Astrophysics (astro-ph)

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    Graviton fluctuations induce strong non-perturbative infrared renormalization effects for the cosmological constant. In flat space the functional renormalization flow drives a positive cosmological constant to zero. We propose a simple computation of the graviton contribution to the flow of the effective potential for scalar fields. Within variable gravity we find that the potential increases asymptotically at most quadratically with the scalar field. With effective Planck mass proportional to the scalar field, the solutions of the derived cosmological equations lead to an asymptotically vanishing cosmological "constant" in the infinite future, providing for dynamical dark energy in the present cosmological epoch. Beyond a solution of the cosmological constant problem, our simplified computation also entails a sizeable positive graviton-induced anomalous dimension for the quartic Higgs coupling in the ultraviolet regime, as required for the successful prediction of the Higgs boson mass within the asymptotic safety scenario for quantum gravity.
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    Characterization of the atmospheres of transiting exoplanets relies on accurate measurements of the extent of the optically thick area of the planet at multiple wavelengths with a precision $\lesssim$100 parts per million (ppm). Next-generation instruments onboard the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) are expected to achieve $\sim$10 ppm precision for several tens of targets. A similar precision can be obtained in modelling only if other astrophysical effects, including the stellar limb-darkening, are accounted for properly. In this paper, we explore the limits on precision due to the mathematical formulas currently adopted to approximate the stellar limb-darkening, and to the use of limb-darkening coefficients obtained either from stellar-atmosphere models or empirically. We propose a new limb-darkening law with two coefficients, `power-2', which outperforms other two-coefficient laws adopted in the literature in most cases, and particularly for cool stars. Empirical limb-darkening based on two-coefficient formulas can be significantly biased, even if the light-curve residuals are nearly photon-noise limited. We demonstrate an optimal strategy to fitting for the four-coefficients limb-darkening in the visible, using prior information on the exoplanet orbital parameters to break some of the degeneracies that otherwise would prevent the convergence of the fit. Infrared observations taken with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will provide accurate measurements of the exoplanet orbital parameters with unprecedented precision, which can be used as priors to improve the stellar limb-darkening characterization, and therefore the inferred exoplanet parameters, from observations in the visible, such as those taken with Kepler/K2, JWST, other past and future instruments.
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    Gravitational lensing of the CMB is a valuable cosmological signal that correlates to tracers of large-scale structure and acts as a important source of confusion for primordial $B$-mode polarization. State-of-the-art lensing reconstruction analyses use quadratic estimators, which are easily applicable to data. However, these estimators are known to be suboptimal, in particular for polarization, and large improvements are expected to be possible for high signal-to-noise polarization experiments. We develop a method and numerical code, $\rm{LensIt}$, that is able to find efficiently the most probable lensing map, introducing no significant approximations to the lensed CMB likelihood, and applicable to beamed and masked data with inhomogeneous noise. It works by iteratively reconstructing the primordial unlensed CMB using a deflection estimate and its inverse, and removing residual lensing from these maps with quadratic estimator techniques. Roughly linear computational cost is maintained due to fast convergence of iterative searches, combined with the local nature of lensing. The method achieves the maximal improvement in signal to noise expected from analytical considerations on the unmasked parts of the sky. Delensing with this optimal map leads to forecast tensor-to-scalar ratio parameter errors improved by a factor $\simeq 2 $ compared to the quadratic estimator in a CMB stage IV configuration.
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    The discovery of radionuclides like 60Fe with half-lives of million years in deep-sea crusts and sediments offers the unique possibility to date and locate nearby supernovae. We want to quantitatively establish that the 60Fe enhancement is the result of several supernovae which are also responsible for the formation of the Local Bubble, our Galactic habitat. We performed three-dimensional hydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement simulations (with resolutions down to subparsec scale) of the Local Bubble and the neighbouring Loop I superbubble in different homogeneous, self-gravitating environments. For setting up the Local and Loop I superbubble, we took into account the time sequence and locations of the generating core-collapse supernova explosions, which were derived from the mass spectrum of the perished members of certain stellar moving groups. The release of 60Fe and its subsequent turbulent mixing process inside the superbubble cavities was followed via passive scalars, where the yields of the decaying radioisotope were adjusted according to recent stellar evolution calculations. The models are able to reproduce both the timing and the intensity of the 60Fe excess observed with rather high precision, provided that the external density does not exceed 0.3 cm-3 on average. Thus the two best-fit models presented here were obtained with background media mimicking the classical warm ionised and warm neutral medium. We also found that 60Fe (which is condensed onto dust grains) can be delivered to Earth via two physical mechanisms: either through individual fast-paced supernova blast waves, which cross the Earth's orbit sometimes even twice as a result of reflection from the Local Bubble's outer shell, or, alternatively, through the supershell of the Local Bubble itself, injecting the 60Fe content of all previous supernovae at once, but over a longer time range.
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    The formation process of massive stars is still poorly understood. Massive young stellar objects (mYSOs) are deeply embedded in their parental clouds, they are rare and thus typically distant, and their reddened spectra usually preclude the determination of their photospheric parameters. M17 is one of the best studied HII regions in the sky, is relatively nearby, and hosts a young stellar population. With X-shooter on the ESO Very Large Telescope we have obtained optical to near-infrared spectra of candidate mYSOs, identified by Hanson et al. (1997), and a few OB stars in this region. The large wavelength coverage enables a detailed spectroscopic analysis of their photospheres and circumstellar disks. We confirm the pre-main sequence (PMS) nature of six of the stars and characterise the O stars. The PMS stars have radii consistent with being contracting towards the main sequence and are surrounded by a remnant accretion disk. The observed infrared excess and the (double-peaked) emission lines provide the opportunity to measure structured velocity profiles in the disks. We compare the observed properties of this unique sample of young massive stars with evolutionary tracks of massive protostars by Hosokawa & Omukai (2009), and propose that these mYSOs near the western edge of the HII region are on their way to become main-sequence stars ($\sim 6 - 20$ $M_{\odot}$) after having undergone high mass-accretion rates (${\dot{M}_{\rm acc}} \sim 10^{-4} - 10^{-3}$ $M_{\odot}$ $\rm yr^{-1}$). Their spin distribution upon arrival at the zero age main sequence (ZAMS) is consistent with that observed for young B stars, assuming conservation of angular momentum and homologous contraction.
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    The previously introduced class of two-parametric phenomenological inflationary models in General Relativity in which the slow-roll assumption is replaced by the more general, constant-roll condition is generalized to the case of $f(R)$ gravity. The simple constant-roll condition is defined in the original, Jordan frame, and exact expressions for the scalaron potential in the Einstein frame, for the function $f(R)$ (in the parametric form) and for inflationary dynamics are obtained. The region of the model parameters permitted by the latest observational constraints on the scalar spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio of primordial metric perturbations generated during inflation is determined.
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    Theoretical and observational evidences have been recently gained for a two-fold classification of short bursts: 1) short gamma-ray flashes (S-GRFs), with isotropic energy $E_{iso}<10^{52}$~erg and no black hole (BH) formation, and 2) the authentic short gamma-ray bursts (S-GRBs), with isotropic energy $E_{iso}>10^{52}$~erg evidencing a BH formation in the binary neutron star merging process. The signature for the BH formation consists in the on-set of the high energy ($0.1$--$100$~GeV) emission, coeval to the prompt emission, in all S-GRBs. No GeV emission is expected nor observed in the S-GRFs. In this paper we present two additional S-GRBs, GRB 081024B and GRB 140402A, following the already identified S-GRBs, i.e., GRB 090227B, GRB 090510 and GRB 140619B. We also return on the absence of the GeV emission of the S-GRB 090227B, at an angle of $71^{\rm{o}}$ from the \textitFermi-LAT boresight. All the correctly identified S-GRBs correlate to the high energy emission, implying no significant presence of beaming in the GeV emission. The existence of a common power-law behavior in the GeV luminosities, following the BH formation, when measured in the source rest-frame, points to a commonality in the mass and spin of the newly-formed BH in all S-GRBs.
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    We report the discovery and multicolor (VRIW) photometry of a rare explosive star MASTER OT J004207.99+405501.1 - a luminous red nova - in the Andromeda galaxy M31N2015-01a. We use our original light curve acquired with identical MASTER Global Robotic Net telescopes in one photometric system: VRI during first 30 days and W (unfiltered) during 70 days. Also we added publishied multicolor photometry data to estimate the mass and energy of the ejected shell, and discuss the likely formation scenarios of outbursts of this type. We propose the interpretation of the explosion, that is consistent with the evolutionary scenario where star merger is a natural stage of the evolution of close-mass stars and may serve as an extra channel for the formation of nova outbursts.
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    SS~433 is an X-ray binary and the source of sub-relativistic, precessing, baryonic jets. We present high-resolution spectrograms of SS 433 in the infrared H and K bands. The spectrum is dominated by hydrogen and helium emission lines. The precession phase of the emission lines from the jet continues to be described by a constant period, P_jet= 162.375 d. The limit on any secularly changing period is $|\dot P| \lesssim 10^{-5}$. The He I 2.0587 micron line has complex and variable P Cygni absorption features produced by an inhomogeneous wind with a maximum outflow velocity near 900 km/s. The He II emission lines in the spectrum also arise in this wind. The higher members of the hydrogen Brackett lines show a double-peaked profile with symmetric wings extending more than +/-1500 km/s from the line center. The lines display radial velocity variations in phase with the radial velocity variation expected of the compact star, and they show a distortion during disk eclipse that we interpret as a rotational distortion. We fit the line profiles with a model in which the emission comes from the surface of a symmetric, Keplerian accretion disk around the compact object. The outer edge of the disk has velocities that vary from 110 to 190 km/s. These comparatively low velocities place an important constraint on the mass of the compact star: Its mass must be less than 2.2 M_solar and is probably less than 1.6 M_solar.
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    Many focal-reducer spectrographs, currently available at state-of-the art telescopes facilities, would benefit from a simple refurbishing that could increase both the resolution and spectral range in order to cope with the progressively challenging scientific requirements but, in order to make this update appealing, it should minimize the changes in the existing structure of the instrument. In the past, many authors proposed solutions based on stacking subsequently layers of dispersive elements and record multiple spectra in one shot (multiplexing). Although this idea is promising, it brings several drawbacks and complexities that prevent the straightforward integration of a such device in a spectrograph. Fortunately nowadays, the situation has changed dramatically thanks to the successful experience achieved through photopolymeric holographic films, used to fabricate common Volume Phase Holographic Gratings (VPHGs). Thanks to the various advantages made available by these materials in this context, we propose an innovative solution to design a stacked multiplexed VPHGs that is able to secure efficiently different spectra in a single shot. This allows to increase resolution and spectral range enabling astronomers to greatly economize their awarded time at the telescope. In this paper, we demonstrate the applicability of our solution, both in terms of expected performance and feasibility, supposing the upgrade of the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC) Optical System for Imaging and low-Intermediate-Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy (OSIRIS).
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    We analyze three scenarios to address the challenge of ultrafast gamma-ray variability reported from active galactic nuclei. We focus on the energy requirements imposed by these scenarios: (i) external cloud in the jet, (ii) relativistic blob propagating through the jet material, and (iii) production of high energy gamma rays in the magnetosphere gaps. We show that while the first two scenarios are not constrained by the flare luminosity, there is a robust upper limit on the luminosity of flares generated in the black hole magnetosphere. This limit depends weakly on the mass of the central black hole and is determined by the accretion disk magnetization, viewing angle, and the pair multiplicity. For the most favorable values of these parameters, the luminosity for 5 min flares is limited by \(2\times10^43\rm\u2009erg\u2009s^-1\), which excludes the black hole magnetosphere origin of the flare detected from \ic. In the scopes of scenarios (i) and (ii), the jet power, which is required to explain the \ic flare, exceeds the jet power estimated based on the radio data. To resolve this discrepancy in the framework of the scenario (ii), it is sufficient to assume that the relativistic blobs are not distributed isotropically in the jet reference frame. A realization of the scenario (i) demands the jet power during the flare exceeding by a factor \(10^2\)the power of the radio jet relevant to a timescale of \(10^8\)years.
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    As shown in an earlier paper, in an axially symmetric Szekeres model infinite blueshift can appear only on those rays that intersect the symmetry axis. It was also shown that with the Szekeres mass-dipole superposed on an L--T background any finite $z$ becomes closer to $-1$ and that null geodesics with $z \approx -1$ exist also in a nonsymmetric Szekeres model. Those Szekeres spacetimes were chosen for their simplicity. In the present paper, an axially symmetric Szekeres dipole is superposed on such an L--T background that was proved, in another paper, to be a promising model of a gamma-ray burst (GRB). The present model does make $z$ closer to $-1$, and has the additional advantage that strong blueshifts appear only along two opposite directions, which is consistent with the hypothetical collimation of the GRBs. The model consists of a quasi-spherical Szekeres region matched into a Friedmann background. The function $t_B(r)$ is constant in the Friedmann region and has a hump in the Szekeres region. Since such a Szekeres island generates stronger blueshifts than an L--T island, the BB hump can be lowered, which moves the observer further away from it. A more distant observer implies a smaller angular radius of the GRB source, so more GRB sources can be fitted into the sky. Null geodesics reaching present GRB observers from different directions relative to the BB hump are numerically calculated, and the patterns of redshift across the image of the GRB source are shown in tables. The Szekeres models of the GRB sources promise to explain the short durations of the GRBs and their afterglows via the effect of non-repeatability of the light paths.
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    We present a near infrared study of the spectral components of the continuum in the inner 500$\times$500 pc$^2$ of the nearby Seyfert galaxy Mrk573 using adaptive optics near-infrared integral field spectroscopy with the instrument NIFS of the Gemini North Telescope at a spatial resolution of $\sim$50 pc. We performed spectral synthesis using the \sc starlight code and constructed maps for the contributions of different age components of the stellar population: young ($age\leq100$ Myr), young-intermediate ($100<age\leq700$ Myr), intermediate-old ($700$ Myr $<age\leq2$ Gyr) and old ($age>2$ Gyr) to the near-IR K-band continuum, as well as their contribution to the total stellar mass. We found that the old stellar population is dominant within the inner 250 pc, while the intermediate age components dominate the continuum at larger distances. A young stellar component contributes up to $\sim$20% within the inner $\sim$70 pc, while hot dust emission and featureless continuum components are also necessary to fit the nuclear spectrum, contributing up to 20% of the K-band flux there. The radial distribution of the different age components in the inner kiloparsec of Mrk573 is similar to those obtained by our group for the Seyfert galaxies Mrk1066, Mrk1157 and NGC1068 in previous works using a similar methodology. Young stellar populations ($\leq$100 Myr) are seen in the inner 200-300 pc for all galaxies contributing with $\ge$20% of the K-band flux, while the near-IR continuum is dominated by the contribution of intermediate-age stars ($t=$100 Myr-2 Gyr) at larger distances. Older stellar populations dominate in the inner 250 pc.
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    We present an unprecedentedly large catalog consisting of 2,354 >~ L^* Lya emitters (LAEs) at z=5.7 and 6.6 on the 13.8 and 21.2 deg^2 sky, respectively, that are identified by the SILVERRUSH program with the first narrowband imaging data of the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) survey. We confirm that the LAE catalog is reliable on the basis of 97 LAEs whose spectroscopic redshifts are already determined by this program and the previous studies. This catalogue is also available on-line. Based on this catalogue, we derive the rest-frame Lya equivalent-width distributions of LAEs at z=5.7 and 6.6 that are reasonably explained by the exponential profiles with the scale lengths of 72+/-19 and 119+/-4 A, respectively, showing the increase trend towards high-z. We find that ~700 LAEs with a large equivalent width (LEW) of >~ 240 A are candidates of young-metal poor galaxies and AGNs. We also find that the fraction of LEW LAEs to all ones is moderately large, ~30%. Our LAE catalog includes 11 Lya blobs (LABs) that are LAEs with spatially extended Lya emission whose profile is clearly distinguished from those of stellar objects at the >~ 3sigma level. The number density of the LABs at z=6-7 is ~10^-7-10^-6 Mpc-3, being ~10-100 times lower than those claimed for LABs at z~2-3, suggestive of disappearing LABs at z>~6, albeit with the different selection methods and criteria for the low and high-z LABs.
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    The circumstellar disk density distributions for a sample of 63 Be southern stars from the BeSOS survey were found by modelling their H$\alpha$ emission line profiles. These disk densities were used to compute disk masses and disk angular momenta for the sample. Average values for the disk mass are 3.4$\times$10$^{-9}$ and 9.5$\times$10$^{-10}$ $M_{\star}$ for early (B0-B3) and late (B4-B9) spectral types, respectively. We also find that the range of disk angular momentum relative to the star are between 150-200 and 100-150 $J_{\star}/M_{\star}$, again for early and late-type Be stars respectively. The distributions of the disk mass and disk angular momentum are different between early and late-type Be stars at a 1\% level of significance. Finally, we construct the disk mass distribution for the BeSOS sample as a function of spectral type and compare it to the predictions of stellar evolutionary models with rapid rotation. The observed disk masses are typically larger than the theoretical predictions, although the observed spread in disk masses is typically large.
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    We study the evolution of circumbinary disks under the gravitational influence of the binary using two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to investigate the impact of disk and binary parameters on the dynamical aspects of the disk. To distinguish between physical and numerical effects we apply three hydrodynamical codes. First we analyse in detail numerical issues concerning the conditions at the boundaries and grid resolution. We then perform a series of simulations with different binary (eccentricity, mass ratio) and disk parameters (viscosity, aspect ratio) starting from a reference model with Kepler-16 parameters. Concerning the numerical aspects we find that the inner grid radius must be of the order of the binary semi-major axis, with free outflow conditions applied such that mass can flow onto the central binary. A closed inner boundary leads to unstable evolutions. We find that the inner disk turns eccentric and precesses for all investigated physical parameters. The precession rate is slow with periods ($T_\mathrm{prec}$) starting at around 500 binary orbits ($T_\mathrm{bin}$) for high viscosity and large $H/R$ where the inner hole is smaller and more circular. Reducing $\alpha$ and $H/R$ increases the gap size and $T_\mathrm{prec}$ reaches 2500 $T_\mathrm{bin}$. For varying binary mass ratios $q_\mathrm{bin}$ the gap size remains constant whereas $T_\mathrm{prec}$ decreases for increasing $q_\mathrm{bin}$. For varying binary eccentricities $e_\mathrm{bin}$ we find two separate branches in the gap size and eccentricity diagram. The bifurcation occurs at around $e_\mathrm{crit} \approx 0.18$ where the gap is smallest with the shortest $T_\mathrm{prec}$. For $e_\mathrm{bin}$ smaller and larger than $e_\mathrm{crit}$ the gap size and $T_\mathrm{prec}$ increase. Circular binaries create the most eccentric disks.
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    We discuss how contemporary multiwavelength observations of young OB-dominated clusters address long-standing astrophysical questions: Do clusters form rapidly or slowly with an age spread? When do clusters expand and disperse to constitute the field star population? Do rich clusters form by amalgamation of smaller subclusters? What is the pattern and duration of cluster formation in massive star forming regions (MSFRs)? Past observational difficulties in obtaining good stellar censuses of MSFRs have been alleviated in recent studies that combine X-ray and infrared surveys to obtain rich, though still incomplete, censuses of young stars in MSFRs. We describe here one of these efforts, the MYStIX project, that produced a catalog of 31,784 probable members of 20 MSFRs. We find that age spread within clusters are real in the sense that the stars in the core formed after the cluster halo. Cluster expansion is seen in the ensemble of (sub)clusters, and older dispersing populations are found across MSFRs. Direct evidence for subcluster merging is still unconvincing. Long-lived, asynchronous star formation is pervasive across MSFRs.
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    Recently, in a study the X-ray flaring activity of Sgr A* with Chandra and XMM-Newton public observations from 1999 to 2014 and 2014 Swift data, it has been argued that the "bright and very bright" flaring rate raised from 2014 Aug. 31. Thanks to 482ks of observations performed in 2015 with Chandra, XMM-Newton and Swift, we test the significance of this rise of flaring rate and determine the threshold of unabsorbed flare flux or fluence leading to any flaring-rate change. The mean unabsorbed fluxes of the 107 flares detected in the 1999-2015 observations are consistently computed from the extracted spectra and calibration files, assuming the same spectral parameters. We construct the observed flare fluxes and durations distribution for the XMM-Newton and Chandra flares and correct it from the detection biases to estimate the intrinsic distribution from which we determine the average flare detection efficiency for each observation. We apply the BB algorithm on the flare arrival times corrected from the corresponding efficiency. We confirm a constant overall flaring rate in 1999-2015 and a rise in the flaring rate for the most luminous/energetic flares from 2014 Aug. 31 (4 months after the passage of the DSO/G2 close to Sgr A*). We also identify a decay of the flaring rate for the less luminous and less energetic flares from 2013 Aug. and Nov., respectively (10 and 7 months before the pericenter of the DSO/G2). The decay of the faint flaring rate is difficult to explain by the tidal disruption of the DSO/G2, whose stellar nature is now well established, since it occurred well before its pericenter. Moreover, a mass transfer from the DSO/G2 to Sgr A* is not required to produce the rise in the bright flaring rate since the energy saved by the decay of the number of faint flares during a long time period may be later released by several bright flares during a shorter time period. (abridged)
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    Fast radio bursts, or FRBs, are transient sources of unknown origin. Recent radio and optical observations have provided strong evidence for an extragalactic origin of the phenomenon and the precise localization of the repeating FRB 121102. Observations using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) have revealed the existence of a continuum non-thermal radio source consistent with the location of the bursts in a dwarf galaxy. All these new data rule out several models that were previously proposed, and impose stringent constraints to new models. We aim to model FRB 121102 in light of the new observational results in the active galactic nucleus (AGN) scenario. We propose a model for repeating FRBs in which a non-steady relativistic $e^\pm$-beam, accelerated by an impulsive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-driven mechanism, interacts with a cloud at the centre of a star-forming dwarf galaxy. The interaction generates regions of high electrostatic field called cavitons in the plasma cloud. Turbulence is also produced in the beam. These processes, plus particle isotropization, the interaction scale, and light retardation effects, provide the necessary ingredients for short-lived, bright coherent radiation bursts. The mechanism studied in this work explains the general properties of FRB 121102, and may also be applied to other repetitive FRBs. Coherent emission from electrons and positrons accelerated in cavitons provides a plausible explanation of FRBs.
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    The standard cosmographic approach consists in performing a series expansion of a cosmological observable around $z=0$ and then using the data to constrain the cosmographic (or kinematic) parameters at present time. Such a procedure works well if applied to redshift ranges inside the $z$-series convergence radius ($z<1$), but can be problematic if we want to cover redshift intervals that fall outside the $z-$series convergence radius. This problem can be circumvented if we work with the $y-$redshift, $y=z/(1+z)$, or the scale factor, $a=1/(1+z)=1-y$, for example. In this paper, we use the scale factor $a$ as the variable of expansion. We expand the luminosity distance and the Hubble parameter around an arbitrary $\tilde{a}$ and use the Supernovae Ia (SNe Ia) and the Hubble parameter data to estimate $H$, $q$, $j$ and $s$ at $z\ne0$ ($\tilde{a}\neq1$). The results obtained from SNe Ia data are compatible with the $\Lambda$CDM model at $2\sigma$ confidence level. On the other hand, at $2\sigma$ confidence level, the results obtained from $H(z)$ data are incompatible with the $\Lambda$CDM model. These conflicting results may indicate a tension between the current SNe Ia and $H(z)$ data sets.
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    Context: High-resolution images of circumstellar debris discs reveal off-centred rings that indicate past or ongoing perturbation, possibly caused by secular gravitational interaction with unseen stellar or substellar companions. The purely dynamical aspects of this departure from radial symmetry are well understood. However, the observed dust is subject to additional forces and effects, most notably collisions and drag. Aims: To complement the studies of dynamics, we therefore aim to understand how new asymmetries are created by the addition of collisional evolution and drag forces, and existing ones strengthened or overridden. Methods: We augmented our existing numerical code "Analysis of Collisional Evolution" (ACE) by an azimuthal dimension, the longitude of periapse. A set of fiducial discs with global eccentricities ranging from 0 to 0.4 is evolved over giga-year timescales. Size distribution and spatial variation of dust are analysed and interpreted. The basic impact of belt eccentricity on spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and images is discussed. Results: We find features imposed on characteristic timescales. First, radiation pressure defines size cutoffs that differ between periapse and apoapse, resulting in an asymmetric halo. The differences in size distribution make the observable asymmetry of the halo depend on wavelength. Second, collisional equilibrium prefers smaller grains on the apastron side of the parent belt, reducing the effect of pericentre glow and the overall asymmetry. Third, Poynting-Robertson drag fills the region interior to an eccentric belt such that the apastron side is more tenuous. Interpretation and prediction of the appearance in scattered light is problematic when spatial and size distribution are coupled.
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    Starting from a summary of detection statistics of our recent X-shooter campaign, we review the major surveys, both space and ground based, for emission counterparts of high-redshift damped Ly$\alpha$ absorbers (DLAs) carried out since the first detection 25 years ago. We show that the detection rates of all surveys are precisely reproduced by a simple model in which the metallicity and luminosity of the galaxy associated to the DLA follow a relation of the form, ${\rm M_{UV}} = -5 \times \left(\,[{\rm M/H}] + 0.3\, \right) - 20.8$, and the DLA cross-section follows a relation of the form $\sigma_{DLA} \propto L^{0.8}$. Specifically, our spectroscopic campaign consists of 11 DLAs preselected based on their equivalent width of SiII $\lambda1526$ to have a metallicity higher than [Si/H] > -1. The targets have been observed with the X-shooter spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope to search for emission lines around the quasars. We observe a high detection rate of 64% (7/11), significantly higher than the typical $\sim$10% for random, HI-selected DLA samples. We use the aforementioned model, to simulate the results of our survey together with a range of previous surveys: spectral stacking, direct imaging (using the `double DLA' technique), long-slit spectroscopy, and integral field spectroscopy. Based on our model results, we are able to reconcile all results. Some tension is observed between model and data when looking at predictions of Ly$\alpha$ emission for individual targets. However, the object to object variations are most likely a result of the significant scatter in the underlying scaling relations as well as uncertainties in the amount of dust which affects the emission.
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    The recent Madala hypothesis, a conjecture that seeks to explain anomalies within Large Hadron Collider (LHC) data (particularly in the transverse momentum of the Higgs boson), is interesting for more than just a statistical hint at unknown and unpredicted physics. This is because the model itself contains additional new particles that may serve as Dark Matter (DM) candidates. These particles interact with the Standard Model via a scalar mediator boson $S$. More interesting still, the conjectured mass range for the DM candidate ($65$ - $100$ GeV) lies within the region of models viable to try explain the recent Galactic Centre (GC) gamma-ray excess seen by Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) and the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS). Therefore, assuming $S$ decays promptly, it should be possible to check what constraints are imposed upon the effective DM annihilation cross-section in the Madala scenario by hunting signatures of $S$ decay that follows DM annihilation within dense astrophysical structures. In order to make use of existing data, we use the Reticulum II dwarf galaxy and the galactic centre gamma-ray excess data sets from Fermi-LAT, and compare these to the consequences of various decay paths for $S$ in the aforementioned environments. We find that, based on this existing data, we can limit $\tau$ lepton, quark, direct gamma-ray, and weak boson channels to levels below the canonical relic cross-section. This allows us to set new limits on the branching ratios of $S$ decay, which can rule out a Higgs-like decay branching for $S$, in the case where the Madala DM candidate is assumed to comprise all DM.
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    Dark Matter (DM) remains a vital, but elusive, component in our current understanding of the universe. Accordingly, many experimental searches are devoted to uncovering its nature. However, both the existing direct detection methods, and the prominent $\gamma$-ray search with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT), are most sensitive to DM particles with masses below 1 TeV, and are significantly less sensitive to the hard spectra produced in annihilation via heavy leptons. The High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) has had some success in improving on the Fermi-LAT search for higher mass DM particles, particularly annihilating via heavy lepton states. However, the recent discovery of high J-factor dwarf spheroidal galaxies by the Dark Energy Survey (DES) opens up the possibility of investing more HESS observation time in the search for DM $\gamma$-ray signatures in dwarf galaxies. This work explores the potential of HESS to extend its current limits using these new targets, as well as the future constraints derivable with the up-coming Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). These limits are further compared with those we derived at low radio frequencies for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Finally, we explore the impact of HESS, CTA, and Fermi-LAT on the phenomenology of the "Madala" boson hypothesized based on anomalies in the data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) run 1. The power of these limits from differing frequency bands is suggestive of a highly effective multi-frequency DM hunt strategy making use of both existing and up-coming Southern African telescopes.
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    To properly describe heating in weakly collisional turbulent plasmas such as the solar wind, inter-particle collisions should be taken into account. Collisions can convert ordered energy into heat by means of irreversible relaxation towards the thermal equilibrium. Recently, Pezzi et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 116, 2016, p. 145001) showed that the plasma collisionality is enhanced by the presence of fine structures in velocity space. Here, the analysis is extended by directly comparing the effects of the fully nonlinear Landau operator and a linearized Landau operator. By focusing on the relaxation towards the equilibrium of an out of equilibrium distribution function in a homogeneous force-free plasma, here it is pointed out that it is significant to retain nonlinearities in the collisional operator to quantify the importance of collisional effects. Although the presence of several characteristic times associated with the dissipation of different phase space structures is recovered in both the cases of the nonlinear and the linearized operators, the influence of these times is different in the two cases. In the linearized operator case, the recovered characteristic times are systematically larger than in the fully nonlinear operator case, this suggesting that fine velocity structures are dissipated slower if nonlinearities are neglected in the collisional operator.
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    We analyze sunspots rotation and magnetic transients in NOAA AR 11429 during two X-class (X5.4 and X1.3) flares using the data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the \emphSolar Dynamics Observatory. A large leading sunspot with positive magnetic polarity rotated counterclockwise. As expected, the rotation was significantly affected by the two flares. The magnetic transients induced by the flares were clearly evident in the sunspots with negative polarity. They were moving across the sunspots with speed of order $3-7\ \rm km \ s^{-1}$. Furthermore, the trend of magnetic flux evolution of these sunspots exhibited changes associated with the flares. These results may shed light on the understanding of the evolution of sunspots.
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    The paucity of hypervelocity stars (HVSs) known to date has severely hampered their potential to investigate the stellar population of the Galactic Centre and the Galactic Potential. The first Gaia data release gives an opportunity to increase the current sample. The challenge is of course the disparity between the expected number of hypervelocity stars and that of bound background stars (around 1 in $10^6$). We have applied a novel data mining algorithm based on machine learning techniques, an artificial neural network, to the Tycho-Gaia astrometric solution (TGAS) catalogue. With no pre-selection of data, we could exclude immediately $\sim 99 \%$ of the stars in the catalogue and find 80 candidates with more than $90\%$ predicted probability to be HVSs, based only on their position, proper motions, and parallax. We have cross-checked our findings with other spectroscopic surveys, determining radial velocities for 30 and spectroscopic distances for 5 candidates. In addition, follow-up observations have been carried out at the Isaac Newton Telescope for 22 stars, for which we obtained radial velocities and distance estimates. We discover 14 stars with a total velocity in the Galactic rest frame > 400 km/s, and 5 of these have a probability $>50\%$ of being unbound from the Milky Way. Tracing back their orbits in different Galactic potential models we find one possible unbound HVS with velocity $\sim$ 520 km/s, 5 bound HVSs, and, notably, 5 runaway stars with median velocity between 400 and 780 km/s. At the moment, uncertainties in the distance estimates and ages are too large to confirm the nature of our candidates by narrowing down their ejection location, and we wait for future Gaia releases to validate the quality of our sample. This test successfully demonstrates the feasibility of our new data mining routine.
  • PDF
    We compare the existent methods including the minimum spanning tree based method and the local stellar density based method in measuring mass segregation of star clusters. We find that the minimum spanning tree method reflects more the compactness, which represents the global spatial distribution of massive stars, while the local stellar density method reflects more the crowdedness, which provides the local gravitational potential information. It is suggested to measure the local and the global mass segregation simultaneously. We also develop a hybrid method which takes both aspects into account. This hybrid method balances the local and the global mass segregation in the sense that if the predominant one is caused either by dynamical evolution or purely accidental, especially when the knowledge is unknown a priori. In addition, we test our prescriptions with numerical models and show the impact of binaries, in estimating the mass segregation value. As an application, we apply these methods on the Orion Nebula Cluster and the Taurus Cluster observations. We find that the Orion Nebula Cluster is significantly mass segregated down to the 20th most massive stars. In contrast, the massive stars of the Taurus cluster are sparsely distributed in many different sub-clusters and show a low degree of compactness. The massive stars of Taurus are also found to be distributed in the high-density regions of sub-clusters, showing significant mass segregation at sub-cluster scale. Finally, we apply these methods to discuss the possible mechanisms of the dynamical evolution of simulated sub-structured star clusters.
  • PDF
    We compile a sample of spectral energy distribution (SED) of 12 GeV radio galaxies (RGs), including eight FR I RGs and four FR II RGs. These SEDs can be represented with the one-zone leptonic model. No significant unification as expected in the unification model is found for the derived jet parameters between FR I RGs and BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs) and between FR II RGs and flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). However, on average FR I RGs have the larger gamma_b (break Lorentz factor of electrons) and lower B (magnetic field strength) than FR II RGs, analogous to the differences between BL Lacs and FSRQs. The derived Doppler factors (delta) of RGs are on average smaller than that of balzars, which is consistent with the unification model that RGs are the misaligned parent populations of blazars with smaller delta. On the basis of jet parameters from SED fits, we calculate their jet powers and the powers carried by each component, and compare their jet compositions and radiation efficiencies with blazars. Most of the RG jets may be dominated by particles, like BL Lacs, not FSRQs. However, the jets of RGs with higher radiation efficiencies tend to have higher jet magnetization. A strong anticorrelation between synchrotron peak frequency and jet power is observed for the GeV RGs and blazars in both the observer and co-moving frames, indicating that the "sequence" behavior among blazars, together with the GeV RGs, may be dominated by the jet power intrinsically.
  • PDF
    In this paper, we investigate the first and second order cosmological perturbations in the light mass Galileon (LMG) scenario. LMG action includes cubic Galileon term along with the standard kinetic term and a potential which is added phenomenologically to achieve late time acceleration. The scalar field is nonminimally coupled to matter in the Einstein frame. Integral solutions of growing and decaying modes are obtained. The effect of the conformal coupling constant ($\beta$), at the perturbation level, has been studied. In this regard, we have studied linear power spectrum and bispectrum. Though different values of $\beta$ has different effects on power spectrum on reduced bispectrum the effect is not significant. It has been found that the redshift-space distortions (RSD) data can be very useful to constrain $\beta$. In this study we consider potentials which can lead to tracker behavior of the scalar field.
  • PDF
    The low-lying energy levels of proton-rich $^{56}$Cu have been extracted using in-beam $\gamma$-ray spectroscopy with the state-of-the-art $\gamma$-ray tracking array GRETINA in conjunction with the S800 spectrograph at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. Excited states in $^{56}$Cu serve as resonances in the $^{55}$Ni(p,$\gamma$)$^{56}$Cu reaction, which is a part of the rp-process in type I x-ray bursts. To resolve existing ambiguities in the reaction Q-value, a more localized IMME mass fit is used resulting in $Q=639\pm82$~keV. We derive the first experimentally-constrained thermonuclear reaction rate for $^{55}$Ni(p,$\gamma$)$^{56}$Cu. We find that, with this new rate, the rp-process may bypass the $^{56}$Ni waiting point via the $^{55}$Ni(p,$\gamma$) reaction for typical x-ray burst conditions with a branching of up to $\sim$40$\%$. We also identify additional nuclear physics uncertainties that need to be addressed before drawing final conclusions about the rp-process reaction flow in the $^{56}$Ni region.
  • PDF
    The initial results of a two year simultaneous optical-radar meteor campaign are described. Analysis of 105 double-station optical meteors having plane of sky intersection angles greater than 5 degrees and trail lengths in excess of 2 km also detected by the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) as head echoes was performed. These events show a median deviation in radiants between radar and optical determinations of 1.5 degrees, with 1/3 of events having radiant agreement to less than one degree. MAARSY tends to record average speeds roughly 0.5 km/s and 1.3 km higher than optical records, in part due to the higher sensitivity of MAARSY as compared to the optical instruments. More than 98% of all head echoes are not detected with the optical system. Using this non-detection ratio and the known limiting sensitivity of the cameras, we estimate that the limiting meteoroid detection mass of MAARSY is in the 10-9 kg to 10-10 kg (astronomical limiting meteor magnitudes of +11 to +12) appropriate to speeds from 30-60 km/s. There is a clear trend of higher peak RCS for brighter meteors between 35 and -30 dBsm. For meteors with similar magnitudes, the MAARSY head echo radar cross-section is larger at higher speeds. Brighter meteors at fixed heights and similar speeds have consistently, on average, larger RCS values, in accordance with established scattering theory. However, our data show RCS ~ v/2, much weaker than the normally assumed RCS ~ v^3, a consequence of our requiring head echoes to also be detectable optically. Most events show a smooth variation of RCS with height broadly following the light production behavior. A significant minority of meteors show large variations in RCS relative to the optical light curve over common height intervals, reflecting fragmentation or possibly differential ablation.
  • PDF
    Spicules and other solar jets such as bright points and fibrils generally show a parabolic height-time relationship, which means that each spicule has a constant deceleration. However the deceleration is only constant for a particular spicule and varies widely from one spicule or jet to another. Nonetheless the careful observations of a number of researchers show that the distance - time relationship is parabolic to a high level of precision. The measurements for heights, maximum velocities, decelerations and flight times are normally presented as histograms or scatter plots, which allow some general trends to be observed. The published results show a clear correlation between the maximum velocity and the deceleration of spicules on scatter plots. This correlation has been claimed to show a linear relation between the acceleration and the maximum velocity of a jet. This linear relationship has been used to help model the mechanisms responsible for the jets. However it is proposed here that the relation between velocity and acceleration is given by the normal equations of motion for constant acceleration and consequently the relationship is non-linear. Other correlations are also examined and the implications for spicule mechanisms are considered.
  • PDF
    We present a model for lightning shock induced chemistry that can be applied to atmospheres of arbitrary H/C/N/O chemistry, hence for extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs. The model couples hydrodynamics and the STAND2015 kinetic gas-phase chemistry. For an exoplanet analogue to the contemporary Earth, our model predicts NO and NO2 yields in agreement with observation. We predict height-dependent mixing ratios during a storm soon after a lightning shock of NO ~ 1e-3 at 40 km and NO2 ~ 1e-4 below 40 km, with O3 reduced to trace quantities (<< 1e-10). For an Earth-like exoplanet with a CO2/N2 dominated atmosphere and with an extremely intense lightning storm over its entire surface, we predict significant changes in the amount of NO, NO2, O3, H2O, H2, and predict significant abundance of C2N. We find that, for the Early Earth, O2 is formed in large quantities by lightning but is rapidly processed by the photochemistry, consistent with previous work on lightning. The effect of persistent global lightning storms are predicted to be significant, primarily due to NO2, with the largest spectral features present at ~3.4 \mum and ~6.2 \mum. The features within the transmission spectrum are on the order of 1 ppm and therefore are not likely detectable with JWST. Depending on its spectral properties, C2N could be a key tracer for lightning on Earth-like exoplanets with a N2/CO2 bulk atmosphere, unless destroyed by yet unknown chemical reactions.
  • PDF
    We present the highest spatial resolution ALMA observations to date of the Class I protostar WL 17 in the $\rho$ Ophiuchus L1688 molecular cloud complex, which show that it has a 12 AU hole in the center of its disk. We consider whether WL 17 is actually a Class II disk being extincted by foreground material, but find that such models do not provide a good fit to the broadband SED and also require such high extinction that it would presumably arise from dense material close to the source such as a remnant envelope. Self-consistent models of a disk embedded in a rotating collapsing envelope can nicely reproduce both the ALMA 3 mm observations and the broadband SED of WL 17. This suggests that WL 17 is a disk in the early stages of its formation, and yet even at this young age the inner disk has been depleted. Although there are multiple pathways for such a hole to be created in a disk, if this hole were produced by the formation of planets it could place constraints on the timescale for the growth of planetesimals in protoplanetary disks.
  • PDF
    We measure the Planck cluster mass bias using dynamical mass measurements based on velocity dispersions of a subsample of 17 Planck-detected clusters. The velocity dispersions were calculated using redshifts determined from spectra obtained at Gemini observatory with the GMOS multi-object spectrograph. We correct our estimates for effects due to finite aperture, Eddington bias and correlated scatter between velocity dispersion and the Planck mass proxy. The result for the mass bias parameter, $(1-b)$, depends on the value of the galaxy velocity bias $b_v$ adopted from simulations: $(1-b)=(0.51\pm0.09) b_v^3$. Using a velocity bias of $b_v=1.08$ from Munari et al., we obtain $(1-b)=0.64\pm 0.11$, i.e, an error of 17% on the mass bias measurement with 17 clusters. This mass bias value is consistent with most previous weak lensing determinations. It lies within $1\sigma$ of the value needed to reconcile the Planck cluster counts with the Planck primary CMB constraints. We emphasize that uncertainty in the velocity bias severely hampers precision measurements of the mass bias using velocity dispersions. On the other hand, when we fix the Planck mass bias using the constraints from Penna-Lima et al., based on weak lensing measurements, we obtain a positive velocity bias $b_v \gtrsim 0.9$ at $3\sigma$.
  • PDF
    We calculate the electromagnetic signal of a gamma-ray flare coming from the surface of a neutron star shortly before merger with a black hole companion. Using a new version of the Monte Carlo radiation transport code Pandurata that incorporates dynamic spacetimes, we integrate photon geodesics from the neutron star surface until they reach a distant observer or are captured by the black hole. The gamma-ray light curve is modulated by a number of relativistic effects, including Doppler beaming and gravitational lensing. Because the photons originate from the inspiraling neutron star, the light curve closely resembles the corresponding gravitational waveform: a chirp signal characterized by a steadily increasing frequency and amplitude. We propose to search for these electromagnetic chirps using matched filtering algorithms similar to those used in LIGO data analysis.
  • PDF
    Accretion of gas and the interaction of matter and radiation are at the heart of many questions pertaining to black hole (BH) growth and the coevolution of massive BHs and their host galaxies. In order to answer them it is critical to quantify how the ionizing radiation that emanates from the innermost regions of the BH accretion flow couples to the surrounding medium and how it regulates the BH fueling. In this work we use high resolution 3-dimensional (3D) radiation-hydrodynamic simulations with the code Enzo, equipped with adaptive ray tracing module Moray, to investigate BH accretion of cold gas regulated by radiative feedback. Our simulations reproduce findings from an earlier generation of 1D and 2D simulations, that the accretion powered UV and X-ray radiation forms a highly ionized bubble, which leads to suppression of BH accretion rate characterized by quasi-periodic outbursts. A new feature revealed by the 3D simulations is the highly turbulent nature of the gas flow in vicinity of the ionization front. Because turbulence is efficient in replenishing the gas in the low-density region inside the ionization front, the 3D simulations show oscillations in the accretion rate of only ~2-3 orders of magnitude, significantly smaller than 1D and 2D models. We calculate the energy budget of the gas flow and find that turbulence is the main contributor to the kinetic energy of the gas but corresponds to less than 10% of its thermal energy. The turbulence therefore does not contribute significantly to the pressure support of the gas but is the key factor that sets the level of BH fueling during quiescent periods between the accretion outbursts.
  • PDF
    The recent discovery of thousands of ultra diffuse galaxies (UDGs) in nearby galaxy clusters has opened a new window into the process of galaxy formation and evolution. Several scenarios have been proposed to explain the formation history of UDGs, and their ability to survive in the harsh cluster environments. A key requirement to distinguish between these scenarios is a measurement of their halo masses which, due to their low surface brightnesses, has proven difficult if one relies on stellar tracers of the potential. We exploit weak gravitational lensing, a technique that does not depend on these baryonic tracers, to measure the average subhalo mass of 784 UDGs selected in 18 clusters at $z\leq0.09$. Our sample of UDGs has a median stellar mass $\langle m_\star\rangle=2\times10^8\,\mathrm{M}_\odot$ and a median effective radius $\langle r_\mathrm{eff}\rangle=2.8$ kpc. We constrain the average mass of subhaloes within 30 kpc to $\log m_\mathrm{UDG}(r<30\,\mathrm{kpc})/\mathrm{M}_\odot\leq10.99$ at 95 per cent credibility, implying an effective virial mass $\log m_{200}/\mathrm{M}_\odot\leq11.80$, and a lower limit on the stellar mass fraction within 10 kpc of 1.0 per cent. Such mass is consistent with a simple extrapolation of the subhalo-to-stellar mass relation of typical satellite galaxies in massive clusters. However, our analysis is not sensitive to scatter about this mean mass; the possibility remains that extreme UDGs reside in haloes as massive as the Milky Way.
  • PDF
    We investigate the distribution of central velocity dispersions for quiescent galaxies in the SDSS at $0.03 \leq z \leq 0.10$. To construct the field velocity dispersion function (VDF), we construct a velocity dispersion complete sample of quiescent galaxies with Dn4000$ > 1.5$. The sample consists of galaxies with central velocity dispersion larger than the velocity dispersion completeness limit of the SDSS survey. Our VDF measurement is consistent with previous field VDFs for $\sigma > 200$ km s$^{-1}$. In contrast with previous results, the VDF does not decline significantly for $\sigma < 200$ km s$^{-1}$. The field and the similarly constructed cluster VDFs are remarkably flat at low velocity dispersion ($\sigma < 250$ km s$^{-1}$). The cluster VDF exceeds the field for $\sigma < 250$ km s$^{-1}$ providing a measure of the relatively larger number of massive subhalos in clusters. The VDF is a probe of the dark matter halo distribution because the measured central velocity dispersion may be directly proportional to the dark matter velocity dispersion. Thus the VDF provides a potentially powerful test of simulations for models of structure formation.
  • PDF
    The spatial and kinematic distribution of warm gas in and around the Coma Cluster is presented through observations of Lyman-alpha absorbers using background QSOs. Updates to the Lyman-alpha absorber distribution found in Yoon et al. (2012) for the Virgo Cluster are also presented. At 0.2-2.0 R_vir of Coma we identify 14 Lyman-alpha absorbers (N_HI = 10^12.8-15.9 cm^-2) towards 5 sightlines and no Lyman-alpha absorbers along 3 sightlines within 3\sigmav_coma. For both Coma and Virgo, most Lyman-alpha absorbers are found outside the virial radius or beyond 1\sigmav consistent with them largely representing the infalling intergalactic medium. The few exceptions in the central regions can be associated with galaxies. The Lyman-alpha absorbers avoid the hot ICM, consistent with the infalling gas being shock-heated within the cluster. The massive dark matter halos of clusters do not show the increasing column density with decreasing impact parameter relationship found for the smaller mass galaxy halos. In addition, while the covering fraction within R_vir is lower for clusters than galaxies, beyond R_vir the covering fraction is somewhat higher for clusters. The velocity dispersion of the absorbers compared to the galaxies is higher for Coma, consistent with the absorbers tracing additional turbulent gas motions in the cluster outskirts. The results are overall consistent with cosmological simulations, with the covering fraction being high in the observations standing out as the primary discrepancy.
  • PDF
    Structure formation at small cosmological scales provides an important frontier for dark matter (DM) research. Scenarios with small DM particle masses, large momenta or hidden interactions tend to suppress the gravitational clustering at small scales. The details of this suppression depend on the DM particle nature, allowing for a direct link between DM models and astrophysical observations. However, most of the astrophysical constraints obtained so far refer to a very specific shape of the power suppression, corresponding to thermal warm dark matter (WDM), i.e., candidates with a Fermi-Dirac or Bose-Einstein momentum distribution. In this work we introduce a new analytical fitting formula for the power spectrum, which is simple yet flexible enough to reproduce the clustering signal of large classes of non-thermal DM models, which are not at all adequately described by the oversimplified notion of WDM. We show that the formula is able to fully cover the parameter space of sterile neutrinos (whether resonantly produced or from particle decay), mixed cold and warm models, fuzzy dark matter, as well as other models suggested by effective theory of structure formation (ETHOS). Based on this fitting formula, we perform a large suite of N-body simulations and we extract important nonlinear statistics, such as the matter power spectrum and the halo mass function. Finally, we present the first preliminary astrophysical constraints from both the number of Milky Way satellites and the Lyman-\alpha forest. This paper is a first step towards a general and comprehensive modeling of small-scale departures from the standard cold DM model.
  • PDF
    The relation between the halo field and the matter fluctuations (halo bias), in the presence of massive neutrinos depends on the total neutrino mass, massive neutrinos introduce an additional scale-dependence of the bias which is usually neglected in cosmological analyses. We investigate the magnitude of the systematic effect on interesting cosmological parameters induced by neglecting this scale dependence, finding that while it is not a problem for current surveys, it is non-negligible for future, denser or deeper ones depending on the neutrino mass, the maximum scale used for the analyses and the details of the nuisance parameters considered. However there is a simple recipe to account for the bulk of the effect as to make it fully negligible, which we illustrate and advocate should be included in analysis of forthcoming large-scale structure surveys.
  • PDF
    A commonly noted feature of the population of multi-planet extrasolar systems is the rarity of planet pairs in low-order mean-motion resonances. We revisit the physics of resonance capture via convergent disk-driven migration. We point out that for planet spacings typical of stable configurations for Kepler systems, the planets can routinely maintain a small but nonzero eccentricity due to gravitational perturbations from their neighbors. Together with the upper limit on the migration rate needed for capture, the finite eccentricity can make resonance capture difficult or impossible in Sun-like systems for planets smaller than ~Neptune-sized. This mass limit on efficient capture is broadly consistent with observed exoplanet pairs that have mass determinations: of pairs with the heavier planet exterior to the lighter planet -- which would have been undergoing convergent migration in their disks -- those in or nearly in resonance are much more likely to have total mass greater than two Neptune masses than to have smaller masses. The agreement suggests that the observed paucity of resonant pairs around sun-like stars may simply arise from a small resonance capture probability for lower-mass planets. Planet pairs that thereby avoid resonance capture are much less likely to collide in an eventual close approach than to simply migrate past one another to become a divergently migrating pair with the lighter planet exterior. For systems around M stars we expect resonant pairs to be much more common, since there the minimum mass threshhold for efficient capture is about an Earth mass.
  • PDF
    We mine the Tycho-\it Gaia astrometric solution (TGAS) catalog for wide stellar binaries by matching positions, proper motions, and astrometric parallaxes. We separate genuine binaries from unassociated stellar pairs through a Bayesian formulation that includes correlated uncertainties in the proper motions and parallaxes. Rather than relying on assumptions about the structure of the Galaxy, we calculate Bayesian priors and likelihoods based on the nature of Keplerian orbits and the TGAS catalog itself. We calibrate our method using radial velocity measurements and obtain 6196 high-confidence candidate wide binaries with projected separations $s\lesssim1$ pc. The normalization of this distribution suggests that at least 0.6\% of TGAS stars have an associated, distant TGAS companion in a wide binary. We demonstrate that \it Gaia's astrometry is precise enough that it can detect projected orbital velocities in wide binaries with orbital periods as large as 10$^6$ yr. For pairs with $s\ \lesssim\ 4\times10^4$~AU, characterization of random alignments indicate our contamination to be $\approx$5\%. For $s \lesssim 5\times10^3$~AU, our distribution is consistent with Öpik's Law. At larger separations, the distribution is steeper and consistent with a power-law $P(s)\propto s^{-1.6}$; there is no evidence in our data of any bimodality in this distribution for $s \lesssim$ 1 pc. Using radial velocities, we demonstrate that at large separations, i.e., of order $s \sim$ 1 pc and beyond, any potential sample of genuine wide binaries in TGAS cannot be easily distinguished from ionized former wide binaries, moving groups, or contamination from randomly aligned stars.
  • PDF
    Supernova cosmology without spectra will be the bread and butter mode for future surveys such as LSST. This lack of supernova spectra results in uncertainty in the redshifts which, if ignored, leads to significantly biased estimates of cosmological parameters. Here we present a hierarchical Bayesian formalism -- zBEAMS -- that fully addresses this problem by marginalising over the unknown or contaminated supernova redshifts to produce unbiased cosmological estimates that are competitive with entirely spectroscopic data. zBEAMS provides a unified treatment of both photometric redshifts and host galaxy misidentification (occurring due to chance galaxy alignments or faint hosts), effectively correcting the inevitable contamination in the Hubble diagram. Like its predecessor BEAMS, our formalism also takes care of non-Ia supernova contamination by marginalising over the unknown supernova type. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique with simulations of supernovae with photometric redshifts and host galaxy misidentification. A novel feature of the photometric redshift case is the important role played by the redshift distribution of the supernovae.
  • PDF
    The varied surfaces and atmospheres of planets make them interesting places to live, explore, and study from afar. Unfortunately, the great distance to even the closest exoplanets makes it impossible to resolve their disk with current or near-term technology. It is still possible, however, to deduce spatial inhomogeneities in exoplanets provided that different regions are visible at different times; this can be due to rotation, orbital motion, and occultations by a star, planet, or moon. Astronomers have so far constructed maps of thermal emission and albedo for short period giant planets. These maps constrain atmospheric dynamics and cloud patterns in exotic atmospheres. In the future, exo-cartography could yield surface maps of terrestrial planets, hinting at the geophysical and geochemical processes that shape them.
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    We present a family of self-consistent axisymmetric rotating globular cluster models which are fitted to spectroscopic data for NGC 362, NGC 1851, NGC 2808, NGC 4372, NGC 5927 and NGC 6752 to provide constraints on their physical and kinematic properties, including their rotation signals. They are constructed by flattening Modified Plummer profiles, which have the same asymptotic behaviour as classical Plummer models, but can provide better fits to young clusters due to a slower turnover in the density profile. The models are in dynamical equilibrium as they depend solely on the action variables. We employ a fully Bayesian scheme to investigate the uncertainty in our model parameters (including mass-to-light ratios and inclination angles) and evaluate the Bayesian evidence ratio for rotating to non-rotating models. We find convincing levels of rotation only in NGC 2808. In the other clusters, there is just a hint of rotation (in particular, NGC 4372 and NGC 5927), as the data quality does not allow us to draw strong conclusions. Where rotation is present, we find that it is confined to the central regions, within radii of $R \leq 2 r_h$. As part of this work, we have developed a novel q-Gaussian basis expansion of the line-of-sight velocity distributions, from which general models can be constructed via interpolation on the basis coefficients.

Recent comments

wiadealo Nov 07 2016 09:27 UTC

Is it [fantasy][1] or real?

[1]: http://buchderfarben.de

climaiw Sep 12 2016 16:19 UTC

I would suggest planets where life can really make a difference.

resodiat Aug 23 2016 13:00 UTC

That is really a long-term perspective.

Māris Ozols Feb 18 2016 14:29 UTC

"...structures seen in the universe today, from clusters of galaxies to Donald Trump."

Jaiden Mispy May 23 2014 08:01 UTC

There's a nice summary of the context for this paper here: http://fioraaeterna.tumblr.com/post/56556056152/quasistars-a-real-life-black-hole-sun

Frédéric Grosshans Mar 05 2014 10:03 UTC

I read this paper as an appendix of an unwritten Fantasy novel, where a 21st century cosmologist is trapped in an alternate Aristotelian 13th century universe ! Thanks for the nice read !