Astrophysics of Galaxies (astro-ph.GA)

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    Accurate measurement of galaxy structures is a prerequisite for quantitative investigation of galaxy properties or evolution. Yet, the impact of galaxy inclination and dust on commonly used metrics of galaxy structure is poorly quantified. We use infrared data sets to select inclination-independent samples of disc and flattened elliptical galaxies. These samples show strong variation in Sérsic index, concentration, and half-light radii with inclination. We develop novel inclination-independent galaxy structures by collapsing the light distribution in the near-infrared on to the major axis, yielding inclination-independent `linear' measures of size and concentration. With these new metrics we select a sample of Milky Way analogue galaxies with similar stellar masses, star formation rates, sizes and concentrations. Optical luminosities, light distributions, and spectral properties are all found to vary strongly with inclination: When inclining to edge-on, $r$-band luminosities dim by $>$1 magnitude, sizes decrease by a factor of 2, `dust-corrected' estimates of star formation rate drop threefold, metallicities decrease by 0.1 dex, and edge-on galaxies are half as likely to be classified as star forming. These systematic effects should be accounted for in analyses of galaxy properties.
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    Context. Ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs) are stellar systems displaying colours and metallicities between those of globular clusters (GCs) and early-type dwarf galaxies, as well as sizes of Reff <= 100 pc and luminosities in the range -13.5 < MV < -11 mag. Although their origin is still subject of debate, the most popular scenarios suggest that they are massive star clusters or the nuclei of tidally stripped dwarf galaxies. Aims. NGC 5044 is the central massive elliptical galaxy of the NGC 5044 group. Its GC/UCD system is completely unexplored. Methods. In Gemini+GMOS deep images of several fields around NGC 5044 and in spectroscopic multi-object data of one of these fields, we detected an unresolved source with g'~20.6 mag, compatible with being an UCD. Its radial velocity was obtained with FXCOR and the penalized pixel-fitting (pPXF) code. To study its stellar population content, we measured the Lick/IDS indices and compared them with predictions of single stellar population models, and we used the full spectral fitting technique. Results. The spectroscopic analysis of the UCD revealed a radial velocity that agrees with the velocity of the elliptical galaxy NGC 5044. From the Lick/IDS indices, we have obtained a luminosity-weighted age and metallicity of 11.7+/-1.4 Gyr and [Z/H] = -0.79 +/- 0.04 dex, respectively, as well as [alpha/Fe] = 0.30 +/- 0.06. From the full spectral fitting technique, we measured a lower age (8.52 Gyr) and a similar total metallicity ([Z/H] = -0.86 dex). Conclusions. Our results indicate that NGC 5044-UCD1 is most likely an extreme GC (MV ~ -12.5 mag) belonging to the GC system of the elliptical galaxy NGC 5044.
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    The propagation of cosmic rays in turbulent magnetic fields is a diffusive process driven by the scattering of the charged particles by random magnetic fluctuations. Such fields are usually highly intermittent, consisting of intense magnetic filaments and ribbons surrounded by weaker, unstructured fluctuations. Studies of cosmic ray propagation have largely overlooked intermittency, instead relying on Gaussian random magnetic fields. Using test particle simulations, we investigate cosmic ray diffusivity in intermittent, dynamo-generated magnetic fields. The results are compared with those obtained from non-intermittent magnetic fields having identical power spectra. The presence of magnetic intermittency significantly enhances cosmic ray diffusion over a wide range of particle energies. We demonstrate that the results can be interpreted in terms of a correlated random walk.
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    Vibration-rotation lines of H$_{2}$ from highly excited levels approaching the dissociation limit have been detected at a number of locations in the shocked gas of the Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC-1), including in a Herbig-Haro object near the tip of one of the OMC-1 "fingers." Population diagrams show that while the excited H$_{2}$ is almost entirely at a kinetic temperature of $\sim$1,800 K, (typical for vibrationally shock-excited H$_{2}$), as in the previously reported case of Herbig-Haro object HH 7 up to a few percent of the H$_{2}$ is at a kinetic temperature of $\sim$5,000~K. The location with the largest fraction of hot H$_{2}$ is the Herbig-Haro object, where the outflowing material is moving at a higher speed than at the other locations. Although theoretical work is required for a better understanding of the 5,000 K H$_{2}$, (including how it cools), its existence and the apparent dependence of its abundance relative to that of the cooler component on the relative velocities of the outflow and the surrounding ambient gas appear broadly consistent with it having recently reformed. The existence of this high temperature H$_{2}$ appears to be a common characteristic of shock-excited molecular gas.
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    We investigate the far-infrared properties of galaxies selected via deep, narrow-band imaging of the H$\alpha$ emission line in four redshift slices from $z=0.40$--$2.23$ over $\sim 1$deg$^2$ as part of the High-redshift Emission Line Survey (HiZELS). We use a stacking approach in the Herschel PACS/SPIRE bands, along with $850\,\mu$m imaging from SCUBA-2 to study the evolution of the dust properties of H$\alpha$-emitters selected above an evolving characteristic luminosity threshold, $0.2L^\star_{{\rm H}\alpha}(z)$. We investigate the relationship between the dust temperatures and the far-infrared luminosities of our stacked samples, finding that H$\alpha$-selection identifies cold, low-$L_{\rm IR}$ galaxies ($T_{\rm dust}\sim 14$k; $\log[L_{\rm IR}/{\rm L}_\odot]\sim 9.9$) at $z=0.40$, and more luminous, warmer systems ($T_{\rm dust}\sim 34$k; $\log[L_{\rm IR}/{\rm L}_\odot]\sim 11.5$) at $z=2.23$. Using a modified greybody model, we estimate "characteristic sizes" for the dust-emitting regions of HiZELS galaxies of $\sim 0.5$kpc, nearly an order of magnitude smaller than their stellar continuum sizes, which may provide indirect evidence of clumpy ISM structure. Lastly, we measure the dust masses from our far-IR SEDs along with metallicity-dependent gas-to-dust ratios ($\delta_{\rm GDR}$) to measure typical molecular gas masses of $\sim 10^{10}$M$_\odot$ for these bright H$\alpha$-emitters. The gas depletion timescales are shorter than the Hubble time at each redshift, suggesting probable replenishment of their gas reservoirs from the intergalactic medium. Based on the number density of H$\alpha$-selected galaxies, we find that typical star-forming galaxies brighter than $0.2L^{\star}_{{\rm H}\alpha}(z)$ host a significant fraction ($35\pm10$%) of the total gas content of the Universe, consistent with the predictions of the latest cosmological simulations.
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    We explore the correlations between velocity and metallicity and the possible distinct chemical signatures of the velocity over-densities of the local Galactic neighbourhood. We use the large spectroscopic survey RAVE and the Geneva Copenhagen Survey. We compare the metallicity distribution of regions in the velocity plane ($v_R,v_\phi$) with that of their symmetric counterparts ($-v_R,v_\phi$). We expect similar metallicity distributions if there are no tracers of a sub-population (e.g., a dispersed cluster, accreted stars), if the disk of the Galaxy is axisymmetric, and if the orbital effects of the bar and the spiral arms are weak. We find that the metallicity-velocity space of the solar neighbourhood is highly patterned. A large fraction of the velocity plane shows differences in the metallicity distribution when comparing symmetric $v_R$ regions. The typical differences in the median metallicity are of $0.05$ dex with statistical significance of at least $95\%$, and with values up to $0.6$ dex. Stars moving with low azimuthal velocity $v_\phi$ and outwards in the Galaxy have on average higher metallicity than those moving inwards. These include stars in the Hercules and Hyades moving groups and other velocity branch-like structures. For higher $v_\phi$, the stars moving inwards have higher metallicity than those moving outwards. The most likely interpretation of the metallicity asymmetry is that it is due to the orbital effects of the Galactic bar and the radial metallicity gradient of the disk. We present a simulation that supports this idea. We have also discovered a positive gradient in $v_\phi$ with respect to metallicity at high metallicities, apart from the two known positive and negative gradients for the thin and thick disks, respectively.
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    We carried out the deep spectroscopic observations of the nearby cluster A2151 with AF2/WYFFOS@WHT. The caustic technique enables us to identify 360 members brighter than $M_r = -16$ and within 1.3$R_{200}$. We separated the members into subsamples according to photometrical and dynamical properties such as colour, local environment and infall time. The completeness of the catalogue and our large sample allow us to analyse the velocity dispersion and the luminosity functions of the identified populations. We found evidence of a cluster still in its collapsing phase. The LF of the red population of A2151 shows a deficit of dwarf red galaxies. Moreover, the normalized LFs of the red and blue populations of A2151 are comparable to the red and blue LFs of the field, even if the blue galaxies start dominating one magnitude fainter and the red LF is well represented by a single Schechter function rather than a double Schechter function. We discuss how the evolution of cluster galaxies depends on their mass: bright and intermediate galaxies are mainly affected by dynamical friction and internal/mass quenching, while the evolution of dwarfs is driven by environmental processes which need time and a hostile cluster environment to remove the gas reservoirs and halt the star formation.
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    A large fraction of active galactic nuclei (AGN) are "invisible" in extant optical surveys due to either distance or dust-obscuration. The existence of this large population of dust-obscured, infrared-bright AGN is predicted by models of galaxy - supermassive black hole coevolution and is required to explain the observed X-ray and infrared backgrounds. Recently, infrared colour-cuts with WISE have identified a portion of this missing population. However, as the host galaxy brightness relative to that of the AGN increases, it becomes increasingly difficult to differentiate between infrared emission originating from the AGN and from its host galaxy. As a solution, we have developed a new method to select obscured AGN using their 20 cm continuum emission to identify the objects as AGN. We created the resulting Invisible AGN Catalogue by selecting objects that are detected in AllWISE (mid-IR) and FIRST (20 cm), but are not detected in SDSS (optical) or 2MASS (near-IR), producing a final catalogue of 46,258 objects. 30 per cent of the objects are selected by existing selection methods, while the remaining 70 per cent represent a potential previously-unidentified population of candidate AGN that are missed by mid-infrared colour cuts. Additionally, by relying on a radio continuum detection, this technique is efficient at detecting radio-loud AGN at z > 0.29, regardless of their level of dust obscuration or their host galaxy's relative brightness.
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    The Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) project explores the role of feedback in cosmological simulations of galaxy formation. Previous FIRE simulations used an identical source code (FIRE-1) for consistency. Now, motivated by the development of more accurate numerics (hydrodynamic solvers, gravitational softening, supernova coupling) and the exploration of new physics (e.g. magnetic fields), we introduce FIRE-2, an updated numerical implementation of FIRE physics for the GIZMO code. We run a suite of simulations and show FIRE-2 improvements do not qualitatively change galaxy-scale properties relative to FIRE-1. We then pursue an extensive study of numerics versus physics in galaxy simulations. Details of the star-formation (SF) algorithm, cooling physics, and chemistry have weak effects, provided that we include metal-line cooling and SF occurs at higher-than-mean densities. We present several new resolution criteria for high-resolution galaxy simulations. Most galaxy-scale properties are remarkably robust to the numerics that we test, provided that: (1) Toomre masses (cold disk scale heights) are resolved; (2) feedback coupling ensures conservation and isotropy, and (3) individual supernovae are time-resolved. As resolution increases, stellar masses and profiles converge first, followed by metal abundances and visual morphologies, then properties of winds and the circumgalactic medium. The central (~kpc) mass concentration of massive (L*) galaxies is sensitive to numerics, particularly how winds ejected into hot halos are trapped, mixed, and recycled into the galaxy. Multiple feedback mechanisms are required to reproduce observations: SNe regulate stellar masses; OB/AGB mass loss fuels late-time SF; radiative feedback suppresses instantaneous SFRs and accretion onto dwarfs. We provide tables, initial conditions, and the numerical algorithms required to reproduce our simulations.
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    In two recent arXiv postings, Maji et al. argue against the existence of a spatially thin, kinematically coherent Disk of Satellites (DoS) around the Milky Way (MW), and suggest that the DoS is "maybe a misinterpretation of the data". These claims are in stark contrast to previous works, and indeed we show that the conclusions of Maji et al. do not hold up to scrutiny. They lack a statistical basis since no attempts have been made to measure the significance of the found satellite alignments, observational biases have been ignored, and measurement errors such as for proper motions have not been considered. When interpreting their hydrodynamic cosmological simulation by comparing it with an alternative model of isotropically distributed satellite velocities, we find no evidence for a significant kinematic coherence among the simulated satellite galaxies, in contrast to the observed MW system. We furthermore discuss general problems faced by attempts to determine the dynamical stability of the DoS via orbit integrations of MW satellite galaxies.
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    We use adaptive-mesh magnetohydrodynamic simulations to study the effect of magnetic fields on ram pressure stripping of galaxies in the intracluster medium (ICM). Although the magnetic pressure in typical clusters is not strong enough to affect the gas mass loss rate from galaxies, magnetic fields can affect the morphology of stripped galaxies. ICM magnetic fields are draped around orbiting galaxies and aligned with their stripped tails. Magnetic fields suppress shear instabilities at the galaxy-ICM interface, and magnetized tails are smoother and narrower than tails in comparable hydrodynamic simulations in Vijayaraghavan & Ricker (2015). Orbiting galaxies stretch and amplify ICM magnetic fields, amplifying magnetic power spectra on $10 - 100$ kpc scales. Galaxies inject turbulent kinetic energy into the ICM via their turbulent wakes and $g$-waves. The magnetic energy and kinetic energy in the ICM increase up to $1.5 - 2$ Gyr of evolution, after which galaxies are stripped of most of their gas, and do not have sufficiently large gaseous cross sections to further amplify magnetic fields and inject turbulent kinetic energy. The increase in turbulent pressure due to galaxy stripping and generation of $g$-waves results in an increase in the turbulent volume fraction of the ICM. This turbulent kinetic energy is not a significant contributor to the overall ICM energy budget, but greatly impacts the evolution of the ICM magnetic field. Additionally, the effect of galaxies on magnetic fields can potentially be observed in high resolution Faraday rotation measure (RM) maps as small scale fluctuations in the RM structure.
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    Star formation in our Galaxy occurs in molecular clouds that are self-gravitating, highly turbulent, and magnetized. We study the conditions under which cloud cores inherit large-scale magnetic field morphologies and how the field is governed by cloud turbulence. We present four moving-mesh simulations of supersonic, turbulent, isothermal, self-gravitating gas with a range of magnetic mean-field strengths characterized by the Alfvénic Mach number $\mathcal{M}_{{\rm A}, 0}$, resolving pre-stellar core formation from parsec to a few AU scales. In our simulations with the turbulent kinetic energy density dominating over magnetic pressure ($\mathcal{M}_{{\rm A}, 0}>1$), we find that the collapse is approximately isotropic with $B\propto\rho^{2/3}$, core properties are similar regardless of initial mean-field strength, and the field direction on $100$ AU scales is uncorrelated with the mean field. However, in the case of a dominant large-scale magnetic field ($\mathcal{M}_{{\rm A}, 0}=0.35$), the collapse is anisotropic with $B\propto\rho^{1/2}$. This transition at $\mathcal{M}_{{\rm A}, 0}\sim1$ is not expected to be sharp, but clearly signifies two different paths for magnetic field evolution in star formation. Based on observations of different star forming regions, we conclude that star formation in the interstellar medium may occur in both regimes. Magnetic field correlation with the mean-field extends to smaller scales as $\mathcal{M}_{{\rm A}, 0}$ decreases, making future ALMA observations useful for constraining $\mathcal{M}_{{\rm A}, 0}$ of the interstellar medium.
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    Motivated by the stellar fossil record of Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies, we show that the star-forming ancestors of the faintest ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (UFDs; ${\rm M}_{\rm V}$ $\sim -2$ or ${\rm M}_{\star}$ $\sim 10^{2}$ at $z=0$) had ultra-violet (UV) luminosities of ${\rm M}_{\rm UV}$ $\sim -3$ to $-6$ during reionization ($z\sim6-10$). The existence of such faint galaxies has substantial implications for early epochs of galaxy formation and reionization. If the faint-end slopes of the UV luminosity functions (UVLFs) during reionization are steep ($\alpha\lesssim-2$) to ${\rm M}_{\rm UV}$ $\sim -3$, then: (i) the ancestors of UFDs produced $>50$% of UV flux from galaxies; (ii) galaxies can maintain reionization with escape fractions that are $>$2 times lower than currently-adopted values; (iii) direct HST and JWST observations may detect only $\sim10-50$% of the UV light from galaxies; (iv) the cosmic star formation history increases by $\gtrsim4-6$ at $z\gtrsim6$. Significant flux from UFDs, and resultant tensions with LG dwarf galaxy counts, are reduced if the high-redshift UVLF turns over. Independent of the UVLF shape, the existence of a large population of UFDs requires a non-zero luminosity function to ${\rm M}_{\rm UV}$ $\sim -3$ during reionization.
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    In this paper, we use stacking analysis to trace the mass-growth, colour evolution, and structural evolution of present-day massive galaxies ($\log(M_{*}/M_{\odot})=11.5$) out to $z=5$. We utilize the exceptional depth and area of the latest UltraVISTA data release, combined with the depth and unparalleled seeing of CANDELS to gather a large, mass-selected sample of galaxies in the NIR (rest-frame optical to UV). Progenitors of present-day massive galaxies are identified via an evolving cumulative number density selection, which accounts for the effects of merging to correct for the systematic biases introduced using a fixed cumulative number density selection, and find progenitors grow in stellar mass by $\approx1.5~\mathrm{dex}$ since $z=5$. Using stacking, we analyze the structural parameters of the progenitors and find that most of the stellar mass content in the central regions was in place by $z\sim2$, and while galaxies continue to assemble mass at all radii, the outskirts experience the largest fractional increase in stellar mass. However, we find evidence of significant stellar mass build up at $r<3~\mathrm{kpc}$ beyond $z>4$ probing an era of significant mass assembly in the interiors of present day massive galaxies. We also compare mass assembly from progenitors in this study to the EAGLE simulation and find qualitatively similar assembly with $z$ at $r<3~\mathrm{kpc}$. We identify $z\sim1.5$ as a distinct epoch in the evolution of massive galaxies where progenitors transitioned from growing in mass and size primarily through in-situ star formation in disks to a period of efficient growth in $r_{e}$ consistent with the minor merger scenario.
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    Since the beginning of the new millennium, more than 100 $z\sim 6$ quasars have been discovered through several surveys and followed-up with multi-wavelength observations. These data provided a large amount of information on the growth of supermassive black holes at the early epochs, the properties of quasar host galaxies and the joint formation and evolution of these massive systems. We review the properties of the highest-$z$ quasars known so far, especially focusing on some of the most recent results obtained in (sub-)millimeter bands. We discuss key observational challenges and open issues in theoretical models and highlight possible new strategies to improve our understanding of the galaxy-black hole formation and evolution in the early Universe.