Astrophysics of Galaxies (astro-ph.GA)

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    Interstellar gas clouds are often both highly magnetized and supersonically turbulent, with velocity dispersions set by a competition between driving and dissipation. This balance has been studied extensively in the context of gases with constant mean density. However, many astrophysical systems are contracting under the influence of external pressure or gravity, and the balance between driving and dissipation in a contracting, magnetized medium has yet to be studied. In this paper we present three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of compression in a turbulent, magnetized medium that resembles the physical conditions inside molecular clouds. We find that in some circumstances the combination of compression and magnetic fields leads to a rate of turbulent dissipation far less than that observed in non-magnetized gas, or in non-compressing magnetized gas. As a result, a compressing, magnetized gas reaches an equilibrium velocity dispersion much greater than would be expected for either the hydrodynamic or the non-compressing case. We use the simulation results to construct an analytic model that gives an effective equation of state for a coarse-grained parcel of the gas, in the form of an ideal equation of state with a polytropic index that depends on the dissipation and energy transfer rates between the magnetic and turbulent components. We argue that the reduced dissipation rate and larger equilibrium velocity dispersion produced by compressing, magnetized turbulence has important implications for the driving and maintenance of turbulence in molecular clouds, and for the rates of chemical and radiative processes that are sensitive to shocks and dissipation.
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    We present an analysis of the height distributions of the different types of supernovae (SNe) from the plane of their host galaxies. We use a well-defined sample of 102 nearby SNe appeared inside high-inclined (i > 85 deg), morphologically non-disturbed S0-Sd host galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. For the first time, we show that in all the subsamples of spirals, the vertical distribution of core-collapse (CC) SNe is about twice closer to the plane of host disc than the distribution of SNe Ia. In Sb-Sc hosts, the exponential scale height of CC SNe is consistent with those of the younger stellar population in the Milky Way (MW) thin disc, while the scale height of SNe Ia is consistent with those of the old population in the MW thick disc. We show that the ratio of scale lengths to scale heights of the distribution of CC SNe is consistent with those of the resolved young stars with ages from ~ 10 Myr up to ~ 100 Myr in nearby edge-on galaxies and the unresolved stellar population of extragalactic thin discs. The corresponding ratio for SNe Ia is consistent with the same ratios of the two populations of resolved stars with ages from a few 100 Myr up to a few Gyr and from a few Gyr up to ~ 10 Gyr, as well as with the unresolved population of the thick disc. These results can be explained considering the age-scale height relation of the distribution of stellar population and the mean age difference between Type Ia and CC SNe progenitors.
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    Observational studies reveal that complex organic molecules (COMs) can be found in various objects associated with different star formation stages. The identification of COMs in prestellar cores, i.e., cold environments in which thermally induced chemistry can be excluded and radiolysis is limited by cosmic rays and cosmic ray induced UV-photons, is particularly important as this stage sets up the initial chemical composition from which ultimately stars and planets evolve. Recent laboratory results demonstrate that molecules as complex as glycolaldehyde and ethylene glycol are efficiently formed on icy dust grains via non-energetic atom addition reactions between accreting H atoms and CO molecules, a process that dominates surface chemistry during the 'CO-freeze out stage' in dense cores. In the present study we demonstrate that a similar mechanism results in the formation of the biologically relevant molecule glycerol - HOCH2CH(OH)CH2OH - a three-carbon bearing sugar alcohol necessary for the formation of membranes of modern living cells and organelles. Our experimental results are fully consistent with a suggested reaction scheme in which glycerol is formed along a chain of radical-radical and radical-molecule interactions between various reactive intermediates produced upon hydrogenation of CO ice or its hydrogenation products. The tentative identification of the chemically related simple sugar glyceraldehyde - HOCH2CH(OH)CHO - is discussed as well. These new laboratory findings indicate that the proposed reaction mechanism holds much potential to form even more complex sugar alcohols and simple sugars.
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    We will discuss some highlights concerning the chemical evolution of our Galaxy, the Milky Way. First we will describe the main ingredients necessary to build a model for the chemical evolution of the Milky Way. Then we will illustrate some Milky Way models which includes detailed stellar nucleosynthesis and compute the evolution of a large number of chemical elements, including C, N, O, $\alpha$-elements, Fe and heavier. The main observables and in particular the chemical abundances in stars and gas will be considered. A comparison theory-observations will follow and finally some conclusions from this astroarchaeological approach will be derived.
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    Matching members in the Coma cluster catalogue of ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs, Yagi et al. 2016) from SUBARU imaging with a very deep radio continuum survey source catalogue of the cluster (Miller et al. 2009) using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) within a rectangular region of ~ 1.19 square degrees centred on the cluster core reveals matches consistent with random. An overlapping set of 470 UDGs and 696 VLA radio sources in this rectangular area finds 33 matches within a separation of 25 arcsec; dividing the sample into bins with separations bounded by 5 arcsec, 10 arcsec, 20 arcsec and 25 arcsec finds 1, 4, 17 and 11 matches. An analytical model estimate, based on the Poisson probability distribution, of the number of randomly expected matches within these same separation bounds is 1.7, 4.9, 19.4 and 14.2, each respectively consistent with the 95 percent Poisson confidence intervals of the observed values. Dividing the data into five clustercentric annuli of 0.1 degree, and into the four separation bins, finds the same result. This random match of UDGs with VLA sources implies that UDGs are not radio galaxies by the standard definition. Those VLA sources having integrated flux > 1 mJy at 1.4 GHz in Miller et al. (2009) without SDSS galaxy matches are consistent with the known surface density of background radio sources. We briefly explore the possibility that some unresolved VLA sources near UDGs could be young, compact, bright, supernova remnants of type Ia events, possibly in the intracluster volume.
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    The 2Jy sample is a survey of radio galaxies with flux densities above 2 Jy at 2.7 GHz. As part of our ongoing work on the southern subset of 2Jy sources, in paper I of this series we analysed the X-ray cores of the complete 2Jy sample with redshifts 0.05<z<0.7. For this work we focus on the X-ray emission associated with the extended structures (jets, lobes, and environments) of the complete subset of 2Jy sources with 0.05<z<0.2, that we have observed with Chandra. We find that hotspots and jet knots are ubiquitous in FRII sources, which also inhabit systematically poorer environments than the FRI sources in our sample. Spectral fits of the hotspots with good X-ray statistics invariably show properties consistent with synchrotron emission, and we show that inverse-Compton mechanisms under-predict the X-ray emission we observe by 1-2 orders of magnitude. Inverse-Compton emission is detected from many of the lobes in our sample, and we find that the lobes of the FRII sources show magnetic fields lower by up to an order of magnitude than expected from equipartition extrapolations. This is consistent with previous results, which show that most FRII sources have electron energy densities higher than minimum energy requirements.
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    We describe a new method for identifying and characterizing the thermodynamic state of large samples of evolved galaxy groups at high redshifts using high-resolution, low-frequency radio surveys, such as those that will be carried out with LOFAR and the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). We identify a sub-population of morphologically regular powerful (FRII) radio galaxies and demonstrate that, for this sub-population, the internal pressure of the radio lobes is a reliable tracer of the external intragroup/intracluster medium (ICM) pressure, and that the assumption of a universal pressure profile for relaxed groups enables the total mass and X-ray luminosity to be estimated. Using a sample of well-studied FRII radio galaxies, we demonstrate that our method enables the estimation of group/cluster X-ray luminosities over three orders of magnitude in luminosity to within a factor of ~2 from low-frequency radio properties alone. Our method could provide a powerful new tool for building samples of thousands of evolved galaxy groups at z>1 and characterizing their ICM.
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    As part of the Accretion Discs in H$\alpha$ with OmegaCAM (ADHOC) survey, we imaged in r, i and H-alpha a region of 12x8 square degrees around the Orion Nebula Cluster. Thanks to the high-quality photometry obtained, we discovered three well-separated pre-main sequences in the color-magnitude diagram. The populations are all concentrated towards the cluster's center. Although several explanations can be invoked to explain these sequences we are left with two competitive, but intriguing, scenarios: a population of unresolved binaries with an exotic mass ratio distribution or three populations with different ages. Independent high-resolution spectroscopy supports the presence of discrete episodes of star formation, each separated by about a million years. The stars from the two putative youngest populations rotate faster than the older ones, in agreement with the evolution of stellar rotation observed in pre-main sequence stars younger than 4 Myr in several star forming regions. Whatever the final explanation, our results prompt for a revised look at the formation mode and early evolution of stars in clusters.
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    We use a newly assembled large sample of 3,545 star-forming galaxies with secure spectroscopic, grism, and photometric redshifts at z=1.5-2.5 to constrain the relationship between UV slope (beta) and dust attenuation (L(IR)/L(UV)=IRX). Our sample benefits from the combination of deep Hubble WFC3/UVIS photometry from the Hubble Deep UV (HDUV) Legacy survey and existing photometric data compiled in the 3D-HST survey, and extends the range of UV luminosity and beta probed in previous UV-selected samples. IRX is measured using stacks of deep Herschel/PACS 100 and 160 micron data, and the results are compared with predictions of the IRX-beta relation for different assumptions of the stellar population model and obscuration curve. We find that z=1.5-2.5 galaxies have an IRX-beta relation that is consistent with the predictions for an SMC extinction curve if we invoke sub-solar metallicity models that are currently favored for high-redshift galaxies, while the commonly assumed starburst attenuation curve over-predicts the IRX at a given beta by a factor of ~3. The IRX of high-mass (M*>10^9.75 Msun) galaxies is a factor of >4 larger than that of low-mass galaxies, lending support for the use of stellar mass as a proxy for attenuation. The commonly observed trend of fainter galaxies having bluer beta may simply reflect bluer intrinsic UV slopes for such galaxies, rather than lower obscurations. The IRX-beta for young/low-mass galaxies implies a dust curve that is steeper than the SMC, suggesting a lower attenuation at a given beta relative to older/more massive galaxies. The lower attenuations and higher ionizing photon output implied by low metallicity stellar population models point to Lyman continuum production efficiencies, xi_ion, that may be elevated by a factor of ~2 relative to the canonical value for L* galaxies, aiding in their ability to keep the universe ionized at z~2. [Abridged]
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    We analyse Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of a set of galaxy clusters selected by the South Pole Telescope using a new publicly-available forward-modelling projection code, MBPROJ2, assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. By fitting a powerlaw plus constant entropy model we find no evidence for a central entropy floor in the lowest-entropy systems. A model of the underlying central entropy distribution shows a narrow peak close to zero entropy which accounts for 70 per cent of the systems, and a second broader peak around 100 keV cm^2. We look for evolution over the 0.28 to 1.2 redshift range of the sample in density, pressure, entropy and cooling time at 0.015 R500 and at 10 kpc radius. By modelling the evolution of the central quantities with a simple model, we find no evidence for a non-zero slope with redshift. In addition, a non-parametric sliding median shows no significant change. The fraction of cool-core clusters with central cooling times below 2 Gyr is consistent above and below z=0.6 (~30-40 per cent). Both by comparing the median thermodynamic profiles in two redshift bins, and by modelling the evolution of the average profile as a function of redshift, we find no significant evolution beyond self-similar scaling in any of our examined quantities. Our average modelled radial density, entropy and cooling-time profiles appear as powerlaws with breaks around 0.2 R500. The dispersion in these quantities rises inwards of this radius to around 0.4 dex, although some of this scatter can be fit by a bimodal model.
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    Measurements of the nearby pulsars Geminga and B0656+14 by the HAWC and Milagro telescopes have revealed the presence of bright TeV-emitting halos surrounding these objects. If young and middle-aged pulsars near the Galactic Center transfer a similar fraction of their energy into TeV photons, then these sources could dominate the emission that is observed by HESS and other ground-based telescopes from the innermost ~10^2 parsecs of the Milky Way. In particular, both the spectral shape and the angular extent of this emission is consistent with TeV halos produced by a population of pulsars. The overall flux of this emission requires a birth rate of ~100-1000 neutron stars per Myr near the Galactic Center, in good agreement with recent estimates.
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    Numerical simulations have become a necessary tool to describe the complex interactions among the different processes involved in galaxy formation and evolution, unfeasible via an analytic approach. The last decade has seen a great effort by the scientific community in improving the sub-grid physics modelling and the numerical techniques used to make numerical simulations more predictive. Although the recently publicly available code GIZMO has proven to be successful in reproducing galaxy properties when coupled with the model of the MUFASA simulations and the more sophisticated prescriptions of the FIRE setup, it has not been tested yet using delayed cooling supernova feedback, which still represent a reasonable approach for large cosmological simulations, for which detailed sub-grid models are prohibitive. In order to limit the computational cost and to be able to resolve the disc structure in the galaxies we perform a suite of zoom-in cosmological simulations with rather low resolution centred around a sub-L* galaxy with a halo mass of $3\times 10^{11}\,\rm M_\odot$ at $z=0$, to investigate the ability of this simple model, coupled with the new hydrodynamic method of GIZMO, to reproduce observed galaxy scaling relations (stellar to halo mass, stellar and baryonic Tully-fisher, stellar mass-metallicity and mass-size). We find that the results are in good agreement with the main scaling relations, except for the total stellar mass, larger than that predicted by the abundance matching technique, and the effective sizes for the most massive galaxies in the sample, which are too small.