Earth and Planetary Astrophysics (astro-ph.EP)

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    We derive analytic estimates for the ability with which one can obtain precise, empirical stellar masses and radii via single-lined eclipsing binaries (EBs) in the era of Gaia and TESS. Including stars that host transiting substellar companions, such single-lined EBs already number in the hundreds from ground-based transit surveys and will comprise a major component of the science yield from the upcoming TESS mission. We explore the requirements for obtaining a given fractional precision on the masses and radii of single-lined EBs using primarily empirical means: radial velocity and eclipse measurements along with either: estimates of the primary's (1) surface gravity from high-resolution spectroscopy, (2) radius inferred from parallax, effective temperature, and bolometric flux, or (3) surface gravity and density from asteroseismology. We then compare these requirements to the precision obtained from invoking stellar models or empirical relations. We show that, for a fiducial transiting Hot Jupiter system, precise, accurate, and essentially model-independent mass and radius measurements for such single-lined eclipsing binaries will be possible in the era of \emphGaia. These will be comparable in precision to those obtained with double-lined eclipsing binaries. Moreover, the systems for which these methods can be applied will vastly outnumber double-lined EBs, thereby possessing the potential to sample a more complete range of stellar types (such as M-dwarfs); these systems will also, in many cases, be more amenable to precision metallicity and abundance determinations than are double-lined EBs.
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    NASA's Kepler Space Telescope was designed to determine the frequency of Earth-sized planets orbiting Sun-like stars, but these planets are on the very edge of the mission's detection sensitivity. Accurately determining the occurrence rate of these planets will require automatically and accurately assessing the likelihood that individual candidates are indeed planets, even at low signal-to-noise ratios. We present a method for classifying potential planet signals using deep learning, a class of machine learning algorithms that have recently become state-of-the-art in a wide variety of tasks. We train a deep convolutional neural network to predict whether a given signal is a transiting exoplanet or a false positive caused by astrophysical or instrumental phenomena. Our model is highly effective at ranking individual candidates by the likelihood that they are indeed planets: 98.8% of the time it ranks plausible planet signals higher than false positive signals in our test set. We apply our model to a new set of candidate signals that we identified in a search of known Kepler multi-planet systems. We statistically validate two new planets that are identified with high confidence by our model. One of these planets is part of a five-planet resonant chain around Kepler-80, with an orbital period closely matching the prediction by three-body Laplace relations. The other planet orbits Kepler-90, a star which was previously known to host seven transiting planets. Our discovery of an eighth planet brings Kepler-90 into a tie with our Sun as the star known to host the most planets.
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    The formation of satellite systems in circum-planetary discs is considered to be similar to the formation of rocky planets in a proto-planetary disc, especially Super-Earths. Thus, it is possible to use systems with large satellites to test formation theories that are also applicable to extrasolar planets. Furthermore, a better understanding of the origin of satellites might yield important information about the environment near the growing planet during the last stages of planet formation. In this work we investigate the formation and migration of the Jovian satellites through N-body simulations. We simulated a massive, static, low viscosity, circum-planetary disc in agreement with the minimum mass sub-nebula model prescriptions for its total mass. In hydrodynamic simulations we found no signs of gaps, therefore type II migration is not expected. Hence, we used analytic prescriptions for type I migration, eccentricity and inclination damping, and performed N-body simulations with damping forces added. Detailed parameter studies showed that the number of final satellites is strong influenced by the initial distribution of embryos, the disc temperature, and the initial gas density profile. For steeper initial density profiles it is possible to form systems with multiple satellites in resonance while a flatter profile favours the formation of satellites close to the region of the Galilean satellites. We show that the formation of massive satellites such as Ganymede and Callisto can be achieved for hotter discs with an aspect ratio of H/r ~ 0.15 for which the ice line was located around 30 R_J.
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    Using high-contrast imaging with the SPHERE instrument at the VLT, we report the first images of a cold brown dwarf companion to the exoplanet host star HD4113A. The brown dwarf HD4113C is part of a complex dynamical system consisting of a giant planet, stellar host and a known wide M-dwarf companion. Its separation of $535\pm3$mas and H-band contrast of $13.35\pm0.10$mag correspond to a projected separation of 22AU and an isochronal mass estimate of $36\pm5$M$_J$ based on COND models. The companion shows strong methane absorption, and through atmospheric model fitting we estimate a surface gravity of $\log g$=5 and an effective temperature of ~500-600K. A comparison of its spectrum with observed T dwarfs indicates a late-T spectral type, with a T9 object providing the best match. By combining the observed astrometry from the imaging data with 27 years of radial velocities, we use orbital fitting to constrain its orbital and physical parameters, as well as update those of the planet HD4113Ab, discovered by previous radial velocity measurements. The data suggest a dynamical mass of $66\pm5$M$_J$ and moderate eccentricity of $0.44\pm0.08$ for the brown dwarf. This mass estimate appears to conflict with the isochronal estimate and that of similar objects, which may be caused by the newly detected object being an unresolved binary brown dwarf system or the presence of an additional object in the system. Through dynamical simulations we show that the planet may undergo strong Lidov-Kozai cycles, raising the possibility that it formed on a quasi-circular orbit and gained its currently observed high eccentricity through interactions with the brown dwarf. Follow-up observations combining radial velocities, direct imaging and Gaia astrometry will be crucial to precisely constrain the dynamical mass of the brown dwarf and allow for in-depth comparison with evolutionary and atmospheric models.
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    Variations and spatial distributions of bright and dark material on dwarf planet Ceres play a key role for the understanding of the processes that have led to its present surface composition. We define limits for bright and dark material in order to distinguish them consistently, based on the reflectance with respect to the average surface using Dawn Framing Camera data. A systematic classification of four types of bright material is presented based on their spectral properties, composition, spatial distribution, and association with specific geomorphological features. We found obvious correlations of reflectance with spectral shape (slopes) and age; however, this is not unique throughout the bright spots. Although impact features show generally more extreme reflectance variations, several areas can only be understood in terms of inhomogeneous distribution of composition as inferred from Dawn Visible and Infrared Spectrometer data. Additional materials with anomalous composition and spectral properties are rare. The identification of the origin of the dark, and particularly the darkest, material remains to be explored. The spectral properties and the morphology of the dark sites suggest an endogenic origin, but it is not clear whether they are more or less primitive surficial exposures or excavated sub-surface but localized material. The reflectance, spectral properties, inferred composition, and geologic context collectively suggest that the bright and dark materials tend to gradually change towards the average surface over time. This could be because of multiple processes, i.e., impact gardening/space weathering, and lateral mixing, including thermal and aqueous alteration, accompanied with changes in composition and physical properties such as grain size, surface temperature, porosity (compaction).
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    The origin of Phobos and Deimos in a giant impact generated disk is gaining larger attention. Although this scenario has been the subject of many studies, an evaluation of the chemical composition of the Mars' moons in this framework is missing. The chemical composition of Phobos and Deimos is unconstrained. The large uncertainty about the origin of the mid-infrared features, the lack of absorption bands in the visible and near-infrared spectra, and the effects of secondary processes on the moons' surface make the determination of their composition very difficult from remote sensing data. Simulations suggest a formation of a disk made of gas and melt with their composition linked to the nature of the impactor and Mars. Using thermodynamic equilibrium we investigate the composition of dust (condensates from gas) and solids (from a cooling melt) that result from different types of Mars impactors (Mars-, CI-, CV-, EH-, comet-like). Our calculations show a wide range of possible chemical compositions and noticeable differences between dust and solids depending on the considered impactors. Assuming Phobos and Deimos as result of the accretion and mixing of dust and solids, we find that the derived assemblage (dust rich in metallic-iron, sulphides and/or carbon, and quenched solids rich in silicates) can be compatible with the observations. The Java's MM (Martian Moons exploration) mission will investigate the physical and chemical properties of the Maroons, especially sampling from Phobos, before returning to Earth. Our results could be then used to disentangle the origin and chemical composition of the pristine body that hit Mars and suggest guidelines for helping in the analysis of the returned samples.
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    The surprising discovery of a ring system around the Centaur 10199 Chariklo in 2013 led to a reanalysis of archival stellar occultation data for the Centaur 2060 Chiron by Ortiz et al. One possible interpretation of that data is that a system of rings exists around Chiron. In this work, we study the dynamical history of the proposed Chiron ring system by integrating nearly 36,000 clones of the Centaur backward in time for 100 Myr under the influence of the Sun and the four giant planets. The severity of all close encounters between the clones and planets while the clones are in the Centaur region is recorded, along with the mean time between close encounters. We find that severe and extreme close encounters are very rare, making it possible that the Chiron ring system has remained intact since its injection into the Centaur region, which we find likely occurred within the past 8.5 Myr. Our simulations yield a backward dynamical half-life for Chiron of 0.7 Myr. The dynamical classes of a sample of clones are found. It is found that, on average, the Centaur lifetimes of resonance hopping clones are twice those of random-walk clones because of resonance sticking in mean motion resonances. In addition, we present MEGNO and chaotic lifetime maps of the region bound by 13 au $\le a \le$14 au and e $\le$0.5. We confirm that the current mean orbital parameters of Chiron are located in a highly chaotic region of a-e phase space.
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    The recent 'Planet Nine' hypothesis has led to many observational and archival searches for this giant planet proposed to orbit the Sun at hundreds of astronomical units. While trans-Neptunian object searches are typically conducted in the optical, models suggest Planet Nine could be self-luminous and potentially bright enough at ~3-5 microns to be detected by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We have previously demonstrated a Planet Nine search methodology based on time-resolved WISE coadds, allowing us to detect moving objects much fainter than would be possible using single-frame extractions. In the present work, we extend our 3.4 micron (W1) search to cover more than three quarters of the sky and incorporate four years of WISE observations spanning a seven year time period. This represents the deepest and widest-area WISE search for Planet Nine to date. We characterize the spatial variation of our survey's sensitivity and rule out the presence of Planet Nine in the parameter space searched at W1 < 16.7 in high Galactic latitude regions (90% completeness).
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    The enigmatic star KIC 8462852, informally known as "Boyajian's Star", has exhibited unexplained variability from both short timescale (days) dimming events, and years-long fading in the Kepler mission. No single physical mechanism has successfully explained these observations to date. Here we investigate the ultraviolet variability of KIC 8462852 on a range of timescales using data from the GALEX mission that occurred contemporaneously with the Kepler mission. The wide wavelength baseline between the Kepler and GALEX data provides a unique constraint on the nature of the variability. Using 1600 seconds of photon-counting data from four GALEX visits spread over 70 days in 2011, we find no coherent NUV variability in the system on 10-100 second or months timescales. Comparing the integrated flux from these 2011 visits to the 2012 NUV flux published in the GALEX-CAUSE Kepler survey, we find a 3% decrease in brightness for KIC 8462852. We find this level of variability is significant, but not necessarily unusual for stars of similar spectral type in the GALEX data. This decrease coincides with the secular optical fading reported by Montet & Simon (2016). We find the multi-wavelength variability is somewhat inconsistent with typical interstellar dust absorption, but instead favors a R$_V$ = 5.0 $\pm$ 0.9 reddening law potentially from circumstellar dust.

Recent comments

C. Jess Riedel Jul 04 2017 21:26 UTC

Even if we kickstart evolution with bacteria, the amount of time until we are capable of von Neumann probes is almost certainly too small for this to be relevant. See for instance [Armstrong & Sandberg](http://www.sciencedirect.com.proxy.lib.uwaterloo.ca/science/article/pii/S0094576513001148). It

...(continued)
xecehim Jun 27 2017 15:03 UTC

It has been [published][1]

[1]: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10509-016-2911-0

wiadealo Nov 07 2016 09:27 UTC

Is it [fantasy][1] or real?

[1]: http://buchderfarben.de

climaiw Sep 12 2016 16:19 UTC

I would suggest planets where life can really make a difference.

resodiat Aug 23 2016 13:00 UTC

That is really a long-term perspective.