Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (astro-ph.CO)

  • PDF
    The phase transition responsible for axion dark matter production can create large amplitude isocurvature perturbations which collapse into dense objects known as axion miniclusters. We use microlensing data from the EROS survey, and from recent observations with the Subaru Hyper Suprime Cam to place constraints on the minicluster scenario. We compute the microlensing event rate for miniclusters treating them as spatially extended objects with an extended mass function. Using the published bounds on the number of microlensing events we bound the fraction of DM collapsed into miniclusters, $f_{\rm MC}$. For an axion with temperature dependent mass consistent with the QCD axion we find $f_{\rm MC}<0.22(m_a/100\,\mu\text{eV})^{-0.57}$, which represents the first observational constraint on the minicluster fraction. We forecast that a high-efficiency observation of ten nights with Subaru would be sufficient to constrain $f_{\rm MC}\lesssim 0.1$ over the entire QCD axion mass range. We make various approximations to derive these constraints and dedicated analyses by the observing teams of EROS and Subaru are necessary to confirm our results. If accurate theoretical predictions for $f_{\rm MC}$ can be made in future then microlensing can be used to exclude, or discover, the QCD axion. Further details of our computations are presented in a companion paper.
  • PDF
    With the first two detections in late 2015, astrophysics has officially entered into the new era of gravitational wave observations. Since then, much has been going on in the field with a lot of work focussing on the observations and implications for astrophysics and tests of general relativity in the strong regime. However much less is understood about how gravitational detectors really work at their fundamental level. For decades, the response to incoming signals has been customarily calculated using the very same physical principle, which has proved so successful in the first detections. In this paper we review the physical principle that is behind such a detection at the very fundamental level, and we try to highlight the peculiar subtleties that make it so hard in practice. We will then mention how detectors are built starting from this fundamental measurement element.
  • PDF
    Motivated by tension between the predictions of ordinary cold dark matter (CDM) and observations at galactic scales, ultralight axionlike particles (ULALPs) with mass of the order $10^{-22}~{\rm eV}$ have been proposed as an alternative CDM candidate. We consider cold and collisionless ULALPs produced in the early universe by the vacuum realignment mechanism and constituting most of CDM. The ULALP fluid is commonly described by classical field equations. However, we show that, like QCD axions, the ULALPs thermalize by gravitational self-interactions and form a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), a quantum phenomenon. ULALPs, like QCD axions, explain the observational evidence for caustic rings of dark matter because they thermalize and go to the lowest energy state available to them. This is one of rigid rotation on the turnaround sphere. By studying the heating effect of infalling ULALPs on galactic disk stars and the thickness of the nearby caustic ring as observed from a triangular feature in the IRAS map of our galactic disk, we obtain lower mass bounds on the ULALP mass of order $10^{-23}~{\rm eV}$ and $10^{-20}~{\rm eV}$ respectively.
  • PDF
    Broad emission-line outflows of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have been proposed for many years but are very difficult to quantitatively study because of the coexistence of the gravitationally-bound and outflow emission. We present detailed analysis of a heavily reddened quasar, SDSS J000610.67+121501.2, whose normal ultraviolet (UV) broad emission lines (BELs) are heavily suppressed by the Dusty Torus as a natural "Coronagraph", thus the blueshifted BELs (BBELs) can be reliably measured. The physical properties of the emission-line outflows are derived as follows: ionization parameter $U \sim 10^{-0.5}$, column density $N_{\rm H}\sim 10^{22.0}$ cm$^{-2}$, covering fraction of $\sim 0.1$ and upper limit density of $n_{\rm H}\sim 10^{5.8}$ cm$^{-3}$. The outflow gases are located at least 41 pc away from the central engine, which suggests that they have expanded to the scale of the dust torus or beyond. Besides, Lya shows a narrow symmetric component, to our surprise, which is undetected in any other lines. After inspecting the narrow emission-line region and the starforming region as the origin of the Lya narrow line, we propose the end-result of outflows, diffusing gases in the larger region, acts as the screen of Lya photons. Future high spatial resolution spectrometry and/or spectropolarimetric observation are needed to make a final clarification.
  • PDF
    Subject of this article is the relationship between modern cosmology and fundamental physics, in particular general relativity as a theory of gravity on one side, together with its unique application in cosmology, and the formation of structures and their statistics on the other. It summarises arguments for the formulation for a metric theory of gravity and the uniqueness of the construction of general relativity. It discusses symmetry arguments in the construction of Friedmann-Lemaître cosmologies as well as assumptions in relation to the presence of dark matter, when adopting general relativity as the gravitational theory. A large section is dedicated to $\Lambda$CDM as the standard model for structure formation and the arguments that led to its construction, and to the of role statistics and to the problem of scientific inference in cosmology as an empirical science. The article concludes with an outlook on current and future developments in cosmology.
  • PDF
    We present an analysis of the pairwise velocity statistics from a suite of cosmological N-body simulations describing the "Running Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker" (R-FLRW) cosmological model. This model is based on quantum field theory in a curved space-time and extends \LambdaCDM with a time-evolving vacuum energy density. To enforce local conservation of matter a time-evolving gravitational coupling is also included. Our results constitute the first study of velocities in the R-FLRW cosmology, and we also compare with other dark energy simulations suites, repeating the same analysis. We find a strong degeneracy between the pairwise velocity and \sigma_8 at z=0 for almost all scenarios considered, which remains even when we look back to epochs as early as z=2. We also investigate various Coupled Dark Energy models, some of which show minimal degeneracy, and reveal interesting deviations from \LambdaCDM which could be readily exploited by future cosmological observations to test and further constrain our understanding of dark energy.
  • PDF
    We introduce CRASH-AMR, a new version of the cosmological Radiative Transfer (RT) code CRASH, enabled to use refined grids. This new feature allows us to attain higher resolution in our RT simulations and thus to describe more accurately ionisation and temperature patterns in high density regions. We have tested CRASH-AMR by simulating the evolution of an ionised region produced by a single source embedded in gas at constant density, as well as by a more realistic configuration of multiple sources in an inhomogeneous density field. While we find an excellent agreement with the previous version of CRASH when the AMR feature is disabled, showing that no numerical artifact has been introduced in CRASH-AMR, when additional refinement levels are used the code can simulate more accurately the physics of ionised gas in high density regions. This result has been attained at no computational loss, as RT simulations on AMR grids with maximum resolution equivalent to that of a uniform cartesian grid can be run with a gain of up to 60% in computational time.
  • PDF
    We use the Horizon Run 4 cosmological N -body simulation to study the effects of distant and close interactions on the alignments of the shapes, spins, and orbits of targets haloes with their neighbours, and their dependence on the local density environment and neighbour separation. Interacting targets have a significantly lower spin and higher sphericity and oblateness than all targets. Interacting pairs initially have anti-parallel spins, but the spins develop parallel alignment as time goes on. Neighbours tend to evolve in the plane of rotation of the target, and in the direction of the major axis of prolate haloes. Moreover, interactions are preferentially radial, while pairs with non-radial orbits are preferentially prograde. The alignment signals are stronger at high-mass and for close separations, and independent on the large-scale density. Positive alignment signals are found at redshifts up to 4, and increase with decreasing redshifts. Moreover, the orbits tend to become prograde at low redshift, while no alignment is found at high redshift (z = 4).
  • PDF
    The forecasted accuracy of upcoming surveys of large-scale structure cannot be achieved without a proper quantification of the error induced by foreground removal (or other systematics like 0-point photometry offset). Because these errors are highly correlated on the sky, their influence is expected to be especially important at very large scales. In this work we quantify how the uncertainty in the visibility mask of a survey influences the measured power spectrum of a sample of tracers of the density field and its covariance matrix. We start from a very large set of 10,000 catalogs of dark matter halos in periodic cosmological boxes, produced with the PINOCCHIO approximate method. To make an analytic approach feasible, we assume luminosity-independent halo bias and an idealized geometry for the visibility mask. We find that the power spectrum of these biased tracers can be expressed as the sum of a cosmological term, a mask term and a term involving their convolution. The mask and convolution terms scale like $P\propto l^2\sigma_A^2$, where $\sigma_A^2$ is the variance of the uncertainty on the visibility mask. With $l=30-100$ Mpc$/h$ and $\sigma_A=5-20$\%, the mask term can be significant at $k\sim0.01-0.1\ h/$Mpc, and the convolution term can amount to $\sim 1-10$\% of the total. For the power spectrum covariance, the coupling of the convolution term with the other two gives rise to several mixed terms, that we quantify by difference using the mock catalogs. These are found to be of the same order of the mask covariance, and to introduce non-diagonal terms at large scales. Then, the power spectrum covariance matrix cannot be expressed as the sum of a cosmological and of a mask term. Our results lie down the theoretical bases to quantify the impact that uncertainties in the mask calibration have on the derivation of cosmological constraints from large spectroscopic surveys. [Abridged]
  • PDF
    Simulations of self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) predict that dark matter should lag behind galaxies during a collision. If the interaction is mediated by a high-mass force carrier, the distribution of dark matter can also develop asymmetric dark matter tails. To search for this asymmetry, we compute the gravitational lensing properties of a mass distribution with a free skewness parameter. We apply this to the dark matter around the four central galaxies in cluster Abell 3827. In the galaxy whose dark matter peak has previously been found to be offset, we measure skewness $s=0.23^{+0.05}_{-0.22}$ in the same direction as the peak offset. Our method may be useful in future gravitational lensing analyses of colliding galaxy clusters and merging galaxies.
  • PDF
    We explore for the first time the effect of self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) on the dark matter (DM) and baryonic distribution in massive galaxies formed in hydrodynamical cosmological simulations, including explicit baryonic physics treatment. A novel implementation of Super-Massive Black Hole (SMBH) formation and evolution is used, as in Tremmel et al.(2015, 2016), allowing to explicitly follow SMBH dynamics at the center of galaxies. A high SIDM constant cross-section is chosen, $\sigma$=10 $\rm cm^2/gr$, to amplify differences from CDM models. Milky Way-like galaxies form a shallower DM density profile in SIDM than they do in CDM, with differences already at 20 kpc scales. This demonstrates that even for the most massive spirals the effect of SIDM dominates over the adiabatic contraction due to baryons. Strikingly, the dynamics of SMBHs differs in the SIDM and reference CDM case. SMBHs in massive spirals have sunk to the centre of their host galaxy in both the SIDM and CDM run, while in less massive galaxies about 80$\%$ of the SMBH population is off-centered in the SIDM case, as opposed to the CDM case in which $\sim$90$\%$ of SMBHs have reached their host's centre. SMBHs are found as far as $\sim$9 kpc away from the centre of their host SIDM galaxy. This difference is due to the increased dynamical friction timescale caused by the lower DM density in SIDM galaxies compared to CDM, resulting in 'core stalling'. This pilot work highlights the importance of simulating in a full hydrodynamical context different DM models combined to SMBH physics to study their influence on galaxy formation.
  • PDF
    We present here predictions for the spatial distribution of 21 cm brightness temperature fluctuations from high-dynamic-range simulations for AGN-dominated reionization histories that have been tested against available Lyman-alpha and CMB data. We model AGN by extrapolating the observed M-sigma relation to high redshifts and assign them ionizing emissivities consistent with recent UV luminosity function measurements. We assess the observability of the predicted spatial 21 cm fluctuations by ongoing and upcoming experiments in the late stages of reionization in the limit in which the hydrogen 21 cm spin temperature is significantly larger than the CMB temperature. Our AGN-dominated reionization histories increase the variance of the 21 cm emission by a factor of up to ten compared to similar reionization histories dominated by faint galaxies, to values close to 100 mK^2 at scales accessible to experiments (k < 1 h/cMpc). This is lower than the sensitivity claimed to have been already reached by ongoing experiments by only a factor of about two or less. When reionization is dominated by AGN, the 21 cm power spectrum is enhanced on all scales due to the enhanced bias of the clustering of the more massive haloes and the peak in the large scale 21 cm power is strongly enhanced and moved to larger scales due to bigger characteristic bubble sizes. AGN dominated reionization should be easily detectable by LOFAR (and later HERA and SKA1) at their design sensitivity, assuming successful foreground subtraction and instrument calibration. Conversely, these could become the first non-trivial reionization scenarios to be ruled out by 21 cm experiments, thereby constraining the contribution of AGN to reionization.

Recent comments

Māris Ozols Feb 18 2016 14:29 UTC

"...structures seen in the universe today, from clusters of galaxies to Donald Trump."

Frédéric Grosshans Mar 05 2014 10:03 UTC

I read this paper as an appendix of an unwritten Fantasy novel, where a 21st century cosmologist is trapped in an alternate Aristotelian 13th century universe ! Thanks for the nice read !