Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (astro-ph.CO)

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    In this work, we use gas mass fraction samples of galaxy clusters obtained from their X-ray surface brightness observations jointly with the most recent $H(z)$ data to impose limits on cosmic opacity. The analyses are performed in a flat $\Lambda$CDM framework and the results are consistent with a transparent universe within $1\sigma$ c.l., however, they do not rule out $\epsilon \neq 0$ with high statistical significance. Furthermore, we show that the current limits on the matter density parameter obtained from X-ray gas mass fraction test are strongly dependent on the cosmic transparency assumption.
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    We obtain the non-linear generalization of the Sachs-Wolfe + integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) formula describing the CMB temperature anisotropies. Our formula is valid at all orders in perturbation theory, is also valid in all gauges and includes scalar, vector and tensor modes. A direct consequence of our results is that the maps of the logarithmic temperature anisotropies are much cleaner than the usual CMB maps, because they automatically remove many secondary anisotropies. This can for instance, facilitate the search for primordial non-Gaussianity in future works. It also disentangles the non-linear ISW from other effects. Finally, we provide a method which can iteratively be used to obtain the lensing solution at the desired order.
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    We use a cluster sample selected independently of the intracluster medium content with reliable masses to measure the mean gas mass fraction, its scatter, the biases of the X-ray selection on gas mass fraction and covariance between X-ray luminosity and gas mass. The sample is formed by 34 galaxy clusters in the nearby ($0.050<z<0.135$) Universe, mostly with $14<\log M_{500}/M_\odot \lesssim 14.5$, and with masses calculated with the caustic technique. First, we found that integrated gas density profiles have similar shapes, extending earlier results based on sub-populations of clusters such as relaxed or X-ray bright for their mass. Second, the X-ray unbiased selection of our sample allows us to unveil a variegate population of clusters: the gas mass fraction shows a scatter of $0.17\pm0.04$ dex, possibly indicating a quite variable amount of feedback from cluster to cluster, larger than found in previous samples targeting sub-populations of galaxy clusters, such as relaxed or X-ray bright. The similarity of the gas density profiles induces an almost scatter-less relation between X-ray luminosity, gas mass and halo mass, and modulates selection effects on the halo gas mass fraction: gas-rich clusters are preferentially included in X-ray selected samples. The almost scatter-less relation also fixes the relative scatters and slopes of the $L_X-M$ and $M_{gas}-M$ relations and makes core-excised X-ray luminosities and gas masses fully covariant. Therefore, cosmological or astrophysical studies involving X-ray or SZ selected samples need to account for both selection effects and covariance of the studied quantities with X-ray luminosity/SZ strenght.
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    All estimates of cluster mass have some intrinsic scatter and perhaps some bias with true mass even in absence of measurement errors which are caused by, e.g., cluster triaxiality and large scale structure. Knowledge of the bias and scatter values is fundamental for both cluster cosmology and astrophysics. In this paper we show that the intrinsic scatter of a mass proxy can be constrained by measurements of the gas fraction because masses with larger values of intrinsic scatter with true mass produce more scattered gas fractions. Moreover, the relative bias of two mass estimates can be constrained by comparing the mean gas fraction at the same (nominal) cluster mass. Our observational study addresses the scatter between caustic (i.e. dynamically estimated) and true masses, and the relative bias of caustic and hydrostatic masses. For these purposes, we use the X-ray Unbiased Cluster Sample, a cluster sample selected independently of the intracluster medium content with reliable masses: 34 galaxy clusters in the nearby ($0.050<z<0.135$) Universe, mostly with $14<\log M_{500}/M_\odot \lesssim 14.5$, and with caustic masses. We found a 35\% scatter between caustic and true masses. Furthermore, we found that the relative bias between caustic and hydrostatic masses is small, $0.06\pm0.05$ dex, improving upon past measurements. The small scatter found confirms our previous measurements of a quite variable amount of feedback from cluster to cluster which is the cause of the observed large variety of core-excised X-ray luminosities and gas masses.
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    The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) has been the world's most successful single dish telescope at submillimetre wavelengths since it began operations in 1987. From the pioneering days of single-element photometers and mixers, through the first modest imaging arrays, leading to the state-of-the-art widefield camera SCUBA-2 and the spectrometer array HARP, the JCMT has been associated with a number of major scientific discoveries. Famous for the discovery of "SCUBA" galaxies, which are responsible for a large fraction of the far-infrared background, to the first images of huge discs of cool debris around nearby stars, possibly giving us clues to the evolution of planetary systems, the JCMT has pushed the sensitivity limits more than any other facility in this most difficult of wavebands in which to observe. Now approaching the 30th anniversary of the first observations the telescope continues to carry out unique and innovative science. In this review article we look back on just some of the scientific highlights from the past 30 years.
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    We investigate for an Effective Field Theory (EFT) framework that can consistently explain inflation to Large Scale Structures (LSS). With the development of the construction algorithm of EFT, we arrive at a properly truncated action for the entire scenario. Using this, we compute the two-point correlation function for quantum fluctuations from Goldstone modes and related inflationary observables in terms of coefficients of relevant EFT operators, which we constrain using Planck 2015 data. We then carry forward this primordial power spectrum with the same set of EFT parameters to explain the linear and non-linear regimes of LSS by loop-calculations of the matter overdensity two-point function. For comparative analysis, we make use of two widely accepted transfer functions, namely, BBKS and Eisenstein-Hu, thereby making the analysis robust. We finally corroborate our results with LSS data from SDSS-DR7 and WiggleZ. The analysis thus results in a consistent, model-independent EFT framework for inflation to structures.
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    We study the impact of thermal inflation on the formation of cosmological structures and present astrophysical observables which can be used to constrain and possibly probe the thermal inflation scenario. These are dark matter halo abundance at high redshifts, satellite galaxy abundance in the Milky Way, and fluctuation in the 21-cm radiation background before the epoch of reionization. The thermal inflation scenario leaves a characteristic signature on the matter power spectrum by boosting the amplitude at a specific wavenumber determined by the number of e-foldings during thermal inflation ($N_{\rm bc}$), and strongly suppressing the amplitude for modes at smaller scales. For a reasonable range of parameter space, one of the consequences is the suppression of minihalo formation at high redshifts and that of satellite galaxies in the Milky Way. While this effect is substantial, it is degenerate with other cosmological or astrophysical effects. The power spectrum of the 21-cm background probes this impact more directly, and its observation may be the best way to constrain the thermal inflation scenario due to the characteristic signature in the power spectrum. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) in phase 1 (SKA1) has sensitivity large enough to achieve this goal for models with $N_{\rm bc}\gtrsim 26$ if a 10000-hr observation is performed. The final phase SKA, with anticipated sensitivity about an order of magnitude higher, seems more promising and will cover a wider parameter space.
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    The Hawking-Penrose singularity theorem states that a singularity forms inside a black hole in general relativity. To remove this singularity one must resort to a more fundamental theory. Using the corrected dynamical equation of loop quantum cosmology and braneworld models, we study the gravitational collapse of a perfect fluid sphere with a rather general equation of state. In the frame of an observer comoving with this fluid, the sphere pulsates between a maximum and a minimum size, avoiding the singularity. The exterior geometry is also constructed. There are usually an outer and an inner apparent horizon, resembling the Reissner-Nordström situation. For a distant observer the horizon crossing occurs in an infinite time and the pulsations of the black hole quantum "beating heart" are completely unobservable. However, it may be observable if the black hole is not spherical symmetric and radiates gravitational wave due to the quadrupole moment, if any.
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    Accurate astronomical distance determination is crucial for all fields in astrophysics, from Galactic to cosmological scales. Despite, or perhaps because of, significant efforts to determine accurate distances, using a wide range of methods, tracers, and techniques, an internally consistent astronomical distance framework has not yet been established. We review current efforts to homogenize the Local Group's distance framework, with particular emphasis on the potential of RR Lyrae stars as distance indicators, and attempt to extend this in an internally consistent manner to cosmological distances. Calibration based on Type Ia supernovae and distance determinations based on gravitational lensing represent particularly promising approaches. We provide a positive outlook to improvements to the status quo expected from future surveys, missions, and facilities. Astronomical distance determination has clearly reached maturity and near-consistency.
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    We perform a systematic search for long-term extreme variability quasars (EVQs) in the overlapping Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and 3-Year Dark Energy Survey (DES) imaging, which provide light curves spanning more than 15 years. We identified ~1000 EVQs with a maximum g band magnitude change of more than 1 mag over this period, about 10% of all quasars searched. The EVQs have L_bol~10^45-10^47 erg/s and L/L_Edd~0.01-1. Accounting for selection effects, we estimate an intrinsic EVQ fraction of ~30-50% among all g<~22 quasars over a baseline of ~15 years. These EVQs are good candidates for so-called "changing-look quasars", where a spectral transition between the two types of quasars (broad-line and narrow-line) is observed between the dim and bright states. We performed detailed multi-wavelength, spectral and variability analyses for the EVQs and compared to their parent quasar sample. We found that EVQs are distinct from a control sample of quasars matched in redshift and optical luminosity: (1) their UV broad emission lines have larger equivalent widths; (2) their Eddington ratios are systematically lower; and (3) they are more variable on all timescales. The intrinsic difference in quasar properties for EVQs suggest that internal processes associated with accretion are the main driver for the observed extreme long-term variability. However, despite their different properties, EVQs seem to be in the tail of a continuous distribution of quasar properties, rather than standing out as a distinct population. We speculate that EVQs are normal quasars accreting at relatively low accretion rates, where the accretion flow is more likely to experience instabilities that drive the factor of few changes in flux on multi-year timescales.
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    We study the dependence of the galaxy content of dark matter halos on large-scale environment and halo formation time using semi-analytic galaxy models applied to the Millennium simulation. We analyze subsamples of halos at the extremes of these distributions and measure the occupation functions for the galaxies they host. We find distinct differences in these occupation functions. The main effect with environment is that central galaxies (and in one model also the satellites) in denser regions start populating lower-mass halos. A similar, but significantly stronger, trend exists with halo age, where early-forming halos are more likely to host central galaxies at lower halo mass. We discuss the origin of these trends and the connection to the stellar mass -- halo mass relation. We find that, at fixed halo mass, older halos and to some extent also halos in dense environments tend to host more massive galaxies. Additionally, we see a reverse trend for the satellite galaxies occupation where early-forming halos have fewer satellites, likely due to having more time for them to merge with the central galaxy. We describe these occupancy variations also in terms of the changes in the occupation function parameters, which can aid in constructing realistic mock galaxy catalogs. Finally, we study the corresponding galaxy auto- and cross-correlation functions of the different samples and elucidate the impact of assembly bias on galaxy clustering. Our results can inform theoretical models of assembly bias and attempts to detect it in the real universe.
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    The angular positions of quasars are deflected by the gravitational lensing effect of foreground matter. The Lyman-alpha forest seen in the spectra of these quasars is therefore also lensed. We propose that the signature of weak gravitational lensing of the forest could be measured using similar techniques that have been applied to the lensed Cosmic Microwave Background, and which have also been proposed for application to spectral data from 21cm radio telescopes. As with 21cm data, the forest has the advantage of spectral information, potentially yielding many lensed "slices" at different redshifts. We perform an illustrative idealized test, generating a high resolution angular grid of quasars (of order arcminute separation), and lensing the Lyman-alphaforest spectra at redshifts z=2-3 using a foreground density field. We find that standard quadratic estimators can be used to reconstruct images of the foreground mass distribution at z~1. There currently exists a wealth of Lya forest data from quasar and galaxy spectral surveys, with smaller sightline separations expected in the future. Lyman-alpha forest lensing is sensitive to the foreground mass distribution at redshifts intermediate between CMB lensing and galaxy shear, and avoids the difficulties of shape measurement associated with the latter. With further refinement and application of mass reconstruction techniques, weak gravitational lensing of the high redshift Lya forest may become a useful new cosmological probe.
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    We investigate the role of thermal velocities in N-body simulations of structure formation in warm dark matter models. Starting from the commonly used approach of adding thermal velocities, randomly selected from a Fermi-Dirac distribution, to the gravitationally-induced (peculiar) velocities of the simulation particles, we compare the matter and velocity power spectra measured from CDM and WDM simulations with and without thermal velocities. This prescription for adding thermal velocities results in deviations in the velocity field in the initial conditions away from the linear theory predictions, which affects the evolution of structure at later times. We show that this is entirely due to numerical noise. For a warm candidate with mass $3.3$ keV, the matter and velocity power spectra measured from simulations with thermal velocities starting at $z=199$ deviate from the linear prediction at $k \gtrsim10$ $h/$Mpc, with an enhancement of the matter power spectrum $\sim \mathcal{O}(10)$ and of the velocity power spectrum $\sim \mathcal{O}(10^2)$ at wavenumbers $k \sim 64$ $h/$Mpc with respect to the case without thermal velocities. At late times, these effects tend to be less pronounced. Indeed, at $z=0$ the deviations do not exceed $6\%$ (in the velocity spectrum) and $1\%$ (in the matter spectrum) for scales $10 <k< 64$ $h/$Mpc. Increasing the resolution of the N-body simulations shifts these deviations to higher wavenumbers. The noise introduces more spurious structures in WDM simulations with thermal velocities and modifies the radial density profiles of dark matter haloes. We find that spurious haloes start to appear in simulations which include thermal velocities at a mass that is $\sim$3 times larger than in simulations without thermal velocities.
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    We study different phenomenological signatures associated with new spin-2 particles. These new degrees of freedom, that we call hidden gravitons, arise in different high-energy theories such as extra-dimensional models or extensions of General Relativity. At low energies, hidden gravitons can be generally described by the Fierz-Pauli Lagrangian. Their phenomenology is parameterized by two dimensionful constants: their mass and their coupling strength. In this work, we analyze two different sets of constraints. On the one hand, we study potential deviations from the inverse-square law on solar-system and laboratory scales. To extend the constraints to scales where the laboratory probes are not competitive, we also study consequences on astrophysical objects. We analyze in detail the processes that may take place in stellar interiors and lead to emission of hidden gravitons, acting like an additional source of energy loss.
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    Exploiting the powerful tool of strong gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters to study the highest-redshift Universe and cluster mass distributions relies on precise lens mass modelling. In this work, we present the first attempt at modelling line-of-sight mass distribution in addition to that of the cluster, extending previous modelling techniques that assume mass distributions to be on a single lens plane. We focus on the Hubble Frontier Field cluster MACS J0416.1-2403, and our multi-plane model reproduces the observed image positions with a rms offset of ~0.53". Starting from this best-fitting model, we simulate a mock cluster that resembles MACS J0416.1-2403 in order to explore the effects of line-of-sight structures on cluster mass modelling. By systematically analysing the mock cluster under different model assumptions, we find that neglecting the lensing environment has a significant impact on the reconstruction of image positions (rms ~0.3"); accounting for line-of-sight galaxies as if they were at the cluster redshift can partially reduce this offset. Moreover, foreground galaxies are more important to include into the model than the background ones. While the magnification factors of the lensed multiple images are recovered within ~10% for ~95% of them, those ~5% that lie near critical curves can be significantly affected by the exclusion of the lensing environment in the models (up to a factor of ~200). In addition, line-of-sight galaxies cannot explain the apparent discrepancy in the properties of massive subhalos between MACS J0416.1-2403 and N-body simulated clusters. Since our model of MACS J0416.1-2403 with line-of-sight galaxies only reduced modestly the rms offset in the image positions, we conclude that additional complexities, such as more flexible halo shapes, would be needed in future models of MACS J0416.1-2403.
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    In this paper we use high-resolution cosmological simulations to study halo intrinsic alignment and its dependence on mass, formation time and large-scale environment. In agreement with previous studies using N-body simulations, it is found that massive halos have stronger alignment. For given mass, older halos have stronger alignment than younger ones. By identifying the cosmic environment of halo using Hessian matrix, we find that for given mass, halos in cluster regions also have stronger alignment than those in filament. The existing theory has not addressed these dependencies explicitly. In this work we extend the linear alignment model with inclusion of halo bias and find that the halo alignment with its mass and formation time dependence can be explained by halo bias. However, the model can not account for the environment dependence, as it is found that halo bias is lower in cluster and higher in filament. Our results suggest that halo bias and environment are independent factors in determining halo alignment. We also study the halo alignment correlation function and find that halos are strongly clustered along their major axes and less clustered along the minor axes. The correlated halo alignment can extend to scale as large as $100h^{-1}$Mpc where its feature is mainly driven by the baryon acoustic oscillation effect.
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    We derive the stochastic description of a massless, interacting scalar field in de Sitter space directly from the quantum theory. This is done by showing that the density matrix for the effective theory of the long wavelength fluctuations of the field obeys a quantum version of the Fokker-Planck equation. This equation has a simple connection with the standard Fokker-Planck equation of the classical stochastic theory, which can be generalised to any order in perturbation theory. We illustrate this formalism in detail for the theory of a massless scalar field with a quartic interaction.

Recent comments

Māris Ozols Feb 18 2016 14:29 UTC

"...structures seen in the universe today, from clusters of galaxies to Donald Trump."

Frédéric Grosshans Mar 05 2014 10:03 UTC

I read this paper as an appendix of an unwritten Fantasy novel, where a 21st century cosmologist is trapped in an alternate Aristotelian 13th century universe ! Thanks for the nice read !