Earth and Planetary Astrophysics (astro-ph.EP)

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    Characterization of the atmospheres of transiting exoplanets relies on accurate measurements of the extent of the optically thick area of the planet at multiple wavelengths with a precision $\lesssim$100 parts per million (ppm). Next-generation instruments onboard the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) are expected to achieve $\sim$10 ppm precision for several tens of targets. A similar precision can be obtained in modelling only if other astrophysical effects, including the stellar limb-darkening, are accounted for properly. In this paper, we explore the limits on precision due to the mathematical formulas currently adopted to approximate the stellar limb-darkening, and to the use of limb-darkening coefficients obtained either from stellar-atmosphere models or empirically. We propose a new limb-darkening law with two coefficients, `power-2', which outperforms other two-coefficient laws adopted in the literature in most cases, and particularly for cool stars. Empirical limb-darkening based on two-coefficient formulas can be significantly biased, even if the light-curve residuals are nearly photon-noise limited. We demonstrate an optimal strategy to fitting for the four-coefficients limb-darkening in the visible, using prior information on the exoplanet orbital parameters to break some of the degeneracies that otherwise would prevent the convergence of the fit. Infrared observations taken with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will provide accurate measurements of the exoplanet orbital parameters with unprecedented precision, which can be used as priors to improve the stellar limb-darkening characterization, and therefore the inferred exoplanet parameters, from observations in the visible, such as those taken with Kepler/K2, JWST, other past and future instruments.
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    We study the evolution of circumbinary disks under the gravitational influence of the binary using two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to investigate the impact of disk and binary parameters on the dynamical aspects of the disk. To distinguish between physical and numerical effects we apply three hydrodynamical codes. First we analyse in detail numerical issues concerning the conditions at the boundaries and grid resolution. We then perform a series of simulations with different binary (eccentricity, mass ratio) and disk parameters (viscosity, aspect ratio) starting from a reference model with Kepler-16 parameters. Concerning the numerical aspects we find that the inner grid radius must be of the order of the binary semi-major axis, with free outflow conditions applied such that mass can flow onto the central binary. A closed inner boundary leads to unstable evolutions. We find that the inner disk turns eccentric and precesses for all investigated physical parameters. The precession rate is slow with periods ($T_\mathrm{prec}$) starting at around 500 binary orbits ($T_\mathrm{bin}$) for high viscosity and large $H/R$ where the inner hole is smaller and more circular. Reducing $\alpha$ and $H/R$ increases the gap size and $T_\mathrm{prec}$ reaches 2500 $T_\mathrm{bin}$. For varying binary mass ratios $q_\mathrm{bin}$ the gap size remains constant whereas $T_\mathrm{prec}$ decreases for increasing $q_\mathrm{bin}$. For varying binary eccentricities $e_\mathrm{bin}$ we find two separate branches in the gap size and eccentricity diagram. The bifurcation occurs at around $e_\mathrm{crit} \approx 0.18$ where the gap is smallest with the shortest $T_\mathrm{prec}$. For $e_\mathrm{bin}$ smaller and larger than $e_\mathrm{crit}$ the gap size and $T_\mathrm{prec}$ increase. Circular binaries create the most eccentric disks.
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    Context: High-resolution images of circumstellar debris discs reveal off-centred rings that indicate past or ongoing perturbation, possibly caused by secular gravitational interaction with unseen stellar or substellar companions. The purely dynamical aspects of this departure from radial symmetry are well understood. However, the observed dust is subject to additional forces and effects, most notably collisions and drag. Aims: To complement the studies of dynamics, we therefore aim to understand how new asymmetries are created by the addition of collisional evolution and drag forces, and existing ones strengthened or overridden. Methods: We augmented our existing numerical code "Analysis of Collisional Evolution" (ACE) by an azimuthal dimension, the longitude of periapse. A set of fiducial discs with global eccentricities ranging from 0 to 0.4 is evolved over giga-year timescales. Size distribution and spatial variation of dust are analysed and interpreted. The basic impact of belt eccentricity on spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and images is discussed. Results: We find features imposed on characteristic timescales. First, radiation pressure defines size cutoffs that differ between periapse and apoapse, resulting in an asymmetric halo. The differences in size distribution make the observable asymmetry of the halo depend on wavelength. Second, collisional equilibrium prefers smaller grains on the apastron side of the parent belt, reducing the effect of pericentre glow and the overall asymmetry. Third, Poynting-Robertson drag fills the region interior to an eccentric belt such that the apastron side is more tenuous. Interpretation and prediction of the appearance in scattered light is problematic when spatial and size distribution are coupled.
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    The initial results of a two year simultaneous optical-radar meteor campaign are described. Analysis of 105 double-station optical meteors having plane of sky intersection angles greater than 5 degrees and trail lengths in excess of 2 km also detected by the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) as head echoes was performed. These events show a median deviation in radiants between radar and optical determinations of 1.5 degrees, with 1/3 of events having radiant agreement to less than one degree. MAARSY tends to record average speeds roughly 0.5 km/s and 1.3 km higher than optical records, in part due to the higher sensitivity of MAARSY as compared to the optical instruments. More than 98% of all head echoes are not detected with the optical system. Using this non-detection ratio and the known limiting sensitivity of the cameras, we estimate that the limiting meteoroid detection mass of MAARSY is in the 10-9 kg to 10-10 kg (astronomical limiting meteor magnitudes of +11 to +12) appropriate to speeds from 30-60 km/s. There is a clear trend of higher peak RCS for brighter meteors between 35 and -30 dBsm. For meteors with similar magnitudes, the MAARSY head echo radar cross-section is larger at higher speeds. Brighter meteors at fixed heights and similar speeds have consistently, on average, larger RCS values, in accordance with established scattering theory. However, our data show RCS ~ v/2, much weaker than the normally assumed RCS ~ v^3, a consequence of our requiring head echoes to also be detectable optically. Most events show a smooth variation of RCS with height broadly following the light production behavior. A significant minority of meteors show large variations in RCS relative to the optical light curve over common height intervals, reflecting fragmentation or possibly differential ablation.
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    We present a model for lightning shock induced chemistry that can be applied to atmospheres of arbitrary H/C/N/O chemistry, hence for extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs. The model couples hydrodynamics and the STAND2015 kinetic gas-phase chemistry. For an exoplanet analogue to the contemporary Earth, our model predicts NO and NO2 yields in agreement with observation. We predict height-dependent mixing ratios during a storm soon after a lightning shock of NO ~ 1e-3 at 40 km and NO2 ~ 1e-4 below 40 km, with O3 reduced to trace quantities (<< 1e-10). For an Earth-like exoplanet with a CO2/N2 dominated atmosphere and with an extremely intense lightning storm over its entire surface, we predict significant changes in the amount of NO, NO2, O3, H2O, H2, and predict significant abundance of C2N. We find that, for the Early Earth, O2 is formed in large quantities by lightning but is rapidly processed by the photochemistry, consistent with previous work on lightning. The effect of persistent global lightning storms are predicted to be significant, primarily due to NO2, with the largest spectral features present at ~3.4 \mum and ~6.2 \mum. The features within the transmission spectrum are on the order of 1 ppm and therefore are not likely detectable with JWST. Depending on its spectral properties, C2N could be a key tracer for lightning on Earth-like exoplanets with a N2/CO2 bulk atmosphere, unless destroyed by yet unknown chemical reactions.
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    We present the highest spatial resolution ALMA observations to date of the Class I protostar WL 17 in the $\rho$ Ophiuchus L1688 molecular cloud complex, which show that it has a 12 AU hole in the center of its disk. We consider whether WL 17 is actually a Class II disk being extincted by foreground material, but find that such models do not provide a good fit to the broadband SED and also require such high extinction that it would presumably arise from dense material close to the source such as a remnant envelope. Self-consistent models of a disk embedded in a rotating collapsing envelope can nicely reproduce both the ALMA 3 mm observations and the broadband SED of WL 17. This suggests that WL 17 is a disk in the early stages of its formation, and yet even at this young age the inner disk has been depleted. Although there are multiple pathways for such a hole to be created in a disk, if this hole were produced by the formation of planets it could place constraints on the timescale for the growth of planetesimals in protoplanetary disks.
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    A commonly noted feature of the population of multi-planet extrasolar systems is the rarity of planet pairs in low-order mean-motion resonances. We revisit the physics of resonance capture via convergent disk-driven migration. We point out that for planet spacings typical of stable configurations for Kepler systems, the planets can routinely maintain a small but nonzero eccentricity due to gravitational perturbations from their neighbors. Together with the upper limit on the migration rate needed for capture, the finite eccentricity can make resonance capture difficult or impossible in Sun-like systems for planets smaller than ~Neptune-sized. This mass limit on efficient capture is broadly consistent with observed exoplanet pairs that have mass determinations: of pairs with the heavier planet exterior to the lighter planet -- which would have been undergoing convergent migration in their disks -- those in or nearly in resonance are much more likely to have total mass greater than two Neptune masses than to have smaller masses. The agreement suggests that the observed paucity of resonant pairs around sun-like stars may simply arise from a small resonance capture probability for lower-mass planets. Planet pairs that thereby avoid resonance capture are much less likely to collide in an eventual close approach than to simply migrate past one another to become a divergently migrating pair with the lighter planet exterior. For systems around M stars we expect resonant pairs to be much more common, since there the minimum mass threshhold for efficient capture is about an Earth mass.
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    The varied surfaces and atmospheres of planets make them interesting places to live, explore, and study from afar. Unfortunately, the great distance to even the closest exoplanets makes it impossible to resolve their disk with current or near-term technology. It is still possible, however, to deduce spatial inhomogeneities in exoplanets provided that different regions are visible at different times; this can be due to rotation, orbital motion, and occultations by a star, planet, or moon. Astronomers have so far constructed maps of thermal emission and albedo for short period giant planets. These maps constrain atmospheric dynamics and cloud patterns in exotic atmospheres. In the future, exo-cartography could yield surface maps of terrestrial planets, hinting at the geophysical and geochemical processes that shape them.

Recent comments

wiadealo Nov 07 2016 09:27 UTC

Is it [fantasy][1] or real?

[1]: http://buchderfarben.de

climaiw Sep 12 2016 16:19 UTC

I would suggest planets where life can really make a difference.

resodiat Aug 23 2016 13:00 UTC

That is really a long-term perspective.