Earth and Planetary Astrophysics (astro-ph.EP)

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    Detection of a planetary ring of exoplanets remains as one of the most attractive but challenging goals in the field. We present a methodology of a systematic search for exoplanetary rings via transit photometry of long-period planets. The methodology relies on a precise integration scheme we develop to compute a transit light curve of a ringed planet. We apply the methodology to 89 long-period planet candidates from the Kepler data so as to estimate, and/or set upper limits on, the parameters of possible rings. While a majority of our samples do not have a sufficiently good signal-to-noise ratio for meaningful constraints on ring parameters, we find that six systems with a higher signal-to-noise ratio are inconsistent with the presence of a ring larger than 1.5 times the planetary radius assuming a grazing orbit and a tilted ring. Furthermore, we identify five preliminary candidate systems whose light curves exhibit ring-like features. After removing four false positives due to the contamination from nearby stars, we identify KIC 10403228 as a reasonable candidate for a ringed planet. A systematic parameter fit of its light curve with a ringed planet model indicates two possible solutions corresponding to a Saturn-like planet with a tilted ring. There also remain other two possible scenarios accounting for the data; a circumstellar disk and a hierarchical triple. Due to large uncertain factors, we cannot choose one specific model among the three.
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    We use simulated planetary systems to model the planet multiplicity of Kepler stars. Previous studies have underproduced single planet systems and invoked the so called Kepler dichotomy, where the planet forming ability of a Kepler star is dichotomous, producing either few or many transiting planets. In this paper we show that the Kepler dichotomy is only required when the inner part of planetary disks are just assumed to be flared. When the inner part of planetary disks are flat, we reproduce the observed planet multiplicity of Kepler stars without the need to invoke a dichotomy. We find that independent of the disk model assumed, the mean number of planets per star is approximately 2 for orbital periods between 3 and 200 days, and for planetary radii between 1 and 5 Earth radii. This contrasts with the Solar System where no planets occupy the same parameter space.
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    The $\kappa$-mechanism has been successful in explaining the origin of observed oscillations of many types of "classical" pulsating variable stars. Here we examine quantitatively if that same process is prominent enough to excite the potential global oscillations within Jupiter, whose energy flux is powered by gravitational collapse rather than nuclear fusion. Additionally, we examine whether external radiative forcing, i.e. starlight, could be a driver for global oscillations in hot Jupiters orbiting various main-sequence stars at defined orbital semimajor axes. Using planetary models generated by the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) and nonadiabatic oscillation calculations, we confirm that Jovian oscillations cannot be driven via the $\kappa$-mechanism. However, we do show that in hot Jupiters oscillations can likely be excited via the suppression of radiative cooling due to external radiation given a large enough stellar flux and the absence of a significant oscillatory damping zone within the planet. This trend seems to not be dependent on the planetary mass. In future observations we can thus expect that such planets may be pulsating, thereby giving greater insight into the internal structure of these bodies.
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    Chondrules are primitive materials in the Solar System. They are formed in the first about 3 Myr of the Solar System's history. This timescale is longer than that of Mars formation, and it is conceivable that protoplanets, planetesimals and chondrules might have existed simultaneously in the solar nebula. Due to protoplanets perturbation on the planetesimal dynamics and chondrule accretion on them, all the formed chondrules are unlikely to be accreted by planetesimals. We investigate the amount of chondrules accreted by planetesimals in such a condition. We assume that a protoplanet is in oligarchic growth, and we perform analytical calculations of chondrule accretion both by a protoplanet and by planetesimals. Through the oligarchic growth stage, planetesimals accrete about half of the formed chondrules. The smallest planetesimals get the largest amount of the chondrules, compared with the amount accreted by more massive planetesimals. We perform a parameter study and find that this fraction is not largely changed for a wide range of parameter sets.
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    Recent theoretical work has shown that the pre-main-sequence (PMS) evolution of stars is much more complex than previously envisioned. Instead of the traditional steady, one-dimensional solution, accretion may be episodic and not necessarily symmetrical, thereby affecting the energy deposited inside the star and its interior structure. Given this new framework, we want to understand what controls the evolution of accreting stars. We use the MESA stellar evolution code with various sets of conditions. In particular, we account for the (unknown) efficiency of accretion in burying gravitational energy into the protostar through a parameter, $\xi$, and we vary the amount of deuterium present. We confirm the findings of previous works that the evolution changes significantly with the amount of energy that is lost during accretion. We find that deuterium burning also regulates the PMS evolution. In the low-entropy accretion scenario, the evolutionary tracks in the H-R diagram are significantly different from the classical tracks and are sensitive to the deuterium content. A comparison of theoretical evolutionary tracks and observations allows us to exclude some cold accretion models ($\xi\sim 0$) with low deuterium abundances. We confirm that the luminosity spread seen in clusters can be explained by models with a somewhat inefficient injection of accretion heat. The resulting evolutionary tracks then become sensitive to the accretion heat efficiency, initial core entropy, and deuterium content. In this context, we predict that clusters with a higher D/H ratio should have less scatter in luminosity than clusters with a smaller D/H. Future work on this issue should include radiation-hydrodynamic simulations to determine the efficiency of accretion heating and further observations to investigate the deuterium content in star-forming regions. (abbrev.)
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    Haze in Pluto's atmosphere was detected in images by both the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) and the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) on New Horizons. LORRI observed haze up to altitudes of at least 200 km above Pluto's surface at solar phase angles from ~20\deg to ~169\deg. The haze is structured with about ~20 layers, and the extinction due to haze is greater in the northern hemisphere than at equatorial or southern latitudes. However, more haze layers are discerned at equatorial latitudes. A search for temporal variations found no evidence for motions of haze layers (temporal changes in layer altitudes) on time scales of 2 to 5 hours, but did find evidence of changes in haze scale height above 100 km altitude. An ultraviolet extinction attributable to the atmospheric haze was also detected by the ALICE ultraviolet spectrograph on New Horizons. The haze particles are strongly forward-scattering in the visible, and a microphysical model of haze is presented which reproduces the visible phase function just above the surface with 0.5 \mum spherical particles, but also invokes fractal aggregate particles to fit the visible phase function at 45 km altitude and account for UV extinction. A model of haze layer generation by orographic excitation of gravity waves is presented. This model accounts for the observed layer thickness and distribution with altitude. Haze particles settle out of the atmosphere and onto Pluto's surface, at a rate sufficient to alter surface optical properties on seasonal time scales. Pluto's regional scale albedo contrasts may be preserved in the face of the haze deposition by atmospheric collapse.
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    Motivated by the large number of compact extrasolar planetary systems discovered by the Kepler Mission, this paper considers perturbations due to possible additional outer planets. The discovered compact systems sometimes contain multiple transiting planets, so that their orbital angular momentum vectors are tightly aligned. Since planetary orbits are susceptible to forced oscillations of their inclination angles, the highly aligned nature of these systems places constraints on possible additional (non-transiting) planets. If planets in the outer regions of these solar systems have sufficiently large mass or sufficiently small semi-major axis, they will induce the compact inner orbits to oscillate in and out of a transiting configuration. This paper considers the dynamics of the compact systems discovered to host five or more planets. In order to not perturb these systems out of a continually, mutually transiting state, additional planetary companions must generally have periastron $p>10$ AU. Specific constraints are found for each of the 18 planetary systems considered, which are obtained by marginalising over other orbital parameters using three different choices of priors for the companion properties (a uniform prior, a transit-inspired prior, and an non-transiting disk prior). A separate ensemble of numerical experiments shows that these compact systems generally cannot contain Jupiter-analogs without disrupting the observed orbits. We also consider how these constraints depend on system properties and find that the surface density of the planetary system is one of the most important variables. Finally, we provide specific results for two systems, WASP-47 and Kepler-20, for which this analysis provides interesting constraints.

Recent comments

wiadealo Nov 07 2016 09:27 UTC

Is it [fantasy][1] or real?

[1]: http://buchderfarben.de

climaiw Sep 12 2016 16:19 UTC

I would suggest planets where life can really make a difference.

resodiat Aug 23 2016 13:00 UTC

That is really a long-term perspective.