Earth and Planetary Astrophysics (astro-ph.EP)

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    The spiral waves detected in the protostellar disc surrounding Elias 2-27 have been suggested as evidence of the disc being gravitationally unstable. However, previous work has shown that a massive, stable disc undergoing an encounter with a massive companion are also consistent with the observations. We compare the spiral morphology of smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations modelling both cases. The gravitationally unstable disc produces symmetric, tightly wound spiral arms with constant pitch angle, as predicted by the literature. The companion disc's arms are asymmetric, with pitch angles that increase with radius. However, these arms are not well-fitted by standard analytic expressions, due to the high disc mass and relatively low companion mass. We note that differences (or indeed similarities) in morphology between pairs of spirals is a crucial discriminant between scenarios for Elias 2-27, and hence future studies must fit spiral arms individually. If Elias 2-27 continues to show symmetric tightly wound spiral arms in future observations, then we posit that it is the first observed example of a gravitationally unstable protostellar disc.
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    Recently, Will calculated an additional contribution to the Mercury's precession of the longitude of perihelion $\varpi$ of the order of $\dot\varpi_\textrm{W}\simeq 0.22$ $\textrm{milliarcseconds per century}$ ($\textrm{mas cty}^{-1}$). To a level which is not explicitly quantified, $\dot\varpi_\textrm{W}$ is partly a direct consequence of certain 1pN third-body accelerations entering the planetary equations of motion, and partly an indirect, mixed effect due to the simultaneous interplay of the standard 1pN pointlike acceleration of the primary with the Newtonian $N$-body acceleration, to the quadrupole order, in the analytical calculation of the secular perihelion precession with the Gauss equations. We critically discuss the actual measurability of the mixed effects with respect to direct ones. The current uncertainties in either the magnitude of the Sun's angular momentum $S_\odot$ and the orientation of its spin axis ${\boldsymbol{\hat{S}}}_\odot$ impact the precessions $\dot\varpi_{J_2^\odot},~\dot\varpi_\textrm{LT}$ induced by the Sun's quadrupole mass moment and angular momentum via the Lense-Thirring effect to a level which makes almost impossible to measure $\dot\varpi_\textrm{W}$ even in the hypothesis that it comes entirely from the aforementioned 1pN third-body accelerations. On the other hand, from the point of view of the Lense-Thirring effect itself, the mismodeled quadrupolar precession $\delta\dot\varpi_{J_2^\odot}$ due to the uncertainties in ${\boldsymbol{\hat{S}}}_\odot$ corresponds to a bias of $\simeq 9\%$ of the relativistic one. The resulting simulated mismodeled range and range-rate times series of BepiColombo are at about the per cent level of the nominal gravitomagnetic ones.
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    The characterization of planetary atmospheres is a daunting task, pushing current observing facilities to their limits. The next generation of high-resolution spectrographs mounted on large telescopes -- such as ESPRESSO@VLT and HIRES@ELT -- will allow us to probe and characterize exoplanetary atmospheres in greater detail than possible to this point. We present a method that permits the recovery of the colour-dependent reflectivity of exoplanets from high-resolution spectroscopic observations. Determining the wavelength-dependent albedo will provide insight into the chemical properties and weather of the exoplanet atmospheres. For this work, we simulated ESPRESSO@VLT and HIRES@ELT high-resolution observations of known planetary systems with several albedo configurations. We demonstrate how the cross correlation technique applied to theses simulated observations can be used to successfully recover the geometric albedo of exoplanets over a range of wavelengths. In all cases, we were able to recover the wavelength dependent albedo of the simulated exoplanets and distinguish between several atmospheric models representing different atmospheric configurations. In brief, we demonstrate that the cross correlation technique allows for the recovery of exoplanetary albedo functions from optical observations with the next generation of high-resolution spectrographs that will be mounted on large telescopes with reasonable exposure times. Its recovery will permit the characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres in terms of composition and dynamics and consolidates the cross correlation technique as a powerful tool for exoplanet characterization.
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    We perform a suite of radiation hydrodynamics simulations of photoevaporating disks with varying the metallicity in a wide range of $10^{-3} \, Z_\odot \leq Z \leq 10^{0.5} \, Z_\odot $. We follow the disk evolution for over $\sim 5000$ years by solving hydrodynamics, radiative transfer, and non-equilibrium chemistry. Our chemistry model is updated from the first paper of this series by adding X-ray ionization and heating. We study the metallicity dependence of the disk photoevaporation rate and examine the importance of X-ray radiation. In the fiducial case with solar metallicity, including the X-ray effects does not significantly increase the photoevaporation rate when compared to the case with ultra-violet (UV) radiation only. At sub-solar metallicities in the range of $Z \gtrsim 10^{-1.5} \, Z_\odot $, the photoevaporation rate increases as metallicity decreases owing to the reduced opacity of the disk medium. The result is consistent with the observational trend that disk lifetimes are shorter in low metallicity environments. Contrastingly, the photoevaporation rate decreases at even lower metallicities of $Z \lesssim 10^{-1.5} \, Z_\odot $, because dust-gas collisional cooling remains efficient compared to far UV photoelectric heating whose efficiency depends on metallicity. The net cooling in the interior of the disk suppresses the photoevaporation. However, adding X-ray radiation significantly increases the photoevaporation rate, especially at $Z \sim 10^{-2}\, Z_\odot$. Although the X-ray radiation itself does not drive strong photoevaporative flows, X-rays penetrate deep into the neutral region in the disk, increase the ionization degree there, and reduce positive charges of grains. Consequently, the effect of photoelectric heating by far UV radiation is strengthened by the X-rays and enhances the disk photoevaporation.
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    Shock waves and the associated phenomena generated by strongly ablating meteoroids with sizes greater than a few millimeters in the lower transitional flow regime of the Earth's atmosphere are the least explored aspect of meteor science. In this paper, we present a comprehensive review of literature covering meteor generated shock wave phenomena, from the aspect of both meteor science and hypersonic gas dynamics. The primary emphasis of this review is placed on the mechanisms and dynamics of the meteor shock waves. We discuss key aspects of both shock generation and propagation, including the great importance of the hydrodynamic shielding that develops around the meteoroid. In addition to this in-depth review, the discussion is extended to an overview of meteoroid fragmentation, followed by airburst type events associated with large, deep penetrating meteoroids. This class of objects has a significant potential to cause extensive material damage and even human casualties on the ground, and as such is of great interest to the planetary defense community. To date, no comprehensive model exists that accurately describes the flow field and shock wave formation of a strongly ablating meteoroid in the non-continuum flow regime. Thus, we briefly present the current state of numerical models that describe the comparatively slower flow of air over non-ablating bodies in the rarefied regime. In respect to the elusive nature of meteor generated shock wave detection, we also discuss relevant aspects and applications of meteor radar and infrasound studies as tools that can be utilized to study meteor shock waves and related phenomena.
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    The orientation and stability of the reconnection x-line in asymmetric geometry is studied using three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell simulations. We initiate reconnection at the center of a large simulation domain to minimize the boundary effect. The resulting x-line has sufficient freedom to develop along an optimal orientation, and it remains laminar. Companion 2D simulations indicate that this x-line orientation maximizes the reconnection rate. The divergence of the non-gyrotropic pressure tensor breaks the frozen-in condition, consistent with its 2D counterpart. We then design 3D simulations with one dimension being short to fix the x-line orientation, but long enough to allow the growth of the fastest growing oblique tearing modes. This numerical experiment suggests that reconnection tends to radiate secondary oblique tearing modes if it is externally (globally) forced to proceed along an orientation not favored by the local physics. The development of oblique structure easily leads to turbulence inside small periodic systems.
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    We conducted high-contrast polarimetry observations of T Tau in the H-band, using the HiCIAO instrument mounted on the Subaru Telescope, revealing structures as near as 0.$\arcsec$1 from the stars T Tau N and T Tau S. The whole T Tau system is found to be surrounded by nebula-like envelopes, and several outflow-related structures are detected in these envelopes. We analyzed the detailed polarization patterns of the circumstellar structures near each component of this triple young star system and determined constraints on the circumstellar disks and outflow structures. We suggest that the nearly face-on circumstellar disk of T Tau N is no larger than 0.$\arcsec$8, or 117 AU, in the northwest, based on the existence of a hole in this direction, and no larger than 0.$\arcsec$27, or 40 AU, in the south. A new structure "N5" extends to about 0.$\arcsec$42, or 59 AU, on the southwest of the star, believed to be part of the disk. We suggest that T Tau S is surrounded by a highly inclined circumbinary disk with a radius of about 0.$\arcsec$3, or 44 AU, with a position angle of about 30$^\circ$, that is misaligned with the orbit of the T Tau S binary. After analyzing the positions and polarization vector patterns of the outflow-related structures, we suggest that T Tau S should trigger the well-known E-W outflow, and is also likely to be responsible for a southwest precessing outflow "coil" and a possible south outflow.
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    Passing stars may play an important role in the evolution of our solar system. We search for close stellar encounters to the Sun among all 7.2 million stars in Gaia-DR2 that have six-dimensional phase space data. We characterize encounters by integrating their orbits through a Galactic potential and propagating the correlated uncertainties via a Monte Carlo resampling. After filtering to remove spurious data, we find 694 stars that have median (over uncertainties) closest encounter distances within 5 pc, all occurring within 15 Myr from now. 26 of these have at least a 50% chance of coming closer than 1 pc (and 7 within 0.5 pc), all but one of which are newly discovered here. We further confirm some and refute several other previously-identified encounters, confirming suspicions about their data. The closest encounter in the sample is Gl 710, which has a 95% probability of coming closer than 0.08 pc (17 000 AU). Using mass estimates from Gaia astrometry and multiband photometry for essentially all encounters, we find that Gl 710 also has the largest impulse on the Oort cloud. Using a Galaxy model we compute the completeness of the Gaia-DR2 encountering sample as a function of perihelion time and distance. Only 15% of encounters within 5 pc occurring within +/- 5 Myr of now have been identified, mostly due to the lack of radial velocities for faint and/or cool stars. Accounting for the incompleteness, we infer the present rate of encounters within 1 pc to be 20 +/- 2 per Myr, a quantity that scales quadratically with the encounter distance out to at least several pc.
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    A number of multiplanet systems are observed to contain planets very close to mean motion resonances, although there is no significant pileup of precise resonance pairs. We present theoretical and numerical studies on the outcome of capture into first-order mean motion resonances (MMRs) using a parametrized planet migration model that takes into account nonlinear eccentricity damping due to planet-disk interaction. This parametrization is based on numerical hydrodynamical simulations and is more realistic than the simple linear parametrization widely used in previous analytic studies. We find that nonlinear eccentricity damping can significantly influence the stability and outcome of resonance capture. In particular, the equilibrium eccentricity of the planet captured into MMRs become larger, and the captured MMR state tends to be more stable compared to the prediction based on the simple migration model. In addition, when the migration is sufficiently fast or/and the planet mass ratio is sufficiently small, we observe a novel phenomenon of eccentricity overshoot, where the planet's eccentricity becomes very large before settling down to the lower equilibrium value. This can lead to the ejection of the smaller planet if its eccentricity approaches unity during the overshoot. This may help explain the lack of low-mass planet companion of hot Jupiters when compared to warm Jupiters.
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    We search for signatures of a distant planet around the two-million-year-old classical T-Tauri star CI Tau hosting a hot Jupiter candidate (M_p sini ~ 8.1 M_Jupiter) in an eccentric orbit (e ~0.3). To probe the existence of an outer perturber, we reanalyzed 1.3 mm dust continuum observations of the protoplanetary disk around CI Tau obtained by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. We found a gap structure at ~0".8 in CI Tau's disk. Our visibility fitting assuming an axisymmetric surface brightness profile suggested that the gap is located at a deprojected radius of 104.5+/-1.6 au and has a width of 36.9+/-2.9 au. The brightness temperature around the gap was calculated to be ~2.3 K lower than that of the ambient disk. Gap-opening mechanisms such as secular gravitational instability and dust trapping can explain the gap morphology in the CI Tau disk. The scenario that an unseen planet created the observed gap structure cannot be ruled out, although the coexistence of an eccentric hot Jupiter and a distant planet around the young CI Tau would be challenging for gravitational scattering scenarios. The mass of the planet was estimated to be between ~0.25 M_Jupiter and ~0.8 M_Jupiter from the gap width and depth (0.41 +0.04/-0.06) in the modeled surface brightness image, which is lower than the current detection limits of high-contrast direct imaging. The young classical T-Tauri CI Tau may be a unique system to explore the existence of a potential distant planet as well as the origin of an eccentric hot Jupiter.
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    Secondary eclipse observations of ultra-hot Jupiters have found evidence that hydrogen is dissociated on their daysides. Additionally, full-phase light curve observations of ultra-hot Jupiters show a smaller day-night emitted flux contrast than that expected from previous theory. Recently, it was proposed by Bell & Cowan (2018) that the heat intake to dissociate hydrogen and heat release due to recombination of dissociated hydrogen can affect the atmospheric circulation of ultra-hot Jupiters. In this work, we add cooling/heating due to dissociation/recombination into the analytic theory of Komacek & Showman (2016) and Zhang & Showman (2017) for the dayside-nightside temperature contrasts of hot Jupiters. We find that at high values of incident stellar flux, the day-night temperature contrast of ultra-hot Jupiters may decrease with increasing incident stellar flux due to dissociation/recombination, the opposite of that expected without including the effects of dissociation/recombination. We propose that a combination of a greater number of full-phase light curve observations of ultra-hot Jupiters and future General Circulation Models that include the effects of dissociation/recombination could determine in detail how the atmospheric circulation of ultra-hot Jupiters differs from that of cooler planets.

Recent comments

C. Jess Riedel Jul 04 2017 21:26 UTC

Even if we kickstart evolution with bacteria, the amount of time until we are capable of von Neumann probes is almost certainly too small for this to be relevant. See for instance [Armstrong & Sandberg](http://www.sciencedirect.com.proxy.lib.uwaterloo.ca/science/article/pii/S0094576513001148). It

...(continued)
xecehim Jun 27 2017 15:03 UTC

It has been [published][1]

[1]: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10509-016-2911-0

wiadealo Nov 07 2016 09:27 UTC

Is it [fantasy][1] or real?

[1]: http://buchderfarben.de

climaiw Sep 12 2016 16:19 UTC

I would suggest planets where life can really make a difference.

resodiat Aug 23 2016 13:00 UTC

That is really a long-term perspective.