Astrophysics (astro-ph)

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    Recent measurements of the Geminga and B0656+14 pulsars by the gamma-ray telescope HAWC (along with earlier measurements by Milagro) indicate that these objects generate significant fluxes of very high-energy electrons. In this paper, we use the very high-energy gamma-ray intensity and spectrum of these pulsars to calculate and constrain their expected contributions to the local cosmic-ray positron spectrum. Among models that are capable of reproducing the observed characteristics of the gamma-ray emission, we find that pulsars invariably produce a flux of high-energy positrons that is similar in spectrum and magnitude to the positron fraction measured by PAMELA and AMS-02. In light of this result, we conclude that it is very likely that pulsars provide the dominant contribution to the long perplexing cosmic-ray positron excess.
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    We give an overview of the current status of keV sterile neutrino Dark Matter. After a short introduction, we start by a general discussion of non-thermal production of Dark Matter, which applies to the three most commonly discussed mechanisms to produce sterile neutrino Dark Matter in the Universe: non-resonant, resonant, and decay production. The main goal in each case is to compute the momentum distribution function $f(p,t)$, which incorporates the full information about the Dark Matter setting under consideration, at least in what concerns its cosmological aspects. While some difficulties lie in the actual computation of this quantity, it is decisive to obtain bounds from cosmic structure formation, which turn out to be the most crucial ones to distinguish different types of production. We will introduce these bounds and we put the resulting limits into a proper context, thereby illustrating that a significant amount of relevant parameter space is available, part of which is testable in particular by Lyman-$\alpha$ data.
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    A presentation at the SciNeGHE conference of the past achievements, of the present activities and of the perspectives for the future of the HARPO project, the development of a time projection chamber as a high-performance gamma-ray telescope and linear polarimeter in the e+e- pair creation regime.
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    Observations of free-free continuum radio emission of four young main-sequence solar-type stars (EK Dra, Pi1 UMa, Chi1 Ori; and Kappa1 Cet) are studied to detect stellar winds or at least to place upper limits on their thermal radio emission, which is dominated by the ionized wind. These stars are excellent proxies for representing the young Sun. Upper limits on mass loss rates are calculated using their observational radio emission. Our aim is to re-examine the faint young Sun paradox by assuming that the young Sun was more massive in its past, and hence to find a possible solution for this famous problem. The observations of our sample are performed with the Karl G. Jansky VLA with excellent sensitivity, using the C-band and the Ku-band. ALMA observations are performed at 100 GHz. For the estimation of the mass loss limits, spherically symmetric winds and stationary, anisotropic, ionized winds are assumed. We compare our results to 1) mass loss rate estimates of theoretical rotational evolution models, and 2) to results of the indirect technique of determining mass loss rates: Lyman-alpha absorption. We are able to derive the most stringent direct upper limits on mass loss so far from radio observations. Two objects, EK Dra and Chi1 Ori, are detected at 6 and 14 GHz down to an excellent noise level. These stars are very active and additional radio emission identified as non-thermal emission was detected, but limits for the mass loss rates of these objects are still derived. The stars Pi1 UMa and Kappa1 Cet were not detected in either C-band or in Ku-band. For these objects we give upper limits to their radio free-free emission and calculate upper limits to their mass loss rates. Finally, we reproduce the evolution of the Sun and derive an estimate for the solar mass of the Sun at a younger age.
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    In this paper we propose a 'knee-like' approximation of the lateral distribution of the Cherenkov light from extensive air showers in the energy range 30-3000 TeV and study a possibility of its practical application in high energy ground-based gamma-ray astronomy experiments (in particular, in TAIGA-HiSCORE). The approximation has a very good accuracy for individual showers and can be easily simplified for practical application in the HiSCORE wide angle timing array in the condition of a limited number of triggered stations.
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    We present results from a detailed analysis of our 2016 \xmm observation of the narrow-line Seyfert~1 galaxy PG~1404+226 which showed a large-amplitude, rapid X-ray variability by a factor of $\sim8$ in $\sim11$\ks. We use this variability event to investigate the origin of the soft X-ray excess emission and the connection between the disk, hot corona and the soft excess emitting region through UV/X-ray cross-correlation, time-resolved spectroscopy and root mean square (rms) spectral modelling. The weakly variable UV emission ($F_{\rm var,UV}$=3.9$\pm0.2\%$) appears to lead the strongly variable X-ray emission ($F_{\rm var, X}$=89.0$\pm0.7\%$) by $\sim33$\ks. Such a UV lead is consistent with the crossing time ($\sim23$\ks) of the seed photons from the disk to a compact ($\sim 10r_s$) hot corona and the time required for their thermal Comptonization ($\sim9$\ks) giving rise to the X-ray power-law emission. The strong soft X-ray excess below 1\keV seen in the mean X-ray spectrum as well as in the time-resolved spectra is well described by both the intrinsic disk Comptonization and the blurred reflection models. The soft excess emission is found to vary together with the power-law component as $F_{{\rm primary}}\propto F_{{\rm excess}}^{2.01}$. The X-ray fractional rms spectrum shows an increase in variability with energy which can be described only in the framework of blurred reflection model in which both the intrinsic continuum and the reflected emission are highly variable in normalization only and are perfectly coupled with each other. Our results suggest that accretion disk provides the seed photons for thermal Comptonization giving rise to the X-ray power-law component which in turn illuminates the innermost accretion disk and gives rise to the soft X-ray excess emission.
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    Polarized extinction and emission from dust in the interstellar medium (ISM) are hard to interpret, as they have a complex dependence on dust optical properties, grain alignment and magnetic field orientation. This is particularly true in molecular clouds. The data available today are not yet used to their full potential. The combination of emission and extinction, in particular, provides information not available from either of them alone. We combine data from the scientific literature on polarized dust extinction with Planck data on polarized emission and we use them to constrain the possible variations in dust and environmental conditions inside molecular clouds, and especially translucent lines of sight, taking into account magnetic field orientation. We focus on the dependence between \lambdamax -- the wavelength of maximum polarization in extinction -- and other observables such as the extinction polarization, the emission polarization and the ratio of the two. We set out to reproduce these correlations using Monte-Carlo simulations where the relevant quantities in a dust model -- grain alignment, size distribution and magnetic field orientation -- vary to mimic the diverse conditions expected inside molecular clouds. None of the quantities chosen can explain the observational data on its own: the best results are obtained when all quantities vary significantly across and within clouds. However, some of the data -- most notably the stars with low emission-to-extinction polarization ratio -- are not reproduced by our simulation. Our results suggest not only that dust evolution is necessary to explain polarization in molecular clouds, but that a simple change in size distribution is not sufficient to explain the data, and point the way for future and more sophisticated models.
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    The observational properties of Soft Gamma Repeaters and Ano\-malous X-ray Pulsars (SGR/AXP) indicate to necessity of the energy source different from a rotational energy of a neutron star. The model, where the source of the energy is connected with a magnetic field dissipation in a highly magnetized neutron star (magnetar) is analyzed. Some observational inconsistencies are indicated for this interpretation. The alternative energy source, connected with the nuclear energy of superheavy nuclei stored in the nonequilibrium layer of low mass neutron star is discussed.
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    Numerical models for the atmospheres of magnetic ApBp stars have in the past dealt only with centred dipole magnetic field geometries. These models include atomic diffusion that stratifies the abundances of metals according to the local magnetic field strength and the direction with respect to the surface normal. The magnetic variations with rotational phase of most well observed stars however reveal that this assumption is far too simplistic. In this work we establish for the first time a three-dimensional (3D) model with abundance stratifications arising from atomic diffusion of 16 metals, adopting a non-axisymmetric magnetic field geometry inspired by the configuration derived for a real ApBp star. We find that the chemical elements are distributed in complex patterns in all three dimensions, far from the simple rings that have been proposed as the dominant abundance structures from calculations that assume a perfectly centred dipolar magnetic geometry
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    We present spectral and timing analyses of simultaneous X-ray and UV observations of the VY Scl system MV Lyr taken by XMM-Newton, containing the longest continuous X-ray+UV light curve and highest signal-to-noise X-ray (EPIC) spectrum to date. The RGS spectrum displays emission lines plus continuum, confirming model approaches to be based on thermal plasma models. We test the sandwiched model based on fast variability that predicts a geometrically thick corona that surrounds an inner geometrically thin disc. The EPIC spectra are consistent with either a cooling flow model or a 2-T collisional plasma plus Fe emission lines in which the hotter component may be partially absorbed which would then originate in a central corona or a partially obscured boundary layer, respectively. The cooling flow model yields a lower mass accretion rate than expected during the bright state, suggesting an evaporated plasma with a low density, thus consistent with a corona. Timing analysis confirms the presence of a dominant break frequency around log(f/Hz) = -3 in the X-ray Power Density Spectrum (PDS) as in the optical PDS. The complex soft/hard X-ray light curve behaviour is consistent with a region close to the white dwarf where the hot component is generated. The soft component can be connected to an extended region. We find another break frequency around log(f/Hz) = -3.4 that is also detected by Kepler. We compared flares at different wavelengths and found that the peaks are simultaneous but the rise to maximum is delayed in X-rays with respect to UV.
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    We generalise Starobinsky's model of inflation to space-times with $D>4$ dimensions, where $D-4$ dimensions are compactified on a suitable manifold. The $D$-dimensional action features Einstein-Hilbert gravity, a higher-order curvature term, a cosmological constant, and potential contributions from fluxes in the compact dimensions. The existence of a stable flat direction in the four-dimensional EFT implies that the power of space-time curvature, $n$, and the rank of the compact space fluxes, $p$, are constrained via $n=p=D/2$. Whenever these constraints are satisfied, a consistent single-field inflation model can be built into this setup, where the inflaton field is the same as in the four-dimensional Starobinsky model. The resulting predictions for the CMB observables are nearly indistinguishable from those of the latter.
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    We examine whether an extended scenario of a two-scalar-field model, in which a mixed kinetic term of canonical and phantom scalar fields is involved, admits the Bianchi type I metric, which is homogeneous but anisotropic spacetime, as its power-law solutions. Then we analyze the stability of the anisotropic power-law solutions to see whether these solutions respect the cosmic no-hair conjecture or not during the inflationary phase. In addition, we will also investigate a special scenario, where the pure kinetic terms of canonical and phantom fields disappear altogether in field equations, to test again the validity of cosmic no-hair conjecture. As a result, the cosmic no-hair conjecture always holds in both these scenarios due to the instability of the corresponding anisotropic inflationary solutions.
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    This work is a methodical study of another option of the hybrid method originally aimed at gamma/hadron separation in the TAIGA experiment. In the present paper this technique was performed to distinguish between different mass groups of cosmic rays in the energy range 200 TeV - 500 TeV. The study was based on simulation data of TAIGA prototype and included analysis of geometrical form of images produced by different nuclei in the IACT simulation as well as shower core parameters reconstructed using timing array simulation. We show that the hybrid method can be sufficiently effective to precisely distinguish between mass groups of cosmic rays.
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    Here we report in depth reanalysis of a paper by Vats et al. (2001) [Astrophys. J. 548, L87] based on the measurements of differential rotation with altitude as a function of observing frequencies (as lower and higher frequencies indicate higher and lower heights, respectively) in the solar corona. The radial differential rotation of the solar corona is estimated from daily measurements of the disc-integrated solar radio flux at 11 frequencies: (275, 405, 670, 810, 925, 1080, 1215, 1350, 1620, 1755 MHz and 2800 MHz). We use the same data as were used in Vats et al. (2001), but instead of the 12th maxima of autocorrelograms used there, we use the 1st secondary maxima to derive the synodic rotation period. We estimate synodic rotation by Gaussian fit of the 1st secondary maxima. Vats et al. (2001) reported that the sidereal rotation period increases with increasing frequency. The variation found by them was from 23.6 to 24.15 days in this frequency range with a difference of only 0.55 days. The present study finds that sidereal rotation period increases with decreasing frequency. The variation range is from 24.4 to 22.5 days and difference is about three times larger (1.9 days). However, at 925 MHz both studies give similar rotation period. In Vats et al. (2001) the Pearson factor with trend line was 0.86 whereas present analysis obtained a ~ 0.97 Pearson factor with the trend line. Our study shows that the solar corona rotates slower at higher altitudes, which is in contradiction to the findings reported in Vats et al. (2001). Key words: Solar radio flux- flux modulation method- Gaussian fit- sidereal rotation period.
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    The nine-year H.E.S.S. Galactic Plane Survey (HGPS) yielded the most uniform observation scan of the inner Milky Way in the TeV gamma-ray band to date. The sky maps and source catalogue of the HGPS allow for a systematic study of the population of TeV pulsar wind nebulae found throughout the last decade. To investigate the nature and evolution of pulsar wind nebulae, for the first time we also present several upper limits for regions around pulsars without a detected TeV wind nebula. Our data exhibit a correlation of TeV surface brightness with pulsar spin-down power $\dot{E}$. This seems to be caused both by an increase of extension with decreasing $\dot{E}$, and hence with time, compatible with a power law $R_\mathrm{PWN}(\dot{E}) \sim \dot{E}^{-0.65 \pm 0.20}$, and by a mild decrease of TeV gamma-ray luminosity with decreasing $\dot{E}$, compatible with $L_{1-10\,\mathrm{TeV}} \sim \dot{E}^{0.59 \pm 0.21}$. We also find that the offsets of pulsars with respect to the wind nebula centres with ages around 10 kyr are frequently larger than can be plausibly explained by pulsar proper motion and could be due to an asymmetric environment. In the present data, it seems that a large pulsar offset is correlated with a high apparent TeV efficiency $L_{1-10\,\mathrm{TeV}}/\dot{E}$. In addition to 14 HGPS sources considered as firmly identified pulsar wind nebulae and 5 additional pulsar wind nebulae taken from literature, we find 10 HGPS sources that form likely TeV pulsar wind nebula candidates. Using a model that subsumes the present common understanding of the very high-energy radiative evolution of pulsar wind nebulae, we find that the trends and variations of the TeV observables and limits can be reproduced to a good level, drawing a consistent picture of present-day TeV data and theory.
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    Massive Primordial Black Holes (MPBH) can be formed after inflation due to broad peaks in the primordial curvature power spectrum that collapse gravitationally during the radiation era, to form clusters of black holes that merge and increase in mass after recombination, generating today a broad mass-spectrum of black holes with masses ranging from 0.01 to $10^5~M_\odot$. These MPBH could act as seeds for galaxies and quick-start structure formation, initiating reionization, forming galaxies at redshift $z>10$ and clusters at $z>1$. They may also be the seeds on which SMBH and IMBH form, by accreting gas onto them and forming the centers of galaxies and quasars at high redshift. They form at rest with zero spin and have negligible cross-section with ordinary matter. If there are enough of these MPBH, they could constitute the bulk of the Dark Matter today. Such PBH could be responsible for the observed fluctuations in the CIB and X-ray backgrounds. MPBH could be directly detected by the gravitational waves emitted when they merge to form more massive black holes, as recently reported by LIGO. Their continuous merging since recombination could have generated a stochastic background of gravitational waves that could eventually be detected by LISA and PTA. MPBH may actually be responsible for the unidentified point sources seen by Fermi, Magic and Chandra. Furthermore, the ejection of stars from shallow potential wells like those of Dwarf Spheroidals (DSph), via the gravitational slingshot effect, could be due to MPBH, thus alleviating the substructure and too-big-to-fail problems of standard collisionless CDM. Their mass distribution peaks at a few tens of $M_\odot$ today, and could be detected also with long-duration microlensing events, as well as by the anomalous motion of stars in GAIA. Their presence as CDM in the Universe could be seen in the time-dilation of lensed images of quasars.
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    Detection of a planetary ring of exoplanets remains as one of the most attractive but challenging goals in the field. We present a methodology of a systematic search for exoplanetary rings via transit photometry of long-period planets. The methodology relies on a precise integration scheme we develop to compute a transit light curve of a ringed planet. We apply the methodology to 89 long-period planet candidates from the Kepler data so as to estimate, and/or set upper limits on, the parameters of possible rings. While a majority of our samples do not have a sufficiently good signal-to-noise ratio for meaningful constraints on ring parameters, we find that six systems with a higher signal-to-noise ratio are inconsistent with the presence of a ring larger than 1.5 times the planetary radius assuming a grazing orbit and a tilted ring. Furthermore, we identify five preliminary candidate systems whose light curves exhibit ring-like features. After removing four false positives due to the contamination from nearby stars, we identify KIC 10403228 as a reasonable candidate for a ringed planet. A systematic parameter fit of its light curve with a ringed planet model indicates two possible solutions corresponding to a Saturn-like planet with a tilted ring. There also remain other two possible scenarios accounting for the data; a circumstellar disk and a hierarchical triple. Due to large uncertain factors, we cannot choose one specific model among the three.
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    A recent analysis of the Supernova Ia data claims a 'marginal' ($\sim3\sigma$) evidence for a cosmic acceleration. This result has been complemented with a non-accelerating $R_{h}=ct$ cosmology, which was presented as a valid alternative to the $\Lambda$CDM model. In this paper, we use the same analysis to show that a non-marginal evidence for acceleration is actually found. We compare the standard Friedmann models to the $R_{h}=ct$ cosmology by complementing SN Ia data with the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, Gamma Ray Bursts and Observational Hubble datasets. We also study the power-law model which is a functional generalisation of $R_{h}=ct$. We find that the evidence for late-time acceleration is beyond refutable at a 4.56$\sigma$ confidence level from SN Ia data alone, and at an even stronger confidence level ($5.38\sigma$) from our joint analysis. Also, the non-accelerating $R_{h}=ct$ model fails to statistically compare with the $\Lambda$CDM having a $\Delta(\text{AIC})\sim30$.
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    We report optical CCD photometry of the recently identified symbiotic star EF Aql. Our observations in Johnson V and B bands clearly show the presence of stochastic light variations with an amplitude of about 0.2 mag on a time scale of minutes. The observations point toward a white dwarf (WD) as the hot component in the system. It is the 11-th object among more than 200 symbiotic stars known with detected optical flickering. Estimates of the mass accretion rate onto the WD and the mass loss rate in the wind of the Mira secondary star lead to the conclusion that less than 1 per cent of the wind is captured by the WD. Eight further candidates for the detection of flickering in similar systems are suggested.
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    As of today, more than 2500 pulsars have been found, nearly all in the Milky Way, with the exception of ~28 pulsars in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds. However, there have been few published attempts to search for pulsars deeper in our Galactic neighborhood. Two of the more promising Local Group galaxies are IC 10 and NGC 6822 (also known as Barnard's Galaxy) due to their relatively high star formation rate and their proximity to our galaxy. IC 10 in particular, holds promise as it is the closest starburst galaxy to us and harbors an unusually high number of Wolf-Rayet stars, implying the presence of many neutron stars. We observed IC 10 and NGC 6822 at 820 MHz with the Green Bank Telescope for ~15 and 5 hours respectively, and put a strong upper limit of 0.1 mJy on pulsars in either of the two galaxies. We also performed single pulse searches of both galaxies with no firm detections.
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    We use simulated planetary systems to model the planet multiplicity of Kepler stars. Previous studies have underproduced single planet systems and invoked the so called Kepler dichotomy, where the planet forming ability of a Kepler star is dichotomous, producing either few or many transiting planets. In this paper we show that the Kepler dichotomy is only required when the inner part of planetary disks are just assumed to be flared. When the inner part of planetary disks are flat, we reproduce the observed planet multiplicity of Kepler stars without the need to invoke a dichotomy. We find that independent of the disk model assumed, the mean number of planets per star is approximately 2 for orbital periods between 3 and 200 days, and for planetary radii between 1 and 5 Earth radii. This contrasts with the Solar System where no planets occupy the same parameter space.
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    We study giant molecular cloud (GMC) collisions and their ability to trigger star cluster formation. We further develop our three dimensional magnetized, turbulent, colliding GMC simulations by implementing star formation sub-grid models. Two such models are explored: (1) "Density-Regulated," i.e., fixed efficiency per free-fall time above a set density threshold; (2) "Magnetically-Regulated," i.e., fixed efficiency per free-fall time in regions that are magnetically supercritical. Variations of parameters associated with these models are also explored. In the non-colliding simulations, the overall level of star formation is sensitive to model parameter choices that relate to effective density thresholds. In the GMC collision simulations, the final star formation rates and efficiencies are relatively independent of these parameters. Between non-colliding and colliding cases, we compare the morphologies of the resulting star clusters, properties of star-forming gas, time evolution of the star formation rate (SFR), spatial clustering of the stars, and resulting kinematics of the stars in comparison to the natal gas. We find that typical collisions, by creating larger amounts of dense gas, trigger earlier and enhanced star formation, resulting in 10 times higher SFRs and efficiencies. The star clusters formed from GMC collisions show greater spatial sub-structure and more disturbed kinematics.
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    The cosmological evolution of primordial black holes (PBHs) is considered. A comprehensive view of the accretion and evaporation histories of PBHs across the entire cosmic history is presented, with focus on the critical mass holes. The critical mass of a PBH for current era evaporation is $M_{cr}\sim 5.1\times10^{14}$ g. Across cosmic time such a black hole will not accrete radiation or matter in sufficient quantity to hasten the inevitable evaporation, if the black hole remains within an average volume of the universe. The accretion rate onto PBHs is most sensitive to the mass of the hole, the sound speed in the cosmological fluid, and the energy density of the accreted components. It is easy for a PBH to accrete to $30M_\odot$ by $z\sim0.1$ even outside any overdense region of the universe, so two merging PBHs are a plausible source for the gravitational wave events GW150914 and GW151226. However it is difficult for isolated PBHs to grow to supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at high redshift with masses large enough to fit observational constraints.
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    Possible formation mechanisms of massive close binary black holes that can merge in the Hubble time to produce powerful gravitational wave bursts detected during advanced LIGO O1 science run are briefly discussed. The pathways include the evolution from field low-metallicity massive binaries, the dynamical formation in globular clusters and primordial black holes. Low effective black hole spins inferred for LIGO GW150914 and LTV151012 events are discussed. Population synthesis calculations of the expected spin and chirp mass distributions from the standard field massive binary formation channel are presented for different metallicities (from zero-metal Population III stars up to solar metal abundance). We conclude that that merging binary black holes can contain systems from different formation channels, discrimination between which can be made with increasing statistics of mass and spin measurements from ongoing and future gravitational wave observations.
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    We studied the spectra of six $z \sim 2.2$ quasars obtained with the X-shooter spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope. The redshift of these sources and X-shooter's spectral coverage allow us to cover the rest spectral range $\sim1200 - 7000$Å for the simultaneous detection of optical and ultraviolet lines emitted by the Broad Line Region. Simultaneous measurements, avoiding issues related to quasars variability, help us understanding the connection between different Broad Line Region line profiles generally used as virial estimators of Black Holes masses in quasars. The goal of this work is comparing the emission lines from the same object to check on the reliability of H$\alpha$, MgII and CIV with respect to H$\beta$. H$\alpha$ and MgII linewidths correlate well with H$\beta$, while CIV shows a poorer correlation, due to the presence of strong blueshifts and asymmetries in the profile. We compare our sample with the only other two whose spectra were taken with the same instrument and for all examined lines our results are in agreement with the ones obtained with X-shooter at $z \sim 1.5 - 1.7$. We finally evaluate CIII] as a possible substitute of CIV in the same spectral range and find that its behaviour is more coherent with those of the other lines: we believe that, when a high quality spectrum such as the ones we present is available and a proper modelization with the FeII and FeIII emissions is performed, the use of this line is more appropriate than that of CIV if not corrected for the contamination by non-virialized components.
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    We present results from a new incoherent-beam Fast Radio Burst (FRB) search on the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) Pathfinder. Its large instantaneous field of view (FoV) and relative thermal insensitivity allow us to probe the ultra-bright tail of the FRB distribution, and to test a recent claim that this distribution's slope, $\alpha\equiv-\frac{\partial \log N}{\partial \log S}$, is quite small. A 256-input incoherent beamformer was deployed on the CHIME Pathfinder for this purpose. If the FRB distribution were described by a single power-law with $\alpha=0.7$, we would expect an FRB detection every few days, making this the fastest survey on sky at present. We collected 1268 hours of data, amounting to one of the largest exposures of any FRB survey, with over 2.4\,$\times$\u200910$^5$\u2009deg$^2$\u2009hrs. Having seen no bursts, we have constrained the rate of extremely bright events to $<\!13$\u2009sky$^{-1}$\u2009day$^{-1}$ above $\sim$\u2009220$\sqrt{(\tau/\rm ms)}$ Jy\u2009ms for $\tau$ between 1.3 and 100\u2009ms, at 400--800\u2009MHz. The non-detection also allows us to rule out $\alpha\lesssim0.9$ with 95$\%$ confidence, after marginalizing over uncertainties in the GBT rate at 700--900\u2009MHz, though we show that for a cosmological population and a large dynamic range in flux density, $\alpha$ is brightness-dependent. Since FRBs now extend to large enough distances that non-Euclidean effects are significant, there is still expected to be a dearth of faint events and relative excess of bright events. Nevertheless we have constrained the allowed number of ultra-intense FRBs. While this does not have significant implications for deeper, large-FoV surveys like full CHIME and APERTIF, it does have important consequences for other wide-field, small dish experiments.
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    To investigate the existence of sterile neutrino, we propose a new neutrino production method using $^{13}$C beams and a $^{9}$Be target for short-baseline electron antineutrino (${\bar{\nu}}_{e}$) disappearance study. The production of secondary unstable isotopes which can emit neutrinos from the $^{13}$C + $^{9}$Be reaction is calculated with three different nucleus-nucleus (AA) reaction models. Different isotope yields are obtained using these models, but the results of the neutrino flux are found to have unanimous similarities. This feature gives an opportunity to study neutrino oscillation through shape analysis. In this work, expected neutrino flux and event rates are discussed in detail through intensive simulation of the light ion collision reaction and the neutrino flux from the beta decay of unstable isotopes followed by this collision. Together with the reactor and accelerator anomalies, the present proposed ${\bar{\nu}}_{e}$ source is shown to be a practically alternative test of the existence of the $\Delta m^{2}$ $\sim$ 1 eV$^{2}$ scale sterile neutrino.
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    Results of the search for $\sim (10^{16} - 10^{17.5})$ eV primary cosmic-ray photons with the data of the Moscow State University (MSU) Extensive Air Shower (EAS) array are reported. The full-scale reanalysis of the data with modern simulations of the installation does not confirm previous indications of the excess of gamma-ray candidate events. Upper limits on the corresponding gamma-ray flux are presented. The limits are the most stringent published ones at energies $\sim 10^{17}$ eV.
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    The past fifty years have been an epoch of impressive progress in the field of astronomical technology. Practically all the technical tools, which we use today, have been developed during that time span. While the first half of this period has been dominated by advances in the detector technologies, during the past two decades innovative telescope concepts have been developed for practically all wavelength ranges where astronomical observations are possible. Further important advances can be expected in the next few decades. Based on the experience of the past, some of the main sources of technological progress can be identified.
  • Feb 28 2017 astro-ph.HE arXiv:1702.07997v1
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    We discuss cold dense QCD by examining constraints from neutron stars, nuclear experiments, and QCD calculations at low and high baryon density. The two solar mass constraint and suggestive small radii (10~13 km) of neutron stars constrain the strength of hadron-quark matter phase transitions. Assuming the adiabatic continuity from hadronic to quark matter, we use a schematic quark model for hadron physics and examine the size of medium coupling constants. We find that to baryon density nB ~ 10n0 (n0: nuclear saturation density), the model coupling constants should be as large as in the vacuum, indicating that gluons remain non- perturbative even after the quark matter formation.
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    The $\kappa$-mechanism has been successful in explaining the origin of observed oscillations of many types of "classical" pulsating variable stars. Here we examine quantitatively if that same process is prominent enough to excite the potential global oscillations within Jupiter, whose energy flux is powered by gravitational collapse rather than nuclear fusion. Additionally, we examine whether external radiative forcing, i.e. starlight, could be a driver for global oscillations in hot Jupiters orbiting various main-sequence stars at defined orbital semimajor axes. Using planetary models generated by the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) and nonadiabatic oscillation calculations, we confirm that Jovian oscillations cannot be driven via the $\kappa$-mechanism. However, we do show that in hot Jupiters oscillations can likely be excited via the suppression of radiative cooling due to external radiation given a large enough stellar flux and the absence of a significant oscillatory damping zone within the planet. This trend seems to not be dependent on the planetary mass. In future observations we can thus expect that such planets may be pulsating, thereby giving greater insight into the internal structure of these bodies.
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    Chondrules are primitive materials in the Solar System. They are formed in the first about 3 Myr of the Solar System's history. This timescale is longer than that of Mars formation, and it is conceivable that protoplanets, planetesimals and chondrules might have existed simultaneously in the solar nebula. Due to protoplanets perturbation on the planetesimal dynamics and chondrule accretion on them, all the formed chondrules are unlikely to be accreted by planetesimals. We investigate the amount of chondrules accreted by planetesimals in such a condition. We assume that a protoplanet is in oligarchic growth, and we perform analytical calculations of chondrule accretion both by a protoplanet and by planetesimals. Through the oligarchic growth stage, planetesimals accrete about half of the formed chondrules. The smallest planetesimals get the largest amount of the chondrules, compared with the amount accreted by more massive planetesimals. We perform a parameter study and find that this fraction is not largely changed for a wide range of parameter sets.
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    The true ground state of hadronic matter may be strange quark matter (SQM). According to this hypothesis, the observed pulsars, which are generally deemed as neutron stars, may actually be strange quark stars. However, proving or disproving the SQM hypothesis still remains to be a difficult problem, due to the similarity between the macroscopical characteristics of strange quark stars and neutron stars. Here we propose a hopeful method to probe the existence of strange quark matter. In the frame work of the SQM hypothesis, strange quark dwarfs and even strange quark planets can also stably exist. Noting that SQM planets will not be tidally disrupted even when they get very close to their host stars due to their extreme compactness, we argue that we could identify SQM planets by searching for very close-in planets among extrasolar planetary systems. Although a search in the $\sim 2950$ exoplanets detected so far has failed to identify any close-in samples that meet the SQM criteria, i.e. lying in the tidal disruption region for normal matter planets, we suggest that such an effort deserves to be continued in the future since it provides a unique test for the SQM hypothesis. Especially, we should keep our eyes on possible pulsar planets with orbital radius less than $\sim 3.8 \times 10^{10}$~cm and period less than $\sim 3400$~s.
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    We use BBN observational data on primordial abundance of ${}^4He$ to constrain f(T) gravity. The three most studied viable $f(T)$ models, namely the power law, the exponential and the square-root exponential are considered, and the BBN bounds are adopted in order to extract constraints on their free parameters. For the power-law model, we find that the constraints are in agreement with those acquired using late-time cosmological data. For the exponential and the square-root exponential models, we show that for realiable regions of parameters space they always satisfy the BBN bounds. We conclude that viable f(T) models can successfully satisfy the BBN constraints.
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    The Kepler space telescope has provided time series of red giants of such unprecedented quality that a detailed asteroseismic analysis becomes possible. For a limited set of about a dozen red giants, the observed oscillation frequencies obtained by peak-bagging together with the most recent pulsation codes allowed us to reliably determine the core/envelope rotation ratio. The results so far show that the current models are unable to reproduce the rotation ratios, predicting higher values than what is observed and thus indicating that an efficient angular momentum transport mechanism should be at work. Here we provide an asteroseismic analysis of a sample of 13 low-luminosity low-mass red giant stars observed by Kepler during its first nominal mission. These targets form a subsample of the 19 red giants studied previously Corsaro et al. 2015, which not only have a large number of extracted oscillation frequencies, but also unambiguous mode identifications We aim to extend the sample of red giants for which internal rotation ratios obtained by theoretical modeling of peak-bagged frequencies are available. We also derive the rotation ratios using different methods, and compare the results of these methods with each other. We built seismic models using a grid search combined with a Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm and obtained rotation averages employing Bayesian inference and inversion methods. We compared these averages with those obtained using a previously developed model-independent method. We find that the cores of the red giants in this sample are rotating 5 to 10 times faster than their envelopes, which is consistent with earlier results. The rotation rates computed from the different methods show good agreement for some targets, while some discrepancies exist for others.
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    V1387 Aql (the donor in the microquasar GRS 1915+105) is a low-mass giant. Such a star consists of a degenerate helium core and a hydrogen-rich envelope. Both components are separated by an hydrogen burning shell. The structure of such an object is relatively simple and easy to model. Making use of the observational constraints on the luminosity and the radius of V1387 Aql, we constrain the mass of this star with evolutionary models. We find a very good agreement between the constraints from those models and from the observed rotational broadening and the NIR magnitude. Combining the constraints, we find solutions with stripped giants of the mass of $\geq\!0.28{\rm M}_{\odot}$ and of the spectral class K5 III, independent of the distance to the system, and a distance-dependent upper limit, $\lesssim\!1{\rm M}_{\odot}$. We also calculate the average mass transfer rate and the duty cycle of the system as a function of the donor mass.
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    This work extends the still modest number of multiple stars with known relative orbit orientation. Accurate astrometry and radial velocities are used jointly to compute or update outer and inner orbits in three nearby triple systems HIP 101955 (orbital periods 38.68 and 2.51 years), HIP 103987 (19.20 and 1.035 years), HIP 111805 (30.13 and 1.50 years) and in one quadruple system HIP 2643 (periods 70.3, 4.85 and 0.276 years), all composed of solar-type stars. The masses are estimated from the absolute magnitudes and checked using the orbits. The ratios of outer to inner periods (from 14 to 20) and the eccentricities of the outer orbits are moderate. These systems are dynamically stable, but not very far from the stability limit. In three systems all orbits are approximately coplanar and have small eccentricity, while in HIP 101955 the inner orbit with e=0.6 is highly inclined.
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    A possibility of time-delayed radio brightenings of Sgr A* triggered by the pericenter passage of the G2 cloud is studied by carrying out global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations taking into account the radiative cooling of the tidal debris of the G2 cloud. Magnetic fields in the accretion flow are strongly perturbed and re-organized after the passage of G2. We have found that the magnetic energy in the accretion flow increases by a factor 3-4 in 5-10 years after the pericenter passage of G2 by a dynamo mechanism driven by the magneto-rotational instability. Since this B-field amplification enhances the synchrotron emission from the disk and the outflow, the radio and the infrared luminosity of Sgr A* is expected to increase around A.D. 2020. The time-delay of the radio brightening enables us to determine the rotation axis of the preexisting disk.
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    Recent theoretical work has shown that the pre-main-sequence (PMS) evolution of stars is much more complex than previously envisioned. Instead of the traditional steady, one-dimensional solution, accretion may be episodic and not necessarily symmetrical, thereby affecting the energy deposited inside the star and its interior structure. Given this new framework, we want to understand what controls the evolution of accreting stars. We use the MESA stellar evolution code with various sets of conditions. In particular, we account for the (unknown) efficiency of accretion in burying gravitational energy into the protostar through a parameter, $\xi$, and we vary the amount of deuterium present. We confirm the findings of previous works that the evolution changes significantly with the amount of energy that is lost during accretion. We find that deuterium burning also regulates the PMS evolution. In the low-entropy accretion scenario, the evolutionary tracks in the H-R diagram are significantly different from the classical tracks and are sensitive to the deuterium content. A comparison of theoretical evolutionary tracks and observations allows us to exclude some cold accretion models ($\xi\sim 0$) with low deuterium abundances. We confirm that the luminosity spread seen in clusters can be explained by models with a somewhat inefficient injection of accretion heat. The resulting evolutionary tracks then become sensitive to the accretion heat efficiency, initial core entropy, and deuterium content. In this context, we predict that clusters with a higher D/H ratio should have less scatter in luminosity than clusters with a smaller D/H. Future work on this issue should include radiation-hydrodynamic simulations to determine the efficiency of accretion heating and further observations to investigate the deuterium content in star-forming regions. (abbrev.)
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    The common envelope binary interaction occurs when a star transfers mass onto a companion that cannot fully accrete it. The interaction can lead to a merger of the two objects or to a close binary. The common envelope interaction is the gateway of all evolved compact binaries, all stellar mergers and likely many of the stellar transients witnessed to date. Common envelope simulations are needed to understand this interaction and to interpret stars and binaries thought to be the byproduct of this stage. At this time, simulations are unable to reproduce the few observational data available and several ideas have been put forward to address their shortcomings. The need for more definitive simulation validation is pressing, and is already being fulfilled by observations from time-domain surveys. In this article, we present an initial method and its implementation for post-processing grid-based common envelope simulations to produce the light-curve so as to compare simulations with upcoming observations. Here we implemented a zeroth order method to calculate the light emitted from common envelope hydrodynamic simulations carried out with the 3D hydrodynamic code Enzo used in uni-grid mode. The code implements an approach for the computation of luminosity in both optically thick and optically thin regimes and is tested using the first 135 days of the common envelope simulation of Passy et al. (2012), where a 0.8 solar masses red giant branch star interacts with a 0.6 solar masses companion. This code is used to highlight two large obstacles that need to be overcome before realistic light curves can be calculated. We explain the nature of these problems and the attempted solutions and approximations in full detail to enable the next step to be identified and implemented. We also discuss our simulation in relation to recent data of transients identified as common envelope interactions.
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    Thermal production of light dark matter with sub-GeV scale mass can be attributed to $3\rightarrow 2$ self-annihilation processes. We consider the thermal average for annihilation cross sections of dark matter at $3\rightarrow 2$ and general higher-order interactions. A correct thermal average for initial dark matter particles is important, in particular, for annihilation cross sections with overall velocity dependence and/or resonance poles. We apply our general results to benchmark models for SIMP dark matter and discuss the effects of the resonance pole in determining the relic density.
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    Discovery of huge magnetic field in magnetars has stimulated a renewed interest about the magnetic field and physics of compact stars, where microphysics such as QED or QCD may play active parts. Here we discuss the equation of state (EOS) of quark matter in the core of compact stars by taking into account the strong magnetic field. We show that quark EOS becomes very stiff in the presence of the strong magnetic field, and becomes stiffest under the causality condition beyond the threshold strength of $B_c\sim O(10^{19})$ G. This is because quarks make the Landau levels in the presence of the magnetic field and thereby only the lowest Landau level is occupied in the extreme case beyond $B_c$. Thus quarks can freely move along the magnetic field with localization in the perpendicular plane, which resembles the quasi-one dimensional systems and gives rise to a stiff EOS. Consequently, we may easily produce high-mass stars beyond two solar mass. As another interesting possibility, we discuss the appearance of the third family of compact stars, succeeding white dwarfs and neutron stars, before collapsing into black holes. We demonstrate an example, which is specified by a discontinuous increase of the adiabatic index at the hadron-quark phase transition. Such new family may affect the supernova explosions or the gravitational wave emitted from the neutron star mergers.
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    The WISE satellite surveyed the entire sky multiple times in four infrared wavelengths (3.4, 4.6, 12, and $22\,\mu$m; Wright et al. 2010). The unprecedented combination of coverage area and depth gives us the opportunity to measure the luminosity function of galaxies, one of the fundamental quantities in the study of them, at $2.4\ \mu$m to an unparalleled level of formal statistical accuracy in the near infrared. The big advantage of measuring luminosity functions at wavelengths in the window $\approx 2$ to $3.5\,\mu$m is that it correlates more closely to the total stellar mass in galaxies than others. In this paper we report on the parameters for the $2.4\,\mu$m luminosity function of galaxies obtained from applying the spectroluminosity functional based methods defined in Lake et al. (2017b) to the data sets described in Lake et al. (2017a) using the mean and covariance of $2.4\,\mu$m normalized SEDs from Lake & Wright (2016). In terms of single Schechter function parameters evaluated at the present epoch, the combined result is: $\phi_\star = 5.8 \pm [0.3_{\mathrm{stat}},\, 0.3_{\mathrm{sys}}] \times 10^{-3} \operatorname{Mpc}^{-3}$, $L_\star = 6.4 \pm [0.1_{\mathrm{stat}},\, 0.3_{\mathrm{sys}}] \times 10^{10}\, L_{2.4\,\mu\mathrm{m}\,\odot}$ ($M_\star = -21.67 \pm [0.02_{\mathrm{stat}},\, 0.05_{\mathrm{sys}}]\operatorname{AB\ mag}$), and $\alpha = -1.050 \pm [0.004_{\mathrm{stat}},\, 0.03_{\mathrm{sys}}]$, corresponding to a galaxy number density of $0.08\operatorname{Mpc}^{-3}$ brighter than $10^6\, L_{2.4\,\mu\mathrm{m}\,\odot}$ ($10^{-3} \operatorname{Mpc}^{-3}$ brighter than $L_\star$) and a $2.4\,\mu$m luminosity density equivalent to $3.8\times10^{8}\,L_{2.4\,\mu\mathrm{m}\,\odot}\operatorname{Mpc}^{-3}$. $\ldots$
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    The WISE satellite surveyed the entire sky multiple times in four infrared (IR) wavelengths ($3.4,\ 4.6,\ 12,$ and $22\ \mu$m, Wright et al. 2010). This all-sky IR photometric survey makes it possible to leverage many of the large publicly available spectroscopic redshift surveys to measure galaxy properties in the IR. While characterizing the cross-matching of WISE data to a single survey is a straightforward process, doing it with six different redshift surveys takes a fair amount of space to characterize adequately, because each survey has unique caveats and characteristics that need addressing. This work describes a data set that results from matching five public redshift surveys with the AllWISE data release, along with a reanalysis of the data described in Lake et al. 2012. The combined data set has an additional flux limit of $80\ \mu$Jy ($19.14$ AB mag) in WISE's W1 filter imposed in order to limit it to targets with high completeness and reliable photometry in the AllWISE data set. Consistent analysis of all of the data is only possible if the color bias discussed in Ilbert et al. (2004) is addressed (for example: the techniques explored in the first paper in this series Lake et al. 2017b). The sample defined herein is used in this paper's sequel paper, Lake et al. 2017a), to measure the luminosity function of galaxies at $2.4\, \mu$m rest frame wavelength, and the selection process of the sample is optimized for this purpose.
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    We study the properties of compact stars in the Randall-Sundrum II type braneworld model. To this end, we solve the braneworld generalization of the stellar structure equations for a static fluid distribution with spherical symmetry considering that the spacetime outside the star is described by a Schwarzschild metric. First, the stellar structure equations are integrated employing the so called causal limit equation of state (EOS), which is constructed using a well established EOS at densities below a fiducial density, and the causal EOS $P= \rho$ above it. It is a standard procedure in general relativistic stellar structure calculations to use such EOS for obtaining a limit in the mass radius diagram, known as causal limit, above which no stellar configurations are possible if the EOS fulfills that the sound velocity is smaller than the speed of light. We find that the equilibrium solutions in the braneworld model can violate the general relativistic causal limit and, for sufficiently large mass they approach asymptotically to the Schwarzschild limit $M = 2 R$. Then, we investigate the properties of hadronic and strange quark stars using two typical EOSs. For masses below $\sim 1.5 - 2 M_{\odot}$, the mass versus radius curves show the typical behavior found within the frame of General Relativity. However, we also find a new branch of stellar configurations that can violate the general relativistic causal limit and that in principle may have an arbitrarily large mass. The stars belonging to this new branch are supported against collapse by the nonlocal effects of the bulk on the brane. We also show that these stars are always stable under small radial perturbations. These results support the idea that traces of extra-dimensions might be found in astrophysics, specifically through the analysis of masses and radii of compact objects.
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    It is shown that the serious problem on the cosmological tension between the direct measurements of the Hubble constant at present and the constant derived from the Planck measurements of the CMB anisotropies can be solved by considering the renormalized model parameters. They are deduced by taking the spatial average of second-order perturbations in the flat Lambda-CDM model, which includes random adiabatic fluctuations.
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    The SiO molecule is one of the candidates for the seed of silicate dust in the circumstellar envelope of evolved stars, but this opinion is challenged. In this work we investigate the relation of the SiO maser emis- sion power and the silicate dust emission power. With both our own observation by using the PMO/Delingha 13.7-m telescope and archive data, a sample is assembled of 21 SiO v=1,J=2-1 sources and 28 SiO v=1,J=1- 0 sources that exhibit silicate emission features in the ISO/SWS spectrum as well. The analysis of their SiO maser and silicate emission power indicates a clear correlation, which is not against the hypothesis that the SiO molecules are the seed nuclei of silicate dust. On the other hand, no correlation is found between SiO maser and silicate crystallinity, which may imply that silicate crystallinity does not correlate with mass loss rate.
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    The first direct detection of gravitational waves resulted from the merger of two stellar mass black holes (sBH) that were 'overweight' compared to sBH observed in our own Galaxy. The upper end of the inferred sBH-sBH merger rate from LIGO observations presents a challenge for existing models. Several groups have now argued that 'overweight' sBH naturally occur in AGN disks and are likely to merge. Here we parameterize sources of sBH in AGN disks and uncertainties in their estimated merger rate. We find the plausible sBH-sBH merger rate in AGN disks detectable with LIGO spans $\sim 0.1-200$ $\rm{Gpc}^{-3} \rm{yr}^{-1}$. Our rate estimate is dominated by the accelerated, gas-driven merger in the AGN disk of pre-existing sBH from a nuclear star cluster whose orbits are ground down into the AGN disk. We predict a wide range of mass ratios for such binary mergers, spanning $\sim [10^{-2},1]$. We suggest a mechanism for producing sBH mergers consistent with present LIGO constraints on precursor spin. If our model is efficient, it also predicts a large population of IMBH in disks around SMBH in the nearby Universe. LISA will be able to severely constrain the rate from this channel through observations of IMBH-SMBH binaries.
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    A simple 'knee-like' approximation of the Lateral Distribution Function (LDF) of Cherenkov light emitted by EAS (extensive air showers) in the atmosphere is proposed for solving various tasks of data analysis in HiSCORE and other wide angle ground-based experiments designed to detect gamma rays and cosmic rays with the energy above tens of TeV. Simulation-based parametric analysis of individual LDF curves revealed that on the radial distance 20-500 m the 5-parameter 'knee-like' approximation fits individual LDFs as well as the mean LDF with a very good accuracy. In this paper we demonstrate the efficiency and flexibility of the 'knee-like' LDF approximation for various primary particles and shower parameters and the advantages of its application to suppressing proton background and selecting primary gamma rays.
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    The radiative association of C(${}^3P$) and H${}^+$ is investigated by calculating cross sections for photon emission into bound ro-vibrational states of CH${}^+$ from the vibrational continua of initial triplet d$\,{}^3\Pi$ or b$\,{}^3\Sigma^-$ states. Potential energy curves and transition dipole moments are calculated using multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) methods with AV6Z basis sets. The cross sections are evaluated using quantum-mechanical methods and rate coefficients are calculated. The rate coefficients are about 100 times larger than those for radiative association of C${}^+({}^2{P^o})$ and H from the A$\,{}^1\Pi$ state. We also confirm that the formation of CH${}^+$ by radiative association of C${}^+({}^2{P^o})$ and H via the triplet c$\,{}^3\Sigma^+$ state is a minor process.

Recent comments

wiadealo Nov 07 2016 09:27 UTC

Is it [fantasy][1] or real?

[1]: http://buchderfarben.de

climaiw Sep 12 2016 16:19 UTC

I would suggest planets where life can really make a difference.

resodiat Aug 23 2016 13:00 UTC

That is really a long-term perspective.

Māris Ozols Feb 18 2016 14:29 UTC

"...structures seen in the universe today, from clusters of galaxies to Donald Trump."

Jaiden Mispy May 23 2014 08:01 UTC

There's a nice summary of the context for this paper here: http://fioraaeterna.tumblr.com/post/56556056152/quasistars-a-real-life-black-hole-sun

Frédéric Grosshans Mar 05 2014 10:03 UTC

I read this paper as an appendix of an unwritten Fantasy novel, where a 21st century cosmologist is trapped in an alternate Aristotelian 13th century universe ! Thanks for the nice read !