Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (astro-ph.CO)

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    We give an overview of the current status of keV sterile neutrino Dark Matter. After a short introduction, we start by a general discussion of non-thermal production of Dark Matter, which applies to the three most commonly discussed mechanisms to produce sterile neutrino Dark Matter in the Universe: non-resonant, resonant, and decay production. The main goal in each case is to compute the momentum distribution function $f(p,t)$, which incorporates the full information about the Dark Matter setting under consideration, at least in what concerns its cosmological aspects. While some difficulties lie in the actual computation of this quantity, it is decisive to obtain bounds from cosmic structure formation, which turn out to be the most crucial ones to distinguish different types of production. We will introduce these bounds and we put the resulting limits into a proper context, thereby illustrating that a significant amount of relevant parameter space is available, part of which is testable in particular by Lyman-$\alpha$ data.
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    We generalise Starobinsky's model of inflation to space-times with $D>4$ dimensions, where $D-4$ dimensions are compactified on a suitable manifold. The $D$-dimensional action features Einstein-Hilbert gravity, a higher-order curvature term, a cosmological constant, and potential contributions from fluxes in the compact dimensions. The existence of a stable flat direction in the four-dimensional EFT implies that the power of space-time curvature, $n$, and the rank of the compact space fluxes, $p$, are constrained via $n=p=D/2$. Whenever these constraints are satisfied, a consistent single-field inflation model can be built into this setup, where the inflaton field is the same as in the four-dimensional Starobinsky model. The resulting predictions for the CMB observables are nearly indistinguishable from those of the latter.
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    We examine whether an extended scenario of a two-scalar-field model, in which a mixed kinetic term of canonical and phantom scalar fields is involved, admits the Bianchi type I metric, which is homogeneous but anisotropic spacetime, as its power-law solutions. Then we analyze the stability of the anisotropic power-law solutions to see whether these solutions respect the cosmic no-hair conjecture or not during the inflationary phase. In addition, we will also investigate a special scenario, where the pure kinetic terms of canonical and phantom fields disappear altogether in field equations, to test again the validity of cosmic no-hair conjecture. As a result, the cosmic no-hair conjecture always holds in both these scenarios due to the instability of the corresponding anisotropic inflationary solutions.
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    Massive Primordial Black Holes (MPBH) can be formed after inflation due to broad peaks in the primordial curvature power spectrum that collapse gravitationally during the radiation era, to form clusters of black holes that merge and increase in mass after recombination, generating today a broad mass-spectrum of black holes with masses ranging from 0.01 to $10^5~M_\odot$. These MPBH could act as seeds for galaxies and quick-start structure formation, initiating reionization, forming galaxies at redshift $z>10$ and clusters at $z>1$. They may also be the seeds on which SMBH and IMBH form, by accreting gas onto them and forming the centers of galaxies and quasars at high redshift. They form at rest with zero spin and have negligible cross-section with ordinary matter. If there are enough of these MPBH, they could constitute the bulk of the Dark Matter today. Such PBH could be responsible for the observed fluctuations in the CIB and X-ray backgrounds. MPBH could be directly detected by the gravitational waves emitted when they merge to form more massive black holes, as recently reported by LIGO. Their continuous merging since recombination could have generated a stochastic background of gravitational waves that could eventually be detected by LISA and PTA. MPBH may actually be responsible for the unidentified point sources seen by Fermi, Magic and Chandra. Furthermore, the ejection of stars from shallow potential wells like those of Dwarf Spheroidals (DSph), via the gravitational slingshot effect, could be due to MPBH, thus alleviating the substructure and too-big-to-fail problems of standard collisionless CDM. Their mass distribution peaks at a few tens of $M_\odot$ today, and could be detected also with long-duration microlensing events, as well as by the anomalous motion of stars in GAIA. Their presence as CDM in the Universe could be seen in the time-dilation of lensed images of quasars.
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    A recent analysis of the Supernova Ia data claims a 'marginal' ($\sim3\sigma$) evidence for a cosmic acceleration. This result has been complemented with a non-accelerating $R_{h}=ct$ cosmology, which was presented as a valid alternative to the $\Lambda$CDM model. In this paper, we use the same analysis to show that a non-marginal evidence for acceleration is actually found. We compare the standard Friedmann models to the $R_{h}=ct$ cosmology by complementing SN Ia data with the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, Gamma Ray Bursts and Observational Hubble datasets. We also study the power-law model which is a functional generalisation of $R_{h}=ct$. We find that the evidence for late-time acceleration is beyond refutable at a 4.56$\sigma$ confidence level from SN Ia data alone, and at an even stronger confidence level ($5.38\sigma$) from our joint analysis. Also, the non-accelerating $R_{h}=ct$ model fails to statistically compare with the $\Lambda$CDM having a $\Delta(\text{AIC})\sim30$.
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    We use BBN observational data on primordial abundance of ${}^4He$ to constrain f(T) gravity. The three most studied viable $f(T)$ models, namely the power law, the exponential and the square-root exponential are considered, and the BBN bounds are adopted in order to extract constraints on their free parameters. For the power-law model, we find that the constraints are in agreement with those acquired using late-time cosmological data. For the exponential and the square-root exponential models, we show that for realiable regions of parameters space they always satisfy the BBN bounds. We conclude that viable f(T) models can successfully satisfy the BBN constraints.
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    Thermal production of light dark matter with sub-GeV scale mass can be attributed to $3\rightarrow 2$ self-annihilation processes. We consider the thermal average for annihilation cross sections of dark matter at $3\rightarrow 2$ and general higher-order interactions. A correct thermal average for initial dark matter particles is important, in particular, for annihilation cross sections with overall velocity dependence and/or resonance poles. We apply our general results to benchmark models for SIMP dark matter and discuss the effects of the resonance pole in determining the relic density.
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    It is shown that the serious problem on the cosmological tension between the direct measurements of the Hubble constant at present and the constant derived from the Planck measurements of the CMB anisotropies can be solved by considering the renormalized model parameters. They are deduced by taking the spatial average of second-order perturbations in the flat Lambda-CDM model, which includes random adiabatic fluctuations.
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    A well-studied possibility is that dark matter may reside in a sector secluded from the Standard Model, except for the so-called photon portal: kinetic mixing between the ordinary and dark photons. Such interactions can be probed at dark matter direct detection experiments, and new experimental techniques involving detection of dark matter-electron scattering offer new sensitivity to sub-GeV dark matter. Typically however it is implicitly assumed that the dark matter is not altered as it traverses the Earth to arrive at the detector. In this paper we study in detail the effects of terrestrial stopping on dark photon models of dark matter, and find that they significantly reduce the sensitivity of XENON10 and DAMIC. In particular we find that XENON10 only excludes masses in the range (5-3000) MeV while DAMIC only probes (20-50) MeV. Their corresponding cross section sensitivity is reduced to a window of cross sections between $(5\times 10^{-38}-10^{-30})~{\rm cm}^{2}$ for XENON10 and a small window around $\sim 10^{-31}~{\rm cm}^{2}$ for DAMIC. We also examine implications for a future DAMIC run.
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    We propose a model for the density statistics in supersonic turbulence, which play a crucial role in star-formation and the physics of the interstellar medium (ISM). Motivated by [Hopkins, MNRAS, 430, 1880 (2013)], the model considers the density to be arranged into a collection of strong shocks of width $\sim\! \mathcal{M}^{-2}$, where $\mathcal{M}$ is the turbulent Mach number. With two physically motivated parameters, the model predicts all density statistics for $\mathcal{M}>1$ turbulence: the density probability distribution and its intermittency (deviation from log-normality), the density variance-Mach number relation, power spectra, and structure functions. For the proposed model parameters, reasonable agreement is seen between model predictions and numerical simulations, albeit within the large uncertainties associated with current simulation results. More generally, the model could provide a useful framework for more detailed analysis of future simulations and observational data. Due to the simple physical motivations for the model in terms of shocks, it is straightforward to generalize to more complex physical processes, which will be helpful in future more detailed applications to the ISM. We see good qualitative agreement between such extensions and recent simulations of non-isothermal turbulence.
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    We develop the framework for testing Lorentz invariance in the dark matter sector using galactic dynamics. We consider a Lorentz violating (LV) vector field acting on the dark matter component of a satellite galaxy orbiting in a host halo. We introduce a numerical model for the dynamics of satellites in a galactic halo and for a galaxy in a rich cluster to explore observational consequences of such an LV field. The orbital motion of a satellite excites a time dependent LV force which greatly affects its internal dynamics. Our analysis points out key observational signatures which serve as probes of LV forces. These include modifications to the line of sight velocity dispersion, mass profiles and shapes of satellites. With future data and a more detailed modeling these signatures can be exploited to constrain a new region of the parameter space describing the LV in the dark matter sector.
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    Large scale filaments, with lengths that can reach tens of Mpc, are the most prominent features in the cosmic web. These filaments have only been observed indirectly through the positions of galaxies in large galaxy surveys or through absorption features in the spectra of high redshift sources. In this study we propose to go one step further and directly detect intergalactic medium filaments through their emission in the HI 21cm line. We make use of high resolution cosmological simulations to estimate the intensity of this emission in low redshift filaments and use it to make predictions for the direct detectability of specific filaments previously inferred from galaxy surveys, in particular the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Given the expected signal of these filaments our study shows that HI emission from large filaments can be observed by current and next generation radio telescopes. We estimate that gas in filaments of length $l \gtrsim$ 15 $h^{-1}$Mpc with relatively small inclinations to the line of sight ($\lesssim 10^\circ$) can be observed in $\sim40-100$ hours with telescopes such as GMRT or EVLA, potentially providing large improvements over our knowledge of the astrophysical properties of these filaments. Due to their large field of view and sufficiently long integration times, upcoming HI surveys with the Apertif and ASKAP instruments will be able to detect large filaments independently of their orientation and curvature. Furthermore, our estimates indicate that a more powerful future radio telescope like SKA-2 can be used to map most of these filaments, which will allow them to be used as a strong cosmological probe.
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    We study large families of theories of interacting spin 2 particles from the point of view of causality. Although it is often stated that there is a unique Lorentz invariant effective theory of massless spin 2, namely general relativity, other theories that utilize higher derivative interactions do in fact exist. These theories are distinct from general relativity, as they permit any number of species of spin 2 particles, are described by a much larger set of parameters, and are not constrained to satisfy the equivalence principle. We consider the leading spin 2 couplings to scalars, fermions, and vectors, and systematically study signal propagation in all these other families of theories. We find that most interactions directly lead to superluminal propagation of either a spin 2 particle or a matter particle, and interactions that are subluminal generate other interactions that are superluminal. Hence, such theories of interacting multiple spin 2 species have superluminality, and by extension, acausality. This is radically different to the special case of general relativity with a single species of minimally coupled spin 2, which leads to subluminal propagation from sources satisfying the null energy condition. This pathology persists even if the spin 2 field is massive. We compare these findings to the analogous case of spin 1 theories, where higher derivative interactions can be causal. This makes the spin 2 case very special, and suggests that multiple species of spin 2 is forbidden, leading us to general relativity as essentially the unique internally consistent effective theory of spin 2.

Recent comments

Māris Ozols Feb 18 2016 14:29 UTC

"...structures seen in the universe today, from clusters of galaxies to Donald Trump."

Frédéric Grosshans Mar 05 2014 10:03 UTC

I read this paper as an appendix of an unwritten Fantasy novel, where a 21st century cosmologist is trapped in an alternate Aristotelian 13th century universe ! Thanks for the nice read !