High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (astro-ph.HE)

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    In this work, we use gas mass fraction samples of galaxy clusters obtained from their X-ray surface brightness observations jointly with the most recent $H(z)$ data to impose limits on cosmic opacity. The analyses are performed in a flat $\Lambda$CDM framework and the results are consistent with a transparent universe within $1\sigma$ c.l., however, they do not rule out $\epsilon \neq 0$ with high statistical significance. Furthermore, we show that the current limits on the matter density parameter obtained from X-ray gas mass fraction test are strongly dependent on the cosmic transparency assumption.
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    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE), one of the four scientific space science missions within the framework of the Strategic Pioneer Program on Space Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is a general purpose high energy cosmic-ray and gamma-ray observatory, which was successfully launched on December 17th, 2015 from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center. The DAMPE scientific objectives include the study of galactic cosmic rays up to $\sim 10$ TeV and hundreds of TeV for electrons/gammas and nuclei respectively, and the search for dark matter signatures in their spectra. In this paper we illustrate the layout of the DAMPE instrument, and discuss the results of beam tests and calibrations performed on ground. Finally we present the expected performance in space and give an overview of the mission key scientific goals.
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    The Cosmic Ray (CR) physics has entered a new era driven by high precision measurements coming from direct detection (especially AMS-02 and PAMELA) and also from gamma-ray observations (Fermi-LAT). In this review we focus our attention on how such data impact the understanding of the supernova remnant paradigm for the origin of CRs. In particular we discuss advancement in the field concerning the three main stages of the CR life: the acceleration process, the escape from the sources and the propagation throughout the Galaxy. We show how the new data reveal a phenomenology richest than previously thought that could even challenge the current understanding of CR origin.
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    In the light of the recently predicted isotopic composition of the kpc-scale jet in Centaurus A, we re-investigate whether this source could be responsible for some of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory. We find that a nearby source like Centaurus A is well motivated by the composition and spectral shape, and that such sources should start to dominate the flux above ~ 4 EeV. The best-fitting isotopes from our modelling, with the maximum 56Fe energy fixed at 250 EeV, are of intermediate mass, 12C to 16O, while the best-fitting particle index is 2.3.
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    The thermal stability of accretion disk and the possibility to see a limit-cycle behaviour strongly depends on the ability of the disk plasma to cool down. Various processes connected with radiation-matter interaction appearing in hot accretion disk plasma contribute to opacity. For the case of geometrically thin and optically thick accretion disk, we can estimate the influence of several different components of function \kappa, given by the Roseland mean. In the case of high temperatures, the electron Thomson scattering is dominant. At lower temperatures atomic processes become important. The slope d log \kappa/d log T can have locally stabilizing or destabilizing effect on the disk. Although the local MHD simulation postulate the stabilizing influence of the atomic processes, only the global time-dependent model can reveal the global disk stability range estimation. This is due to global diffusive nature of that processes. In this paper, using previously tested GLADIS code with modified prescription of the viscous dissipation, we examine the stabilizing effect of the Iron Opacity Bump.
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    We present a detailed multi-wavelength study of an unobscured, highly super-Eddington Type-1 QSO RX J0439.6-5311. We combine the latest XMM-Newton observation with all archival data from infrared to hard X-rays. The optical spectrum is very similar to that of 1H 0707-495 in having extremely weak [O \sc iii] and strong Fe \sc ii emission lines, although the black hole mass is probably slightly higher at $5-10 \times10^{6}~\rm M_{\odot}$. The broadband SED is uniquely well-defined due to the extremely low Galactic and intrinsic absorption, so the bolometric luminosity is tightly constrained. The optical/UV accretion disc continuum is seen down to 900 Å, showing that there is a standard thin disc structure down to $R \ge$ 190-380 $R_{\rm g}$ and determining the mass accretion rate through the outer disc. This predicts a much higher bolometric luminosity than observed, indicating that there must be strong wind and/or advective energy losses from the inner disc, as expected for a highly super-Eddington accretion flow. Significant outflows are detected in both the NLR and BLR emission lines, confirming the presence of a wind. We propose a global picture for the structure of a super-Eddington accretion flow where the inner disc puffs up, shielding much of the potential NLR material, and show how inclination angle with respect to this and the wind can explain very different X-ray properties of RX J0439.6-5311 and 1H 0707-495. Therefore, this source provides strong supporting evidence that `simple' and `complex' super-Eddington NLS1s can be unified within the same accretion flow scenario but with different inclination angles. We also propose that these extreme NLS1s could be the low-redshift analogs of weak emission-line quasars (WLQs).
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    A relativistic spacecraft of the type envisioned by the Breakthrough Starshot initiative will inevitably get charged through collisions with interstellar particles and UV photons. Interstellar magnetic fields would, therefore, deflect the trajectory of the spacecraft. We calculate the expected deflection for typical interstellar conditions. We also find that the charge distribution of the spacecraft is asymmetric, producing an electric dipole moment. The interaction between the moving electric dipole and the interstellar magnetic field is found to produce a large torque, which can result in fast rotation of the spacecraft around the axis perpendicular to the direction of motion, with an oscillation period of $\sim$ 0.5 hr. We then calculate the spacecraft spin due to impulsive torques by dust bombardment. Finally, we discuss the effect of the spacecraft rotation and suggest several methods to mitigate it.
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    We report on the results of a 4-year timing campaign of PSR~J2222$-0137$, a 2.44-day binary pulsar with a massive white dwarf (WD) companion, with the Nançay, Effelsberg and Lovell radio telescopes. Using the Shapiro delay for this system, we find a pulsar mass $m_{p}=1.76\,\pm\,0.06\,\Msun$ and a WD mass $m_{c}\,=\,1.293\,\pm\,0.025\,\Msun$. We also measure the rate of advance of periastron for this system, which is marginally consistent with the GR prediction for these masses. The short lifetime of the massive WD progenitor star led to a rapid X-ray binary phase with little ($< \, 10^{-2} \, \Msun$) mass accretion onto the neutron star (NS); hence, the current pulsar mass is, within uncertainties, its birth mass; the largest measured to date. We discuss the discrepancy with previous mass measurements for this system; we conclude that the measurements presented here are likely to be more accurate. Finally, we highlight the usefulness of this system for testing alternative theories of gravity by tightly constraining the presence of dipolar radiation. This is of particular importance for certain aspects of strong-field gravity, like spontaneous scalarization, since the mass of PSR~J2222$-0137$ puts that system into a poorly tested parameter range.
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    We study the long-term quasi-steady evolution of the force-free magnetosphere of a magnetar coupled to its internal magnetic field. We find that magnetospheric currents can be maintained on long timescales of the order of thousands of years. Meanwhile, the energy, helicity and twist stored in the magnetosphere all gradually increase over the course of this evolution, until a critical point is reached, beyond which a force-free magnetosphere cannot be constructed. At this point, some large scale magnetospheric rearrangement, possibly resulting in an outburst or a flare, must occur, releasing a large fraction of the stored energy, helicity and twist. After that, the quasi-steady evolution should continue in a similar manner from the new initial conditions. The timescale for reaching this critical point depends on the overall magnetic field strength and on the relative fraction of the toroidal field. The energy stored in the force-free magnetosphere is found to be up to $\sim 30\%$ larger than the corresponding vacuum energy. This implies that for a $10^{14}$ G field at the pole, the energy budget available for fast magnetospheric events is of the order of a few $10^{44}$ erg. The spindown rate is estimated to increase by up to $\sim 60\%$, since the dipole content in the magnetosphere is enhanced by the currents present there. A rough estimate of the braking index $n$ reveals that it is systematically $n < 3$ for the most part of the evolution, consistent with actual measurements for pulsars and early estimates for several magnetars.
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    The spectrum of the MeV tail detected in the black-hole candidate Cygnus X-1 remains controversial as it appeared much harder when observed with the INTEGRAL Imager IBIS than with the INTEGRAL spectrometer SPI or CGRO. We present an independent analysis of the spectra of Cygnus X-1 observed by IBIS in the hard and soft states. We developed a new analysis software for the PICsIT detector layer and for the Compton mode data of the IBIS instrument and calibrated the idiosyncrasies of the PICsIT front-end electronics. The spectra of Cygnus X-1 obtained for the hard and soft states with the INTEGRAL imager IBIS are compatible with those obtained with the INTEGRAL spectrometer SPI, with CGRO, and with the models that attribute the MeV hard tail either to hybrid thermal/non-thermal Comptonisation or to synchrotron emission.
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    We have searched for optical identifications for 39 Chandra X-ray sources that lie within the 1.9 arcmin half-mass radius of the nearby (d = 4.0 kpc), core-collapsed globular cluster, NGC 6752, using deep Hubble Space Telescope ACS/WFC imaging in B435, R625, and H alpha. Photometry of these images allows us to classify candidate counterparts based primarily on color-magnitude and color-color diagram location. The color-color diagram is particularly useful for quantifying the H alpha line equivalent width. In addition to recovering 11 previously detected optical counterparts, we propose 20 new optical IDs. In total, there are 16 likely or less certain cataclysmic variables (CVs), nine likely or less certain chromospherically active binaries, three galaxies, and three active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The latter three sources, which had been identified as likely CVs by previous investigations, now appear to be extragalactic objects based on their proper motions. As we previously found for NGC 6397, the CV candidates in NGC 6752 fall into a bright group that is centrally concentrated relative to the turnoff-mass stars and a faint group that has a spatial distribution that is more similar to that of the turnoff-mass stars. This is consistent with an evolutionary scenario in which CVs are produced by dynamical interactions near the cluster center and diffuse to larger radius orbits as they age.
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    The SN1987A in the Giant Magellanic Cloud was an amazing and extraordinary event because it was detected in real time for different neutrinos experiments ($\nu$s) around the world. Approximate $\sim25$ events were observed in three different experiments: Kamiokande II (KII) $\sim 12$, Irvine-Michigan-Brookhaven (IMB) $\sim 8$ e Baksan $\sim 5$, plus a contrived burst at Mont Blanc (Liquid Scintillator Detector - LSD) later dismissed because of energetic requirements (Aglietta et al. 1988). The neutrinos have an important play role into the neutron star newborn: at the moment when the supernova explodes the compact object remnant is freezing by neutrinos ($\sim99\%$ energy is lost in the few seconds of the explosion). The work is motivated by neutrinos' event in relation arrival times where there is a temporal gap between set of events ($\sim6\mbox{s}$). The first part of dataset came from the ordinary mechanism of freezing and the second part suggests different mechanism of neutrinos production. We tested two models of cooling for neutrinos from SN1987A: 1st an exponential cooling is an ordinary model of cooling and 2nd a two-step temperature model that it considers two bursts separated with temporal gap. Our analysis was done with Bayesian tools (\it Bayesian Information Criterion - BIC) The result showed strong evidence in favor of a two-step model against one single exponential cooling ($\ln\mbox{B}_{ij} > 5.0$), and suggests the existence of two neutrino bursts at the moment the neutron star was born.
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    It was recently pointed out that direct detection signals from at least three different targets may be used to determine whether the Dark Matter (DM) particle is different from its antiparticle. In this work, we examine in detail the feasibility of this test under different conditions, motivated by proposals for future detectors. Specifically, we perform likelihood fits to mock data under the hypotheses that the DM particle is identical to or different from its antiparticle, and determine the significance with which the former can be rejected in favor of the latter. In our analysis, we consider 3 different values of the DM mass ($50$ GeV, $300$ GeV, $1$ TeV) and 4 different experimental ensembles, each consisting of at least 3 different targets -- Xe and Ar plus one among the following: Si, Ge, $\mathrm{CaWO_4}$, or Ge/$\mathrm{CaWO_4}$. For each of these experimental ensembles and each DM mass, the expected discrimination significance is calculated as a function of the DM-nucleon couplings. In the best case scenario, the discrimination significance can reach $\mathcal{O}(3\sigma)$ for three of the four ensembles considered, and $\mathcal{O}(5\sigma)$ for the ensemble including $\mathrm{Si}$, highlighting the need for a variety of experimental targets in order to determine the DM properties. These results show that future direct detection signals could be used to exclude, at a statistically significant level, a Majorana or a real DM particle, giving a critical clue about the identity of the Dark Matter.
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    We study different phenomenological signatures associated with new spin-2 particles. These new degrees of freedom, that we call hidden gravitons, arise in different high-energy theories such as extra-dimensional models or extensions of General Relativity. At low energies, hidden gravitons can be generally described by the Fierz-Pauli Lagrangian. Their phenomenology is parameterized by two dimensionful constants: their mass and their coupling strength. In this work, we analyze two different sets of constraints. On the one hand, we study potential deviations from the inverse-square law on solar-system and laboratory scales. To extend the constraints to scales where the laboratory probes are not competitive, we also study consequences on astrophysical objects. We analyze in detail the processes that may take place in stellar interiors and lead to emission of hidden gravitons, acting like an additional source of energy loss.
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    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows have been observed across the electromagnetic spectrum, and physical parameters of GRB jets and their surroundings have been derived using broadband modeling. While well-sampled lightcurves across the broadband spectrum are necessary to constrain all the physical parameters, some can be strongly constrained by the right combination of just a few observables, almost independently of the other unknowns. We present a method involving the peaks of radio lightcurves to constrain the fraction of shock energy that resides in electrons, $\epsilon_e$. This parameter is an important ingredient for understanding the microphysics of relativistic shocks; Based on a sample of 36 radio afterglows, we find $\epsilon_e$ has a narrow distribution centered around $0.13-0.15$. Our method can be used as a diagnostic tool for determining $\epsilon_e$, and puts constraints on the broadband modeling of GRB afterglows. We show that earlier measurements of the spreads in parameter values for $\epsilon_e$, the kinetic energy of the shock, and the density of the circumburst medium, based on broadband modeling across the entire spectrum, are inconsistent with our analysis of radio peaks. This could be due to different modeling methods and assumptions, and possibly missing ingredients in past and current modeling efforts. Furthermore, we show that observations at $\gtrsim10$ GHz performed $0.3-30$ days after the GRB trigger, are best suited for pinpointing the synchrotron peak frequency, and consequently $\epsilon_e$. At the same time, observations at lower radio frequencies can pin down the synchrotron self-absorption frequency and help constrain the other physical parameters of GRB afterglows.
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    Rotating radio transients (RRATs), loosely defined as objects that are discovered through only their single pulses, are sporadic pulsars that have a wide range of emission properties. For many of them, we must measure their periods and determine timing solutions relying on the timing of their individual pulses, while some of the less sporadic RRATs can be timed by using folding techniques as we do for other pulsars. Here, based on Parkes and Green Bank Telescope (GBT) observations, we introduce our results on eight RRATs including their timing-derived rotation parameters, positions, and dispersion measures (DMs), along with a comparison of the spin-down properties of RRATs and normal pulsars. Using data for 24 RRATs, we find that their period derivatives are generally larger than those of normal pulsars, independent of any intrinsic correlation with period, indicating that RRATs' highly sporadic emission may be associated with intrinsically larger magnetic fields. We carry out Lomb$-$Scargle tests to search for periodicities in RRATs' pulse detection times with long timescales. Periodicities are detected for all targets, with significant candidates of roughly 3.4 hr for PSR J1623$-$0841 and 0.7 hr for PSR J1839$-$0141. We also analyze their single-pulse amplitude distributions, finding that log-normal distributions provide the best fits, as is the case for most pulsars. However, several RRATs exhibit power-law tails, as seen for pulsars emitting giant pulses. This, along with consideration of the selection effects against the detection of weak pulses, imply that RRAT pulses generally represent the tail of a normal intensity distribution.
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    A very massive star with a carbon-oxygen core in the range of $64\;{\rm M_{\odot}}<M_{\mathrm{CO}}<133\;{\rm M_{\odot}}$ is expected to undergo a very different kind of explosion known as a pair instability supernova. Pair instability supernovae are candidates for superluminous supernovae due to the prodigious amounts of radioactive elements they create. Observations of a nearby pair-instability supernova would allow us to test current models of stellar evolution at the extreme of stellar masses. Much will be sought within the electromagnetic radiation we detect but we should not forget that the neutrino flux from a pair-instability supernova also contains unique signatures of the event that unambiguously identify this type of explosion. We calculate the expected neutrino flux at Earth from a one-dimensional pair-instability supernova simulation taking into account the full time and energy dependence of the neutrino emission and the flavor evolution through the outer layers of the star. We use the SNOwGLoBES event rate software to calculate the signal in five different detectors chosen to represent present or near future designs. We find a pair-instability supernova can easily be detected in multiple different neutrino detectors at the `standard' supernova distance of $10\;{\rm kpc}$ producing several events in DUNE, JUNE and SuperKamiokande. The proposed HyperKamiokande detector would detect events from a pair-instability supernova as far as $\sim 60\;{\rm kpc}$ allowing it to reach the Magellanic Clouds and the several very high mass stars known to exist there.