X-ray emitting regions. The similar behaviors of the X-ray and radio timing noises also imply that the variation of the interstellar medium is not the origin of the Crab pulsar's timing noises, which is consistent with the results obtained from the multi-frequency radio observations of PSR B1540-06.
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    Recent reports claiming association of the massive star binary system $\gamma^2 $Velorum (WR 11) with a high-energy $\gamma$-ray source observed by \textitFermi-LAT contrast the so-far exclusive role of $\eta$ Carinae as the hitherto only detected $\gamma$-ray emitter in the source class of particle-accelerating colliding-wind binary (CWB) systems. We offer support to this claim of association by providing dedicated model predictions for the nonthermal photon emission spectrum of $\gamma^2$ Velorum. We use three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic modeling (MHD) to investigate the structure and conditions of the wind-collision region (WCR) of $\gamma^2$ Velorum including the important effect of radiative braking in the stellar winds. A transport equation is then solved throughout the computational domain to study the propagation of relativistic electrons and protons. The resulting distributions of particles are subsequently used to compute nonthermal photon emission components. In agreement with observation in X-ray spectroscopy, our simulations yield a large shock-cone opening angle. We find the nonthermal $\gamma$-ray emission of $\gamma^2$ Velorum to be of hadronic origin owing to the strong radiation fields in the binary system which inhibit the acceleration of electrons to energies sufficiently high for efficient inverse Compton radiation. We also discuss the strong dependence of a hadronic $\gamma$-ray component on the energy-dependent diffusion used in the simulations. Of two mass-loss rates for the WR star found in literature, only the higher one is able to accommodate the observed $\gamma$-ray spectrum with reasonable values for important simulation parameters such as the injection ratio of high-energy particles within the WCR.
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    The HAWC observatory recently published their second source catalog with 39 very high energy gamma-ray sources based on 507 days of exposure time. Among these, there were 16 sources that are more than one degree away from any known TeV source. We studied 13 of these 16 sources with VERITAS and \textitFermi-LAT data. VERITAS, an array of four imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes observing gamma rays with energies higher than 85 GeV, can provide a more detailed image of the source with much shorter exposure time and with better angular resolution. With \textitFermi-LAT data, we searched for the counterparts at lower energies (E>10 GeV). The exposure of VERITAS varies among the 13 sources, and we used eight years of \textitFermi-LAT data. VERITAS found weak gamma-ray emission in the region of PWN~DA~495 coinciding with 2HWC J1953+294 in this follow-up study. We will discuss the results especially focusing on the PWN~DA~495 region and the SNR~G~54.1+0.3 region where \textitFermi-LAT detected a GeV counterpart of SNR~G~54.1+0.3, a known TeV source detected by both VERITAS and HAWC.
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    The cosmic merger rate density of black hole binaries (BHBs) can give us an essential clue to constraining the formation channels of BHBs, in light of current and forthcoming gravitational wave detections. Following a Monte Carlo approach, we couple new population-synthesis models of BHBs with the Illustris cosmological simulation, to study the cosmic history of BHB mergers. We explore six population-synthesis models, varying the prescriptions for supernovae, common envelope, and natal kicks. In most considered models, the cosmic BHB merger rate follows the same trend as the cosmic star formation rate. The normalization of the cosmic BHB merger rate strongly depends on the treatment of common envelope and on the distribution of natal kicks. We find that most BHBs merging within LIGO's instrumental horizon come from relatively metal-poor progenitors (<0.2 Zsun). The total masses of merging BHBs span a large range of values, from ~6 to ~82 Msun. In our fiducial model, merging BHBs consistent with GW150914, GW151226 and GW170104 represent ~6, 3, and 12 per cent of all BHBs merging within the LIGO horizon, respectively. The heavy systems, like GW150914, come from metal-poor progenitors (<0.15 Zsun). Most GW150914-like systems merging in the local Universe appear to have formed at high redshift, with a long delay time. In contrast, GW151226-like systems form and merge all the way through the cosmic history, from progenitors with a broad range of metallicities. Future detections will be crucial to put constraints on common envelope, on natal kicks, and on the BHB mass function.