Earth and Planetary Astrophysics (astro-ph.EP)

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    We have conducted experimental measurements and numerical simulations of a precession driven flow in a cylindrical cavity. The study is dedicated to the precession dynamo experiment currently under construction at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and aims at the evaluation of the hydrodynamic flow with respect to its ability to drive a dynamo. We focus on the strongly non-linear regime in which the flow is essentially composed of the directly forced primary Kelvin mode and higher modes in terms of standing inertial waves arising from non-linear self-interactions. We obtain an excellent agreement between experiment and simulation with regard to both, flow amplitudes and flow geometry. A peculiarity is the resonance-like emergence of an axisymmetric mode that represents a double role structure in the meridional plane. Kinematic simulations of the magnetic field evolution induced by the time-averaged flow yield dynamo action at critical magnetic Reynolds numbers around ${\rm{Rm}}^{\rm{c}}\approx 430$ which is well within the range of the planned liquid sodium experiment.
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    The Juno Orbiter has provided improved estimates of the even gravitational harmonics J2 to J8 of Jupiter. To compute higher-order moments, new methods such as the Concentric Maclaurin Spheroids (CMS) method have been developed which surpass the so far commonly used Theory of Figures (ToF) method in accuracy. This progress rises the question whether ToF can still provide a useful service for deriving the internal structure of giant planets in the Solar system. In this paper, I apply both the ToF and the CMS method to compare results for polytropic Jupiter and for the physical equation of state H/He-REOS.3 based models. An accuracy in the computed values of J2 and J4 of 0.1% is found to be sufficient in order to obtain the core mass safely within 0.5 Mearth numerical accuracy and the atmospheric metallicity within about 0.0004. ToF to 4th order provides that accuracy, while ToF to 3rd order does not for J4. Furthermore, I find that the assumption of rigid rotation yields J6 and J8 values in agreement with the current Juno estimates, and that higher order terms (J10 to J18) deviate by about 10% from predictions by polytropic models. This work suggests that ToF4 can still be applied to infer the deep internal structure, and that the zonal winds on Jupiter reach less deep than 0.9 RJup.
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    Magnetorotational instability (MRI) is one of the fundamental processes in astrophysics, driving angular momentum transport and mass accretion in a wide variety of cosmic objects. Despite much theoretical/numerical and experimental efforts over the last decades, its saturation mechanism and amplitude, which sets the angular momentum transport rate, remains not well understood, especially in the limit of high resistivity, or small magnetic Prandtl numbers typical to interiors of protoplanetary disks, liquid cores of planets and liquid metals in laboratory. We investigate the nonlinear development and saturation properties of the helical magnetorotational instability (HMRI) in a magnetized Taylor-Couette flow using direct numerical simulations. From the linear theory of HMRI, it is known that the Elsasser number, or interaction parameter plays a special role for its dynamics and determines its growth rate. We show that this parameter is also important in the nonlinear problem. By increasing its value, a sudden transition from weakly nonlinear, where the system is slightly above the linear stability threshold, to turbulent regime occurs. We calculate the azimuthal and axial energy spectra corresponding to these two regimes and show that they differ qualitatively. Remarkably, the nonlinear states remain in all cases nearly axisymmetric suggesting that HMRI turbulence is quasi two-dimensional in nature. Although the contribution of non-axisymmetric modes increases moderately with the Elsasser number, their total energy remains much smaller than that of the axisymmetric ones.
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    We present the first good evidence for exocomet transits of a host star in continuum light in data from the Kepler mission. The Kepler star in question, KIC 3542116, is of spectral type F2V and is quite bright at $K_p = 10$. The transits have a distinct asymmetric shape with a steeper ingress and slower egress that can be ascribed to objects with a trailing dust tail passing over the stellar disk. There are three deeper transits with depths of $\simeq 0.1\%$ that last for about a day, and three that are several times more shallow and of shorter duration. The transits were found via an exhaustive visual search of the entire Kepler photometric data set, which we describe in some detail. We review the methods we use to validate the Kepler data showing the comet transits, and rule out instrumental artifacts as sources of the signals. We fit the transits with a simple dust-tail model, and find that a transverse comet speed of $\sim$35-50 km s$^{-1}$ and a minimum amount of dust present in the tail of $\sim 10^{16}$ g are required to explain the larger transits. For a dust replenishment time of $\sim$10 days, and a comet lifetime of only $\sim$300 days, this implies a total cometary mass of $\gtrsim 3 \times 10^{17}$ g, or about the mass of Halley's comet. We also discuss the number of comets and orbital geometry that would be necessary to explain the six transits detected over the four years of Kepler prime-field observations. Finally, we also report the discovery of a single comet-shaped transit in KIC 11084727 with very similar transit and host-
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    Exploring weakly perturbed Keplerian motion within the restricted three-body problem, Lidov (1962) and, independently, Kozai (1962) discovered coupled oscillations of eccentricity and inclination (the KL-cycles). Their classical studies were based on an integrable model of the secular evolution, obtained by double averaging of the disturbing function approximated with its first non-trivial term. This was the quadrupole term in the series expansion with respect to the ratio of the semimajor axis of the disturbed body to that of the disturbing body. If the next (octupole) term is kept in the expression for the disturbing function, long-term modulation of the KL-cycles can established (Ford et al., 2000, Naoz et al., 2011, Katz et al., 2011). Specifically, flips between the prograde and retrograde orbits become possible. Since such flips are observed only when the perturber has a non-zero eccentricity, the term "Eccentric Kozai-Lidov Effect" (or EKL-effect) was proposed by Lithwick and Naoz (2011) to specify such behaviour. We demonstrate that the EKL-effect can be interpreted as a resonance phenomenon. To this end, we write down the equations of motion in terms of "action-angle" variables emerging in the integrable Kozai-Lidov model. It turns out that for some initial values the resonance is degenerate and the usual "pendulum" approximation is insufficient to describe the evolution of the resonance phase. Analysis of the related bifurcations allows us to estimate the typical time between the successive flips for different parts of the phase space.
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    The ancestor philosophers' dream of thousands of new worlds is finally realised: about 3500 extrasolar planets have been discovered in the neighborhood of our Sun. Most of them are very different from those we used to know in our Solar System. Others orbit their parent star inside the belt known as Habitable Zone where a rocky planet with the appropriate climate could have the availability of liquid water on its surface. Those planets, in HZ or not, will be the object of observation that will be performed by new space-/ground-based instrumentation. Space missions, such as JWST and the very recently proposed ARIEL (ESA M-Class Mission), or ground based instruments (SPHERE@VLT, GPI@GEMINI and EPICS@ELT) have been proposed and built to measure the atmospheric transmission, reflection and emission spectra over a wide wavelength range. Most of exoplanets have local counterparts in the Solar System planets that are available for comparative studies, but there are also interesting outsider cases like super Earths. In our own system, proto-planet evolution was flanked by an active prebiotic chemistry that brought about the emergency of life on the Earth. The search for life signatures requires the knowledge of planet atmospheres, main objective of future exoplanetary space explorations. As, for now, we have only one example of life in the universe, we are bound to study terrestrial organisms to assess possibilities of life on other planets and guide our search for possible extinct or extant life on other planetary bodies. The planet atmosphere characteristics and possible biosignatures will be inferred by studying such composite spectrum in order to identify the emission/absorption lines/bands from atmospheric molecules as water, carbon monoxide, methane, ammonia etc.
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    We spectroscopically characterize the atmosphere of HD 106906b, a young low-mass companion near the deuterium burning limit. The wide separation to its host star of 7.1" makes it an ideal candidate for high-SNR and high-resolution spectroscopy. We aim to derive new constraints on HD 106906b's spectral type, effective temperature, and luminosity, and also provide a high-SNR template spectrum for future characterization of extrasolar planets. We obtained 1.1--2.5 $\mu$m integral field spectroscopy with the VLT/SINFONI instrument with a spectral resolution of R$\approx$2000--4000. New estimates of HD 106906b's parameters are derived by analyzing spectral features, comparing to spectral catalogs of other low-mass objects, and fitting with theoretical isochrones. We identify several spectral absorption lines that are consistent with a low mass for HD 106906b. We derive a new spectral type of L1.5$\pm$1.0, one subclass earlier than previous estimates. Through comparison with other young low-mass objects, this translates to a luminosity of log($L/L_\odot$)=$-3.65\pm0.08$ and an effective temperature of Teff = $1820\pm240$ K. Our new mass estimates range between $M=11.9^{+1.7}_{-0.8}$ $M_{\rm Jup}$ (hot start) and $M=14.0^{+0.2}_{-0.5}$ $M_{\rm Jup}$ (cold start). These limits take into account a possibly finite formation time, i.e., HD 106906b is allowed to be 0--3 Myr younger than its host star. We exclude accretion onto HD 106906b at rates $\dot{M}>4.8\times10^{-10}$ $M_{\rm Jup}$yr$^{-1}$ based on the fact that we observe no hydrogen (Paschen-$\beta$, Brackett-$\gamma$) emission. This is indicative of little or no circumplanetary gas. With our new observations, HD 106906b is the planetary-mass object with one of the highest SNR spectra yet. We make the spectrum available for download for future comparison with data from existing and next-generation (e.g, ELT, JWST) spectrographs.
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    Context: Transmission spectroscopy has become a prominent tool for characterizing the atmospheric properties on close-in transiting planets. Recent observations have revealed a remarkable diversity in exoplanet spectra, which show absorption signatures of Na, K and $\mathrm{H_2O}$, in some cases partially or fully attenuated by atmospheric aerosols. Aerosols (clouds and hazes) themselves have been detected in the transmission spectra of several planets thanks to wavelength-dependent slopes caused by the particles' scattering properties. Aims: We present an optical 550 - 960 nm transmission spectrum of the extremely irradiated hot Jupiter WASP-103b, one of the hottest (2500 K) and most massive (1.5 $M_J$) planets yet to be studied with this technique. WASP-103b orbits its star at a separation of less than 1.2 times the Roche limit and is predicted to be strongly tidally distorted. Methods: We have used Gemini/GMOS to obtain multi-object spectroscopy hroughout three transits of WASP-103b. We used relative spectrophotometry and bin sizes between 20 and 2 nm to infer the planet's transmission spectrum. Results: We find that WASP-103b shows increased absorption in the cores of the alkali (Na, K) line features. We do not confirm the presence of any strong scattering slope as previously suggested, pointing towards a clear atmosphere for the highly irradiated, massive exoplanet WASP-103b. We constrain the upper boundary of any potential cloud deck to reside at pressure levels above 0.01 bar. This finding is in line with previous studies on cloud occurrence on exoplanets which find that clouds dominate the transmission spectra of cool, low surface gravity planets while hot, high surface gravity planets are either cloud-free, or possess clouds located below the altitudes probed by transmission spectra.
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    Motivated by models suggesting that the inner planet forming regions of protoplanetary discs are predominantly lacking in viscosity-inducing turbulence, and are possibly threaded by Hall-effect generated large-scale horizontal magnetic fields, we examine the dynamics of the corotation region of a low-mass planet in such an environment. The corotation torque in an inviscid, isothermal, dead zone ought to saturate, with the libration region becoming both symmetrical and of a uniform vortensity, leading to fast inward migration driven by the Lindblad torques alone. However, in such a low viscosity situation, the material on librating streamlines essentially preserves its vortensity. If there is relative radial motion between the disc gas and the planet, the librating streamlines will no longer be symmetrical. Hence, if the gas is torqued by a large scale magnetic field so that it undergoes a net inflow or outflow past the planet, driving evolution of the vortensity and inducing asymmetry of the corotation region, the corotation torque can grow, leading to a positive torque. In this paper we treat this effect by applying a symmetry argument to the previously studied case of a migrating planet in an inviscid disc. Our results show that the corotation torque due to a laminar Hall-induced magnetic field in a dead zone behaves quite differently from that studied previously for a viscous disc. Furthermore, the magnetic field induced corotation torque and the dynamical corotation torque in a low viscosity disc can be regarded as one unified effect.

Recent comments

C. Jess Riedel Jul 04 2017 21:26 UTC

Even if we kickstart evolution with bacteria, the amount of time until we are capable of von Neumann probes is almost certainly too small for this to be relevant. See for instance [Armstrong & Sandberg](http://www.sciencedirect.com.proxy.lib.uwaterloo.ca/science/article/pii/S0094576513001148). It

...(continued)
xecehim Jun 27 2017 15:03 UTC

It has been [published][1]

[1]: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10509-016-2911-0

wiadealo Nov 07 2016 09:27 UTC

Is it [fantasy][1] or real?

[1]: http://buchderfarben.de

climaiw Sep 12 2016 16:19 UTC

I would suggest planets where life can really make a difference.

resodiat Aug 23 2016 13:00 UTC

That is really a long-term perspective.