Astrophysics (astro-ph)

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    On August 17, 2017 at 12:41:04 UTC the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational-wave detectors made their first observation of a binary neutron star inspiral. The signal, GW170817, was detected with a combined signal-to-noise ratio of 32.4 and a false-alarm-rate estimate of less than one per $8.0\times10^4$ years. We infer the component masses of the binary to be between 0.86 and 2.26 $M_\odot$, in agreement with masses of known neutron stars. Restricting the component spins to the range inferred in binary neutron stars, we find the component masses to be in the range 1.17 to 1.60 $M_\odot$, with the total mass of the system $2.74^{+0.04}_{-0.01}\,M_\odot$. The source was localized within a sky region of 28 deg$^2$ (90% probability) and had a luminosity distance of $40^{+8}_{-14}$ Mpc, the closest and most precisely localized gravitational-wave signal yet. The association with the gamma-ray burst GRB 170817A, detected by Fermi-GBM 1.7 s after the coalescence, corroborates the hypothesis of a neutron star merger and provides the first direct evidence of a link between these mergers and short gamma-ray bursts. Subsequent identification of transient counterparts across the electromagnetic spectrum in the same location further supports the interpretation of this event as a neutron star merger. This unprecedented joint gravitational and electromagnetic observation provides insight into astrophysics, dense matter, gravitation and cosmology.
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    On 2017 August 17 a binary neutron star coalescence candidate (later designated GW170817) with merger time 12:41:04 UTC was observed through gravitational waves by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detectors. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor independently detected a gamma-ray burst (GRB 170817A) with a time delay of $\sim$1.7 s with respect to the merger time. From the gravitational-wave signal, the source was initially localized to a sky region of 31 deg$^2$ at a luminosity distance of $40^{+8}_{-8}$ Mpc and with component masses consistent with neutron stars. The component masses were later measured to be in the range 0.86 to 2.26 Msun. An extensive observing campaign was launched across the electromagnetic spectrum leading to the discovery of a bright optical transient (SSS17a, now with the IAU identification of AT 2017gfo) in NGC 4993 (at $\sim$40 Mpc) less than 11 hours after the merger by the One-Meter, Two Hemisphere (1M2H) team using the 1 m Swope Telescope. The optical transient was independently detected by multiple teams within an hour. Subsequent observations targeted the object and its environment. Early ultraviolet observations revealed a blue transient that faded within 48 hours. Optical and infrared observations showed a redward evolution over $\sim$10 days. Following early non-detections, X-ray and radio emission were discovered at the transient's position $\sim$9 and $\sim$16 days, respectively, after the merger. Both the X-ray and radio emission likely arise from a physical process that is distinct from the one that generates the UV/optical/near-infrared emission. No ultra-high-energy gamma-rays and no neutrino candidates consistent with the source were found in follow-up searches. (Abridged)
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    The discovery of a kilonova (KN) associated with the Advanced LIGO (aLIGO)/Virgo event GW170817 opens up new avenues of multi-messenger astrophysics. Here, using realistic simulations, we provide estimates of the number of KNe that could be found in data from past, present and future surveys without a gravitational-wave trigger. For the simulation, we construct a spectral time-series model based on the DES-GW multi-band light-curve from the single known KN event, and we use an average of BNS rates from past studies of $10^3 \rm{Gpc}^{-3}/\rm{year}$, consistent with the $1$ event found so far. Examining past and current datasets from transient surveys, the number of KNe we expect to find for ASAS-SN, SDSS, PS1, SNLS, DES, and SMT is between 0 and $0.3$. We predict the number of detections per future survey to be: 8.3 from ATLAS, 10.6 from ZTF, 5.5/69 from LSST (the Deep Drilling / Wide Fast Deep), and 16.0 from WFIRST. The maximum redshift of KNe discovered for each survey is z = 0.8 for WFIRST, z = 0.25 for LSST and z = 0.04 for ZTF and ATLAS. For the LSST survey, we also provide contamination estimates from Type Ia and Core-collapse supernovae: after light-curve and template-matching requirements, we estimate a background of just 2 events. More broadly, we stress that future transient surveys should consider how to optimize their search strategies to improve their detection efficiency, and to consider similar analyses for GW follow-up programs.
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    Gravitational waves were discovered with the detection of binary black hole mergers and they should also be detectable from lower mass neutron star mergers. These are predicted to eject material rich in heavy radioactive isotopes that can power an electromagnetic signal called a kilonova. The gravitational wave source GW170817 arose from a binary neutron star merger in the nearby Universe with a relatively well confined sky position and distance estimate. Here we report observations and physical modelling of a rapidly fading electromagnetic transient in the galaxy NGC4993, which is spatially coincident with GW170817 and a weak short gamma-ray burst. The transient has physical parameters broadly matching the theoretical predictions of blue kilonovae from neutron star mergers. The emitted electromagnetic radiation can be explained with an ejected mass of 0.04 +/- 0.01 Msol, with an opacity of kappa <= 0.5 cm2/gm at a velocity of 0.02 +/- 0.1c. The power source is constrained to have a power law slope of beta = -1.2 +/- 0.3, consistent with radioactive powering from r-process nuclides. We identify line features in the spectra that are consistent with light r-process elements (90 < A < 140). As it fades, the transient rapidly becomes red, and emission may have contribution by a higher opacity, lanthanide-rich ejecta component. This indicates that neutron star mergers produce gravitational waves, radioactively powered kilonovae, and are a nucleosynthetic source of the r-process elements.
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    Merging neutron stars offer an exquisite laboratory for simultaneously studying strong-field gravity and matter in extreme environments. We establish the physical association of an electromagnetic counterpart EM170817 to gravitational waves (GW170817) detected from merging neutron stars. By synthesizing a panchromatic dataset, we demonstrate that merging neutron stars are a long-sought production site forging heavy elements by r-process nucleosynthesis. The weak gamma-rays seen in EM170817 are dissimilar to classical short gamma-ray bursts with ultra-relativistic jets. Instead, we suggest that breakout of a wide-angle, mildly-relativistic cocoon engulfing the jet elegantly explains the low-luminosity gamma-rays, the high-luminosity ultraviolet-optical-infrared and the delayed radio/X-ray emission. We posit that all merging neutron stars may lead to a wide-angle cocoon breakout; sometimes accompanied by a successful jet and sometimes a choked jet.
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    We present an analysis of the host-galaxy environment of Swope Supernova Survey 2017a (SSS17a), the discovery of an electromagnetic counterpart to a gravitational wave source, GW170817. SSS17a occurred 1.9 kpc (in projection; 10.2") from the nucleus of NGC 4993, an S0 galaxy at a distance of 40 Mpc. We present a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) pre-trigger image of NGC 4993, Magellan optical spectroscopy of the nucleus of NGC 4993 and the location of SSS17a, and broad-band UV through IR photometry of NGC 4993. The spectrum and broad-band spectral-energy distribution indicate that NGC 4993 has a stellar mass of log (M/M_solar) = 10.49^+0.08_-0.20 and star formation rate of 0.003 M_solar/yr, and the progenitor system of SSS17a likely had an age of >2.8 Gyr. There is no counterpart at the position of SSS17a in the HST pre-trigger image, indicating that the progenitor system had an absolute magnitude M_V > -5.8 mag. We detect dust lanes extending out to almost the position of SSS17a and >100 likely globular clusters associated with NGC 4993. The offset of SSS17a is similar to many short gamma-ray burst offsets, and its progenitor system was likely bound to NGC 4993. The environment of SSS17a is consistent with an old progenitor system such as a binary neutron star system.
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    We discovered Swope Supernova Survey 2017a (SSS17a) in the LIGO/Virgo Collaboration (LVC) localization volume of GW170817, the first detected binary neutron star (BNS) merger, only 10.9 hours after the trigger. No object was present at the location of SSS17a only a few days earlier, providing a qualitative spatial and temporal association with GW170817. Here we quantify this association, finding that SSS17a is almost certainly the counterpart of GW170817, with the chance of a coincidence being < 9 x 10^-6 (90% confidence). We arrive at this conclusion by comparing the optical properties of SSS17a to other known astrophysical transients, finding that SSS17a fades and cools faster than any other observed transient. For instance, SSS17a fades >5 mag in g within 7 days of our first data point while all other known transients of similar luminosity fade by <1 mag during the same time period. Its spectra are also unique, being mostly featureless, even as it cools. The rarity of "SSS17a-like" transients combined with the relatively small LVC localization volume and recent non-detection imply the extremely unlikely chance coincidence. We find that the volumetric rate of SSS17a-like transients is < 1.6 x 10^4 Gpc^-3 year^-1 and the Milky Way rate is <0.19 per century. A transient survey designed to discover similar events should be high cadence and observe in red filters. The LVC will likely detect substantially more BNS mergers than current optical surveys will independently discover SSS17a-like transients, however a 1-day cadence survey with LSST could discover an order of magnitude more events.
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    We present the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations of the binary neutron star merger event GW170817 and the associated short gamma-ray burst (SGRB) GRB\u2009170817A detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor. The LAT was entering the South Atlantic Anomaly at the time of the LIGO/Virgo trigger ($t_{\rm GW}$) and therefore cannot place constraints on the existence of high-energy (E $>$ 100 MeV) emission associated with the moment of binary coalescence. We focus instead on constraining high-energy emission on longer timescales. No candidate electromagnetic counterpart was detected by the LAT on timescales of minutes, hours, or days after the LIGO/Virgo detection. The resulting flux upper bound (at 95\% C.L.\/) from the LAT is $4.5\times$10$^{-10}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ in the 0.1--1 GeV range covering a period from T0 + 1153 s to T0 + 2027 s. At the distance of GRB\u2009170817A, this flux upper bound corresponds to a luminosity upper bound of 9.7$\times10^{43}$ erg s$^{-1}$, which is 5 orders of magnitude less luminous than the only other LAT SGRB with known redshift, GRB\u2009090510. We also discuss the prospects for LAT detection of electromagnetic counterparts to future gravitational wave events from Advanced LIGO/Virgo in the context of GW170817/GRB\u2009170817A.
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    The Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo observatories recently discovered gravitational waves from a binary neutron star inspiral. A short gamma-ray burst (GRB) that followed the merger of this binary was also recorded by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (Fermi-GBM), and the Anticoincidence Shield for the Spectrometer for the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), indicating particle acceleration by the source. The precise location of the event was determined by optical detections of emission following the merger. We searched for high-energy neutrinos from the merger in the GeV--EeV energy range using the ANTARES, IceCube, and Pierre Auger Observatories. No neutrinos directionally coincident with the source were detected within $\pm500$ s around the merger time. Additionally, no MeV neutrino burst signal was detected coincident with the merger. We further carried out an extended search in the direction of the source for high-energy neutrinos within the 14-day period following the merger, but found no evidence of emission. We used these results to probe dissipation mechanisms in relativistic outflows driven by the binary neutron star merger. The non-detection is consistent with model predictions of short GRBs observed at a large off-axis angle.
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    Context. Glitches are important to understand the internal structure of neutron stars. They are studied using timing observations. The best studied neutron star in this respect is the Crab Pulsar. The first glitch recorded in this pulsar occurred in 1969 Sep, at an epoch when timing observations (and their analysis) were still in their infancy, the regularity of the observations was relatively poor, and errors on the observations were relatively high in the initial stages of the observations. Lyne et al. (1993) analyzed most of the available data using modern techniques, and showed that this was a typical glitch of the Crab pulsar, with typical glitch parameters. Aims. This work analyses all available data, and shows that the 1969 event in the Crab pulsar is amenable to radically different interpretations. Methods. The Crab pulsar was timed by five different groups during this epoch, one at radio and the rest at optical frequencies. These data are available in the public domain, and have been analyzed using the TEMPO2 software. Results. The 1969 event in the Crab pulsar can be better modeled as a typical glitch that was interrupted by a (recently proposed) non-glitch speed-up event. This work also demonstrates a frequency and amplitude modulated sinusoidal variation in the timing noise of the Crab pulsar; such a coherent oscillation has not been noticed so far in either the Crab or any other pulsar. Conclusions. This work provides an explanation for the post-glitch behavior of the Crab pulsar glitches of 1969 Sep and 2004 Nov, and similar glitches in other pulsars, in terms of the recently proposed non-glitch speed-up event. If true, then non-glitch speed-up events may not be as rare as believed earlier. It is unlikely that the frequency and amplitude modulated sinusoidal variation in the timing noise is due to unmodeled planetary companions.
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    The Latin American Giant Observatory (LAGO) is an extended astroparticle observatory with the goal of studying Gamma Ray Bursts (among other extreme universe phenomena), space weather and atmospheric radiation at ground level. It consists of a network of several Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) located at different sites and different latitudes along the American Continent (from Mexico up to the Antarctic region). Another interest of LAGO is to encourage and support the development of experimental basic research in Latin America, mainly with low cost equipment. In the case of Chiapas, Mexico, the experimental astroparticle physics activity was limited, up to now, to data analysis from other detectors located far away from the region. Thanks to the collaboration within LAGO, the deployment of one WCD is ongoing at the Universidad Autónoma de Chiapas (UNACH). This will allow, for the first time in the region, to train students and researchers in the deployment processes. Till now the setup of the signal-processing electronics has been performed and the characterization of the photomultiplier tube is currently being done. The main, short-term goal is to install one WCD on top of the Tacaná volcano in Chiapas in a short term. The status of the work is presented.
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    Using Hamilton-Jacobi formalism, The scenario of warm inflation with viscous pressure is considered. The formalism gives a way of computing the slow-rolling parameters without extra approximation, and it is well-known as a powerful method in cold inflation. The model is studied in detail for three different cases of dissipation and bulk viscous pressure coefficients. In the first case where both coefficients are taken as a constant, it is shown that the case could not portray warm inflationary scenario compatible with observational data even it is possible to restrict the model parameters. For other cases, the results shows that the model could properly predicts the perturbation parameters in which they stay in perfect agreement with Planck data. As a further argument, $r-n_s$ and $\alpha_s-n_s$ are drown that show the required result could stand in acceptable area expressing a compatibility with observational data.
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    Using $\sim 100$ X-ray selected clusters in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data, we constrain the luminosity function of cluster red sequence galaxies in the redshift range of $0.1<z<1.05$. We develop a hierarchical Bayesian method that simultaneously models redshift evolution and cluster mass dependence. The results from this method are tested by red sequence luminosity function parameters derived in cluster redshift or mass bins. We find a hint that the faint end slope of a Schechter function fit may evolve with redshift at a significance level of $\sim 1.9 \sigma$. Faint cluster red sequence galaxies possibly become more abundant at lower redshift, indicating a different formation time from the bright red sequence galaxies. Optical cluster cosmology analyses may wish to consider this effect when deriving mass proxies. We also constrain the amplitude of the luminosity function with the hierarchical Bayesian method, which strongly correlates with cluster mass and provides an improved estimate of cluster masses. This technique can be applied to a larger sample of X-ray or optically selected clusters from the Dark Energy Survey, significantly improving the sensitivity of the analysis.
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    Gravitational waves from a merger of two neutron stars were discovered for the first time in GW170817, together with diverse electromagnetic (EM) counterparts. To make constraints on a relativistic jet from the NS merger, we calculate the EM signals in (1) the short gamma-ray burst sGRB 170817A from an off-axis jet, (2) the optical-infrared macronova (or kilonova), especially the blue macronova, from a jet-powered coccon, and (3) the X-ray and radio afterglows from the interaction between the jet and interstellar medium. We find that a typical sGRB jet is consistent with these observations, and there is a parameter space to explain all the observations in a unified fashion with an isotropic energy $\sim 10^{51}$--$10^{52}$ erg, opening angle $\sim 20^{\circ}$, and viewing angle $\sim 30^{\circ}$. The off-axis emission is less de-beamed than the point source case because the viewing angle is comparable to the opening angle. The ambient density might be low $\sim 10^{-3}$--$10^{-6}$ cm$^{-3}$, which can be tested by the future observations of radio flares and X-ray remnants.
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    Multi-messenger gravitational wave (GW) astronomy has commenced with the detection of the binary neutron star merger GW170817 and its associated electromagnetic counterparts. The almost coincident observation of the GW and the gamma ray burst GRB170817A constrain the speed of GWs at the level of $|c_g/c-1|\leq4.5\cdot10^{-16}$. We use this result to probe the nature of dark energy (DE), showing that scalar-tensor theories with derivative interactions with the curvature are highly disfavored. As an example we consider the case of Galileons, a well motivated gravity theory with viable cosmology, which predicts a variable GW speed at low redshift, and is hence strongly ruled out by GW170817. Our result essentially eliminates any cosmological application of these DE models and, in general, of quartic and quintic Horndeski and most beyond Horndeski theories. We identify the surviving scalar-tensor models and, in particular, present specific beyond Horndeski theories avoiding this constraint. The viable scenarios are either conformally equivalent to theories in which $c_g=c$ or rely on cancellations of the anomalous GW speed that are valid on arbitrary backgrounds. Our conclusions can be extended to any other gravity theory predicting an anomalous GW propagation speed such as Einstein-Aether, Hořava gravity, Generalized Proca, TeVeS and other MOND-like gravities.
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    Dwarf galaxy anomalies, such as their abundance and cusp-core problems, remain a prime challenge in our understanding of galaxy formation. The inclusion of baryonic physics could potentially solve these issues, but the efficiency of stellar feedback is still controversial. We analytically explore the possibility of feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in dwarf galaxies and compare AGN and supernova (SN) feedback. We assume the presence of an intermediate mass black hole within low mass galaxies and standard scaling relations between the relevant physical quantities. We model the propagation and properties of the outflow and explore the critical condition for global gas ejection. Performing the same calculation for SNe, we compare the ability of AGN and SNe to drive gas out of galaxies. We find that a critical halo mass exists below which AGN feedback can remove gas from the host halo and that the critical halo mass for AGN is greater than the equivalent for SNe in a significant part of the parameter space, suggesting that AGN could provide an alternative and more successful source of negative feedback than SNe, even in the most massive dwarf galaxies.
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    We present the first relativistic MHD numerical simulation of a magnetic jet that propagates through and emerges from the dynamical ejecta of a binary neutron star merger. Generated by the magnetized rotation of the merger remnant, the jet propagates through the ejecta and produces an energetic cocoon that expands at mildly relativistic velocities and breaks out of the ejecta. We show that if the ejecta has a low-mass ($\sim10^{-7} M_\odot$) high-velocity ($v\sim0.85$ c) tail, the cocoon shock breakout will generate $\gamma$-ray emission that is comparable to the observed short GRB170817A that accompanied the recent gravitational wave event GW170817. Thus, we propose that this GRB, which is quite different from all other short GRBs observed before, was produced by a different mechanism. We expect, however, that such events are numerous and many will be detected in coming LIGO-Virgo runs.
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    The short Gamma-Ray Burst, GRB170817A, that followed the binary neutron star merger gravitational waves signal, GW170817, is not a usual sGRB. It is weaker by three orders of magnitude than the weakest sGRB seen before and its spectra, showing a hard early signal followed by a softer thermal spectrum, is unique. We show, first, that the $\gamma$-rays must have emerged from at least mildly relativistic outflow, implying that a relativistic jet was launched following the merger. We then show that the observations are consistent with the predictions of a mildly relativistic shock breakout: a minute $\gamma$-ray energy as compared with the total energy and a rather smooth light curve with a hard to soft evolution. We present here a novel analytic study and detailed numerical 2D and 3D relativistic hydrodynamic and radiation simulations that support the picture in which the observed $\gamma$-rays arose from a shock breakout of a cocoon from the merger's ejecta (Kasliwal 2017). The cocoon can be formed by either a choked jet which does not generate a sGRB (in any direction) or by a successful jet which generates an undetected regular sGRB along the system's axis pointing away from us. Remarkably, for the choked jet model, the macronova signal produced by the ejecta (which is partially boosted to high velocities by the cocoon's shock) and the radio that is produced by the interaction of the shocked cocoon material with the surrounding matter, agree with the observed UV/optical/IR emission and with current radio observations. Finally, we discuss the possibility that the jet propagation within the ejecta may photodissociate some of of the heavy elements and may affect the composition of a fraction of ejecta and, in turn, the opacity and the early macronova light.
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    The LIGO/VIRGO collaboration has recently announced the detection of gravitational waves from a neutron star-neutron star merger (GW170817) and the simultaneous measurement of an optical counterpart (the gamma-ray burst GRB 170817A). The close arrival time of the gravitational and electromagnetic waves limits the difference in speed of photons and gravitons to be less than about one part in $10^{15}$. This has three important implications for cosmological scalar-tensor gravity theories that are often touted as dark energy candidates and alternatives to $\Lambda$CDM. First, for the most general scalar-tensor theories---beyond Horndeski models---three of the five parameters appearing in the effective theory of dark energy can now be severely constrained on astrophysical scales; we present the results of combining the new gravity wave results with galaxy cluster observations. Second, the combination with the lack of strong equivalence principle violations exhibited by the supermassive black hole in M87, constrains the quartic galileon model to be cosmologically irrelevant. Finally, we derive a new bound on the disformal coupling to photons that implies that such couplings are irrelevant for the cosmic evolution of the field.
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    The detection of gravitational waves from coalescing binary neutron stars represents another milestone in gravitational-wave astronomy. However, since LIGO is currently not as sensitive to the merger/ringdown part of the waveform, the possibility that such signals are produced by a black hole-neutron star binary can not be easily ruled out without appealing to assumptions about the underlying compact object populations. We review a few astrophysical channels that might produce black holes below 3 $M_{\odot}$ (roughly the upper bound on the maximum mass of a neutron star), as well as existing constraints for these channels. We show that, due to the uncertainty in the neutron star equation of state, it is difficult to distinguish gravitational waves from a binary neutron star system, from those of a black hole-neutron star system with the same component masses, assuming Advanced LIGO sensitivity. This degeneracy can be broken by accumulating statistics from many events to better constrain the equation of state, or by third-generation detectors with higher sensitivity to the late spiral to post-merger signal. We also discuss the possible differences in electromagnetic counterparts between binary neutron star and low mass black hole-neutron star mergers, arguing that it will be challenging to definitively distinguish the two without better understanding of the underlying astrophysical processes.
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    Pinning of vortex lines in the inner crust of a spinning neutron star may be the mechanism that enhances the differential rotation of the internal neutron superfluid, making it possible to freeze some amount of angular momentum which eventually can be released, thus causing a pulsar glitch. We investigate the general relativistic corrections to pulsar glitch amplitudes in the slow-rotation approximation, consistently with the stratified structure of the star. We thus provide a relativistic generalization of a previous Newtonian model that was recently used to estimate upper bounds on the masses of glitching pulsars. We find that the effect of general relativity on the glitch amplitudes obtained by emptying the whole angular momentum reservoir is less than 30%. Moreover we show that the Newtonian upper bounds on the masses of large glitchers obtained from observations of their maximum recorded event differ by less than a few percent from those calculated within the relativistic framework. This work can also serve as a basis to construct more sophisticated models of angular momentum reservoir in a relativistic context: in particular, we present two alternative scenarios for macroscopically rigid and loose pinned vortex lines, and we generalize the Feynman-Onsager relation to the case when both entrainment coupling between the fluids and a strong axisymmetric gravitational field are present.
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    The observation of GW170817 and its electromagnatic counterpart implies that gravitational waves travel at the speed of light, with deviations smaller than a few parts in $10^{-15}$. We discuss the consequences of this experimental result for models of dark energy and modified gravity characterized by a single scalar degree of freedom. To avoid tuning, the speed of gravitational waves must be unaffected not only for our particular cosmological solution, but also for nearby solutions obtained by slightly changing the matter abundance. For this to happen the coefficients of various operators must satisfy precise relations that we discuss both in the language of the Effective Field Theory of Dark Energy and in the covariant one, for Horndeski, beyond Horndeski and degenerate higher-order theories. The simplification is dramatic: of the three functions describing quartic and quintic beyond Horndeski theories, only one remains and reduces to a standard conformal coupling to the Ricci scalar for Horndeski theories. We show that the deduced relations among operators do not introduce further tuning of the models, since they are stable under quantum corrections.
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    Some of the heavy elements, such as gold and europium (Eu), are almost exclusively formed by the rapid neutron capture process (r-process). However, it is still unclear which astrophysical site between core-collapse supernovae and neutron star - neutron star (NS-NS) mergers produced most of the r-process elements in the universe. Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) models can test these scenarios by quantifying the frequency and yields required to reproduce the amount of Eu observed in galaxies. Although NS-NS mergers have become popular candidates, their required frequency (or rate) needs to be consistent with that obtained from gravitational wave measurements. Here we address the first NS-NS merger detected by LIGO/Virgo (GW170817) and its associated Gamma-ray burst and analyze their implication on the origin of r-process elements. Among other elements, we find that this event has produced between 15 and 70 Earth masses of gold. The range of NS-NS merger rate densities of 320$-$4740 Gpc$^{-3}$ yr$^{-1}$ provided by LIGO/Virgo is remarkably consistent with the range required by GCE to explain the Eu abundances in the Milky Way with NS-NS mergers, assuming a typical r-process abundance pattern for the ejecta. When using theoretical calculations to derive Eu yields, constraining the role of NS-NS mergers becomes more challenging because of nuclear astrophysics uncertainties. This is the first study that directly combines nuclear physics uncertainties with GCE calculations. If GW170817 is a representative event, NS-NS mergers can produce Eu in sufficient amount and are likely to be the main r-process site.
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    The eruptive cycles of dwarf novae (DN) are thought to be due to a thermal-viscous instability in the accretion disk surrounding the white dwarf (WD). This model has long been known to imply a stress to pressure ratio \alpha ~0.1 in outburst compared to \alpha ~ 0.01 in quiescence. Such an enhancement in $\alpha$ has recently been observed in simulations of turbulent transport driven by the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) when convection is present, without requiring a net magnetic flux. We independently recover this result by carrying out PLUTO MHD simulations of vertically stratified, radiative, shearing boxes with the thermodynamics and opacities appropriate to DN. The results are robust against the choice of vertical boundary conditions. The thermal equilibrium solutions found by the simulations trace the well-known S-curve in the density-temperature plane. We confirm that the high values of \alpha ~ 0.1 occur near the tip of the hot branch of the S-curve, where convection is active. However, we also present thermally-stable simulations at lower temperatures that have standard values of \alpha ~ 0.03 despite the presence of vigorous convection. We find no simple relationship between \alpha and the strength of the convection, as measured by the ratio of convective to radiative flux. The cold branch is only very weakly ionized so, in the second part of this work, we studied the impact of non-ideal MHD effects on transport. We include resistivity in the simulations and find that the MRI-driven transport is quenched (\alpha ~ 0) below the critical density at which the magnetic Reynolds number R_m ≤10^4. This is problematic as X-ray emission observed in quiescent systems requires ongoing accretion onto the WD. We verify that these X-rays cannot self-sustain MRI-driven turbulence by photo-ionizing the disk and discuss possible solutions to the issue of accretion in quiescence.
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    The leading theory for short-duration GRBs ($\lesssim$ 2s) is neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS) mergers or black hole-NS mergers, while bursts of soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) in a nearby galaxy may mimic a short GRB. If a short GRB due to a merger occur in the local Universe (i.e., redshift $\le$ 0.1-0.2), the merger event can simultaneously produce gravitational wave signal detectable by current detectors like advanced LIGO/Virgo, while no detectable signal is expected for an SGR. Recently, Fermi GBM detected a short GRB~170817A. It is reported to have a redshift of 0.0098. Assuming this is true, it will have two profound implications: (1) the isotropic-equivalent $\gamma$-ray energetics, E$_{iso,\gamma}$, of GRB~170817A is only about 4 $\times$ 10$^{46}$ erg, much lower than a typical cosmological short GRB whose E$_{iso,\gamma}$ is $\gtrsim10^{50}$erg. So it will be the first low-luminosity GRB of short duration. An interesting explanation is that it is an off-axis short GRB with structured jets; and (2) given its proximity, the GW signal of a merger should have been detected by advanced LIGO/Virgo.
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    The Oort cloud (OC) probably formed more than 4$\,$Gyr ago and has been moving with the Sun in the Galaxy since, exposed to external influences, most prominently to the Galactic tide and passing field stars. Theories suggest that other stars might posses exocomets distributed similarly to our OC. We study the erosion of the OC and the possibility for capturing exocomets during the encounters with such field stars. We carry out simulations of flybys, where both stars are surrounded by a cloud of comets. We measure how many exocomets are transferred to the OC, how many OC's comets are lost, and how this depends on the other star's mass, velocity and impact parameter. Exocomets are transferred to the OC only during relatively slow ($\lesssim0.5\,$km$\,$s$^{-1}$) and close ($\lesssim10^5\,$AU) flybys and these are expected to be extremely rare. Assuming that all passing stars are surrounded by a cloud of exocomets, we derive that the fraction of exocomets in the OC has been about $10^{-5}$--$10^{-4}$. Finally we simulate the OC for the whole lifetime of the Sun, taking into account the encounters and the tidal effects. The OC has lost 25--65% of its mass, mainly due to stellar encounters, and at most 10% (and usually much less) of its mass can be captured. However, exocomets are often lost shortly after the encounter that delivers them, due to the Galactic tide and consecutive encounters.
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    We perform a $z$-band survey for an optical counterpart of a binary neutron star coalescence GW170817 with Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam. Our untargeted transient search covers $23.6$ deg$^2$ corresponding to the $56.6\%$ credible region of GW170817 and reaches the $50\%$ completeness magnitude of $20.6$ mag on average. As a result, we find 60 candidates of extragalactic transients, including J-GEM17btc (a.k.a. SSS17a/DLT17ck). While J-GEM17btc is associated with NGC 4993 that is firmly located inside the 3D skymap of GW170817, the other 59 candidates do not have distance information in the GLADE v2 catalog or NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED). Among 59 candidates, 58 are located at the center of extended objects in the Pan-STARRS1 catalog, while one candidate has an offset. We present location, $z$-band apparent magnitude, and time variability of the candidates and evaluate the probabilities that they are located inside of the 3D skymap of GW170817. The probability of J-GEM17btc is $64\%$ being much higher than those of the other 59 candidates ($9.3\times10^{-3}-2.1\times10^{-1}\%$). Furthermore, the possibility, that at least one of the other 59 candidates is located within the 3D skymap, is only $3.2\%$. Therefore, we conclude that J-GEM17btc is the most-likely and distinguished candidate as the optical counterpart of GW170817.
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    Binary neutron star mergers are important to understand stellar evolution, the chemical enrichment of the universe via the r-process, the physics of short gamma-ray bursts, gravitational waves and pulsars. The rates at which these coalescences happen is uncertain, but it can be constrained in different ways. One of those is to search for the optical transients produced at the moment of the merging, called a kilonova, in ongoing SN searches. However, until now, only theoretical models for kilonovae were available and their rates have been computed without knowing what a kilonova actually looks like. The recent kilonova discovery AT~2017gfo/DLT17ck gives us the opportunity to constrain the rate of kilonovae using the light curve of a real event. We constrain the rate of binary neutron star mergers using the DLT40 Supernova search. Excluding AT~2017gfo/DLT17ck, which was discovered thanks to the aLIGO/aVirgo trigger, no other transients similar to AT~2017gfo/DLT17ck have been detected during the last 13 months of daily cadence observations of $\sim$ 2200 nearby ($<$40 Mpc) galaxies. We find that the rate of BNS mergers is 0.48 kilonovae per 100 years per $10^{10}$ $L_{B_{\odot}}$ or, in volume, $<0.94\pm0.08\,10^{-4}\,\rm{Mpc^3}\,\rm{yr^{-1}}$, consistent with previous BNS coalescence rates. Based on our rate limit, and the sensitivity of aLIGO/aVirgo during O2, it is very unlikely that kilonova events are lurking in old pointed galaxy SN search datasets.
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    The unprecedented optical and near-infrared lightcurves of the first electromagnetic counterpart to a gravitational wave source, GW170817, a binary neutron star merger, exhibited a strong evolution from blue to near-infrared (a so-called 'kilonova' or 'macronova'). The emerging near-infrared component is widely attributed to the formation of r-process elements which provide the opacity to shift the blue light into the near infrared. An alternative scenario is that the light from the blue component gets extinguished by dust formed by the kilonova and subsequently is re-emitted at near-infrared wavelengths. We here test this hypothesis using the lightcurves of AT2017gfo, the kilonova accompanying GW170817. We find that of order 10$^{-5}$ $M_\odot$ of carbon is required to reproduce the optical/near-infrared lightcurves as the kilonova fades. This putative dust cools from $\sim$ 2000 K at $\sim$ 4 d after the event to $\sim$ 1500 K over the course of the following week, thus requiring dust with a high condensation temperature, such as carbon. We contrast this with the nucleosynthetic yields predicted by a range of kilonova wind models. These suggest that at most 10$^{-9}$ $M_\odot$ of carbon is formed. Moreover, the decay in the inferred dust temperature is slower than that expected in kilonova models. We therefore conclude that in current models of the blue component of the kilonova, the near-infrared component in the kilonova accompanying GW170817 is unlikely to be due to dust.
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    We search for high-energy gamma-ray emission from the binary neutron star merger GW170817 with the H.E.S.S. Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes. The observations presented here have been obtained starting only 5.3h after GW170817. The H.E.S.S. target selection identified regions of high probability to find a counterpart of the gravitational wave event. The first of these regions contained the counterpart SSS17a that has been identified in the optical range several hours after our observations. We can therefore present the first data obtained by a ground-based pointing instrument on this object. A subsequent monitoring campaign with the H.E.S.S. telescopes extended over several days, covering timescales from 0.22 to 5.2 days and energy ranges between $270\,\mathrm{GeV}$ to $8.55\,\mathrm{TeV}$. No significant gamma-ray emission has been found. The derived upper limits on the very-high-energy gamma-ray flux for the first time constrain non-thermal, high-energy emission following the merger of a confirmed binary neutron star system.
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    Recently, the optical counterpart of a gravitational wave source GW170817 has been identified in NGC 4993 galaxy. Together with evidence from observations in electromagnetic waves, the event has been suggested as a result of a merger of two neutron stars. We analyze the multi-wavelength data to characterize the host galaxy property and its distance to examine if the properties of NGC 4993 are consistent with this picture. Our analysis shows that NGC 4993 is a bulge-dominated galaxy with reff ~ 2-3 kpc and the Sersic index of n = 3-4 for the bulge component. The spectral energy distribution from 0.15 to 24 micron indicates that this galaxy has no significant ongoing star formation, the mean stellar mass of (0.3 - 1.2) times 10^11 Msun,the mean stellar age greater than ~3 Gyr, and the metallicity of about 20% to 100% of solar abundance. Optical images reveal dust lanes and extended features that suggest a past merging activity. Overall, NGC 4993 has characteristics of normal, but slightly disturbed elliptical galaxies. Furthermore, we derive the distance to NGC 4993 with the fundamental plane relation using 17 parameter sets of 7 different filters and the central stellar velocity dispersion from literature, finding an angular diameter distance of 37.7 +- 8.7 Mpc. NGC 4993 is similar to some host galaxies of short gamma-ray bursts but much different from those of long gamma-ray bursts, supporting the picture of GW170817 as a result of a merger of two NSs.
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    The coincident detection of a gravitational-wave (GW) event GW170817 with electromagnetic (EM) signals (e.g., a short gamma-ray burst SGRB 170817A or a macronova) from a binary neutron star merger within the nearby galaxy NGC 4933 provides a new, multimessenger test of the weak equivalence principle (WEP), extending the WEP test with GWs and photons. Assuming that the arrival time delay between the GW signals from GW170817 and the photons from SGRB 170817A or the macronova is mainly attributed to the gravitational potential of the Milky Way, we demonstrate that the strict upper limits on the deviation from the WEP are $\Delta \gamma<1.4\times10^{-3}$ for GW170817/macronova and $\Delta \gamma <5.9\times10^{-8}$ for GW170817/SGRB 170817A. A much more severe constraint on the WEP accuracy can be achieved ($\sim0.9\times10^{-10}$) for GW170817/SGRB 170817A when we consider the gravitational potential of the Virgo Cluster, rather than the Milky Way's gravity. This provides the tightest limit to date on the WEP through the relative differential variations of the $\gamma$ parameter for two different species of particles. Compared with other multimessenger (photons and neutrinos) results, our limit is 7 orders of magnitude tighter than that placed by the neutrinos and photons from supernova 1987A, and is almost as good as or is an improvement of 6 orders of magnitude over the limits obtained by the low-significance neutrinos correlated with GRBs and a blazar flare.
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    During a compact binary merger involving at least one neutron star, a small fraction of the gravitational energy could be liberated in such a way to accelerate a small fraction (~ 10^-6) of the neutron star mass in an isotropic or quasi-isotropic way. In presence of certain conditions, a pair-loaded fireball can form, which undergoes accelerated expansion reaching relativistic velocities. As in the standard fireball scenario, internal energy is partly transformed into kinetic energy. At the photospheric radius, the internal radiation can escape, giving rise to a pulse that lasts for a time equal to the delay time since the merger. The subsequent interaction with the interstellar medium can then convert part of the remaining kinetic energy back into radiation in a weak isotropic afterglow at all wavelengths. This scenario does not require the presence of a jet: the associated isotropic prompt and afterglow emission should be visible for all NS-NS and BH-NS mergers within 60 Mpc, independent of their inclination. The prompt emission is similar to that expected from an off-axis jet, either structured or much slower than usually assumed (Gamma ~ 10), or from the jet cocoon. The predicted afterglow emission properties can discriminate among these scenarios.
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    The merger of two neutron stars is predicted to give rise to three major detectable phenomena: a short burst of gamma-rays, a gravitational wave signal, and a transient optical/near-infrared source powered by the synthesis of large amounts of very heavy elements via rapid neutron capture (the r-process). Such transients, named "macronovae" or "kilonovae", are believed to be centres of production of rare elements such as gold and platinum. The most compelling evidence so far for a kilonova was a very faint near-infrared rebrightening in the afterglow of a short gamma-ray burst at z = 0.356, although findings indicating bluer events have been reported. Here we report the spectral identification and describe the physical properties of a bright kilonova associated with the gravitational wave source GW 170817 and gamma-ray burst GRB 170817A associated with a galaxy at a distance of 40 Mpc from Earth. Using a series of spectra from ground-based observatories covering the wavelength range from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared, we find that the kilonova is characterized by rapidly expanding ejecta with spectral features similar to those predicted by current models. The ejecta is optically thick early on, with a velocity of about 0.2 times light speed, and reaches a radius of about 50 astronomical units in only 1.5 days. As the ejecta expands, broad absorption-like lines appear on the spectral continuum indicating atomic species produced by nucleosynthesis that occurs in the post-merger fast-moving dynamical ejecta and in two slower (0.05 times light speed) wind regions. Comparison with spectral models suggests that the merger ejected 0.03-0.05 solar masses of material, including high-opacity lanthanides.
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    \it Fermi/GBM (Gamma-ray Burst Monitor) and INTEGRAL (the International Gamma-ray Astrophysics Laboratory) reported the detection of the $\gamma$-ray counterpart, GRB 170817A, to the LIGO (Light Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory)/\it Virgo gravitational wave detected binary neutron star merger, GW 170817. GRB 170817A is likely to have an internal jet or other origin such as cocoon emission, shock-breakout, or a flare from a viscous disc. In this paper we assume that the $\gamma$-ray emission is caused by energy dissipation within a relativistic jet and we model the afterglow synchrotron emission from a reverse- and forward- shock in the outflow. We show the afterglow for a low-luminosity $\gamma$-ray burst (GRB) jet with a high Lorentz-factor ($\Gamma$); a low-$\Gamma$ and low-kinetic energy jet; a low-$\Gamma$, high kinetic energy jet; structured jets viewed at an inclination within the jet-half-opening angle; and an off-axis `typical' GRB jet. The off-axis jet will produce a 10 GHz afterglow that peaks at $\sim 100$ days with a flux $\sim 10$ mJy. Only a high $\gamma$-ray efficiency low-luminosity jet, with either a high- or low- $\Gamma$, is consistent with a jet afterglow non-detection.
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    The historic detection of gravitational waves from a binary neutron star merger (GW170817) and its electromagnetic counterpart led to the first accurate (sub-arcsecond) localization of a gravitational-wave event. The transient was found to be $\sim$10" from the nucleus of the S0 galaxy NGC 4993. We report here the luminosity distance to this galaxy using two independent methods. (1) Based on our MUSE/VLT measurement of the heliocentric redshift ($z_{\rm helio}=0.009783\pm0.000023$) we infer the systemic recession velocity of the NGC 4993 group of galaxies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) frame to be $v_{\rm CMB}=3231 \pm 53$ km s$^{-1}$. Using constrained cosmological simulations we estimate the line-of-sight peculiar velocity to be $v_{\rm pec}=307 \pm 230$ km s$^{-1}$, resulting in a cosmic velocity of $v_{\rm cosmic}=2924 \pm 236$ km s$^{-1}$ ($z_{\rm cosmic}=0.00980\pm 0.00079$) and a distance of $D_z=40.4\pm 3.4$ Mpc assuming a local Hubble constant of $H_0=73.24\pm 1.74$ km s$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-1}$. (2) Using Hubble Space Telescope measurements of the effective radius (15.5" $\pm$ 1.5") and contained intensity and MUSE/VLT measurements of the velocity dispersion, we place NGC 4993 on the Fundamental Plane (FP) of E and S0 galaxies. Comparing to a frame of 10 clusters containing 226 galaxies, this yields a distance estimate of $D_{\rm FP}=44.0\pm 7.5$ Mpc. The combined redshift and FP distance is $D_{\rm NGC 4993}= 41.0\pm 3.1$ Mpc. This 'electromagnetic' distance estimate is consistent with the independent measurement of the distance to GW170817 as obtained from the gravitational-wave signal ($D_{\rm GW}= 43.8^{+2.9}_{-6.9}$ Mpc) and confirms that GW170817 occurred in NGC 4993.
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    We report on SALT low resolution optical spectroscopy and optical/IR photometry undertaken with other SAAO telescopes (MASTER-SAAO and IRSF) of the kilonova AT 2017gfo (aka SSS17a) in the galaxy NGC4993 during the first 10 days of discovery. This event has been identified as the first ever electromagnetic counterpart of a gravitational wave event, namely GW170817, which was detected by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave observatories. The event is likely due to a merger of two neutron stars, resulting in a kilonova explosion. SALT was the third telescope to obtain spectroscopy of AT 2017gfo and the first spectrum, 1.2 d after the merger, is quite blue and shows some broad features, but no identifiable spectral lines and becomes redder over time. We compare the spectral and photometric evolution with recent kilonova simulations and conclude that they are in qualitative agreement for post-merger wind models with proton: nucleon ratios of $Y_e$ = 0.25$-$0.30. The blue colour of the first spectrum is consistent with the lower opacity of the Lathanide-free r-process elements in the ejecta. Differences between the models and observations are likely due to the choice of system parameters combined with the absence of atomic data for more elements in the ejecta models.
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    During the second observing run of the Laser Interferometer gravitational- wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo Interferometer, a gravitational-wave signal consistent with a binary neutron star coalescence was detected on 2017 August 17th (GW170817), quickly followed by a coincident short gamma-ray burst trigger by the Fermi satellite. The Distance Less Than 40 (DLT40) Mpc supernova search performed pointed follow-up observations of a sample of galaxies regularly monitored by the survey which fell within the combined LIGO+Virgo localization region, and the larger Fermi gamma ray burst error box. Here we report the discovery of a new optical transient (DLT17ck, also known as SSS17a; it has also been registered as AT 2017gfo) spatially and temporally coincident with GW170817. The photometric and spectroscopic evolution of DLT17ck are unique, with an absolute peak magnitude of Mr = -15.8 \pm 0.1 and an r-band decline rate of 1.1mag/d. This fast evolution is generically consistent with kilonova models, which have been predicted as the optical counterpart to binary neutron star coalescences. Analysis of archival DLT40 data do not show any sign of transient activity at the location of DLT17ck down to r~19 mag in the time period between 8 months and 21 days prior to GW170817. This discovery represents the beginning of a new era for multi-messenger astronomy opening a new path to study and understand binary neutron star coalescences, short gamma-ray bursts and their optical counterparts.
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    We present the spectroscopic evolution of AT 2017gfo, the optical counterpart of the first binary neutron star (BNS) merger detected by LIGO and Virgo, GW170817. While models have long predicted that a BNS merger could produce a kilonova (KN), we have not been able to definitively test these models until now. From one day to four days after the merger, we took five spectra of AT 2017gfo before it faded away, which was possible because it was at a distance of only 39.5 Mpc in the galaxy NGC 4993. The spectra evolve from blue ($\sim6400$K) to red ($\sim3500$K) over the three days we observed. The spectra are relatively featureless --- some weak features exist in our latest spectrum, but they are likely due to the host galaxy. However, a simple blackbody is not sufficient to explain our data: another source of luminosity or opacity is necessary. Predictions from simulations of KNe qualitatively match the observed spectroscopic evolution after two days past the merger, but underpredict the blue flux in our earliest spectrum. From our best-fit models, we infer that AT 2017gfo had an ejecta mass of $0.03M_\odot$, high ejecta velocities of $0.3c$, and a low mass fraction $\sim10^{-4}$ of high-opacity lanthanides and actinides. One possible explanation for the early excess of blue flux is that the outer ejecta is lanthanide-poor, while the inner ejecta has a higher abundance of high-opacity material. With the discovery and follow-up of this unique transient, combining gravitational-wave and electromagnetic astronomy, we have arrived in the multi-messenger era.
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    We report the e INTernational Gamma-ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) detection of the short gamma-ray burst GRB 170817A (discovered by Fermi-GBM) with a signal-to-noise ratio of 4.6, and, for the first time, its association with the gravitational waves (GWs) from binary neutron star (BNS) merging event GW170817 detected by the LIGO and Virgo observatories. The significance of association between the gamma-ray burst observed by INTEGRAL and GW170817 is 3.2 $\sigma$, while the association between the Fermi-GBM and INTEGRAL detections is 4.2 $\sigma$. GRB 170817A was detected by the SPI-ACS instrument about 2 s after the end of the gravitational wave event. We measure a fluence of $(1.4 \pm 0.4 \pm 0.6) \times$10$^{-7}$ erg cm$^{-2})$ (75--2000 keV), where, respectively, the statistical error is given at the 1 $\sigma$ confidence level, and the systematic error corresponds to the uncertainty in the spectral model and instrument response. We also report on the pointed follow-up observations carried out by INTEGRAL, starting 19.5 h after the event, and lasting for 5.4 days. We provide a stringent upper limit on any electromagnetic signal in a very broad energy range, from 3 keV to 8 MeV, constraining the soft gamma-ray afterglow flux to $<7.1\times$10$^{-11}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ (80--300 keV). Exploiting the unique capabilities of INTEGRAL, we constrained the gamma-ray line emission from radioactive decays that are expected to be the principal source of the energy behind a kilonova event following a BNS coalescence. Finally, we put a stringent upper limit on any delayed bursting activity, for example from a newly formed magnetar.
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    We present details of our observational campaigns of electromagnetic transients associated with GW170817/GRB170817A using optical telescopes of Chilescope observatory and Big Scanning Antenna (BSA) of Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory at 110~MHz. The Chilescope observatory detected an optical transient of $\sim19^m$ on the third day in the outskirts of the galaxy NGC 4993; we continued observations following its rapid decrease. We put an upper limit of $1.5\times10^4$ Jy on any radio source of duration 10--60 s which may be associated with GW170817/GRB170817A. The prompt gamma-ray emission consists of two distinctive components - a hard short pulse delayed by $\sim 2$ seconds with respect to the LIGO signal and softer thermal pulse with $T\sim 10 $ keV lasting for another $\sim2$ seconds. The appearance of the thermal component at the end of the burst is uncharacteristic for GBRs. Both the hard and the soft components do not satisfy the Amati relation, making GRB170817A distinctively different from other short GRBs. Based on gamma-ray and optical observations we develop a model of prompt high-energy emission associated with GRB170817A. The merger of two neutron stars create an accretion torus of $\sim10^{-2} M_\odot$, which supplies the black hole with magnetic flux and confines the Blandford-Znajek-powered jet. We associate the hard prompt spike with the quasi-spherical break-out of the jet from the disk wind. As the jet plows through the wind with sub-relativistic velocity, it creates a radiation dominated shock that heats the wind material to tens of keV, producing the soft thermal component. After the break out the continuing jet regains collimation so that its emission, as well as early afterglows, is beamed away from the observer. The model explains both the off-axis viewing geometry and observations of the prompt emission.
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    A binary neutron star (BNS) merger has been widely argued to be one of the progenitors of a short gamma-ray burst (GRB). This central engine can be verified if its gravitational-wave (GW) event is detected simultaneously. Very recently, the association of GW170817 with short GRB170817A was reported by the LIGO/Virgo collaboration for the sake of excellent temporal and location coincidence. It is undoubtedly a landmark in multi-messenger astronomy and can greatly enhance our understanding of the BNS merger processes. Multi-wavelength follow-up observations have been launched soon after the merger and X-ray, optical and radio counterparts have been detected, which are consistent with the predictions of the BNS merger scenario. Observationally, GRB170817A falls into the low-luminosity class which has a higher statistical occurrence rate and detection probability than the normal (high-luminosity) class. However, there is a possibility that GRB170817A is intrinsically powerful but we are off-axis and only observe its side emission. In this paper, we provide a timely modeling of the afterglow emission from this GRB and the associated macronova signal from the ejecta during a BNS merger, under the assumption of a structured jet, a two-component jet and an intrinsically low-energy quasi-isotropic fireball respectively. Comparing the properties of the afterglow emission with follow-up multi-wavelength observations, we could distinguish between the three models. Furthermore, a few model parameters (e.g., the ejecta mass and velocity) could be constrained.
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    We report Chandra observations of GW170817, the first neutron star-neutron star merger discovered by the joint LIGO-Virgo Collaboration, and the first direct detection of gravitational radiation associated with an electromagnetic counterpart, Fermi short gamma-ray burst GRB 170817A. The event occurred on 2017 August 17 and subsequent observations identified an optical counterpart, SSS17a, coincident with NGC 4993 (~10 arcsec separation). Early Chandra (∆t ~ 2 days) and Swift (∆t ~ 1-3 days) observations yielded non-detections at the optical position, but ~9 days post-trigger Chandra monitoring revealed an X-ray point source coincident with SSS17a. We present two deep Chandra observations totaling ~95 ks, collected on 2017 September 01-02 (∆t ~ 15-16 days). We detect X-ray emission from SSS17a with L_0.3-10 keV = 2.6^+0.5_-0.4 x 10^38 ergs, and a power law spectrum of Gamma = 2.4 +/- 0.8. We find that the X-ray light curve from a binary NS coalescence associated with this source is consistent with the afterglow from an off-axis short gamma-ray burst, with a jet angled >~23 deg from the line of sight. This event marks both the first electromagnetic counterpart to a LIGO-Virgo gravitational-wave source and the first identification of an off-axis short GRB. We also confirm extended X-ray emission from NGC 4993 (L_0.3-10 keV ~ 9 x 10^38 ergs) consistent with its E/S0 galaxy classification, and report two new Chandra point sources in this field, CXOU J130948 and CXOU J130946.
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    The astrophysical r-process site where about half of the elements heavier than iron are produced has been a puzzle for several decades. Here we discuss the role of one of the leading ideas --neutron star mergers (NSMs)-- in the light of the first direct detection of such an event in both gravitational (GW) and electromagnetic (EM) waves where we put particular emphasis on the implications for cosmic nucleosynthesis. The slope of the bolometric lightcurve is consistent with the radioactive decay of neutron star ejecta with $Y_e \lesssim 0.3$ (but not larger), which provides strong evidence for an r-process origin of the electromagnetic emission. We find that the NIR lightcurves can be well fitted either with or without lanthanide-rich ejecta. Our limits on the ejecta mass together with estimated rates directly confirm earlier purely theoretical or indirect observational conclusions that double neutron star mergers are indeed a major site of cosmic nucleosynthesis. Interpreting the estimate from the observed event as the \em typical ejecta mass from a NSM would lead to a very large r-process mass in the Galaxy. This could be a hint that the event ejected a particularly large amount of mass, maybe due to a small mass ratio, which would be compatible with the GW limits. The observations suggests that NSMs are responsible for a broad range of r-process nuclei and not just for the heaviest elements beyond $A \approx 130$ as earlier thought.
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    We present Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra imaging, combined with Very Large Telescope MUSE integral field spectroscopy of the counterpart and host galaxy of the first binary neutron star merger detected via gravitational wave emission by LIGO & Virgo, GW170817. The host galaxy, NGC 4993, is an S0 galaxy at z=0.009783. There is evidence for large, face-on spiral shells in continuum imaging, and edge-on spiral features visible in nebular emission lines. This suggests that NGC 4993 has undergone a relatively recent (<1 Gyr) ``dry'' merger. This merger may provide the fuel for a weak active nucleus seen in Chandra imaging. At the location of the counterpart, HST imaging implies there is no globular or young stellar cluster, with a limit of a few thousand solar masses for any young system. The population in the vicinity is predominantly old with <1% of any light arising from a population with ages <500 Myr. Both the host galaxy properties and those of the transient location are consistent with the distributions seen for short-duration gamma-ray bursts, although the source position lies well within the effective radius (r_e ~ 3 kpc), providing an r_e-normalized offset that is closer than ~90% of short GRBs. For the long delay time implied by the stellar population, this suggests that the kick velocity was significantly less than the galaxy escape velocity. We do not see any narrow host galaxy interstellar medium features within the counterpart spectrum, implying low extinction, and that the binary may lie in front of the bulk of the host galaxy.
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    The historic first detection of gravitational wave emission from a binary neutron star merger by the advanced LIGO/Virgo detector network was also the inauguration of GW/EM multi-messenger astronomy, as an associated short gamma-ray burst (SGRB) and a radioactive kilonova (KN) were found in broad-band electromagnetic follow-up campaigns. These observations cement the association between SGRBs and compact object mergers, as well as providing a well sampled multi-wavelength light curve of a KN for the first time. Here we compare the optical and near-infrared light curves of this KN, AT2017gfo, to the counterparts of a sample of nearby (z < 0.5) SGRBs to characterize their diversity in terms of their brightness distribution. Although at similar epochs AT2017gfo appears fainter than every SGRB-associated KN claimed so far, we find three bursts (GRBs 050509B, 061201 and 080905A) where, if the reported redshifts are correct, deep upper limits rule out the presence of a KN similar to AT2017gfo by several magnitudes. Combined with the properties of previously claimed KNe in SGRBs this suggests considerable diversity in the properties of KN drawn from compact object mergers, despite the similar physical conditions that are expected in many NS-NS mergers. This diversity is likely a product of the merger type (NS-NS versus NS-BH) and the detailed properties of the binary (mass ratio, spins etc). Ultimately disentangling these properties should be possible through observations of SGRBs and gravitational wave sources, providing direct measurements of heavy element enrichment throughout the Universe.
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    The LIGO/Virgo Collaboration (LVC) detected on August 17, 2017 an exceptional gravitational wave (GW) event temporally consistent within $\sim\,2 \, \rm s$ with the GRB 1708117A observed by Fermi/GBM and INTEGRAL. The event turns out to be compatible with a neutron star--neutron star (NS--NS) coalescence that subsequently produced a radio/optical/X-ray transient detected at later times. We report the main results of the observations by the AGILE satellite of the GW 170817 localization region (LR) and its electromagnetic counterpart. At the LVC detection time $T_0$, the GW 170817 LR was occulted by the Earth. The AGILE instrument collected useful data before and after the GW/GRB event because in its spinning observation mode it can scan a given source many times per hour. The earliest exposure of the GW 170817 LR by the gamma-ray imaging detector (GRID) started about 935 s after $T_0$. No significant X-ray or gamma-ray emission was detected from the LR that was repeatedly exposed over timescales of minutes, hours and days before and after GW 170817, also considering Mini-Calorimeter and Super-AGILE data. Our measurements are among the earliest ones obtained by space satellites on GW 170817, and provide useful constraints on the precursor and delayed emission properties of the NS--NS coalescence event. We can exclude with high confidence the existence of an X-ray/gamma-ray emitting magnetar-like object with a large magnetic field of $10^{15} \, \rm G$. Our data are particularly significant during the early stage of evolution of the e.m. remnant.
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    Short-duration gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs) have long been proposed to be produced in systems involving the coalescence of double neutron stars (NS-NS), and the observations of sGRB afterglows and host galaxies are consistent with such a conjecture. Based on the estimated event rate density derived from previously observed sGRBs at cosmological distances, the chance of detecting a sGRB within a small volume for detectable NS-NS mergers by advanced LIGO is very low. On August 17, 2017, coinciding with a double neutron star merger gravitational wave event detected by the LIGO-Virgo gravitational wave detector network, a short-duration GRB 170817A was detected by both Gamma-Ray Monitor (GBM) on board NASA's Fermi Gamma-Ray Observatory and INTEGRAL. Here we show that the fluence ($\sim 4.46 \times 10^{-7} \ {\rm erg \ cm^{-2}} $) and spectral peak energy ($\sim 158$ keV) of this sGRB fall into the lower portion of the distributions of known sGRBs. With a very small distance from Earth, its peak isotropic luminosity ($\sim 1.7\times 10^{47}~{\rm erg \ s^{-1}}$) is abnormally low. With its detection, the estimated event rate density above this luminosity is at least $190^{+440}_{-160} {\rm Gpc^{-3} \ yr^{-1}}$, which is close to but still below the NS-NS merger event rate density. The low-luminosity sGRB may originate from a structured jet viewed from a large viewing angle. Alternatively, not all NS-NS mergers produce energetic jets. There are similar faint soft GRBs in the Fermi GBM archival data, a small fraction of which might belong to this new population of nearby, low-luminosity sGRBs.
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    Following the reported discovery of the gravitational-wave pulse GW170817/ G298048 by three LIGO/Virgo antennae (Abbott et al., 2017a), the MASTER Global Robotic Net telescopes obtained the first image of the NGC 4993 galaxy after the NS+NS merging. The optical transient MASTER OTJ130948.10-232253.3/SSS17a was later found, which appears to be a kilonova resulting from a merger of two neutron stars. In this paper we report the independent detection and photometry of the kilonova made in white light and in B, V, and R filters. We note that luminosity of the discovered kilonova NGC 4993 is very close to another possible kilonova proposed early GRB 130603 and GRB 080503.
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    Recent detection of gravitational waves from a neutron star (NS) merger event GW170817 and identification of an electromagnetic counterpart provide a unique opportunity to study the physical processes in NS mergers. To derive properties of ejected material from the NS merger, we perform radiative transfer simulations of kilonova, optical and near-infrared emissions powered by radioactive decays of r-process nuclei synthesized in the merger. We find that the observed near-infrared emission lasting for > 10 days is explained by 0.03 Msun of ejecta containing lanthanide elements. However, the blue optical component observed at the initial phases requires an ejecta component with a relatively high electron fraction (Ye). We show that both optical and near-infrared emissions are simultaneously reproduced by the ejecta with a medium Ye of ~ 0.25. We suggest that a dominant component powering the emission is post-merger ejecta, which exhibits that mass ejection after the first dynamical ejection is quite efficient. Our results indicate that NS mergers synthesize a wide range of r-process elements and strengthen the hypothesis that NS mergers are the origin of r-process elements in the Universe.

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C. Jess Riedel Jul 04 2017 21:26 UTC

Even if we kickstart evolution with bacteria, the amount of time until we are capable of von Neumann probes is almost certainly too small for this to be relevant. See for instance [Armstrong & Sandberg](http://www.sciencedirect.com.proxy.lib.uwaterloo.ca/science/article/pii/S0094576513001148). It

...(continued)
xecehim Jun 27 2017 15:03 UTC

It has been [published][1]

[1]: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10509-016-2911-0

wiadealo Nov 07 2016 09:27 UTC

Is it [fantasy][1] or real?

[1]: http://buchderfarben.de

climaiw Sep 12 2016 16:19 UTC

I would suggest planets where life can really make a difference.

resodiat Aug 23 2016 13:00 UTC

That is really a long-term perspective.

Māris Ozols Feb 18 2016 14:29 UTC

"...structures seen in the universe today, from clusters of galaxies to Donald Trump."

Jaiden Mispy May 23 2014 08:01 UTC

There's a nice summary of the context for this paper here: http://fioraaeterna.tumblr.com/post/56556056152/quasistars-a-real-life-black-hole-sun

Frédéric Grosshans Mar 05 2014 10:03 UTC

I read this paper as an appendix of an unwritten Fantasy novel, where a 21st century cosmologist is trapped in an alternate Aristotelian 13th century universe ! Thanks for the nice read !