Astrophysics of Galaxies (astro-ph.GA)

  • PDF
    A Type IIn supernova (SN) is dominated by the interaction of SN ejecta with the circumstellar medium (CSM). Some SNe IIn (e.g., SN 2006jd) have episodes of re-brightening ("bumps") in their light curves. We present iPTF13z, a SN IIn discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) and characterised by several bumps in its light curve. We analyse this peculiar behaviour trying to infer the properties of the CSM and of the SN explosion, as well as the nature of its progenitor star. We obtained multi-band optical photometry for over 1000 days after discovery with the P48 and P60 telescopes at Palomar Observatory. We obtained low-resolution optical spectra in the same period. We did an archival search for progenitor outbursts. We analyse our photometry and spectra, and compare iPTF13z to other SNe IIn. A simple analytical model is used to estimate properties of the CSM. iPTF13z was a SN IIn showing a light curve with five bumps during its decline phase. The bumps had amplitudes between 0.4 and 0.9 mag and durations between 20 and 120 days. The most prominent bumps appeared in all our different optical bands. The spectra showed typical SN IIn characteristics, with emission lines of H$\alpha$ (with broad component FWHM ~$10^{3}-10^{4} ~{\rm ~km ~s^{-1}}$ and narrow component FWHM ~$10^2 \rm ~km ~s^{-1}$) and He I, but also with Fe II, Ca II, Na I D and H$\beta$ P-Cygni profiles (with velocities of ~$10^{3}$ ${\rm ~km ~s^{-1}}$). A pre-explosion outburst was identified lasting $\gtrsim 50$ days, with $M_r \approx -15$ mag around 210 days before discovery. Large, variable progenitor mass-loss rates (~> 0.01 $M_{\odot} \rm ~yr^{-1}$) and CSM densities (~> 10$^{-16}$ g cm$^{-3}$) are derived. We suggest that the light curve bumps of iPTF13z arose from SN ejecta interacting with denser regions in the CSM, possibly produced by the eruptions of a luminous blue variable star.
  • PDF
    We use new X-ray data obtained with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), near-infrared (NIR) fluxes, and mid-infrared (MIR) spectra of a sample of 24 unobscured type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGN) to study the correlation between various hard X-ray bands between 3 and 80 keV and the infrared (IR) emission. The IR to X-ray correlation spectrum (IRXCS) shows a maximum at ~15-20 micron, coincident with the peak of the AGN contribution to the MIR spectra of the majority of the sample. There is also a NIR correlation peak at ~2 micron, which we associate with the NIR bump observed in some type 1 AGN at ~1-5 micron and is likely produced by nuclear hot dust emission. The IRXCS shows practically the same behaviour in all the X-ray bands considered, indicating a common origin for all of them. We finally evaluated correlations between the X-ray luminosities and various MIR emission lines. All the lines show a good correlation with the hard X-rays (rho>0.7), but we do not find the expected correlation between their ionization potentials and the strength of the IRXCS.
  • PDF
    The galactocentric distance of quasar absorption outflows are conventionally determined using absorption troughs from excited states, a method hindered by severely saturated or self-blended absorption troughs. We propose a novel method to estimate the size of a broad absorption line (BAL) region which partly obscures an emission line region by assuming virialized gas in the emission region surrounding a supermassive black hole with known mass. When a spiky Lya1216 line emission is present at the flat bottom of the deep Nv1240 absorption trough, the size of BAL region can be estimated. We have found 3 BAL quasars in the SDSS database showing such Lya lines. The scale of their BAL outflows are found to be 3-26 pc, moderately larger than the theoretical scale (0.01-0.1 pc) of trough forming regions for winds originating from accretion discs, but significantly smaller than most outflow sizes derived using the absorption troughs of the excited states of ions. For these three outflows, the lower limits of ratio of kinetic luminosity to Eddington luminosity are 0.02%-0.07%. These lower limits are substantially smaller than that is required to have significant feedback effect on their host galaxies.
  • PDF
    The SgrB2 molecular cloud contains several sites forming high-mass stars. SgrB2(N) is one of its main centers of activity. It hosts several compact and UCHII regions, as well as two known hot molecular cores (SgrB2(N1) and SgrB2(N2)), where complex organic molecules are detected. Our goal is to use the high sensitivity of ALMA to characterize the hot core population in SgrB2(N) and shed a new light on the star formation process. We use a complete 3 mm spectral line survey conducted with ALMA to search for faint hot cores in SgrB2(N). We report the discovery of three new hot cores that we call SgrB2(N3), SgrB2(N4), and SgrB2(N5). The three sources are associated with class II methanol masers, well known tracers of high-mass star formation, and SgrB2(N5) also with a UCHII region. The chemical composition of the sources and the column densities are derived by modelling the whole spectra under the assumption of LTE. The H2 column densities are computed from ALMA and SMA continuum emission maps. The H2 column densities of these new hot cores are found to be 16 up to 36 times lower than the one of the main hot core Sgr B2(N1). Their spectra have spectral line densities of 11 up to 31 emission lines per GHz, assigned to 22-25 molecules. We derive rotational temperatures around 140-180 K for the three new hot cores and mean source sizes of 0.4 for SgrB2(N3) and 1.0 for SgrB2(N4) and SgrB2(N5). SgrB2(N3) and SgrB2(N5) show high velocity wing emission in typical outflow tracers, with a bipolar morphology in their integrated intensity maps suggesting the presence of an outflow, like in SgrB2(N1). The associations of the hot cores with class II methanol masers, outflows, and/or UCHII regions tentatively suggest the following age sequence: SgrB2(N4), SgrB2(N3), SgrB2(N5), SgrB2(N1). The status of SgrB2(N2) is unclear. It may contain two distinct sources, a UCHII region and a very young hot core.
  • PDF
    The Carina nebula hosts a large number of globulettes. The majority are of planetary mass, but there are also those with masses of several tens up to a few hundred Jupiter masses. We carried out radio observations of molecular line emission in 12CO and 13CO (2-1) and (3-2) of 12 larger objects in addition of positions in adjacent shell structures using APEX. All selected objects were detected with radial velocities shifted relative to the emission from related shell structures and background molecular clouds. Globulettes along the western part of an extended dust shell show a small spread in velocity with small velocity shifts relative to the shell. This system of globulettes and shell structures in the foreground of the bright nebulosity surrounding the cluster Trumpler 14 is expanding with a few km/s relative to the cluster. The Carina globulettes are compact and denser than objects of similar mass studied previously in the Rosette nebula. Some globulettes in Tr 14 are located far from any shell structures. These objects move at a similar speed as the globulettes along the shell. The distribution and velocities of the globulettes studied suggest that they have originated from eroding shells and elephant trunks.
  • PDF
    We identify and investigate known ultracool stars and brown dwarfs that are being observed or indirectly constrained by the Gaia mission. These objects will be the core of the Gaia ultracool dwarf sample composed of all dwarfs later than M7 that Gaia will provide direct or indirect information on. We match known L and T dwarfs to the Gaia first data release, the Two Micron All Sky Survey and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer AllWISE survey and examine the Gaia and infrared colours, along with proper motions, to improve spectral typing, identify outliers and find mismatches. There are 321 L and T dwarfs observed directly in the Gaia first data release, of which 10 are later than L7. This represents 45 % of all the known LT dwarfs with estimated Gaia G magnitudes brighter than 20.3 mag. We determine proper motions for the 321 objects from Gaia and the Two Micron All Sky Survey positions. Combining the Gaia and infrared magnitudes provides useful diagnostic diagrams for the determination of L and T dwarf physical parameters. We then search the Tycho-Gaia astrometric solution Gaia first data release subset to find any objects with common proper motions to known L and T dwarfs and a high probability of being related. We find 15 new candidate common proper motion systems.
  • PDF
    We study how the gas in a sample of galaxies (M* > 10e9 Msun) in clusters, obtained in a cosmological simulation, is affected by the interaction with the intra-cluster medium (ICM). The dynamical state of each elemental parcel of gas is studied using the total energy. At z ~ 2, the galaxies in the simulation are evenly distributed within clusters, moving later on towards more central locations. In this process, gas from the ICM is accreted and mixed with the gas in the galactic halo. Simultaneously, the interaction with the environment removes part of the gas. A characteristic stellar mass around M* ~ 10e10 Msun appears as a threshold marking two differentiated behaviours. Below this mass, galaxies are located at the external part of clusters and have eccentric orbits. The effect of the interaction with the environment is marginal. Above, galaxies are mainly located at the inner part of clusters with mostly radial orbits with low velocities. In these massive systems, part of the gas, strongly correlated with the stellar mass of the galaxy, is removed. The amount of removed gas is sub-dominant compared with the quantity of retained gas which is continuously influenced by the hot gas coming from the ICM. The analysis of individual galaxies reveals the existence of a complex pattern of flows, turbulence and a constant fuelling of gas to the hot corona from the ICM that could make the global effect of the interaction of galaxies with their environment to be substantially less dramatic than previously expected.
  • PDF
    We use new deep 21 cm HI observations of the moderately inclined galaxy NGC 4559 in the HALOGAS survey to investigate the properties of extra-planar gas. We use TiRiFiC to construct simulated data cubes to match the HI observations. We find that a thick disk component of scale height $\sim\,2\,\mathrm{kpc}$, characterized by a negative vertical gradient in its rotation velocity (lag) of $\sim13 \pm 5$ km s$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-1}$ is an adequate fit to extra-planar gas features. The tilted ring models also present evidence for a decrease in the magnitude of the lag outside of $R_{25}$, and a radial inflow of $\sim 10$ km s$^{-1}$. We extracted lagging extra-planar gas through Gaussian velocity profile fitting. From both the 3D models and and extraction analyses we conclude that $\sim10-20\%$ of the total \HI mass is extra-planar. Most of the extra-planar gas is spatially coincident with regions of star formation in spiral arms, as traced by H$\alpha$ and GALEX FUV images, so it is likely due to star formation processes driving a galactic fountain. We also find the signature of a filament of a kinematically "forbidden" HI, containing $\sim 1.4\times 10^{6}$ M$_{\odot}$ of HI, and discuss its potential relationship to a nearby HI hole. We discover a previously undetected dwarf galaxy in HI located $\sim 0.4^{\circ}$ ($\sim 58$ kpc) from the center of NGC 4559, containing $\sim 4\times10^{5}$ M$_{\odot}$. This dwarf has counterpart sources in SDSS with spectra typical of HII regions, and we conclude it is two merging blue compact dwarf galaxies.
  • PDF
    Many features near the Galactic Center have been called 3-kiloparsec arms. We reached a point of having too many divergent data, making it difficult to be constrained by a single physical model. Their differing characteristics suggest different physical and dynamical objects. Radial velocity data on the so-called 3-kpc arms do not coincide with radial velocities of major spiral arms near 3kpc, nor near 2 kpc, nor near 4 kpc from the Galactic Center (Fig. 1 and 2). Different 3-kpc arm features may require different models: turbulence around a shock in a Galactic density wave between 2 and 4 kpc from the Galactic Center (Table 1), or nuclear rotation between 0 and 2 kpc from the Galactic Center region (Table 2), or a putative radial expansion between 0 and 4 kpc from the Galactic Center. Despite their naming as Near 3-kiloparsec arms or Far 3-kiloparsec arms, these features are not major arms. Those 3-kpc arm features nearer the Galactic Center (within 13o of Galactic longitude) may be different than those farther out (Table 2). Here we show that the plethora of observed '3-kpc arm' features can be separated in two: those with Galactic longitude of 13 degrees or more away from the Galactic Center (Table 1 - some of which are possibly associated with the observed major spiral arms), and those within 13 degrees from the Galactic Center (Table 2 - some of which are possibly associated with the observed central bars; Fig.1 and Fig.2).
  • PDF
    We present IFS-RedEx, a spectrum and redshift extraction pipeline for integral-field spectrographs. A key feature of the tool is a wavelet-based spectrum cleaner. It identifies reliable spectral features, reconstructs their shapes, and suppresses the spectrum noise. This gives the technique an advantage over conventional methods like Gaussian filtering, which only smears out the signal. As a result, the wavelet-based cleaning allows the quick identification of true spectral features. We test the cleaning technique with degraded MUSE spectra and find that it can detect spectrum peaks down to S/N = 8 while reporting no fake detections. We apply IFS-RedEx to MUSE data of the strong lensing cluster MACSJ1931.8-2635 and extract 54 spectroscopic redshifts. We identify 29 cluster members and 22 background galaxies with z >= 0.4. IFS-RedEx is open source and publicly available.
  • PDF
    We use $>$9400 $\log(m/M_{\odot})>10$ quiescent and star-forming galaxies at $z\lesssim2$ in COSMOS/UltraVISTA to study the average size evolution of these systems, with focus on the rare, ultra-massive population at $\log(m/M_{\odot})>11.4$. The large 2-square degree survey area delivers a sample of $\sim400$ such ultra-massive systems. Accurate sizes are derived using a calibration based on high-resolution images from the Hubble Space Telescope. We find that, at these very high masses, the size evolution of star-forming and quiescent galaxies is almost indistinguishable in terms of normalization and power-law slope. We use this result to investigate possible pathways of quenching massive $m>M^*$ galaxies at $z<2$. We consistently model the size evolution of quiescent galaxies from the star-forming population by assuming different simple models for the suppression of star-formation. These models include an instantaneous and delayed quenching without altering the structure of galaxies and a central starburst followed by compaction. We find that instantaneous quenching reproduces well the observed mass-size relation of massive galaxies at $z>1$. Our starburst$+$compaction model followed by individual growth of the galaxies by minor mergers is preferred over other models without structural change for $\log(m/M_{\odot})>11.0$ galaxies at $z>0.5$. None of our models is able to meet the observations at $m>M^*$ and $z<1$ with out significant contribution of post-quenching growth of individual galaxies via mergers. We conclude that quenching is a fast process in galaxies with $ m \ge 10^{11} M_\odot$, and that major mergers likely play a major role in the final steps of their evolution.
  • PDF
    We combine Gaia data release 1 astrometry with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images taken some ~10-15 years earlier, to measure proper motions of stars in the halo of our Galaxy. The SDSS-Gaia proper motions have typical statistical errors of 2 mas/yr down to r~20 mag, and are robust to variations with magnitude and colour. Armed with this exquisite set of halo proper motions, we identify RR Lyrae, blue horizontal branch (BHB), and K giant stars in the halo, and measure their net rotation with respect to the Galactic disc. We find evidence for a gently rotating prograde signal (< V_\phi > ~5-25 km/s) in the halo stars, which shows little variation with Galactocentric radius out to 50 kpc. There is also tentative evidence for a kinematic bias with metallicity, whereby the metal richer BHB and K giant stars have slightly stronger prograde rotation than the metal poorer stars. Using the Auriga simulation suite we find that the old (T >10 Gyr) stars in the simulated halos exhibit mild prograde rotation, with little dependence on radius or metallicity, in general agreement with the observations. The weak halo rotation suggests that the Milky Way has a minor in situ halo component, and has undergone a relatively quiet accretion history.
  • PDF
    Stars form in cold molecular clouds. However, molecular gas is difficult to observe because the most abundant molecule (H2) lacks a permanent dipole moment. Rotational transitions of CO are often used as a tracer of H2, but CO is much less abundant and the conversion from CO intensity to H2 mass is often highly uncertain. Here we present a new method for estimating the column density of cold molecular gas (Sigma_gas) using optical spectroscopy. We utilise the spatially resolved H-alpha maps of flux and velocity dispersion from the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral-field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. We derive maps of Sigma_gas by inverting the multi-freefall star formation relation, which connects the star formation rate surface density (Sigma_SFR) with Sigma_gas and the turbulent Mach number (Mach). Based on the measured range of Sigma_SFR = 0.005-1.5 M_sol/yr/kpc^2 and Mach = 18-130, we predict Sigma_gas = 7-200 M_sol/pc^2 in the star-forming regions of our sample of 260 SAMI galaxies. These values are close to previously measured Sigma_gas obtained directly with unresolved CO observations of similar galaxies at low redshift. We classify each galaxy in our sample as 'Star-forming' (219) or 'Composite/AGN/Shock' (41), and find that in Composite/AGN/Shock galaxies the average Sigma_SFR, Mach, and Sigma_gas are enhanced by factors of 2.0, 1.6, and 1.3, respectively, compared to Star-forming galaxies. We compare our predictions of Sigma_gas with those obtained by inverting the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation and find that our new method is a factor of two more accurate in predicting Sigma_gas, with an average deviation of 32% from the actual Sigma_gas.
  • PDF
    We present new Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) 1.3 mm continuum observations of the SR 24S transition disk with an angular resolution $\lesssim0.18"$ (12 au radius). We perform a multi-wavelength investigation by combining new data with previous ALMA data at 0.45 mm. The visibilities and images of the continuum emission at the two wavelengths are well characterized by a ring-like emission. Visibility modeling finds that the ring-like emission is narrower at longer wavelengths, in good agreement with models of dust trapping in pressure bumps, although there are complex residuals that suggest potentially asymmetric structures. The 0.45 mm emission has a shallower profile inside the central cavity than the 1.3 mm emission. In addition, we find that the $^{13}$CO and C$^{18}$O (J=2-1) emission peaks at the center of the continuum cavity. We do not detect either continuum or gas emission from the northern companion to this system (SR 24N), which is itself a binary system. The upper limit for the dust disk mass of SR 24N is $\lesssim 0.12\,M_{\bigoplus}$, which gives a disk mass ratio in dust between the two components of $M_{\mathrm{dust, SR\,24S}}/M_{\mathrm{dust, SR\,24N}}\gtrsim840$. The current ALMA observations may imply that either planets have already formed in the SR 24N disk or that dust growth to mm-sizes is inhibited there and that only warm gas, as seen by ro-vibrational CO emission inside the truncation radii of the binary, is present.
  • PDF
    Recent studies suggest that the quenching properties of galaxies are correlated over several mega-parsecs. The large-scale "galactic conformity" phenomenon around central galaxies has been regarded as a potential signature of "galaxy assembly bias" or "pre-heating", both of which interpret conformity as a result of direct environmental effects acting on galaxy formation. Building on the iHOD halo quenching framework developed in Zu & Mandelbaum (2015, 2016), we discover that our fiducial halo mass quenching model, without any galaxy assembly bias, can successfully explain the overall environmental dependence and the conformity of galaxy colours in SDSS, as measured by the mark correlation functions of galaxy colours and the red galaxy fractions around isolated primaries, respectively. Our fiducial iHOD halo quenching mock also correctly predicts the differences in the spatial clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing signals between the more vs. less red galaxy subsamples, split by the red-sequence ridge-line at fixed stellar mass. Meanwhile, models that tie galaxy colours fully or partially to halo assembly bias have difficulties in matching all these observables simultaneously. Therefore, we demonstrate that the observed environmental dependence of galaxy colours can be naturally explained by the combination of 1) halo quenching and 2) the variation of halo mass function with environment --- an indirect environmental effect mediated by two separate physical processes.
  • PDF
    We present the detection of supermassive black holes (BHs) in two Virgo ultracompact dwarf galaxies (UCDs), VUCD3 and M59cO. We use adaptive optics assisted data from the Gemini/NIFS instrument to derive radial velocity dispersion profiles for both objects. Mass models for the two UCDs are created using multi-band Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, including the modeling of mild color gradients seen in both objects. We then find a best-fit stellar mass-to-light ratio ($M/L$) and BH mass by combining the kinematic data and the deprojected stellar mass profile using Jeans Anisotropic Models (JAM). Assuming axisymmetric isotropic Jeans models, we detect BHs in both objects with masses of $4.4^{+2.5}_{-3.0} \times 10^6$ $M_{\odot}$ in VUCD3 and $5.8^{+2.5}_{-2.8} \times 10^6$ $M_{\odot}$ in M59cO (3$\sigma$ uncertainties). The BH mass is degenerate with the anisotropy parameter, $\beta_z$; for the data to be consistent with no BH requires $\beta_z = 0.4$ and $\beta_z = 0.6$ for VUCD3 and M59cO, respectively. Comparing these values with nuclear star clusters shows that while it is possible that these UCDs are highly radially anisotropic, it seems unlikely. These detections constitute the second and third UCDs known to host supermassive BHs. They both have a high fraction of their total mass in their BH; $\sim$13% for VUCD3 and $\sim$18% for M59cO. They also have low best-fit stellar $M/L$s, supporting the proposed scenario that most massive UCDs host high mass fraction BHs. The properties of the BHs and UCDs are consistent with both objects being the tidally stripped remnants of $\sim$10$^9$ M$_\odot$ galaxies.
  • PDF
    Jets from supermassive black holes in the centres of galaxy clusters are a potential candidate for moderating gas cooling and subsequent star formation through depositing energy in the intra-cluster gas. In this work, we simulate the jet-intra-cluster medium interaction using the moving-mesh magnetohydrodynamics code Arepo. Our model injects supersonic, low density, collimated and magnetised outflows in cluster centres, which are then stopped by the surrounding gas, thermalise and inflate low-density cavities filled with cosmic-rays. We perform high-resolution, non-radiative simulations of the lobe creation, expansion and disruption, and find that its dynamical evolution is in qualitative agreement with simulations of idealised low-density cavities that are dominated by a large-scale Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The buoyant rising of the lobe does not create energetically significant small-scale chaotic motion in a volume-filling fashion, but rather a systematic upward motion in the wake of the lobe and a corresponding back-flow perpendicular to it. We find that, overall, 50 per cent of the injected energy ends up in material which is not part of the lobe, and about 25 per cent remains in the inner 100 kpc. We conclude that jet-inflated, buoyantly rising cavities drive systematic gas motions which play an important role in heating the central regions, while mixing of lobe material is sub-dominant. Encouragingly, the main mechanisms responsible for this energy deposition can be modelled already at resolutions within reach in future, high-resolution cosmological simulations of galaxy clusters.